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Home of the Dawgs

UGA Games Online

Due to SEC TV contracts, 95.5 WSB can only stream live UGA football games to those within a 75 mile radius of Metro Atlanta.

Georgia Bulldogs coverage on the Home of the Dawgs

  • If you haven't followed former Georgia defensive coordinator Mel Tucker's career since he left UGA you've missed a lot. Tucker has recently taken quite the climb up the professional ladder, but his ascent is also a reminder of how far one of the so-called Power Five conferences has fallen. Tucker spent 2019 as Colorado head coach, and started this year by reaffirming his commitment to the Buffaloes when Michigan State reached out to him about its open coaching position, only to eventually change his mind and take the job with the Spartans. There was plenty of pearl clutching about Tucker's waffling, but given the upcoming election, he won't be the only one who backs off of a grandiose promise this year. The more significant issue isn't Tucker's integrity. It's the Pac 12's solvency. Michigan State convinced Tucker to bolt Boulder by reportedly doubling the salary he was making at Colorado a financial flex for which the Buffaloes could apparently offer no answer. To add to the indignity, ESPN reported last week that one of the rumored candidates to replace Tucker at Colorado Alabama offensive coordinator Steve Sarkisian was going to stick with the Crimson Tide, and possibly get a handsome raise in the process. Let this sink in: we might be at the point where it's more financially rewarding to be an assistant coach in the SEC than it is to be a head coach in the Pac 12. If that's true, how did we get here? Like most things with college football, it revolves around television. Simply put, the Pac 12 Network is the biggest TV disaster since Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. Its revenues fall well short of what the Big 10 and SEC networks provide their league members, and that extra cash allows a program such as UGA to spend twice as much on recruiting as Pac 12 schools. Bigger recruiting budgets lead to better players, and the best players seemingly don't want to stay out west anymore. There were no Pac 12 teams in the top 10 of the 247Sports Composite Team Ranking for the 2020 class, and only two Pac 12 programs in the top 20. USC which was fourth in 2018 fell to 55th this cycle. UGA signee Kendall Milton from Clovis, Calif. is the nation's No. 7 running back, and the exact kind of player you might have expected to see playing for a team like USC in the past. However, Milton made it clear during the recruiting process he wanted to test himself in the talent-rich SEC. 'It seems like out here, in a sense, people want to go get it more,' Milton recently said of playing in the South. 'When I came out here it kind of motivated me to have that same mindset, and come out here and basically do anything necessary to get what you want. 'I'd say it's the mindset out here that sets it apart.' Other recruits seemingly agree. 'You can't play for a title staying out west,' an unnamed former five-star recruit from California told 247Sports. The Pac 12 hasn't had a representative in the College Football Playoff since 2016. However, it isn't the only league dealing with issues. Oklahoma has won the Big 12 five consecutive years, and made the Playoff in each of the last three seasons, but the Sooners don't have much to show for those postseason berths. Oklahoma blew a 17-point lead in a loss to UGA in 2017. The following year, the Sooners stumbled into a 28-0 hole vs. Alabama before losing 45-34. This past season, Oklahoma surrendered 63 points in a humiliating beatdown by LSU. In other words, Sooner Playoff flops vs. SEC foes have joined the New York City ball drop as one of America's most dependable New Year's traditions. Oklahoma simply doesn't recruit well enough to beat the best SEC teams. The Sooners had top-10 classes from 2017-19, but UGA and Alabama had higher rated classes in each of those seasons, and LSU had higher classes in two of those three years. To make matters worse, Oklahoma fell to 11th for the 2020 class a fact that seemed to make Sooners coach Lincoln Riley a bit defensive. 'Everybody wants to judge classes when they sign, which is the absolute worst time to judge a class,' Riley recently said. 'There's a lot of guys we signed that we wouldn't trade for anybody.' Riley certainly seems confident in his choices, but keep in mind he's the same coach who squib kicked at the end of the first half vs. UGA in the Rose Bowl, so maybe his decision making isn't as laudable as he thinks it is. And speaking of bad ideas, how about the ACC? It's hard to find much fault with Clemson. Dabo Swinney has built an elite program and a perennial championship contender, but the league the Tigers call home is weaker than a wine spritzer. Clemson was the only ACC team last season ranked in the final Associated Press top 25. The ACC had the same number of ranked teams as the Sun Belt and half as many as the Mountain West. These unfortunate facts beg a question: why is it assumed that Playoff spots each season should be gifted to underperforming leagues like the Pac 12 and ACC or a proven fraud like Oklahoma? In true 'It Just Means More' fashion, six of the top 11 teams in ESPN's SP+ preseason ratings are from the SEC. The Pac 12, Big 12 and ACC have a combined six teams in the top 20. Yet at the end of the season, hot-take-for-hire pundits will be arguing the SEC doesn't deserve two Playoff teams. College football isn't little league baseball. Everyone doesn't necessarily get a turn. If we're going to have five so-called 'Power' conferences, then some of those leagues need to do more to look the part. Stop getting outbid for your coaches. Stop getting beat for the best recruits. Or stop pretending to play at the SEC's level. The post Opinion: The gap between the SEC and most other conferences is widening appeared first on DawgNation.
