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Coronavirus updates: Third passenger from Coral Princess cruise ship dies
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Coronavirus updates: Third passenger from Coral Princess cruise ship dies

Coronavirus outbreak: What you need to know

Coronavirus updates: Third passenger from Coral Princess cruise ship dies

More than 1.2 million people worldwide – including more than 312,000 people in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. Officials are attempting to contain the COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S. as hospitals brace for unprecedented patient surges.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here.

Live updates for Sunday, April 5, continue below: 

Third passenger from Coral Princess cruise ship dies

Update 10:52 p.m. EDT April 5: A third passenger from the Coral Princess cruise ship has died, CNN reported.

The passenger was taken from the cruise ship after it docked to a hospital and later died.

Two passengers had died before the ship docked early Saturday morning in Miami.

Florida congressman, first to test positive, now rid of virus

Update 9:46 p.m. EDT April 5: A U.S. congressman from Florida who was the first representative to test positive, has recovered from the coronavirus.

Rep. Mario Daiz-Balart said Sunday he was virus-free.

“Today, after being deemed #COVID19 free by my doctor, I was able to reunite with my family in Miami,” Diaz-Balart said on social media. "Though still a bit weak, I feel well, & I applied to participate in the (Red Cross) plasma donation to help those with serious or immediately life-threatening COVID-19 infections.”

He later stressed the importance of social distancing.

“I want to reiterate the seriousness of this sickness, and I encourage everyone to continue to follow the (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) guidelines,” he said.

Italy sees lowest death rate in weeks

Update 8:56 p.m. EDT April 5: Health officials believe the curve is flattening in Italy where the country recorded its lowest death rate in nearly two weeks.

Italy’s Civil Protection Service said Sunday 525 people died in a 24-hour period, the lowest since March 19 when 427 people died, The Associated Press reported.

“The curve, which had been plateauing for days, is starting to descend," health officials Silvio Brusaferro said Sunday.

More than 15,800 people have died from the virus in Italyaccording to Johns Hopkins virus tracking site. There are more than 128,000 confirmed cases.

The country recorded more than 4,300 new cases Sunday. However, that number is a decrease from earlier in the outbreak when daily cases topped 6,000.The country has been on lockdown for nearly four weeks.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Washington sending 400 ventilators from national stockpile to New York

Update 7:56 p.m. EDT April 5: Gov. Jay Inslee announced Sunday that Washington will be returning more than 400 ventilators from the federal government to help the state of New York, which is experiencing a higher number of coronavirus cases.

"I’ve said many times over the last few weeks, we are in this together. This should guide all of our actions at an individual and state level in the coming days and weeks," Inslee said.

The ventilators were sent from the Strategic National Stockpile, KIRO-TV reported. Washington recently purchased more than 750 of its own ventilators that will arrive over the next several weeks.

“Thanks to the mitigation efforts the governor has put in place and the cooperation of Washingtonians, we have seen fewer infections in our communities than anticipated. Our current status allows us to help others who have a more immediate need," said Raquel Bono, a former vice admiral and director of Washington state’s COVID-19 Health System Response Management.

There are more than 7,400 confirmed cases and 319 deaths in Washington state, according to The New York Times. In New York state, there are more than 122,500 confirmed cases and 4,159 deaths.

Boris Johnson admitted to hospital with virus

Update 6:06 p.m. EDT April 5: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson was admitted to a hospital Sunday because of the coronavirus.

He went to the hospital because he still has symptoms 10 days after testing positive for the virus, The Associated Press reported.

Officials said the move is a “precautionary step,” the BBC reported. Johnson is expected to stay overnight.

Johnson, 55, has been quarantined since testing positive March 26.

Tiger at Bronx Zoo tests positive for virus 

Update 4:56 p.m. EDT April 5: A tiger at the Bronx Zoo tested positive for the coronavirus.

It is believed the big cat was exposed to the virus by an employee at the zoo, accoridng to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Several lions and tigers were showing symptoms of the virus March 27, but only the one tested positive. All of the big cats are expected to recover.

The zoo has been closed to the public since about mid-March. Other animals in the zoo are not showing signs of the virus.

Death Valley National Park temporarily closes

Update 3:26 p.m. EDT April 5: Death Valley National Park has been temporarily closed, effective Saturday due to public health concerns surrounding the spread of the coronavirus, the National Park Service said on its website. The National Park Service said Daylight Pass and California highway 190 will remain open at the park, which is located in California and Nevada. The order means all park facilities, restrooms, viewpoints, trails, roads, and campgrounds are closed until further notice, according to the website.

