ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
82°
Mostly Cloudy
H 88° L 67°
  • cloudy-day
    82°
    Current Conditions
    Mostly Cloudy. H 88° L 67°
  • cloudy-day
    84°
    Evening
    Mostly Cloudy. H 88° L 67°
  • cloudy-day
    68°
    Morning
    Partly Cloudy. H 86° L 66°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Home of the Dawgs

UGA Games Online

Due to SEC TV contracts, no SEC school or radio station can stream live football games on their website. Listen to the LIVE broadcast on-air at News 95.5 and AM750 WSB.  

Georgia Bulldogs coverage on the Home of the Dawgs

  • Famed trophies from storied college football rivalries include the Golden Egg that Ole Miss and Mississippi State play for, the Little Brown Jug given to the Michigan-Minnesota winner, and Paul Bunyan’s Axe, awarded to the Wisconsin-Minnesota victor. Notably absent from that list, however, is the Deep South’s Oldest Rivalry. The Silver Chalice is the oldest extant UGA football artifact in the university’s archive. (Jason Hasty/Hargrett Library) Few fans remember it, but, for a short time, Georgia and Auburn actually did play for a prize: an engraved silver chalice. And the chalice won by Georgia’s not-yet-Bulldogs in 1894 is among the treasures from the University of Georgia’s athletics archive that the Hargrett Rare Book & Manuscript Library will be taking on the road this summer.  Considering all the rivalries that Georgia football has, the trophy tradition is surprisingly lacking in Athens. Yes, Georgia and Georgia Tech do play for the Governor’s Cup, originally awarded to the winner of the Bullpups-Baby Jackets Thanksgiving Day freshman classic. And, for the past decade, the student governments at UGA and the University of Florida have been exchanging a prize called the Okefenokee Oar that goes to the winner of the annual game in Jacksonville. (It thankfully has resided at the Tate Center in Athens for the past couple of years.) But, that’s it. I’d long wondered why the Georgia-Auburn series doesn’t have such a trophy. And, then, when I visited the Hargrett Library in Athens last year, I heard about the Silver Chalice. The chalice in the Hargrett collection is the oldest extant UGA football artifact. It was awarded to the winner of the game between Georgia and Auburn played on Nov. 24, 1894, at Atlanta’s Athletic Park, a playing field on Jackson Street, off Auburn Avenue, that long since has been redeveloped.   The late Dr. John F. Stegeman (of the Athens family whose name graces Georgia’s basketball arena) wrote in his book about Georgia football history, “The Ghosts of Herty Field,” that the 1894 game, only the second ever between Georgia and Auburn, saw hundreds of fans travel to Atlanta from Athens on five Seaboard Railroad express coaches. There also were Georgia Tech students on hand — cheering for Auburn, naturally. The 1894 team, which finished with a 5-1 record, was coached by Englishman Robert Winston, Georgia’s first paid head coach. (A year later, the legendary Glenn “Pop” Warner would become Georgia’s coach.) The team didn’t yet have an official nickname, but its mascot was Trilby, a solid white female bull terrier owned by a student. The hard-fought battle with Auburn (then officially known as the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama)  was tied 8-8 late in the game, and darkness had fallen. Auburn requested the game be called, but Georgia refused. Then, as Stegeman recounted, the ball was snapped back to the Auburn fullback, “who stood ready to punt from behind his own goal-line, but he lost it in the shadows. He dropped the ball, tried to pick it up, and finally was smothered” by Georgia’s All-Southern center, Rufus B. Nalley. The safety put Georgia ahead 10 to 8, and that ended up being the final score. The Atlanta Constitution reported: “Athens is ablaze with enthusiasm tonight. Students and citizens alike are painting the town red and black.” The inscription on the chalice awarded to Georgia for winning the game reads: University of Georgia vs Auburn Nov 24 1894 Presented by Alumni and friends of both Colleges won by University of Georgia football team Score – University 10 Auburn 8 UGA athletics history specialist Jason Hasty is taking some of the school’s sports treasures on the road. (Bill King/special) As best UGA athletics history specialist  Jason Hasty can tell, the Silver Chalice was awarded twice. “We have the one from 1894, and Auburn has one they say was from the year after that, though I