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13-year-old 'guardian angel' saves best friend from drowning at pool party

13-year-old 'guardian angel' saves best friend from drowning at pool party

A 13-year-old boy was able rescue his best friend from nearly drowning at a pool party Saturday.  Kaleb Reeves and his best friend, Nick Williams, were at a birthday party when someone pushed Williams into the deep end, friends said. Williams isn't able to swim.  Channel 2's Michael Seiden talked to Reeves, who said that when friends didn't see Williams resurface, they started to panic.  Reeves took action.  'We were just having fun jumping in the water, and some of my friends on the balcony were saying that Nick was under the water, drowning,' Reeves said. 'I was confused, because I've never seen him get in the water.  Reeves said Williams' sister was able to feel him with her foot.  'I dove in and grabbed him, and I pulled him up,' Reeves said. 'I got up under him and pushed him out of the water.' One of the mothers at the party got Williams out of the water and started CPR.  TRENDING STORIES Police: Argument over cover charge led to deadly shooting at busy Midtown lounge UPDATE! Beloved mailman's retirement GoFundMe raises more than $20k Texas men die trying to jump car across open drawbridge, police say Williams was rushed to Scottish Rite Children's Hospital, where he is recovering and is expected to make a full recovery. Reeves said Williams and could go home as early as tomorrow. 'I love him, and I'm glad he's ok,' Reeves said.  Williams' family, who are at his bedside, called Reeves their 'guardian angel.' Reeves mother said that's just who her son is.  'Kaleb would do it for anyone,' she said. 'He's got a big heart. 

17-year-old shot at Dunwoody apartment complex

17-year-old shot at Dunwoody apartment complex

Police are trying to figure out who shot a 17-year-old at an apartment complex in Dunwoody on Friday. The male teenager was found with a gunshot wound at the Arrive Perimeter luxury apartments off Asbury Square just after 5:15 p.m., Dunwoody police said in a news release.  The teen was taken to an area hospital and is expected to survive, Sgt. Robert Parsons told AJC.com. Police have not determined what led to the shooting, but investigators said the incident does not appear to be random, the release said. Parsons said there is no description of a suspect at this time. This is the same apartment complex where a DeKalb County teacher was accused of killing his boyfriend before dying in a car wreck in Clayton County in April, AJC.com previously reported. MORE: Teacher asked school for a sub after allegedly killing boyfriend Anyone with information on this teen’s shooting is asked to contact police at 678-382-6916 or by email at jared.bradley@dunwoodyga.gov. In other news:

Large crowd marches at Capitol against Georgia’s ‘heartbeat’ abortion law

Large crowd marches at Capitol against Georgia’s ‘heartbeat’ abortion law

A large crowd of abortion rights supporters rallied at the Georgia Capitol and marched in opposition to Georgia’s “heartbeat” law, which bans abortion after cardiac activity is detected, typically six weeks.  The crowd assembled on Washington Street SW shortly after noon to start the mile march to CNN Center, chanting, “My body, my choice.” Organized under the name #DoBetterGA, the gathering wanted to bring attention to House Bill 481, which was signed into law earlier this month by Gov. Brian Kemp. The changes take effect in January but face a certain court challenge before then; Liliana Bakhtiari, speaking on behalf of Planned Parenthood Southeast, promised it. “Kemp, we have a message for you,” Bakhtiari said. “You will be seeing us in court soon.” READ | Local DAs say they won’t prosecute women under ‘heartbeat’ abortion law The crowd, carrying signs and chanting pro-abortion rights slogans, filled Washington Street in front of the Capitol . But it all started with a group of college-aged activists and “20 or 30” messages to friends, said Molly Weston, a 19-year-old from Atlanta and one of the event’s co-organizers.  “The magnitude of this is something we never anticipated,” Weston said. “This is the first event we’ve organized, and we’ve gotten a lot of help from other activists and the ACLU.”  Speakers at the event came from other pro-abortion rights activist groups including Georgia’s chapter of NARAL Pro-Choice America, Planned Parenthood Southeast and Black Votes Matter. Many of those who spoke emphasized that the abortion law and similar legislation does not only impact women, but the population at large. “An attack on abortions is an attack on the bodily autonomy of all folks,” said Amina Ali, a Georgia State University student and president of the school’s chapter of URGE (Unite for Reproductive and Gender Equality). “This is not about men making decisions about women’s bodies, or white women making decisions about people of color’s bodies. We need to realize that no one should be making any decisions about anyone’s bodies.”  The passage of HB 481 has led some in the entertainment industry to call for a boycott of Georgia, which has been a hub for movie and TV production in recent years. Two members of the film industry spoke at the rally, saying that they believed a boycott was not the right way to combat the law. Instead, they said, they believed they needed to stay and fight. Molly Coffee, a lifelong Georgia resident who has worked in the film industry for 10 years, said she and many others in the industry have purposefully chose to remain in Georgia instead of decamping for New York or Los Angeles because they love the state, and they want to help keep the industry robust in Georgia while remaining politically active.  “Many of us have made the career choices to allow us to stay here and build our families and our lives,” Coffee said. “Please know that Georgia’s hardworking women and many men in this industry will continue to be the resistance on the inside. Speakers also encouraged the crowd to continue their activism after the march was long done by contacting legislators and voting against those who vote for legislation like HB 481.  “We see your playbook. We know what you’re up to,” said Wanda Mosley of Black Votes Matter. “We will organize, strategize, resist and win.” Like AJC on Facebook | Follow us on Twitter

House Republican blocks final vote on disaster aid bill until June Victims of Hurricanes, floods, wildfires, and other natural disasters will have to wait into next month for Congress to give final approval to a $19.1 billion relief bill, as final passage of the plan in the House was blocked on Friday by a lone Republican lawmaker, forcing a delay until Congress returns for legislative business in the first week of June.   “I respectfully object,” said Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX), a more conservative Republicans who stayed in town after the House had completed its legislative business on Thursday, and came to the floor Friday morning to object to acting on the plan without a full roll call vote.   The House had approved $19.1 billion in disaster aid in early May; the Senate on Thursday amended the plan with the backing of President Trump – but it wasn’t good enough to get unanimous consent for approval in the House. “If I do not object, Congress will have passed into law a bill that spends $19 billion of taxpayer money without members of Congress being present here in our nation’s capital,” Roy said on the House floor, forcing a further delay on the disaster aid measure. One of Roy’s objections was that no money was included in the plan for the immigrant surge along the southern border - President Trump had backed off of that in order to secure a deal on Thursday. Roy’s maneuver drew the scorn of fellow Republicans from states which are need of aid - like Georgia - where farmers suffered devastating losses from Hurricane Michael. Rep. Jody Hice (R-GA) tweeted that “our farmers need aid today,” as this move by his GOP colleague will delay that process into June, leaving a bad taste in the mouths of fellow Republicans with farmers in need of assistance.   Democrats were furious. “House Republicans’ last-minute sabotage of an overwhelmingly bipartisan disaster relief bill is an act of staggering political cynicism,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.  “Countless American families hit by devastating natural disasters across the country will now be denied the relief they urgently need,” Pelosi added in a statement. “This is a rotten thing to do,” said Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA), who noted to reporters that Roy was blocking aid for his own home state of Texas. “We should have passed this months ago,” said Rep. Donna Shalala (D-FL), who asked for approval of the measure on the House floor. “I am beyond fed up. This is wrong,” said Rep. Cindy Axne (D-IA).  “This bill is about helping people – not about playing Washington politics.” “Republican politicians are playing games while people’s homes are literally underwater,” said Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D-OH).   Unless Republicans relent next week, the House would not be able to set up a vote on the disaster aid measure until the week of June 3. “There are people who are really hurting, and he’s objecting,” Shalala said.  “He’s holding hostage thousands of people.”  The House has two ‘pro forma’ meetings scheduled for next week - on Tuesday and Friday.  Republicans could object to passing the bill at those times as well.