Fauci says coronavirus could become seasonal

Update 3:11 p.m. EDT April 5: Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. said there is a very good chance the new coronavirus “will assume a seasonal nature” because it is unlikely the disease will be under control globally.

“Unless we get this globally under control, there’s a very good chance that it will assume a seasonal nature,” Fauci, speaking on CBS’ “Face the Nation," said Sunday. “We need to be prepared, that since it unlikely would be completely eradicated from the planet, that as we get into (the) next (flu) season, we may see the beginning of a resurgence.”

Trump approves disaster declarations for Delaware, South Dakota

Update 2:06 p.m. EDT April 5: President Donald Trump approved disaster declarations for Delaware and South Dakota, according to CNN. The president has now approved disaster declarations for 42 states, the U.S. Virgin islands, the Northern Mariana Islands, the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico.

Navy captain relieved of aircraft carrier command tests positive

Update 12:46 p.m. EDT April 5: Brett E. Crozier, the Navy captain removed from command of the coronavirus-stricken U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt, has tested positive for COVID-19, The New York Times reported, citing who was removed from command of the coronavirus-stricken aircraft carrier U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt, The New York Times reported, citing two Naval Academy classmates of Crozier’s who are close to him and his family.

A Navy spokesman declined comment on the captain’s status, the newspaper reported.

Crozier was removed from the warship Thursday. He was fired after the San Francisco Chronicle reported Crozier emailed a letter to Navy leaders that listed failures in providing necessary resources to disinfect the ship as the virus spread through it, the Times reported.

Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union” there were 155 confirmed coronavirus cases among sailors aboard the aircraft carrier.

“There is an investigation ongoing,” Esper said on “State of the Union.” “All the services at times relieve commanders without the benefit of an investigation up front because they’ve lost confidence in them. It’s certainly not unique to the Navy.”

NJ governor says state has secured 500 ventilators

Update 12:14 p.m. EDT April 5: In a tweet Sunday, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said his state has secured about 500 additional ventilators after having “multiple” conversations with the White House. “Ventilators are our No. 1 need right now,” Murphy tweeted. “I won’t stop fighting to get us the equipment we need to save every life we can.”

Queen Elizabeth II: 'History will remember your actions’

Update 10:44 a.m. EDT April 5: Queen Elizabeth II, making a rare address to the nation, is expected to urge citizens in the United Kingdom to exercise discipline and resolve during the coronavirus crisis. Normally the queen, now 93, makes one speech annually, but this will be the second in two months, the BBC reported.

"I am speaking to you at what I know is an increasingly challenging time,” she said, according to excerpts obtained by The Associated Press. “A time of disruption in the life of our country; a disruption that has brought grief to some, financial difficulties to many and enormous changes to the daily lives of us all.”

The queen has given an address like this on only three other occasions, according to the AP: After the Queen Mother’s death in 2002, before the funeral of Princess Diana in 1997, and during first Gulf War in 1991.

“I hope in the years to come everyone will be able to take pride in how they responded to this challenge,” the queen said in remarks that will be broadcast Sunday night. “Those who come after us will say that the Britons of this generation were as strong as any.”

‘Hardest and saddest’ week ahead, surgeon general says

Update 10:26 a.m. EDT April 5: U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams said the upcoming week will be the “hardest and the saddest” for Americans. Adams, speaking on “Fox News Sunday,” characterized the next phase of the coronavirus pandemic as a “Pearl Harbor moment” and a “9/11 moment.”

“I want Americans to understand that as hard as this week is going to be, there is a light at the end of the tunnel,” Adams said on the news program.

DC, Maryland, Virginia see increase in cases

Update 10:10 a.m. EDT April 5: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases continues to rise in the area around Washington, D.C. Sunday morning, there were 6.422 cases in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia, The Washington Post reported. There were 3,126 cases in Maryland, 2,410 in Virginia and 906 in the District of Columbia, the newspaper reported. The total of virus-related deaths stood at 126 -- 52 in Virginia, 53 in Maryland and 21 in D.C.

Pastor at Falwell’s church tests positive

Update 8:59 a.m. EDT April 5: Charles Billingsley, worship leader of Thomas Road Baptist Church in Lynchburg, Virginia, tested positive for the coronavirus, Pastor Jonathan Falwell told WDBJ. Falwell posted the announcement on his Facebook page Saturday. He says Billingsley’s symptoms are mild and he is getting better each day.

Legendary NFL kicker Tom Dempsey dies from complications

Update 8:42 a.m. EDT April 5: Former NFL placekicker Tom Dempsey, who set an NFL record with a 63-yard field goal in 1970, died Saturday from complications from the coronavirus, his family said. He was 73. Dempsey contracted COVID-19 in March during an outbreak at a New Orleans retirement home, NOLA.com reported. He is one of 15 residents at the home to die from the virus.