haven’t seen it,” Hasty told me this week. “It was supposed to be a tradition for the winner of that game to be given a little silver chalice each year. They did it in 1894 and I believe in ’95, but it seems like the tradition fell away after that.” He doesn’t know why. Hasty agrees that “ i t’s strange that the Deep South’s Oldest Rivalry, and one of the nation’s oldest rivalries, doesn’t have anything like that associated with it. I’d like to see them bring it back.” I’d like to see that, too. The Silver Chalice isn’t the only UGA athletics treasure Hasty is taking out on a summer tour of several public libraries in east and central Georgia. Hasty said he’s bringing “a lot of football material, because that’s what the most people want to see,” including “some jerseys from the 1920s and 1940s and probably the ’80s or ’90s. I’m trying to show the differences in style over the years. And how the color has changed a little bit. It used to be a much darker red, nearly a crimson, so we were really the Crimson and Black, not the Red and Black.” Also included in the traveling exhibit, he said, are “a pair of really early silver britches, probably from the early 1940s. And a pair of pants from the 1930s that belonged to quarterback Andy Roddenberry. They’re plain khaki football pants with black stripes. Not many people think about what we wore before we wore the silver britches.” The exhibit also includes a selection of football helmets, including Herschel Walker’s helmet. “We always show that,” Hasty said, “because that’s the one thing people always want to see. Also, a silver helmet from the 1950s and a leather helmet from the 1940s. I want to give people a sense of how things have changed over the years.” Among the newer items on display are placekicker Rodrigo Blankenship’s jersey and shoes, and the football from last year’s Florida game. (Jason Hasty/Hargrett Library) Among the newer items on display: the ball used in last year’s Florida game, and placekicker Rodrigo Blankenship’s jersey and some of his kicking shoes from last season (not the pink ones, unfortunately). Said Hasty: “I think he wanted to hang on to the pink kicking cleats. Hopefully he’ll put them to good use this coming season.” Another item to be included is a piece of the railroad track that ran behind Sanford Stadium prior to the expansion after 1980. “When the stadium was expanded, the rail lines were pulled out and replaced,” Hasty said. “The old track was cut up into small sections and we have a piece.  Given how fondly remembered the track crowd is, it’s an artifact that I’m pretty excited to display.”  From other sports, Hasty has Keturah Orji’s track and field uniform from the 2016 Rio Olympics; a racquet from this year’s women’s tennis team (which won the indoor national title); and a baseball jersey from the early 1900s. “It’s thick wool,” Hasty said. “It would be difficult to wear that in Georgia weather.” The traveling exhibit, consisting of about 35 to 40 different items, is free and open to the general public. The materials will be on display on the following dates and locations:   June 4 (Mary Vinson Memorial Library, Milledgeville), June 5 (Monroe Public Library, Monroe), June 12 (Augusta-Richmond Public Library, Augusta), July 24 (Greensboro Public Library, Greensboro), and Aug. 23 (Washington Memorial Library, Macon). Generally, Hasty said, “some people take 10 to 15 minutes or a half hour to look at things” in the traveling exhibits, “while some people really want to stay and talk. I’ll be on-site and happy to answer any questions. “We get a lot of UGA alumni at these exhibits, and it turns into something like a mini alumni reunion, where people connect with other alumni from their town.” In plotting the exhibit’s itinerary, he said he “tried to look at different parts of the state and go to areas that don’t get a lot of things like this. Atlanta gets a lot.” (The closest stop to both Athens and Atlanta on this year’s tour is the library in Monroe.) “I’m really excited this time to take it to Macon and Augusta, which is about as far as we can go from Athens at the moment.” Currently, Hasty said, “we try to be an hour or two from Athens, to make it easier to move the materials there and back. In the future, I hope to expand that and get to areas of South Georgia and West Georgia, like Savannah and Columbus in the next couple of years.” Hasty said he tries to “tailor the items a little bit to the communities, so it’s not the same in every town. This year, since were