  • The announcement this past week that UGA bought out its scheduled 2021 game against San Jose State in Athens in order to play Clemson in a neutral-site game in Charlotte has a lot of fans excited (which couldn't be said about the now-dropped matchup with the Aztecs of the Mountain West conference). The addition of national powerhouse Clemson to next year's schedule justifiably has drawn praise across the college football landscape. The bold move is part of the aggressive upgrading of the Dawgs' nonconference schedule that head coach Kirby Smart and his football operations director, Josh Lee, have spearheaded over the past couple of years. The results so far have been impressive. Georgia has previously announced home-and-home series scheduled withTexas (2028 at Austin and 2029 in Athens), UCLA (2025 in Pasadena and 2026 in Athens), Florida State (2027 in Tallahassee and 2028 in Athens), Oklahoma (2023 in Norman and 2031 in Athens) and Ohio State (2030 in Athens and 2031 in Columbus). Plus a pair of home-and-home series with Clemson (2029 at Clemson and 2030 in Athens, and 2032 in Athens and 2033 at Clemson), and three other neutral-site Power 5 games at Atlanta's Mercedes Benz Stadium: this year againstVirginia, 2022 vs. Oregon, and 2024 vs. Clemson. (It was amusing to read one national site's estimation that Georgia-Clemson 'is about to become a bit of a rivalry.' Obviously, they don't know the tremendous history of the Georgia-Clemson series, which dates back to 1897 and included a long stretch of meeting every year. In fact, I feel safe in saying that, Jacksonville included, Georgia-Clemson was the Dawgs' hottest rivalry in the early '80s, with the peak being the 1982 game, which was nationally televised and played on Labor Day. It was the first night game to take place in Sanford Stadium in three decades, and it featured not only two Top 10 teams, but also the two most recent national champions.) As a longtime proponent of more games against the Tigers, I'm especially pleased that this gives Georgia and Clemson six games scheduled over the next 14 years, a vast improvement over the two-games-a-decade pattern they'd fallen into after the expansion of the SEC ended the annual meetings of the two programs located about 80 miles apart. The Dawgs and the Cats have met only eight times since 1987, with the most recent being 2014, when a Georgia win Between the Hedges avenged a loss at Clemson a year earlier. The addition of this game serves Clemson's interests as well, as the ACC powerhouse is looking to upgrade its nonconference schedules, since its weak conference opposition has been the subject of much griping nationally as the Tigers have become a regular participant in the College Football Playoff. UGA has turned heads across the country with its aggressive Power 5 scheduling over the coming decade and a half, and I'm all for it. As Athletic Director Greg McCarity told me this time last year, 'the scheduling model we're moving to in the future will be built around eight conference games, and Tech, and two more Power 5's and one non-Power 5 opponent.' So, in other words, only one 'cupcake' per season (as opposed to 2018, when Georgia had three such games in Athens). As I said then, it's an ambitious and somewhat daunting schedule model. But, McGarity said, 'That's our goal. Kirby is all about playing a tough schedule and playing quality opponents.' As McGarity said in a statement announcing the 2021 Clemson game, ' We will now have at least two Power 5 opponents on our schedule through 2033.' That will give the Dawgs at least 10 regular-season games each year against Power 5 conference teams (including the eight SEC games). This also means that Georgia will open away from Athens in a high-profile neutral-site game three years running: this season against Virginia at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta in the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game, 2021 in Charlotte, and back to Mercedes-Benz Stadium in 2022 to meet Oregon in another Chick-fil-A game. Still, despite all that, there's definitely room for improvement in Georgia's home scheduling. Just look at the 2021 season, which had a pretty weak lineup for fans in Athens even before they dropped the San Jose State game. Now, the six remaining games in Athens will consist of South Carolina, Kentucky, Missouri, Arkansas, UAB and Charleston Southern, the latter another FCS opponent from the level of Division 1 NCAA football below the bowl division. That's not as dire as the 2018 season, which saw a nonconference lineup of Austin Peay, Middle Tennessee and UMass in addition to Tech, but it's definitely nothing to get excited about. I recognize that the filling out of the nonconference schedule with so-called 'cupcakes' is something of a necessary evil in college football, since Power 5 opponents usually demand a return game in a home-and-home deal. And, with the Dawgs filling one spot each year with