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Home Fix It Show

Saturdays, 9am-12pm

Dave Baker

Home Fix It Show with Dave Baker

Resident household repair and home improvement expert, Dave Baker provides tips and advice on planning, building and fixing up around the house.   He rounds out his "toolbox of knowledge" by inviting home repair experts to answer any and all home improvement questions. Listen to Dave Baker Saturday's at 9am - Noon on News 95.5 AM750 WSB. 

For more information on Dave's appearances, guests, and more, visit his website: Thehomefixitpage.com, and be sure to check out his blog!
Grab your hammer and join the show! If you want to get the inside scoop on what's new in home improvement or if you're a 'do-it-yourselfer', you'll be listening to the Home Fix-It Show Saturday mornings from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m.

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Home-Fix-It radio host Dave Baker offers seasonal advice for maintaining and upgrading the value of your home. Get tips ranging from “quick fixes around the house” to advice about hiring outside contractors, plumbers, electricians, etc.

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Recent Posts

  • You are having trouble with your plumbing, or your hvac system, or even your garage door. Want to know how to find a good company to do the work? Here are 5 things to look for. 5 Things that I believe differentiate a great service company from a so-so one… - Size of company. For my money I want to use a company that is big enough and has enough experience so there are no surprises. Most large companies with many employees are rarely stumped when it comes to trouble shooting. - Stability of company. Although I am sure that there are a few quality start-up service companies out there, I prefer one that has been around and been successful. That tells me that they have the resources to get the job done. - Set specific appointments. I like my service companies to tell me when they are going to be there within an hour. I hate the “…sometime between 2p and 5p…” routine.  Tell me when you are going to be there, then call me 15 minutes before you get there in case I have stepped out. Really sharp companies will call me within an hour of completion to make sure I am happy with their work and service. - Talk to me. Once at my house, I like the company to tell me the issues, then tell me how much it will cost (without guessing) to fix, and also tell me how long it will take to get the job done. (And don't lie to me. If you are starting on Monday and it’s going to take 4 days don't tell me 2. Dumb as I look even I will begin to suspect something when you show up to work on Thursday.) If something goes wrong (or right) I want to know as you go, not afterward when you are trying to explain the extra hundred tacked onto the bill… - Don’t be a stranger. If I have a problem after you leave and need you back out to fix or finish a job I don’t want to hear “…we will get there when we can…” I waited for you to get here the first time, once you are in my house doing my job; I should become a priority to you. Anything else is unacceptable.
  • With Thanksgiving fast approaching it is time for your annual tips and suggestions for hanging those holiday lights. Before you start decorating read this… Nothing quite says ‘Happy Holidays’ like hanging roughly 75,000 lights on your house, by your house, in your house, in your trees, on your shrubs, on your lawn.  And nothing says ‘2018’ like telling you this on November 2nd. (Next year I’m moving this reminder to the same week I see my first Christmas ad on TV – so roughly August 23rd). Holiday lighting is a fun, festive way to celebrate. I don’t know about you but I love to drive around town and ‘look at the lights’ – the bigger display the better as far as I am concerned. If you are a light hanger, inside or out, here are some tips to help keep you and your property safe. Make sure that you only use lights outdoors that are rated for outdoor use. The same goes for indoor lighting. Also – be sure any extension cords you use are appropriately rated indoor/outdoor, AND use only UL approved lights Make sure all outdoor receptacles are protected by a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter).  Make sure that you have smoke detectors in your home and that they are working, as well as a fire extinguisher. Each year examine your old lights to make sure they are in good working order, and be sure to discard strands that are worn. Drop cords are the number one reason for electrical fires in homes, never run a drop cord under a rug, especially if there is foot traffic in the area, and never overload a drop cord. Never run drop cords out windows or doors. Don’t over load the circuit which the lights are on. Read the labels on the box of lights for the total wattage. Most outdoor circuits should only be loaded to roughly 1500 watts. If small children are in the home consider 12 or 24-volt lights. As a general rule only three strands of lights should be linked together. Purchasing and Installation Tips - Don’t screw hooks into your home to hold up the lights, they will eventually rust and begin to look bad. Use the new plastic gutter hangers from the store. - Don’t drive nails into your roof to mount lights to. Use the new clips that mount under your shingles. However if your roof is old and brittle, don’t use the shingle mounts either. In the case of an old brittle roof perhaps you should not put lights on your roof. Or get a new roof, then use the shingle mounts. - Approximate number of lights needed to decorate your tree: 3’ Tree: 50 – 100 Lights 4’ Tree: 100 – 150 Lights 5’ Tree: 150 – 200 Lights 6’ Tree: 200 – 250 Lights 7’ Tree: 300 – 350 Lights Figure 35 – 40 Lights for each foot over 7’ Of course, if you are my neighbor, you don’t hang lights each year as much as just plug in the ones you left up from last year. If this is you make sure you unplug the lights before you do any repairs. One more important tip - don't gamble on bad looking light strings. I think you can purchase 7-kazillion lights for about $1.37 - so if yours are old or frayed, by all means step up and get new ones.  Now that you know the basics – go nuts! Send me a picture of your creation to Dave@TheHomeFixItPage.com