doing Milledgeville, I’m going to have some photos of Charles Herty [the founder of football at UGA] and his early teams, since he was from Milledgeville.” He said he’s gearing the exhibits “toward everyone. It’s for the die-hard fans, but also someone who doesn’t know much at all will enjoy some of the exhibits. We get a lot of parents bringing little kids with them. They’re excited to see some of these things, even if they don’t really know what they are. You see the parents explaining to their kids who Herschel Walker was.” Bringing their kids up right, in other words. A fan’s fan The 1981 billboard design by famed artist Jack Davis. (University of Georgia) Every year, members of the Georgia Bulldog Club who’ve contributed to the Hartman Fund get a small packet of items from the club “as a small token of our appreciation for your support.” Some years, the items included are more elaborate than other years. Occasionally, in the past, there’ve been coin-like medallions commemorating championships, and sometimes more clever items. My all-time favorite is the mini-billboard from 1981 featuring the Jack Davis artwork marking the national championship. This year’s packet of treats for Hartman Fund contributors includes a mini USB fan. (Olivia King/special) This year’s packet includes the usual Georgia Bulldog Club car window decals and football schedule magnet, and also a mini USB fan that is designed to plug into a cellphone “to help you stay cool while watching the Dawgs in Sanford Stadium this fall.” Unfortunately, the fan appears not to work with all cellphones (though my daughter found it works on an iPhone 6). I’ve seen a couple of Facebook polls in which the majority of the fans responding said the mini fan didn’t work at all with their phone. Who knows, maybe next year we’ll be lucky and get another national championship mini-billboard. I think that’d work for all UGA fans. The post Forgotten relic of UGA-Auburn rivalry may be coming to your town appeared first on DawgNation.
  • CORAL GABLES, Fla. — The symmetry appears uncanny on the surface, but Lawrence Cager’s football journey has been filled with twists and turns. Ultimately, Cager believes, fate has brought him to where he belongs and needs to be. Cager  hosted Georgia receiver J.J. Holloman when Holloman visited Miami as a prospect in November of 2016. A little more than two years later, Holloman was Cager’s host in Athens, Ga., for the Hurricane receiver’s visit last February. The two hit it off so well that they’re going to be roommates when Cager arrives in Athens on May 28 with business degree in hand and a national championship on his mind. “J.J. is like family to me,” Cager told DawgNation last weekend. “Out of high school, I wanted to be a Georgia Bulldog from the jump.” Cager has impact player written all over him, ready for a break-out season after a career-high 21 catches for 374 yards last season. Smart said more than once he’s concerned about the Georgia receiver position after four of the top five pass catchers from last season moved on. Cager is already on NFL radar, his 6-foot-5, 218-pound frame and impressive jumping ability leading to a team-high six TDs in 2018 at Miami. RELATED: Cager among four UGA players on Senior Bowl early radar It’s fair to assume Cager will be in the Red Zone mix at Georgia. Cager was recruited to Miami by current Georgia offensive coordinator James Coley, choosing the Hurricanes over Alabama and playing the 2015 season with Coley as his coordinator. “God works in mysterious ways,” Cager said. “I’m here now with the coach I loved at Miami (Coley), and the coach I loved at Alabama (Kirby Smart), so I couldn’t ask to be in a better position.”   Play ball! Growing up in baseball-crazy Baltimore, Cager fancied himself a future major leaguer and didn’t take football serious entering into his freshman year at Calvert Hall College High School in Maryland. Former five-time all-star Tori Hunter came to watch Cager hit when he was in eighth grade, and Lawrence’s high school coach was a regional scout for the Detroit Tigers. All signs pointed to baseball. Until they didn’t. Cager played football as a freshman “just to have fun” when coach Devin Redd, the CEO and co-founder of Baltimore’s Next Level Nation, altered Cager’s life with his observation. “Devin Redd said I could play on Sundays,” Cager said. “He told me ’you have something people don’t have; you move like a 5-foot-11 guy but you’re 6-5.” Cager scored 15 touchdowns and had more than 