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President Jimmy Carter is “doing alright” and disappointed he’s not teaching Sunday School today

President Jimmy Carter is “doing alright” and disappointed he’s not teaching Sunday School today

Former President Jimmy Carter had every intention of being back in church to teach Sunday School today. It wasn’t until midday Saturday that he let his family know he’d decided to take a little more time to rest up following recent surgery. “He’s tired and wants to recuperate,” said his niece Kim Fuller, who taught in his place. “I think it took more out of him than he thought.” Fuller’s sister, Jana Carter, made welcoming remarks before the lesson began. Their uncle is “doing alright” and is disappointed he’s not in church to teach Sunday School this as he’d planned, she said. “He’s so resilient,” she said, adding that the family is glad he’s taking a little more downtime. No. 39 is recovering from surgery following a broken hip. On the Sundays when President Carter teaches, the parking lot is bustling long before the sun comes up. Volunteers arrive in the small hours to welcome folks who show up as early as 1 or 2 a.m.  Security is also very strict on “Jimmy Sundays,” as Fuller put in, when the U.S. Secret Service is on hand. Things were a bit more relaxed today: The sanctuary was not quite full on Sunday - still a pretty good turnout - and everyone here has been warmly welcomed. “I can’t wait to tell him how many people still came,” Rev. Tony Lowden said. Ahead of time, he played the voice mail from Carter inviting him to lead the church. “The day after his surgery, the physical therapist came in. He was jumping up halfway out of the bed saying, come on let’s get this going!” Lowden said. “He’s 94. He’s up and walking up and down the hall.” Amazed as he has been at his parishioner’s spirit and strength, Lowden has no doubt of the source.  “It’s the presence of God inside him that’s challenging him to live for Christ,” he said. “That’s why he wanted to be here so bad. He wanted to tell you about Christ even though he needed rest.” Here are a few more images. Return for updates.

Woman killed in stabbing at shopping center, police say

Woman killed in stabbing at shopping center, police say

Police say a woman is dead after a stabbing at a shopping center in Roswell Saturday night.  The suspect was also injured and taken to the hospital. He is in serious condition.  Several police cars, officers and ambulances responded to the Old Lake Place shopping center on Alpharetta Street around 8 p.m. Police said the stabbing happened at Dalias Events. Video shot by Channel 2 Action News showed young people crying and hugging each other in the parking lot and police tape strung across the business.  Police said the suspect was seriously hurt before they got there. The victim's identity and the suspect's motive have not been released.  TRENDING STORIES: Columbine school shooting survivor found dead in home Celebrity chef offers to hire lunch lady fired after giving lunch to student who couldn't pay Georgia country star Travis Tritt's tour bus involved in fatal crash  

