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Home Fix It Show

Saturdays 9am - 12pm

Dave Baker

Home Fix It Show with Dave Baker

Resident household repair and home improvement expert, Dave Baker provides tips and advice on planning, building and fixing up around the house.   He rounds out his "toolbox of knowledge" by inviting home repair experts to answer any and all home improvement questions. Listen to Dave Baker Saturday's at 9am - Noon on News 95.5 AM750 WSB. 

For more information on Dave's appearances, guests, and more, visit his website: Thehomefixitpage.com, and be sure to check out his blog!
Grab your hammer and join the show! If you want to get the inside scoop on what's new in home improvement or if you're a 'do-it-yourselfer', you'll be listening to the Home Fix-It Show Saturday mornings from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m.

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Home-Fix-It radio host Dave Baker offers seasonal advice for maintaining and upgrading the value of your home. Get tips ranging from “quick fixes around the house” to advice about hiring outside contractors, plumbers, electricians, etc.

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Recent Posts

  • As it warms up out comes the yuckiest of pests - the cockroach. Here are 5 things you didn't know about that vile bug… 5 Things you didn't know about the cockroach, plus a bonus tip on their removal… - Cockroaches can live without their heads for up to a week, eventually dying of thirst. - The roach can live for up to a month without food. - Cockroaches can run at a speed of 3 miles per hour, which is just about the average walking speed of a human. - Cockroaches have been found to be one of the top asthma triggering allergens in the home. - Roaches can hold their breath for as long as 40 minutes. Bonus segment. Want to remove the cockroach from your premises. These ideas may help… Identify all cracks, crevices and holes. These are places that harbor cockroaches. Seal as many of these holes and cracks as possible. Spray the cracks and crevices with Dinotefuran.: It’s easier to say when you aren’t trying to say it into a microphone. Pest control professionals use Alpine Pressurized Insecticide, which is an aerosol can that they use to treat cracks and crevices on the interior of homes. This is a great product to use for roaches in the kitchen or general insects inside a home.
  • Q- I am planning on expanding my house by finishing my basement and perhaps adding a room onto the back. How much can I add with my current hvac system? Bucky in Johns Creek A - Not much. Heating and air conditioning systems are sized by the livable square footage of a house. That probably doesn't include an unfinished basement, and it certainly doesn't include an addition. An under-sized unit will perform inefficiently and will be costly. Your favorite heating and air company should offer, for free, to come out and size your house and give you an exact answer. One of the possible solutions for adding more ummph to your current system would be adding a smaller system just for the basement. This is something you will need to decide on before your finish the basement as you will want to run the ductwork before completing the walls. Your extra room could then be nicely controlled by a mini-split (such as a Mr. Slim unit made by Mitsubishi). It is also possible to include a system for your basement and your addition. Your HVAC company will easily be able to measure the size unit you need and give you estimates.
  • Q - We enjoy our deck, but the metal deck furniture looks a little on the ragged side. I would prefer not to spend the money on new, how can I make it look good again? Alan in Dunwoody A - Fortunately, refinishing your metal deck/patio furniture is easier than you think, and it will make a world of difference when it comes to enjoying your backyard. Here is the play by play on making your metal furniture look spiffy again: - Remove all the rubber tips from the legs and cushions. - Wash and rinse the furniture thoroughly using a mild detergent. - With a wire brush, scrape off all the rust and the loose flakes of paint. If you have places with paint 'bubbling' up on the furniture use a screwdriver to remove the bump then wire brush it clean. - Once you are done with the scraping, use a commercial rust remover to remove all the rust. Now the fun part. Paint or spray the furniture with the rust-resistant paint. If the furniture is really corroded you may want to use a rust-resistant primer first. Note - you don't have to use black. What were once 4 black chairs and 2 black end tables on my deck are now 2 red chairs, 2 yellow chairs, and two tables with a color that is in the blue family, I think. Now just let it dry – up to 24 hours for each coat depending on weather and paint instructions. Then replace rubber tips and cushions and bingo – new patio/deck furniture. If you take the time to do proper preparation, your job may well last a couple three years. And at 105 hamburgers and hot dogs per year per person, that is a lot backyard enjoyment!