Dempsey was born without fingers on his right hand and wore a small, flat shoe on his kicking foot, the website reported. His record-setting field goal, on the last play of the game against the Detroit Lions on Nov. 8, 1970, at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, helped the Saints rally to a 19-17 victory. His field goal beat the previous mark by seven yards.

NBA, Knicks, Nets work with Chinese official to donate 1M surgical masks to New York

Update 7:50 a.m. EDT April 5: The NBA and two professional basketball teams are working with a Chinese official to provide 1 million surgical masks to “essential workers” in New York.

According to Reuters, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced the donation – a collaborative effort involving the league, the New York Knicks, the Brooklyn Nets and Chinese Consul General Huang Ping – Saturday on social media.

“New York thanks you,” Cuomo tweeted Saturday afternoon. “We are beyond grateful for this gift of critically needed PPE.”

>> See the tweet here

As of Sunday morning, New York had reported at least 114,174 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 3,565 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Pope Francis celebrates Palm Sunday Mass without public

Update 6:52 a.m. EDT April 5: Amid the coronavirus pandemic, Pope Francis took a different approach to his Palm Sunday Mass, typically celebrated outside in St. Peter’s Square in Vatican City with tens of thousands of people looking on.

According to The Associated Press, the pope celebrated the Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica. Only a few prelates, nuns and guests were invited to attend, the AP reported.

As of Sunday morning, Italy had reported 124,632 COVID-19 cases – the third-highest in the world, according to Johns Hopkins UniversityItaly also had logged at least 15,362 deaths, more than any other country.

Oprah Winfrey donating $10 million to relief efforts

Update 5:45 a.m. EDT April 5: Media mogul Oprah Winfrey is donating $10 million amid the coronavirus pandemic, she said last week.

In an Instagram post Thursday, Winfrey praised America’s Food Fund, a donation drive started by actor Leonardo DiCaprio, Laurene Powell Jobs, Apple and the Ford Foundation. According to the initiative’s GoFundMe page, it is currently benefiting two food charities: Feeding America and World Central Kitchen, founded by celebrity chef José Andrés.

“I was struck by the work these organizations are doing, and while everyone’s priority right now is to stay safer at home, I know there are many of us looking for ways to help,” Winfrey wrote. “I believe that America’s Food Fund will be a powerful way to make a difference for our neighbors in need and am committing $1 million to this fund to support those facing food insecurity.”

She added that she is “donating $10 million overall to help Americans during this pandemic in cities across the country and in areas where I grew up.”

>> See the post here

View this post on Instagram

@chefjoseandres and Claire Babineaux-Fontenot have teamed up with @leonardodicaprio, Laurene Powell Jobs and @Apple to launch America’s Food Fund to help feed local communities. I was struck by the work these organizations are doing and while everyone’s priority right now is to stay safer at home, I know there are many of us looking for ways to help. I believe that America’s Food Fund will be a powerful way to make a difference for our neighbors in need and am committing $1 million to this fund to support those facing food insecurity. I am donating $10 million overall to help Americans during this pandemic in cities across the country and in areas where I grew up. For more on this Fund and how everyone can be of service, tap the link in my bio to watch this free AppleTV+ conversation.

A post shared by Oprah (@oprah) on

As of Sunday morning, America’s Food Fund’s crowdfunding campaign had raised more than $13 million toward its $15 million goal.

Tokyo to report 143 new cases, breaking city’s single-day record

Update 4:43 a.m. EDT April 5: Tokyo on Sunday will report 143 new coronavirus cases, topping the city’s single-day record, the Japan Times is reporting.

Japan’s capital city has reported more than 1,000 cases of the virus, according to the newspaper.

On Sunday morning, Johns Hopkins University reported 3,139 confirmed coronavirus cases and 77 deaths in Japan.

BBB warns of fake coronavirus stimulus check, other scams

Update 3:40 a.m. EDT April 5: Scammers across the United States continue to trick people in an attempt to steal their money or information, WHBQ-TV is reporting.

The Better Business Bureau said that most of the recent scams reported involves the stimulus checks that the government will be sending out to citizens.

