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Georgia man bites off tip of officer’s nose during arrest

Georgia man bites off tip of officer’s nose during arrest

A Gainesville man bit off the end of a police officer's nose during an arrest Monday seriously disfiguring him. Gainesville police said Kenton Thompson, 31, was being arrested when he ran from officers. When the caught up to him, he fought them, biting one of the officers in the face. The bite 'resulted in serious injury and disfigurement to (the officer's) face,' police said. Thompson is being held at Hall County Jail and charged with aggravated battery, possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug-related objects and felony obstruction. The police officer’s condition is unclear. His identity has not been released.

House approves $1.5T plan to fix crumbling infrastructure

House approves $1.5T plan to fix crumbling infrastructure

The Democratic-controlled House approved a $1.5 trillion plan Wednesday to rebuild the nation’s crumbling infrastructure, pouring hundreds of billions of dollars into projects to fix roads and bridges, upgrade transit systems, expand interstate railways and dredge harbors, ports and channels. The bill also authorizes more than $100 billion to expand internet access for rural and low-income communities and $25 billion to modernize the U.S. Postal Service’s infrastructure and operations, including a fleet of electric vehicles. Lawmakers approved the Moving Forward Act by a 233-188 vote, mostly along party lines. It now goes to the Republican-controlled Senate, where a much narrower bill approved by a key committee has languished for nearly a year. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has not attempted to schedule a floor debate and none appears forthcoming. The idea of “Infrastructure Week” in the Trump era has become a long-running inside joke in Washington because there was little action to show for it. Still, Wednesday's vote represented at least a faint signal of momentum for the kind of program that has traditionally held bipartisan appeal. Democrats hailed the House bill, which goes far beyond transportation to fund schools, health care facilities, public utilities and affordable housing. Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and a sponsor of the legislation, called it a “transformational investment in American infrastructure that will create millions of jobs.” Republicans ridiculed the bill for what they called a Green New Deal-style focus on climate. 'Instead of seeking bipartisan solutions, this bill adds $1.5 trillion to the nation’s debt and disguises a heavy-handed and unworkable Green New Deal regime of new requirements as an ‘infrastructure bill,’” said Missouri Rep. Sam Graves, the top Republican on the transportation panel. Graves blamed House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democrats for turning what has traditionally been a bipartisan issue in Congress — infrastructure — into what he called “a partisan wish list.” Republicans scored a rare procedural victory, winning approval of an amendment to block money from the bill going to Chinese state-owned enterprises or companies responsible for building internment camps for the nation's Uighur minority. The White House promised a veto if the measure reaches the president's desk. In a statement this week, the White House said the bill “is heavily biased against rural America,'' is based on debt financing and ”fails to tackle the issue of unnecessary permitting delays' that have long impeded infrastructure projects. President Donald Trump has frequently declared his support for infrastructure projects and pledged during the 2016 campaign to spend at least $1 trillion to improve infrastructure. Since taking office, Trump has repeatedly called for enactment of an infrastructure package — but those efforts have failed to result in legislation. Hopes were dashed last year when Trump said he wouldn’t deal with Democrats if they continued to investigate him. The House later impeached him. Trump said after signing a $2 trillion coronavirus relief package that low interest rates made it a good time to borrow money to pay for an infrastructure bill. No formal proposal has emerged, although the White House has suggested the next virus response bill could include an infrastructure component. The centerpiece of the House legislation is a nearly $500 billion, 5-year surface transportation plan for roads, bridges and railways. The White House said in its veto threat that the proposal is “heavily skewed toward programs that would disproportionately benefit America’s urban areas.' The bill would divert money from the Highway Trust Fund to transit and rail projects that “have seen declining market shares in recent years,” the White House statement said. Democrats countered that the bill would rebuild the nation’s transportation infrastructure, not only by fixing crumbling roads and bridges, but also by investing in public transit and the national rail network, boosting low- and zero-emission vehicles and cutting carbon pollution that contributes to climate change. The bill also authorizes $130 billion in school infrastructure targeted at high-poverty schools with facilities that endanger the health and safety of students and educators, Democrats said. The schools portion alone could create more than 2 million jobs, they said. The bill would spend more than $100 billion to create or preserve at least 1.8 million affordable homes. “These investments will help reduce housing inequality, create jobs and stimulate the broader economy,'' Democrats said in a 'fact sheet' promoting the bill. The measure also would upgrade child care facilities and protect access to safe drinking water by investing $25 billion in a state revolving fund that ensures communities have clean drinking water and remove dangerous contaminants from local water systems. Three Republicans voted in favor of the bill: Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania and Reps. Jeff Van Drew and Chris Smith, both of New Jersey. Two Democrats opposed it: Reps. Collin Peterson of Minnesota and Ben McAdams of Utah. __ Associated Press writer Andrew Taylor contributed to this story.

