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Food splatter, black substance on wall contribute to Checkers failing health inspection

Food splatter, black substance on wall contribute to Checkers failing health inspection

A fast-food restaurant in DeKalb County failed a health inspection, in part because the walls had food splatter and a black substance. The Checkers on Panola Road in Lithonia got a score of 58 on July 16. A year ago the restaurant got an 82 on its health inspection. One customer told Channel 2’s Carol Sbarge that 58 is a bad score that means someone is not doing what they’re supposed to be doing. Violations included soda nozzle and ice scoop holder with a black substance, cheese and lettuce not held cold enough, and exterior of food equipment with food debris. The inspector also noted there were numerous flies in the restaurant and told management to notify pest control. TRENDING STORIES: President Trump endorses candidate for Georgia governor ahead of GOP runoff 18 metro Atlanta houses raided simultaneously in massive drug operation 25-year-old UGA grad missing after leaving work at metro Atlanta Publix When Sbarge went to the Checkers Tuesday she saw a pest control worker pull up. The manager was not there when Sbarge got there. She reached out to the corporate office for a statement but is still waiting for a response. One of the repeat violations was that the inspection report was not posted in public view. We’ll let you know how the restaurant does when it is re-inspected this month.

FBI Director Wray says Russia continues to sow discord in US

FBI Director Wray says Russia continues to sow discord in US

FBI Director Christopher Wray said Wednesday that Russia continues to use fake news, propaganda and covert operations to 'spin up' Americans on both sides of hot-button issues to sow discord in the United States. Wray stood behind the intelligence agencies' assessment that Moscow meddled in the 2016 presidential election, dismissing Russian President Vladimir Putin's claim that his country was not involved. 'He's got his view. I can tell you what my view is,' Wray said at the opening event of the Aspen Security Forum in Colorado. 'The intelligence community's view has not changed. My view has not changed.' Wray spoke after a day of controversy in Washington over whether President Donald Trump accepts the intelligence agencies' assessment and whether he believes Moscow is continuing to try to influence American elections or threaten the nation's infrastructure. Wray also dismissed Putin's offer to allow the U.S. access to 12 Russian military intelligence officers who have been indicted on charges of interfering in the election in return for being able to interview Americans the Kremlin has accused of unspecified crimes. The White House said it was under consideration. Wray dismissed the offer. 'I never want to say never about anything,' Wray said, 'but it's certainly not high on our list of investigative techniques.' Much of the conversation with Wray, which was moderated by NBC's Lester Holt, focused on Russia. 'Russia continues to engage in malign influence operations to this day,' Wray said. He said that while U.S. officials have not yet seen an effort by Russia to target specific election systems, it is aggressively engaged in influence operations to sow discord and divisiveness in America. 'To me, it's a threat that we need to take very serious and respond to with fierce determination,' Wray said. He said the Russians identify divisive issues, and through covert and overt operations, fake news and propaganda, they 'spin people up on both sides of an issue and then kind of watch us go after each other.' Russia isn't the only country threatening the U.S., Wray said. He said he thinks China, from a counterintelligence perspective, represents the broadest and most significant threat America faces. China wants to replace the United States as the most powerful economic engine in the world and is infiltrating American businesses to get an edge. 'We have economic espionage investigations in all 50 states' that can be traced back to China, Wray said. 'It covers everything from corn seeds in Iowa to wind turbines in Massachusetts and everything in between. 'The volume of it. The pervasiveness of it. The significance of it is something that I think this country cannot underestimate.