Georgia Tech and looking to add a second Power 5 opponent each year, you expect the two remaining nonconference games to be a bit less challenging. Also, not all cupcakes are equal. Opponents taken from the Group of 5 conferences that rank just below the Power 5 range from true cupcakes to something more akin to college basketball's 'mid-majors.' (Maybe, if we're going to continue the food-related terminology for opponents you pay handsomely to come be a sacrificial lamb, we should call these teams something other than a cupcake. Let's borrow from the QuickTrip chain and call them 'snackles.') The true cupcakes tend to be programs along the lines of Louisiana-Monroe (on this year's schedule), UMass and Western Kentucky. Unfortunately, Georgia seems to be relying a bit too much on the allowance that schools at its level can count one game a season against FCS opponents, who really aren't even up to cupcake level. Let's call them 'bon-bons.' Looking at upcoming schedules, we see these bon-bons coming to Athens: East Tennessee State in 2020, Charleston Southern in 2021, Samford in 2022, Tennessee Tech in 2024, and the return of Austin Peay in 2025. Asking UGA fans shell out for tickets and travel to Athens, dealing with the attendant traffic and parking headaches, to see such games is a bit much. That's especially true for those of us who contribute to the Hartman Fund for the chance to buy season tickets. I thought it was noteworthy that, as part of the Georgia-Clemson scheduling musical chairs, Southern Cal was able to dump UC Davis and pick up San Jose State, meaning it will maintain its status of never having played an FCS opponent. (Only three Football Bowl Subdivision programs have never played a team from the FCS in football Notre Dame, UCLA and USC.) Really, it would suit me if Georgia never again added another FCS opponent to its schedule with the exception of Yale, which I still would love to see come back to Athens in 2029 to mark the centennial of the Georgia-Yale clash that dedicated Sanford Stadium. Unfortunately, as UGA told me last year, they tried to schedule Yale for 2029, but the Ivy League school wasn't interested. But, the Yalies aside, I'd like to see Smart and Lee focusing more on the Group of 5 than the FCS. And, maybe, they could give some thought to opponents at that level that have some regional interest. (Besides Georgia Southern, which has shown up occasionally on UGA schedules in recent decades, a game against Georgia State would be of much greater interest to fans. And, as Tennessee found out last year, the Panthers aren't to be taken too lightly.) There's another reason UGA ought to be thinking about an upgrading of its non-Power 5 opponents: attendance. Figures showing actual attendance at Sanford Stadium released by UGA show that lower-tier opponents tend to put fewer folks in the stands, sinking as low as 56,065 for Louisiana-Lafayette in 2016. In the 2018 season, the most recent for which real attendance (as opposed to paid attendance) figures have been released, Austin Peay brought only 78,050 to Sanford for the season-opener, and only 67,764 attended the UMass game. So, yeah, the seats may have been sold, but in an era when every game is televised, the fact that quite a few fans aren't bothering to show up for such games should send a message that such cupcakes aren't really what the UGA fan base wants to see. Like I said, overall, I'm very pleased with the aggressive scheduling Georgia has undertaken at the Power 5 level, but I'd like to see the rest of the nonconference schedule be less of a snoozefest. The post UGA's nonconference football schedule needs even more bold moves appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Lawrence Cager might not be 100 percent for the NFL combine this week, but fans who have followed his career know better than to count him out. The 6-foot-5, 220-pound Cager overcame a shoulder injury and bruised ribs to lead Georgia to a 24-17 win over Florida this season with 7 catches for 132 yards and a touchdown last season. pic.twitter.com/IsmaE5biyV Lawrence Cager (@lawrencecager3) October 28, 2019 'I was dead, I hadn't practiced or played in like 2 1/2 weeks, so you got to rise from the dead sometime,' Cager said after his historic performance. 'I wasn't going to miss this game for anything.' RELATED: Lawrence Cager performance at Florida one for the ages Cager did, however, miss the final three games of the season after suffering an ankle injury in a Nov. 27 practice and undergoing ankle surgery on Nov. 29. Cager's absences staggered the Georgia football team. Cager had three first down catches in the first half against South Carolina, but without him, the offense came apart and lost 20-17 overtime. The 10 Georgia football players invited to 2020 NFL Combine Georgia quarterback Jake Fromm completed more than 70 percent of his passes with Cager on the field. But without him, the pass game struggled. Fromm completed less than 50 percent when the graduate transfer from Miami was sidelined. 