Trump supports new round of direct coronavirus payments

Trump supports new round of direct coronavirus payments

President Donald Trump said Wednesday that he supports a fresh round of government payments to individuals to help them weather the coronavirus pandemic but “it has to be done properly.” Trump also said he wants payments larger than the $1,200 the government sent to most individuals earlier this year. He did not say how big he'd like the payments to be. Trump complained about creating disincentives for people to go back to work, but appeared to be confusing the direct federal payments with a $600-per-week federal supplement for anyone collecting state unemployment benefits. The $600 federal unemployment benefit runs out at the end of July and lawmakers are deciding whether to extend it. Republicans have argued against doing so, saying it created a situation where some people made more money collecting unemployment than they would if they had returned to work. “We had something where they wanted, where it gave you a disincentive to work last time. And it was still money going to people and helping people so I was all for that,” Trump said during an interview with Fox Business Network. “But we want to create a very great incentive to work. So we’re working on that and I’m sure we’ll all come together.” The president also said he wants an easier distribution process free of some of the glitches that plagued the first round. “I want the money getting to people to be larger so they can spend it. I want the money to get there quickly and in a non-complicated fashion,” Trump said. In May, Democrats pushed a $3 trillion coronavirus relief bill through the House, including almost $1 trillion for state and local governments and another round of $1,200 direct payments to individuals, along with help for the unemployed, renters and homeowners, college debt holders and the Postal Service. Republicans mocked the bill as a bloated Democratic wish-list and it was dead on arrival in the GOP-led Senate. Republicans have said they want to see how $3 trillion in previously approved coronavirus relief is working before authorizing additional spending. GOP leaders also wanted to assess how states were reopening their economies before deciding on a new round of economic assistance, but many states are experiencing alarming spikes in coronavirus infections and have delayed or rolled back aspects of their reopening. Trump and top Republicans like Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., insist the next measure protect businesses that are reopening from liability lawsuits. Democrats oppose that. Trump also wants a payroll tax cut, which Democrats also oppose and some GOP leaders do not yet support. On the question of a fourth round of assistance, Trump said in May: “Phase Four is going to happen. But it’s going to happen in a much better way for the American people.”

Stay up to date as Atlanta area schools release their plans for returning in the fall.
Stay up to date as Atlanta area schools release their plans for returning in the fall.
Stay up to date as Atlanta area schools release their plans for returning in the fall.
Stay up to date as Atlanta area schools release their plans for returning in the fall.
U.S. sets another single day record for new virus cases A day after Dr. Anthony Fauci told Senators he was worried that daily counts of new Coronavirus cases could skyrocket to 100,000 nationwide, the U.S. registered over 52,000 new virus cases on Wednesday, with continued growth in California, Texas, Florida, and Arizona. 'COVID-19 continues to spread at an alarming rate,' said Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) of California, whose state reported 9,740 new cases of the virus on Wednesday. California joined Arizona, Texas, Florida and other states in pulling back on re-opening plans, as new restrictions will be placed on restaurants, movie theaters, museums, and bars. 'Our outbreak is accelerating,' said Dr. Caitlin Rivers of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. 'We need to face this head on.' In mid-June, the U.S. had a 7-day rolling average of 21,500 new virus cases a day. In barely two weeks, that nearly doubled to over 40,000 cases a day. On Wednesday, Vice President Mike Pence traveled to Arizona for meetings with state officials on the outbreak there, as Arizona has not only been reporting more virus cases, but also more deaths. 'You are safer at home,' Gov. Doug Ducey (R) bluntly told Arizona residents during a tarmac news conference with the Vice President. As he did on Sunday in Texas, the Vice President urged Americans to wear a face covering to help slow the spread of the virus. 'Wear a mask when indicated by state or local authorities,' Pence said. Pence announced that the Arizona Governor had asked for 500 medical personnel to help deal with rising hospitalizations for the Coronavirus, as the Vice President also said temporary medical facilities might be provided as well. Back at the White House, President Trump was not caught up in the worries about the rising case levels, again confidently saying that the United States would be able to survive the best punch from the virus. 'I think at some point, that's just going to sort of disappear, I hope,' the President told Fox Business in an interview.
 
Savannah mask mandate takes effect, putting Kemp in tricky spot
Savannah mask mandate takes effect, putting Kemp in tricky spot
LISTEN: Kemp speaks with WSB about extending Georgia's state of emergency
LISTEN: Kemp speaks with WSB about extending Georgia's state of emergency
Georgia reports daily, weekly records for coronavirus cases
Georgia reports daily, weekly records for coronavirus cases
Georgia reports daily, weekly records for coronavirus cases
Georgia reports daily, weekly records for coronavirus cases
Protests continue as Georgia posts record COVID cases
Protests continue as Georgia posts record COVID cases
Georgia House gives final OK to home delivery of beer, wine and liquor 
Georgia House gives final OK to home delivery of beer, wine and liquor 
Georgia House, Senate agree to school cuts but no employee furloughs
Georgia House, Senate agree to school cuts but no employee furloughs
Legislature adopts sweeping reforms for senior care homes
Legislature adopts sweeping reforms for senior care homes
Election officials grilled over lines and problems in Georgia primary
Election officials grilled over lines and problems in Georgia primary
Senate greenlights COVID protections for Georgia businesses
Senate greenlights COVID protections for Georgia businesses