1,000 yards receiving as a freshman before moving up to varsity as a sophomore, a three-sport athlete also playing basketball and baseball. “Lawrence’s ascent began when he came into high school,” Calvert Hall coach Donald Davis said. “He wasn’t sure what direction he would go in; he dabbled in baseball, at one point thought about soccer, and he was a very good at baseball.” Then Cager decided to go out for track his junior year, and he ended up at the Penn Relays and Nationals, clearing 6-foot-11. By then, however, Cager had decided on football. “I knew football would take me where I needed to go,” Cager said, “when I got my first offers from Oregon State and Toledo my sophomore year.” Silent commit A strong showing at a Nike Camp in New Jersey led Cager to receive an invite to The Opening in 2014. Future Georgia receiver Terry Godwin was also there. Ohio State coach Urban Meyer invited Cager to the Buckeyes’ famed “Friday Night Lights” recruiting event, and Cager and his family were so impressed that he made a silent commitment on July 25, 2014. Cager already had an Alabama offer in hand, and then Michigan State offered, along with Notre Dame, Miami, Ole Miss, South Carolina and Nebraska. Cager found himself intrigued and wanted to take visits, particularly to the Top 5 Mississippi State-Alabama matchup in 2014. “The fact I wanted to visit there told me I didn’t need to be committed,” Cager said. “I wanted to see other schools before I could know.” Cager’s parents were pushing for Wake Forest because of the academics there, so the Deacons got the first official visit followed by Virginia Tech, and then Cager’s visit to the Michigan-Ohio State game. Cager headed to the U.S. Army All-American Game thinking he wanted to go to Alabama, while his parents were still encouraging him to go to Wake Forest. Shower commit Cager told the CBS team at the U.S. Army All-American Game he was going to commit to Alabama, live at halftime, during the Jan. 3 broadcast. But behind the scenes Cager’s parents were telling hm to re-think it; there was uncertainty over whether offensive coordinator Lane Kiffin would be returning to the staff the next season. “It was a tough phone call to Nick Saban,” Cager said of the days leading up to the game. Once game day arrived, Cager had an issue on his hands: A spot on CBS to commit before a live national audience, but uncertainty as to which school that would be. “During warm-ups before the game, I was trying to figure out which school I’m going to commit to,” Cager said. “So while everyone else is on the field getting ready to play, I was in the shower room calling schools … some were answering, but they said they’d already had a commitment or were full at the position.” That included Georgia when Cager reached out to Mark Richt. “They told me they were full, because Jayson Stanley had committed,” Cager said. “Coach Coley was the only one at a school I liked who would take my commit. “He said, ‘Change the game!’’ “ Cager’s coach told then-Miami head coach AL Golden that it was a TV commit. Cager was scheduled to visit Alabama the following Saturday, and then he’d visit Miami. “So I committed on TV to Miami without ever being in Miami in my life,” Cager said, laughing at the naivety of his youth. “It’s funny how God works, because that’s how he put Coach Coley in my life.” Until he wasn’t. Lawrence Cager’s upside has him on NFL radar. Rob Floyd/ Getty Images The Richt Years The score was 58-0 on Oct. 25, 2015, Clemson handing Miami the worst loss in the Hurricanes’ 90-year football history. “I know it isn’t far from outhouse to penthouse,” Clemson coach Dabo Swinney said, according ESPN. “I don’t celebrate anything from Miami’s bad day. I feel for him. I hate it, man.  Hurricanes’ coach Al Golden hated it even more when he was fired the next day, making way for Larry Scott to assume interim duties. Miami won the remained of the regular season games, but the Hurricanes elected to go with suddenly available Richt, a school alum who had parted ways with Georgia. RELATED: Mark Richt praised by rivals Saban, Fulmer, Spurrier Cager couldn’t wait to build off his freshman season, but then things took a turn for the worst — specifically, his knee. “I tore my ACL on the last play, on the last day of the last week of 7on -7 drills before camp, back in July of 2016 going into my sophomore season,” Cager said. “I was determined to come back quicker than they projected, so I was in the training room from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. every