'He was the one guy, and this isn't from Jake, (but) he looked like the guy that Jake was really comfortable with,' Former New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks Super Bowl scout Jim Nagy said. 'He was kind of the bailout guy. Jake knew where Lawrence was going to be, and they looked like they were on the same page,' said Nagy, who has studied film of UGA players in preparation an ESPN analyst role for the NFL combine. 'That wasn't always the case (with other receivers). Especially the guys out on the perimeter. It looked like they weren't on the same page quite a bit.' Cager, despite his success for Georgia this season he had 33 catches for 476 yards and 4 TDs in nine games projects as a later-round pick heading into the combine. 'Where he gets drafted will be interesting,' Nagy said. 'But big picture, where Cager is concerned at the next level, is going to be what he does on special teams. 'If you don't project to be a top three receiver on an NFL team next year, and you're a four or a five or a six, you're going to have to play in the kicking game.' Georgia football coach Kirby Smart harps on that all the time. The message seems to get lost on some. Smart is actually doing his players a favor by teaching them to play special teams and utilizing them on the units. Former Bulldogs receiver Jayson Stanley went undrafted last year and didn't make a catch all season. But Stanley's special teams ability landed him a spot on the Miami Dolphins' practice squad, and he's now rostered with the Jacksonville Jaguars. Cager, however, didn't play special teams in his short time at Georgia. With the injuries he was battling he hurt his shoulder before the halfway mark of the season it was all he could do to play receiver. Nagy said that Cager impressed when he was on the field at Georgia. 'You heard from the people in Miami he was inconsistent catching the football, but he sure didn't look that way (at Georgia),' Nagy said. 'I was at the Notre Dame game, he made plays in that game, so yeah, the injury thing is real, he's going to have to work through that. And, Nagy said, Cager is going to have to convince teams is willing and able to play special teams. 'From a scout's perspective, that would be my reservation, never really seeing Lawrence do that,' Nagy said. 'Is he fast enough, is he aggressive enough, is he strong enough to be that guy to run down on kickoff or punt? 'I'm not saying he's not, but when you are talking about Day Three (NFL draft rounds 4-6) receivers, that's a huge part of the equation, not just what they do at receiver.' Nagy said very few college receivers transition quickly into one of the top three receiver spots on an NFL team, so they need to show value on special teams to earn a spot on the 53-man roster. 'Big picture, that's what Lawrence is going to be facing, that's what teams are battling with now,' Nagy said. 'If we take him in the fifth or the sixth round, is he going to be active on game day for us?' First things first, Cager needs to get himself active and healthy enough to work out for the NFL teams. If not at the combine, perhaps by the Georgia Pro Day, which is projected to be March 18. Cager has been mum, but earlier the year he put a short video out of himself running on a treadmill. Cager was one of 10 Georgia players invited to the NFL combine. The quarterbacks and receivers work out on Thursday night (TV: NFL Network, 4 p.m.). DawgNation Georgia in NFL Draft Why Jake Fromm is not for everybody, per NFL Network analyst D'Andre Swift draft stock makes Georgia football RBU' again Jake Fromm evaluation, comparison, per former Super Bowl scout The 10 Georgia football players invited to 2020 NFL Combine ESPN labels Georgia a 'loser' in NFL early entry process NFL draft projections: Jake Fromm staying down South? Mel Kiper Jr.'s mock: Andrew Thomas and D'Andre Swift future teammates The post Georgia's Lawrence Cager has questions to answer at NFL combine appeared first on DawgNation.
Football Schedule
Sat, 8/31 Final: UGA 30 - VAN 6
Sat, 9/7 Final: UGA 63 -MURR 17
Sat, 9/14 Final: UGA 55 - ARK 0
Sat, 9/21 Final: UGA 23 - ND 17
Sat, 10/5 Final: UGA 43 - TENN 14
Sat, 10/12 Final: SC 20 - UGA 17
Sat, 10/19 Final: UK 0 - UGA 21
Sat, 11/2 Final: UGA 24 - FLA 17
Sat, 11/9 Final: MIZ 0 - UGA 27
Sat, 11/16 Final: UGA 21 - AUB 14
Sat, 11/23 Final: TA&AM 13 - UGA 19
Sat, 11/30 Final: UGA 52 - GT 7
Sat, 12/7 Final: UGA 10 - LSU 37
ALLSTATE SUGAR BOWL Final: UGA 26 - Baylor 14

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News

  • Seven people were shot at a Houston flea market Sunday. The Harris County Sheriff’s Office responded to a call around 7:41 p.m., KPRC reported. Investigators said no one was critically injured. Some injuries are believed to have been caused by ricochet of gunfire. A man is in custody, KPRC reported. This is a developing story. Check back for updates.