  • With warmer temperatures comes the prospect of actually doing something fun outside, like enjoying your deck. That means it is once again time to wonder if your old buddy, the deck, needs sealing. Now I know what you are thinking. You are thinking that sealing your deck is on the list of fun things to do right behind picking your mother-in-law up at the airport.  I know you would rather be sitting in front of your big screen television watching the Gilligan’s Island marathon than out working on your deck , but take heart – a few hours of work with relatively no heavy lifting on your deck  will give you a deck  that will last through another season of grilling out and sipping mai tais.  First of all, your deck may not even need to be sealed. Here’s how to tell: simply drip water on the deck. If it beads, then your deck does not need to be re-sealed. Yes, your deck could be old and grungy, but if it still beads water then more than likely it only needs to be cleaned. Cleaning is easy. You can use a product like Deck Brite, or a deck cleaner from Behr, Jomax, or Olympic and clean the deck with little trouble. Be sure to read and follow all label directions. Simple enough, but what if the water didn’t bead? Then you may miss an episode or two of Gilligan. It will probably be the episode where the castaways have a plan to get rescued but then Gilligan messes it up. I know. That’s your favorite one… So let’s say you have to do some sealing – and you really should at some point because it will help your deck last longer. Here is what you need to know: - Protection. Protection for you means goggles and rubber gloves while you are working with the stripper and the stain or sealer. You must also protect your plants and vegetation around the deck. This means soaking the plants to help dilute anything that maybe come in contact with them, and then cover with plastic. - Stripping. Not you. Believe me; no one wants to see you working on your deck with your shirt off, especially the last week of March or the first week of April. It’s also good to use a stripper even if most of the deck doesn’t need it just so the whole deck will be at the same starting point. - Purchase a quality stain/sealer stripper from your favorite hardware store. No matter how big of a man you are, please be sure to read and follow all label directions. After applying the stripper be sure to rinse off with plenty of water (to help dilute the stripper as it goes into your yard). Let your deck dry and give it the water test again. Repeat this whole step again if necessary – that is if water still beads. For reasons that will become evident later, when stripping it is important to strip the entire deck. Allow your deck some time to dry. Maybe here you can catch an episode or two of Gilligan’s Island, or if you’re really lucky maybe Hogan’s Heroes will be on (fyi - Kinch has a radio in the coffee pot). Now your deck is ready for staining/sealing. - Sealing. Find a nice semi-transparent stain from your favorite hardware store and again, (I sense a theme here) read and follow all label directions, applying with a roller. Work in small areas, applying the second coat BEFORE the first coat dries. Why? Because if you allow the first coat of SEALANT to dry, guess what it does to the second coat? That’s right, it seals it out there by not allowing your second coat to soak in and dry. That second coating of sealant is very, very, very, very, very difficult to remove. It will also be very, very, very, very, very slippery. If you don’t believe me, call my brother-in-law.  Let dry. - Clean up. Wash your hands and rinse the tarps covering your vegetation. Throw away the roller you used during application. Fold the tarp and store in your crawl space. Place the unused cans of sealant and stripper in a well-ventilated area. Wipe your feet before you step on the carpet. Hang your hat on the hat rack you got for Christmas 7 years ago but have never used. Put your clothes in the hamper. Hang up the towel you stole from the Hampton Inn and wipe up any water on the floor around the shower. Don’t wear the striped shirt with the plaid shorts or the black calf length socks with sandals (you know who you are). There, your deck is good to go for the entire season. You may want to give it the old water test again in 6-8 months, but as your deck gets older you will have to do it less. And that’s good news. Enjoy Gilligan.
  • Q - I hear people talk about 'termite letters' all the time. What exactly are they talking about? Neil in Lithonia A - A termite letter is a report that a pest control company will create after doing an inspection of a house. Some states have actual forms that this is supposed to follow by state law.  Georgia is a prime example - they have the 'Official Georgia Wood Infestation Report' which is required for any home sale in the state. The termite inspection letter will disclose everything that was found by the inspector, whether the house is currently infested with termites or has been in the past, and will also usually note if any parts of the house were inaccessible for inspection. If you are the buyer, your bank may require you to have a termite letter before you close on your house. There can be restrictions, and they may require it to have been within a certain time period before the loan closes (so they essentially 'expire').  One very important piece of advice: get your termite letter done in advance of the closing date.