day until I could walk.” Cager was running in two weeks and running in three months, ready for spring drills, but Richt held him out as a precaution. The 2017 season, however, was at best “up and down” Cager said. “You think you won’t think about it (surgically repaired knee), but it’s in the back of your head, that what if I do this, or I do that, and I might hurt it again,” Cager said. Finally recovered, Cager was ready for a big redshirt junior season in 2018, but the Hurricanes’ offense struggled. The quarterback position was a revolving door, and the lack of consistency under center translated to a hot-and-cold passing game. Richt stepped down after the season, and Cager decided to exercise his eligibility as a graduate transfer. Georgia, with Coley recently promoted to offensive coordinator, was the first to call. “Kirby was like, ‘I’m not going to lose you this time, right?’ “ Cager said. “ ‘You’re going to come home now.’ “My mind went to Athens as soon as I made a decision to be a Bulldog, I felt right at home.” DawgNation in South Florida Kenny McIntosh draws comparisons to Sony Michel, Jordan Scarlett Lawrence Cager eager for Georgia touch down ’The Blueprint,’ championship plans for South Florida star Lawrence Cager with DawgNation   The post The fascinating story of how Lawrence Cager ended up at Georgia appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Kirby Smart has no intentions of leaving his post as Georgia football coach any time in the near future — or ever, for that matter. “Why would I leave home?” Smart said Thursday night in his hometown of Bainbridge, Ga., during a question and answer session,  according The Post Searchlight. “I have more passion and energy in my heart for the University of Georgia than you’ll ever realize,” Smart said. “Because it did more for me than anything I’ve been to in my life.” Smart was an All-SEC safety at Georgia and four-time member of the SEC Academic Honor Roll (1995-98), graduating from UGA’s celebrated Terry College of Business. Smart began his coaching career with the Bulldogs as an administrative assistant on Jim Donnan’s staff in 1999. He returned in 2005 to serve as an assistant to former coach Mark Richt. RELATED: Brandon Adams podcast discusses Kirby Smart as Georgia ‘coach for life’ Smart’s 32-10 record as Georgia’s head coach marks the highest winning percentage (.762) in UGA history. The Bulldogs recently had seven players selected in the 2019 NFL draft and are poised to break the program record next year as Smart enters his fourth season at the helm. RELATED: Kirby Smart’s 2020 draft class will set record Only 43 years old, Smart has already delivered an SEC Championship. UGA was seconds away from the College Football Playoff Championship in 2017 and narrowly missed a second College Football Playoff appearance in 2018. Smart has been paid appropriately for his success. He draws a $7 million per year salary as part of the seven-year, $49 million contract extension he signed last year. Still, there has been speculation that the NFL or Alabama might one day lure Smart away from his alma mater, as it has many other great coaches. Florida’s Steve Spurrier is a prime example. Spurrier was a Heisman Trophy winner for the Gators who came back to coach his alma mater for 12 years (1990-2001) before leaving for the NFL’s Washington Redskins. Spurrier ultimately returned to college coaching, but he did so at South Carolina, where he coached another 11 years. Smart could be different in the sense that he grew up and played his high school football in Georgia, whereas Spurrier was raised in Tennessee. RELATED: AJC columnist Mark Bradley asks, could Smart coach UGA for life? Smart’s appearance at the Bainbridge football fundraiser at the Bainbridge Country Club on Thursday night served as evidence of his loyal nature. “I get asked to speak a lot, but I asked to speak at this event,” Smart said, according to his hometown newspaper. “You got me now because you put Bainbridge back on the map, put it where it’s supposed to be.” Bainbridge, where Smart starred before choosing Georgia, beat Warner Robins 47-41 in triple overtime of the Class AAAAA State Championship Game last season. Smart shared how Bainbridge is what led him to the national level of success he’s enjoying at Georgia. “I had the great fortune of going (to Georgia),” Smart said. “Probably would have never gotten there without some of the great people in this room. “I assure you, it was what drove