  • NBA star Kobe Bryant, his daughter Gianna and seven others will be remembered Monday at a memorial service at the Los Angeles Staples Center. Twenty thousand people are expected at the venue Monday afternoon to remember those killed last month when the helicopter they were riding in crashed into a hillside in Southern California. The service was scheduled Monday, 2-24-20, because the date is significant for Bryant’s family. For a time in his career, Bryant wore a No. 24 jersey. Gianna, who played basketball as well, wore a No. 2 jersey on her basketball team. Bryant’s wife and Gianna’s mother, Vanessa Bryant, said in an Instagram post that she and Kobe Bryant were together for 20 years. Tickets for seats in the Staples Center, which also incorporated the numbers 2 and 24, went for $224 for some tickets, $224 for two ticket packages in certain sections and $24.02 for other tickets. The proceeds from the ticket sales will go to the Mamba and Mambacita Sports Foundation. According to the organization’s website, the foundation 'exists to further Kobe and Gianna Bryant’s legacy through charitable endeavors in sports.” Here’s what you need to know if you want to watch the service:  What time: The service begins at 10 a.m. PT. That’s 1 p.m. ET. What channel: Several networks will be airing the service, among them CNN, E! News and BET. Will it be livestreamed: The memorial will be livestreamed on several sites. You can stream it through ETLive.com and CBS All Access, as well as the ET Live app on Roku, Amazon Fire TV or Apple TV. ESPN will be streaming it here. ABC News, NBCNews.com, Hulu Live TV, Sling TV, Yahoo Sports and Facebook Watch will also livestream the event.
  • A family has to bury another loved one after a man was shot during a viewing at a funeral home in Arkansas. Forrest City police said the shooting happened outside a funeral home off South Washington Street on Friday afternoon. Officers said the shooter, Christopher Reed, and victim, Curtis Allen, were cousins and were arguing about a dispute from back in 2014. Allen’s sister said she was outside when the shooting happened. “Your own family would do something so horrific on one of the most horrific days of someone’s life,” said Rozette Allen. Rozette Allen said her family traveled from Illinois to pay respects to their father Friday afternoon. She said Reed and her brother had unresolved issues from the past. She said Reed went up to her brother to shake his hand outside the funeral home but Curtis Allen wanted to be left alone. “He started pulling out a gun from his bookbag, and I’m like, ‘He has a gun, he has a gun,’ and he started shooting,” said Rozette Allen. Benjamin Wynne works at Miles J. Kimble Mortuary and Cremation. He said he was inside when he heard gunshots. “When he went through, ran through the funeral home, I immediately called police,” said Wynne. Police said Reed shot Curtis Allen multiple times. Allen was taken to the hospital and died Sunday. Officers arrested Reed and charged him with first-degree murder, aggravated assault and other charges. Rozette Allen said she will miss her brother, whom she described as a loving father of four kids. “I love him keep watching over us, watch over all of us,” said Allen.
  • A man was arrested after he attempted to rob a dog walker, shot him in the leg and then stole the dog walker’s dog, Daytona Beach police said. Officers said they responded around 2:30 p.m. Sunday after receiving a call for help. Investigators said a man was walking his dog when Dwayne Foster approached him with a handgun and told the man to empty his pockets. The man refused and Foster fired several shots, with one striking the man in the leg, police said. The man was treated on the scene by paramedics and is in stable condition. Officers said they were able to track Foster down, along with the victim’s dog, as well as the gun. Charges are pending against Foster.
  • A 21-year-old woman from Pittsburgh fell around 80 feet from a cliff near Breakneck Bridge at McConnells Mill State Park on Sunday afternoon, fire officials confirmed. Dispatchers said the call came in around 3:23 p.m. Fire officials said the woman was flown to a hospital and has head and back injuries. The woman was with a group of Slippery Rock University students. No other information was immediately available.
  • A rider fell off a float Sunday during a Mardi Gras parade. The rider fell from the lower level of float 16B during the Thoth parade, WDSU reported. The rider was taken to a hospital in stable condition. Two people have died during parades this week. A man was struck and killed Saturday night when he was caught between two sections of a tandem float. Earlier in the week, Geraldine Carmouche, 58, died in a similar accident involving a tandem float. In response to the deaths, city officials have banned all tandem floats for the remainder of the Carnival season.