News

  • Hobby Lobby is closing all its stores nationwide and furloughing employees without pay. The arts and crafts store released a statement Friday saying it’s closing its doors due to the coronavirus pandemic. Hobby Lobby also said in the statement that it will be furloughing a large portion of corporate and distribution employees. Hobby Lobby will remain closed after 8 p.m. Friday until further notice. Hobby Lobby statement: 'As the country continues efforts to manage and mitigate the devastating health and economic impacts of the COVID-19 virus, Hobby Lobby will, after careful consideration, close the remainder of its stores, and furlough nearly all store employees and a large portion of corporate and distribution employees, effective Friday, April 3rd, at 8:00 p.m. The stores will remain closed until further notice. HOBBY LOBBY OFFICIAL STATEMENT “In order to allow our furloughed employees to take full advantage of the Pandemic Unemployment Compensation and Recovery Rebates provided to eligible employees by the federal government, we are ending emergency leave pay and suspending use of Company provided paid time off benefits (PPTO and Vacation) in accordance with the requirements outlined in the CARES Act (subject to State law requirements). However, we will maintain medical, dental, life, and long-term disability benefits for employees while furloughed through at least May 1, 2020, and will pay the cost of employee premiums for these benefits on behalf of employees while furloughed without pay. We encourage furloughed employees to file their claims with their State’s unemployment commissions as soon as possible. Upon return, employees will retain their original dates of hire and any accrued PPTO and Vacation. Our sincere gratitude goes out to our dedicated employees at this difficult time, and we look forward to the day when we can welcome them back, once we are able to reopen. HOBBY LOBBY OFFICIAL STATEMENT “We know our customers relied on us to provide essential products, including materials to make personal protective equipment, such as face masks, educational supplies for the countless parents who are now educating their children from home, and the thousands of small arts and crafts businesses who rely on us for supplies to make their products. Over the past several weeks, we implemented several best practices to provide a safer shopping environment, including the installation of physical barriers between customers and cashiers, enhanced cleaning, and the enforcement of social distancing measures. We are prepared to reopen our stores in a responsible way when the current situation improves, and look forward to welcoming our valued customers back to our stores. Until then, we pray for those affected by the virus, protection for the health care professionals caring for the sick, economic security for all impacted businesses and employees, and wisdom for our leaders.” HOBBY LOBBY OFFICIAL STATEMENT 'As the country continues efforts to manage and mitigate the devastating health and economic impacts of the COVID-19 virus, Hobby Lobby will, after careful consideration, close the remainder of its stores, and furlough nearly all store employees and a large portion of corporate and distribution employees, effective Friday, April 3rd, at 8:00 p.m. The stores will remain closed until further notice.”
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed its guidance late Friday concerning the wearing of cloth face masks while out in public. The CDC, according to President Donald Trump, said that people, when going to public locations, should now wear “non-medical, cloth face coverings.” The action is voluntary, Trump said in his afternoon press briefing. Since the beginning of the battle against COVID-19, the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had said that people didn’t need to wear masks unless they were sick and coughing, The New York Times reported prior to Trump’s announcement. Thursday evening, Trump had said his administration would have regulations when it came to the general population and the wearing of masks. Some opportunities for wearing masks while in public would be when going to pharmacies and grocery stores, the Times reported. Many people may now be looking for ways to make their own personal protective equipment or to make PPE for those working the front lines. There are many designs to make, from no-sew options to ones that need some needle and thread. No Sew Supplies: A bandanna or piece of finished cloth Hair elastics Sewn versions Supplies: Paper, to make a pattern Cotton fabric Fusible interfacing Elastic Pins Sewing machine The New York Times has an alternate pattern. Click here for step by step instructions. Kaiser Permanente has also shared a design approved by the health system for donation to hospitals, The Washington Post reported.