me to success.” Smart has been proactive designing future success for Georgia as well. It is Smart who is spearheading UGA’s aggressive scheduling model and seeking a facilities blueprint aimed at keeping the Bulldogs an annual title contender. RELATED: Smart shares visionary side of Georgia scheduling plan The Bulldogs recently scheduled a future home-and-home series with Oklahoma in 2023 (away) and 2031 (Athens). Smart’s comments this week make it clear he plans to be on the sideline for both, in Norman, and between the hedges in his “home.” More Kirby Smart DawgNation coverage • Kirby Smart takes playful jab at Florida • WATCH: Kirby Smart shares two most meaningful Georgia wins, bucket list • MORE: Kirby Smart ‘no regrets’ on Justin Fields’ situation • Kirby Smart says ‘We want to talk with our helmets’ • Kirby Smart makes key point defending Jake Fromm The post Kirby Smart plans to coach Georgia infinitely: ‘Why would I leave home’ appeared first on DawgNation.

WSB Sports on Twitter

News

  • A Mississippi teen is fighting for her life after being shot in a drive-by shooting in Jonestown, Mississippi. >> Read more trending news  Family members said Lamonshae Williams was shot in the stomach during a graduation party overnight. She was rushed to Regional One in critical condition. Williams graduated from Coahoma Early College High School on Saturday. Relatives told FOX13 she graduated sixth in her class.  Another victim who was shot at the scene was treated at a local hospital and is expected to be OK. Lamonshae's mother Luetisha Gardner said she is heartbroken about the situation. She told FOX13 that Lamonsha's older sister was killed a few years ago. Jonestown has very limited police coverage, so Coahoma County deputies are currently handling the case. Officers have not identified any suspects at this time. This is a developing story. Check back for updates.
  • A year ago, the world watched as Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were married at Windsor Castle’s historic St. George’s Chapel. Less than a year after their nuptials, they welcomed their first child, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor. On Sunday, the couple celebrated their first wedding anniversary. >> Read more trending news  Harper’s Bazaar reported that the couple has shared behind-the-scenes moments from their big day in an Instagram post on Sussex Royal. Related: Prince Harry and Meghan Markle: A relationship timeline The video slideshow begins with a series of black-and-white photos that include images of Markle holding hands with her mother, Doria Ragland, and Prince Harry pretending to hitchhike to his wedding. Audio of “This Little Light of Mine,” which Sussex Royal said was selected by the couple for their recessional, can be heard as the images are displayed. The video slideshow ends in color images of the big day and wedding bells. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex also shared a message to supporters, saying, “Thank you for all of the love and support from so many of you around the world. Each of you made this day even more meaningful.” Watch the video below.
  • Billionaire Robert F. Smith, who received an honorary doctorate from Morehouse College at institution’s Sunday morning graduation exercises, had already announced a $1.5 million gift to the school.  But during his remarks in front of the nearly 400 graduating seniors, the billionaire technology investor and philanthropist surprised some by announcing that his family was providing a grant to eliminate the student debt of the entire class of 2019.  >> Read more trending news  “This is my class, and I know my class will pay this forward,” he said. He received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters at the ceremony. The announcement elicited the biggest cheers of the morning. Tonga Releford, whose son, Charles Releford III, is a member of the class of 2019, estimates that her son’s student loans are around $70,000. “I feel like it’s Mother’s Day all over again,” she told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Smith’s gift has been estimated at $40 million. Tonga Releford’s husband, Charles Hereford Jr., is also a Morehouse graduate. He said their younger son, Colin, is a junior at Morehouse, an all-male historically black college. The father said he doesn’t know who the keynote speaker will be at Colin’s graduation ceremony but is hoping for a return performance by Smith.  “Maybe he’ll come back next year,” he said.