Atlanta’s Tracey Pendley named 2020 Georgia Teacher of the Year

Atlanta’s Tracey Pendley named 2020 Georgia Teacher of the Year

Tracey Nance Pendley, a fourth-grade teacher at Burgess Peterson Academy in Atlanta Public Schools, earned the 2020 Georgia Teacher of the Year award tonight. “Tracey’s Georgia Teacher of the Year recognition speaks to her love and passion for our students and for teaching and to the tremendous impact she is having on our students’ lives and on their future,” said APS Superintendent Meria Carstarphen. “This is an incredible honor for Tracey and for APS as it’s the first time in nearly four decades that one of our teachers has won this award. We are so proud of Tracey for being a shining example of what teaching excellence is and should be, and we are grateful to her for being a part of our APS family.”  Pendley is the current holder of APS’ Excellence in Teaching Award,  which highlights the district’s best, brightest and most accomplished classroom educators. She is also the recipient of the 2018 Atlanta Families Award for Excellence in Education.  According to the state Department of Education: Pendley graduated from Furman University in 2006 with a bachelor’s degree in sociology and religion and completed a master’s in teaching in 2009 through the University of Chicago’s Urban Teacher Education Program. She has been a classroom teacher in Atlanta Public Schools since 2012; prior to that, she taught in the Chicago Public Schools.  “Tracey Pendley was a child who benefited deeply and irreversibly from her own education, and she chose to pay that forward to her own students,” said Georgia Superintendent  Richard Woods. “The passion and joy she brings to her classroom are inspiring, and her focus is right where it belongs: on the relationships with students that serve as the foundation of all meaningful learning, development, and growth. I am honored to name her the 2020 Georgia Teacher of the Year.” As a child, Pendley found hope in her education, and describes her own life as “the story of the impact that great Georgia educators have on students.”  “As I attended nine different schools and managed the uncertainties of life with a single parent who was an addict, my teachers provided the stability and encouragement that my twin brother and I needed,” she said. “I had several superhero teachers who showed me what a huge impact an engaging, loving, and trust-filled education has on a child’s life. Our teachers were our cheerleaders, our role models, and sometimes, even our caretakers.” While a student at Furman University, Pendley took over management of the Clubhouse Gang, an afterschool program for students in underserved neighborhoods. Along with volunteers, she met with students twice a week to mentor them and help with homework. After college, she initially began work on a doctorate in sociology, but realized that she belonged in the field, with students. “When students leave my classroom, I want them to know that they are loved, uniquely talented, and that learning from their mistakes is the key to becoming successful,” Pendley said. “I never want students to be held back by the numbers they receive on papers, but rather, I want students to know that their growth is what matters – growth as a confident individual with integrity, growth in their relationships, and growth in their academic abilities.” As Georgia Teacher of the Year, Pendley will represent Georgia teachers by speaking to the public about the teaching profession and potentially conducting workshops and programs for educators. She will also participate in the competitive selection process for the 2020 National Teacher of the Year.  2020 Georgia Teacher of the Year Finalists Tracey Pendley, 2020 Georgia Teacher of the Year, Burgess Peterson Academy, Atlanta Public Schools  Stephanie Peterson, 2020 Runner-Up, Westside Elementary School, Lowndes County Schools  Kristen Applebee, Georgia Academy for the Blind, State Schools  Amy Arnold, Colham Ferry Elementary School, Oconee County Schools  Dr. David Bishop Collins, Fernbank Science Center, DeKalb County Schools  Carlos Hernandez, General Ray Davis Middle School, Rockdale County Schools  Lewis Kelly, Newton High School, Newton County Schools  Kiana Pinckney, Palmetto Elementary School, Fulton County Schools  Teresa Thompson, South Tattnall Middle School, Tattnall County Schools  Francisco “Frank” Zamora, Johnson High School, Hall County Schools

First GOP lawmaker in Congress says Trump engaged in 'impeachable conduct' The political fallout from the Mueller Report received an unexpected jolt on Saturday from a Republican member of the U.S. House, as Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI), a more libertarian lawmaker who has often been a critic of the President, became the first GOP member of Congress to open the door for the President Trump's impeachment, saying it's clear Mr. 'Trump has engaged in impeachable conduct.' In a series of posts on Twitter, Amash - a member of the House Freedom Caucus - accused Attorney General William Barr of having 'deliberately misrepresented' the findings and evidence of the Mueller Report. 'In comparing Barr’s principal conclusions, congressional testimony, and other statements to Mueller’s report, it is clear that Barr intended to mislead the public about Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s analysis and findings,' Amash said, making the calls for impeachment now bipartisan. 'Mueller’s report identifies multiple examples of conduct satisfying all the elements of obstruction of justice, and undoubtedly any person who is not the president of the United States would be indicted based on such evidence,' Amash said, echoing an argument heard from many Democrats. Democrats welcomed Amash's declaration. 'This is a very consequential statement,' said Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-VA). 'Thank you Justin Amash for putting country ahead of party.' 'We can now have bipartisan impeachment proceedings. Thank you, @justinamash,' said Rep. Seth Moulton (D-MA). Amash chided members of both parties for reacting to the Mueller Report simply because of who was targeted, basically predicting that if a Democrat had been in the White House, the reactions would have been completely opposite 'We’ve witnessed members of Congress from both parties shift their views 180 degrees — on the importance of character, on the principles of obstruction of justice — depending on whether they’re discussing Bill Clinton or Donald Trump,' Amash added on Twitter. There was no evidence that Amash's statement was going to open the flood gates in Congress against the President - but it will give Democrats the ability to say there are bipartisan concerns about President Trump. “Call him the lone member of the Republican Integrity Caucus,” said Congressional scholar Norm Ornstein, who has been a frequent critic of the President. Fellow Republican Congressman, Rep. Ken Buck (R-CO) took a mild jab at Amash, writing on Twitter that his nickname for Amash was right, using the hashtag, 'Often Wrong Never In Doubt.