  • A Brooklyn landlord waived this month’s rent for hundreds of his tenants. Mario Salerno posted signs on the 18 buildings he owns throughout the borough letting tenants know they do not have to pay April’s rent, The New York Times reported. “My concern is everyone’s health,” Salerno told the Times. “I told them just to look out for your neighbor and make sure that everyone has food on their table.” Salerno had not calculated how much he would be losing from not collecting rent on the 80 apartments, but it’s likely hundreds of thousands of dollars, the Times reported. “I’m really not concerned about the rent right now, I’m concerned about people’s health,” Salerno told Greenpointers.com. “Not only are we up against an epidemic, these poor people have no jobs and they’re worried about getting sick. I didn’t think it was much on a person like me, who God was good to, to help them all out.” It has helped ease the stress for some tenants who are out of work because of the coronavirus. Tenant Paul Gentile has lived four years in one of Salerno’s buildings. He works as an attorney but lost his job when the courthouses closed March 18. “You don’t see that, especially in a landlord-tenant relationship in New York City,” Gentile told the Times. “He’s amazing.”
  • A Michigan sugar company purchased $131,000 worth of gift cards from restaurants in communities where it operates. The Michigan Sugar Co. gave each of its 1,300 employees a $100 gift card from more than 50 restaurants, MLive reported. “We hope this helps ease the pain of this pandemic for those businesses just a little bit,” Michigan Sugar Co. Board Chairman Adam Herford told MLive. The company has also donated personal protection equipment including masks, gloves and safety glasses to Michigan-area health care facilities.
  • A Detroit bus driver who complained about a coughing passenger in a video posted on social media, has died from the coronavirus. Jason Hargrove got sick four days after posting the video on March 21 where he went on a profanity-laced tirade about a woman who coughed repeatedly while on the bus. The bus drivers’ unions said Hargrove, 50, died Wednesday. The coronavirus can spread through the air, health officials have said. “Public workers doing our job, trying to make (an) honest living, take care of our families,” Hargrove said in the video. “For you to get on the bus ... and cough several times without covering up your mouth and you know (we’re) in the middle of a pandemic — that lets me know that some folks don’t care.” The city stopped collecting fares March 17. The buses were to be more thoroughly cleaned and passengers were required to enter and exit from the rear door only. Mayor Mike Duggan expressed condolences and urged others to watch Hargroves’ video. “He was infected before we closed the front doors (on buses),” Duggan said. “Some of his language is graphic, but I don’t know how you can watch it and not tear up. He knew his life was being put in jeopardy ... by someone who didn’t take this seriously and now he’s gone.”
  • A Pennsylvania man who lost a lung to cancer about a decade ago has survived another health battle -- this time, with the coronavirus. It started as what he assumed was just a cold, but when Richard Botti, 61, started to feel lung pain in early March, he thought his cancer had returned. It turned out to be COVID-19 instead. Because of his previous bout with cancer, he was at higher risk. His family told WPXI they got very concerned when his conditioned started to worsen. “It slowly got worse and he wasn’t getting out of bed,” said Vanessa Venezie, his daughter. “You immediately think the worst because of everything you’re seeing and reading.” He soon tested positive for the coronavirus and had to be hospitalized. However, he pulled through, spending 11 days at Heritage Valley Hospital hooked up to oxygen. Botti’s daughter wanted to share not all coronavirus outcomes are grim. “We’re just really happy and we want people to know there is hope for them,” Venezie said. “Stay focused on the positive. Do things that make you feel good. We can all get trapped in the negative.” Botti was taken back home by medics in an ambulance equipped to handle COVID-19 cases. He has to self-isolate in his room away from his family for two weeks.