  • How do I keep out the mice?  Q – I read in a lot of places how to remove mice from my basement and crawlspace, but never do I read how to keep them out in the first place. Do you have an ideas on this? Charlotte in Templeton A – Thanks for that question. We don’t talk enough about how to keep the mice out to begin with. Here are a few tips: First of all you want to seal the entire perimeter of your home. This includes places like around crawlspace vents and between/behind your gutter and your attic. Use a thick metal and not just some chicken wirey junk. Mice can get through tiny openings and chew thru flimsy metals. Install door sweeps on exterior doors and repair any screens that have holes in them. Seal cracks and holes in your foundation or crawlspace including around plumbing and electrical openings and around vents. Use steel wool or caulk or a combination of the two. Keep your attic and basement/crawlspace ventilated and dry. And sealed. Repair or have repaired any cracks in any blocks or concrete or bricks on or around your house. Trim back your shrubbery from your house and move that stack of firewood at least 25 feet away from your house. Cool, dry, and clean is no way for a mouse to go thru life. Keeping your house, your basement and your crawlspace like that will help to keep the mice away. Oh, and get a cat.
  • Q – We are approaching the holiday season, or as it is known in our family, the traveling season. Our neighbors recently came back from vacation with bed bugs. How can we avoid having the same bad luck? Dorothy in Acworth A – Well first off, don’t travel or stay in the same places your neighbors did… The dreaded bed bug is out there just lurking to find a warm space to crawl on and suck some blood and repeat. Here are a few things you can do to impede their goal… Carry a small flashlight with you to help you inspect your room upon arrival. Don’t place your suitcase on the carpeted floor or on the bed until after you have checked it out. Set it in the bathroom or in the tub (which is easiest to inspect). OK – now start checking with the bed as this is the most popular spot for the BB’s to congregate. Carefully pull back the sheets and inspect all around the edges of the mattress (this is where the light comes in handy). Now check around the bed, thoroughly check the nightstands, and check the walls including looking behind that pop art festival hanging over the bed. All are popular bed bug hang out spots. It is a good idea to take a plastic suitcase liner to keep your suitcase in during your stay (they are sold just for this purpose and altho they can be mildly difficult to get a suitcase into, they do their job). Ok – next step – if you find bed bugs and still want to stay in that hotel, notify the front desk and asked to be moved to a room not adjacent to the bed bug room, preferably on a different floor. Make sure you give the new room the same look over. Think you are done? Not so fast… Whether or not you find the bugs when you return from your trip promptly wash your clothes and vacuum out your suitcase. After you vacuum out your suitcase empty the vacuum cleaner into a plastic bag, seal it and put it outside into your trash can. No, not your suitcase, the stuff you vacuumed out of it. Store your suitcase in a plastic bag until next time. Enjoy your trip and don’t worry about the bugs. You checked and you didn’t find any so don’t spend your time sweating it…
  • Q – We are shopping for a new garage door. What should we be looking for in terms of energy efficiency? Marilyn in Monroe A – While a new garage door is always a good idea (hint to my neighbors) you are smart to be adding energy efficiency to your list of things that are important in selecting a new door. You are basically looking for 2 things: A – The ‘R’ value of the door. ‘R’ value is the number assigned to measure the insulative (I just made up that word) properties of anything. Almost every component of your house comes with an ‘R’ value. The higher the ‘R’ value number is, the more insulation that object will provide. 2 – Any potential for air leakage around the edges of the door or through the door itself. I think the garage area is one of the toughest areas in your house to insulate because no matter how well your door insulates, you open it once and you are starting all over again. You need to look for well-fitting hardware that keep the door panels secure and tight, is there weather-stripping that goes around the door – even across the floor of the garage under the door (there should!), and are there windows in the door? I know windows always add a degree of light and life to an otherwise dark area, but they are not very energy efficient. One last item – have a professional install your new door. Sure you are a whiz with a level and a screwdriver and such, but there are many components of garage door installation that you probably aren’t aware of (The correct tension of the spring is? Anyone? Anyone?) and frankly, are better not dealing with. Good luck!