  • The creepy, unsettling image of the “Momo challenge” will be coming to the big screen, according to one report. Deadline reported that “Getaway,” a horror film directed by Lilton Stewart III, will follow a group of teens on their last summer vacation before college who end up secluded in a cabin. >> Read more trending news  “In ghost story fashion, one tells the story of the urban legend, MOMO, a strange spirit of a bird-like woman that taunts its victims with specific personal details and violent commands via text message and phone calls,” Deadline reported. “What starts out as a harmless prank soon turns more sinister over the next 24 hours as the teens start disappearing without any motive or pattern.” The urban legend is inspired by the viral internet hoax that made the rounds last year. Related: What is the ‘Momo challenge’ and is it a hoax? Despite endless media coverage and local law enforcement warnings on social media of the supposed internet challenge, there were no verified cases of the “challenge” or people being harmed because of the game. “We’ve seen no recent evidence of videos promoting the Momo Challenge on YouTube,”  the video platform said on Twitter in February 2019. “Videos encouraging harmful and dangerous challenges are against our policies.”
  • DJ Khaled has released the music video for his single “Higher,” which stars John Legend and the late rapper Nipsey Hussle. The song comes from the producer-DJ’s new album “Father of Asahd.” >> Read more trending news  Billboard reported that the video, directed by Eif Rivera, starts with a tribute to Hussle, who died after he was shot outside his now-shuttered The Marathon Clothing brick-and-mortar store March 31. The video, TMZ reported, is the last one Hussle shot. Behind-the-scenes video obtained by the tabloid site shows Legend, Hussle and Khaled standing on top of a parking structure with a piano and retro cars in shades of blue. Khaled said in a statement Wednesday that the video footage was shot days before Hussle died. Legend reflected on shooting the music video after news broke of Hussle’s death. “Recently, I embarked on a soul-searching journey down a road I never thought I would travel in a million years. It began when a tragedy robbed the world of an enlightened soul, a brother, a father, a partner and my friend, Nipsey Hussle,” the statement said. “Just days prior, he shared his energy and positivity with me on a video set for a song called, ‘Higher.’ After much prayer and reflection, and with the full blessing of the Asghedom family, I am sharing that moment with the world. “The very title of the song reminds us that vibrating on a ‘Higher; level was the essence of Nipsey’s soul. It is in this spirit, of moving forward, of preserving his mission that I, my co-workers, producers and label partners are donating 100% of all our proceeds from 'Higher' to Nipsey's children, Emani and Kross. “The Marathon Continues.” Watch the music video on YouTube and see a teaser below.
  • Alec Baldwin, Robert DeNiro and 'Saturday Night Live' cast members took one last jab at President Donald Trump's administration this week in the comedy show's final cold open of the season. In Saturday's sketch, Baldwin's Trump led first lady Melania Trump (Cecily Strong), Vice President Mike Pence (Beck Bennett), White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders (Aidy Bryant) and other cast members in a musical number set to the tune of Queen's 'Don't Stop Me Now.'  >> Click here to watch 'Tonight, I'm gonna have myself a real good time,' Baldwin's Trump crooned from behind his Oval Office desk before the others joined in, one by one, dancing and singing. 'He's a billionaire unless you take a look at his tax returns,' Strong's Melania Trump sang at one point. 'He's gonna hide, hide, hide, oh, there's no showing you.' 'I wanna make a super-straight man out of you,' Bennett's Pence chimed in later. >> Read more trending news  Several other 'SNL' regulars appeared in the sketch, including Kenan Thompson as Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, Chris Redd as Kanye West, Kate McKinnon as Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Mikey Day as Donald Trump Jr. and Alex Moffat as Eric Trump. But DeNiro, appearing as special counsel Robert Mueller, nearly put a damper on the celebration. 'Wait a second,' DeNiro's Mueller bellowed. 'I have something very important to say to the American people – something they need to hear.' 'No collusion, no obstruction, so don't stop me now,' Baldwin's Trump interjected as the song resumed. Read more here.