Judge denies request from accusers of Georgia Tech coach Pastner to delay case

Judge denies request from accusers of Georgia Tech coach Pastner to delay case

An Arizona judge has denied a request to delay proceedings in a  sexual assault civil suit filed against Georgia Tech basketball coach Josh Pastner. The request comes from Pastner’s accusers -- a former friend, Ron Bell, and his girlfriend, Jennifer Pendley. The Arizona couple told a court last week that more than 50 attorneys have declined to represent them in the case, a month after their original legal team dropped them amid documented suspicions that the couple fabricated the assault claims. Bell and Pendley have been ordered to come up with legal filing requests by August 7, ahead of a September hearing. In exclusive jail video and audio recordings obtained by Channel 2 investigative reporter Nicole Carr, the couple can be seen having a meltdown over the case, with Bell saying he doesn’t believe the very claims he has lodged against Pastner in court. The recordings stem from Bell’s short stint in a Pima County, Arizona, jail for a Cobb County probation violation that ended with him being extradited to Georgia this spring. He was released after serving more than a month between the two jails. TRENDING STORIES: 18 metro Atlanta houses raided simultaneously in massive drug operation President Trump endorses candidate for Georgia governor ahead of GOP runoff Georgia teacher sentenced to 2 years in prison for firing gun in classroom “I guarantee you, you don’t have a case after I speak,” Bell told Pendley in one recording. “Ron, I don’t want—” Pendley said before being cut off. “I’m just going to frankly say I don’t believe it happened,” Bell said. 'That’s all I’m going to say.” “Ron I --,” Pendley said before being cutting off a second time.” “I don’t believe it and these are the reasons why,' Bell said. Bell never described “the reasons why,” but threatened to take away Pendley’s witness in the case and berated her for talking to the press about his arrest. In the series of calls, Bell repeatedly said he would go to the press with “the truth” about Pendley’s sex assault claims. He also threatened to convince her one witness to back out of supporting her claims. “You’re going to look like a (expletive) liar when I come out,” Bell told Pendley. “Ron, please don’t do this,” Pendley said. “And I’m going to back Josh 100 percent,” Bell said. “You can go cry with your new lawyer,” Bell said in another portion of the call. “I’m going to be called as a witness for Josh.” “Ron--' “And I’m saying that on a recorded line,' Bell said. “I’m done. I’m done.” Bell originally spoke to Carr in 2017, when he said he was upset that Pastner had not come up with a job for him at Georgia Tech. Bell provided receipts related to an NCAA investigation into allegations that Pastner provided illegal player benefits. Bell said he had been used to support the effort. [READ MORE: Man says GT coach knew he bought flights, meals, clothes for players] Pastner sued the couple for defamation earlier this year, and they turned around to accuse of him of sexually assaulting Pendley in a Houston hotel room in 2016. The couple’s legal team dropped the case a month ago, amid suspicions the sex assault claims were fabricated. Pastner’s legal team recently filed a motion pointing out the couple still had not provided evidence they claimed to have in the case, and asked an Arizona judge to consider dismissing the case. The team submitted phone call transcripts to support that motion. In the transcripts, Bell berated Pendley, threatened to break up with her and alluded to false sex assault allegations.   [READ MORE: Jail recordings suggest false sex assault claims against Georgia Tech's Pastner] Last week, the couple told a judge they wanted to delay the case, because of their trouble in finding new representation. Bell and Pendley told the court more than 50 attorneys declined to take on the case, and they were having trouble obtaining their case file from their previous attorneys. While Pendley and Bell have not personally returned messages regarding the case, Carr confirmed the couple has representation that joined the case this week. The firm is just getting a chance to review the case to prepare for upcoming court deadlines.

For the first time in two years, Jamie Dupree has returned to radio. You can also subscribe to get Washington Insider Jamie Dupree’s take on what’s happening in Washington delivered to your inbox every weekday.
For the first time in two years, Jamie Dupree has returned to radio. You can also subscribe to get Washington Insider Jamie Dupree’s take on what’s happening in Washington delivered to your inbox every weekday.
For the first time in two years, Jamie Dupree has returned to radio. You can also subscribe to get Washington Insider Jamie Dupree’s take on what’s happening in Washington delivered to your inbox every weekday.
For the first time in two years, Jamie Dupree has returned to radio. You can also subscribe to get Washington Insider Jamie Dupree’s take on what’s happening in Washington delivered to your inbox every weekday.
Russian woman kept in custody as feds allege covert political work for Moscow

A federal judge on Wednesday refused to release a 29 year-old Russian woman who pleaded not guilty to illegal political activity in the United States, as federal prosecutors alleged that Mariia Butina was working “as part of a covert Russian influence campaign” in 2016 and 2017, which was aided by at least one American.

“Because Butina has been exposed as an illegal agent of Russia, there is the grave risk that she will appeal to those within that government with whom she conspired to aid her escape from the United States,” prosecutors said in new court documents filed on [More]