News

  • The wedding band has been in his family for more than a hundred years. So, when he noticed it was no longer on his finger at Saturday's Georgia football game, Stuart Howell said his heart dropped.
  • Congratulations to Atlanta Braves superstar Ronald Acuña, Jr. on winning the National League Rookie of the Year Award! Acuña finished 2018 with 26 home runs, a .293 batting average and 64 runs batted in. Ronnie ROY. Your 2018 NL Rookie of the Year: @ronaldacunajr24. pic.twitter.com/7b6UX7EIR9 — MLB (@MLB) November 12, 2018 The 20-year-old beat out Washington Nationals outfielder Juan Soto and Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Walker Buehler. Acuña is the first Braves player to win the NL Rookie of the Year Award award since Craig Kimbrel in 2011. Before that, Rafael Furcal won in 2000. 
  • A woman who owns land near where a deadly wildfire started in Northern California said Monday that Pacific Gas & Electric Co. sought access to her property just before the blaze started because the utility's power lines were causing sparks. It's still not clear what caused the massive fire that started Thursday, killing at least 29 people and destroying the Sierra Nevada foothill town of Paradise. PG&E has said it experienced a problem on an electrical transmission line near the site of the massive fire, minutes before the blaze broke out. The fire started on 64 acres of land in Pulga, California, owned by Betsy Ann Cowley. Cowley told The Associated Press she received an email from the utility on Wednesday telling her that crews needed to come to her property to work on the high-power lines because 'they were having problems with sparks.' PG&E declined to discuss the email when contacted by AP. Two days before the fire started, PG&E told customers in nine counties, including Butte County, that it might shut off their power Nov. 8 because of extreme fire danger. The fire started about 6:30 a.m. that morning. Later that day, PG&E said it had decided against a power cut because weather conditions did not warrant one.
  • The deadly wildfires whipping through California have killed more than 30 people and destroyed thousands of homes and businesses. Officials are calling the fires the worst in state history. >> Read more trending news  Celebrities, such as Miley Cyrus, Martin Sheen, Gerard Butler and others, are not immune to the flames and have lost homes and property alongside average citizens.  One couple in particular, well-known car enthusiasts and collectors Gary and Diane Cerveny, reportedly lost an irreplaceable collection of classic and rare vehicles worth millions, according to Autoweek. Hotrod.com described the couple as “the best kind of car collectors” and called their collection “eclectic.”  There was a Ferrari Dino, a ’65 Pontiac GTO gasser, a ’66 Dodge Dart, a Marty Robbins NASCAR, a ’66 Dodge Charger, a ’71 Plymouth Barracuda, a ’97 Dodge Viper, a Studebaker kart hauler and perhaps the rarest car in the collection, the one-of-a-kind 1948 Norman Timbs Special. >> Related: Photos: California wildfires kill dozens, destroy entire town The dramatic streamliner was created in the 1940s by mechanical engineer Norman Timbs, according to Conceptcarz.com. The elegant, swooping custom car took over three years to build, then eventually disappeared. It was rediscovered in the desert in 2002 and restored. >> Related: Actor Martin Sheen flees Malibu wildfire; says little chance home survived The Cervenys kept their collection at a shop in Malibu, which has been ravaged by the wildfires.  
  • Georgia Secretary of State Robyn Crittenden told county election officials Monday to count absentee ballots even if they lack a voter’s date of birth, as long as the voter’s identity can be verified. Crittenden issued the instructions for county election officials as they face a Tuesday deadline to certify the results of the Nov. 6 election. [READ: Abrams sues for more time; Kemp's campaign says math is clear] Republican Brian Kemp holds the lead over Democrat Stacey Abrams in the race to become Georgia’s governor. Abrams would need to gain more than 20,000 votes to force the race into a runoff. Crittenden’s instructions could affect vote counting in Gwinnett County, where election officials rejected 1,587 mailed absentee ballots. Gwinnett has the largest number of potential uncounted absentee ballots for Abrams in the state. Many of Gwinnett’s rejections were because absentee ballots contained incorrect birthdate information or insufficient information on the return envelope. [READ: Bourdeaux files motion to delay election certification in 7th District race] Crittenden sent the letter after the State Election Board voted unanimously Sunday night to issue guidance for how local election officials should proceed with their counts. Her letter is meant to reinforce state laws and provide clarification to county election officials, according to the Secretary of State’s office. Rules about vote counting haven’t changed. “What is required is the signature of the voter and any additional information needed for the county election official to verify the identity of the voter,” Crittenden wrote. “Therefore, an election official does not violate [state law] when they accept an absentee ballot despite the omission of a day and month of birth ... if the election official can verify the identity of the voter.” [RUNOFF: Everything you need to know about Secretary of State race] Gwinnett County accounted for 31 percent of all Georgia’s rejected absentee ballots, often because of discrepancies with birth dates, addresses, signatures and insufficient information. Gwinnett Commission Chairwoman Charlotte Nash said she wasn’t surprised at the scrutiny Gwinnett has received because of “the role that both parties saw it playing in their success.” She defended the way the elections office has conducted its business. [READ: Kemp campaign calls Abrams' refusal to concede 'a disgrace to democracy'] “They always focus a lot on figuring out how to deal with the issues that arise,” Nash said last week, “and I have every expectation that they will do that this time around too.”  Gwinnett Elections Board Chairman Stephen Day, a Democrat, has also defended county staff. “There are definitely different political points of view [on the elections board], but we do agree that our staff has acted in the way that the law stated they should act,” Day said following Friday’s closed-door elections board meeting. “We do understand that there are different interpretations of that.”