Here are some of the scams reported to the BBB this week:

  • A phone call saying that student loans qualify you for immediate COVID-19 relief. The woman who reported this scam said she doesn’t have any student loans.
  • Two Facebook messages from someone posing as a government official that that says you qualify for an immediate COVID-19 grant. Both targets were offered grants of $50,000 to $300,000 if they paid an upfront fee by gift cards or wire. One victim said the person communicating with her was posing as William Barr, U.S. Attorney General.
  • A Facebook message from a “friend” that asks you to call a specified number and give your Social Security Number so you can find out when you’ll get your government relief check. The woman who reported this scam said several of her church members had told her about it thinking it was real.
  • A text message asking for your Social Security Number to see if you qualified for $50,000 from The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The money was for seniors affected by coronavirus.
  • A text message stating that if you confirmed your bank account information and paid $50, you could get your stimulus check immediately.
  • The FBI has warned of a text message scam that appears to be from Costco offering you $100 to spend there. The FBI says if you click on the link, malware will be downloaded to your device.

The Better Business Bureau said to remember:

  • The government will not ask you to pay anything up front to get the stimulus money. No fees. No charges. No nothing.
  • The government does not need you to provide your personal information in order to receive your payment. They will deposit money into the account you gave on your tax return last year or send you a check. Anyone asking for your Social Security number, bank account, or credit card number is a scammer.
  • The checks are not in the mail … yet. Anyone who tells you they can expedite your check for a fee is a scammer.
  • Never give your bank account information to someone you don’t know. Scammers will call and pressure you to divulge your bank account information so they can steal the money in the account.
  • Look-alikes and sound-alikes aren’t the real thing. Just because the a caller claims to be with the government doesn’t mean he is. Scammers make up official-sounding names to fool you.
  • Phone numbers can deceive. Con artists “spoof” their phone numbers to change what you see in caller ID. They could be calling from anywhere.

If you spot a scam, please report it to the Better Business Bureau at bbb.org/scamtracker.

HIV drug showing signs of successfully treating coronavirus patients

Update 1:44 a.m. EDT April 5: A drug used to treat HIV and cancer patients has shown success in treating some of the most severe coronavirus patients and was just cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to start a phase two clinical trial. Much of the work behind the drug is happening in Washington state.

The drug was developed by a company called CytoDyn in Vancouver, Washington.

It is manufactured by a company in Bothell, Washington, AGC Biologics, which makes a special molecule that is the key ingredient in the drug, KIRO-TV reported.

Scientists at CytoDyn figured out it could work to treat COVID-19, and the first severely sick patients who’ve tried it have shown improvement.

The drug is called leronlimab, comes in a vial and is a two-shot-per-week dose over two weeks.

It is being tried on 10 of the most critically ill COVID-19 patients at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, the University Hospital for Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

The patients are on ventilators, and some are barely conscious.

“The first four patients who were intubated, two were extubated. One of them self-extubated and became alert,” said Nader Pourhassan, the CEO of CytoDyn.

Now the two patients are out of the intensive care unit.

Pourhassan said when he heard the results, he had to stop what he was doing.

“And cried for about five minutes. It was very, very emotional,” Pourhassan said.

He said studies show that in the U.S., 85% of COVID-19 patients who end up needing ventilators will die.

But the patients who’ve gotten shots of this drug have shown strong results.

“All eight patients we’ve analyzed so far – the first eight patients – saw immunological benefits. The FDA immediately allowed us to have a phase two randomized trial. We are initiating that today,” Pourhassan said Friday.

He said the results were even seen in COVID patients who only got the shots three days, though it takes two weeks for the drugs to take full effect.

Read more here.

U.S. cases soar past 312,000, including nearly 8,500 deaths

Update 12:53 a.m. EDT April 5: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States soared past 312,000 across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands early Sunday.

According to researchers at Johns Hopkins University, there are at least 312,146 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 8,496 deaths. Worldwide, there are 1,203,099 confirmed cases and 64,774 deaths from the virus. U.S. cases outnumber those in any other nation, including the 126,168 reported in Spain and the 124,632 confirmed in Italy.

Of the confirmed deaths in the U.S., 3,565 have occurred in New York, 846 in New Jersey, 540 in Michigan and 409 in Louisiana.

In terms of diagnosed cases, New York remains the hardest-hit with at least 114,174 confirmed cases, followed by New Jersey with 34,124, Michigan with 14,225 and California with 13,878.

Five other states have each confirmed at least 10,000 novel coronavirus cases, including:

• Louisiana: 12,496, including 409 deaths

• Massachusetts: 11,736, including 216 deaths

• Florida: 11,545, including 195 deaths

• Pennsylvania: 10,444, including 139 deaths

• Illinois: 10,359, including 244 deaths

Meanwhile, Washington state has confirmed at least 7,500 novel coronavirus infections, while Texas and Georgia have confirmed at least 6,000 cases each.

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Read More

News

  • The family of a man who died of the coronavirus is now suing the cruise line after he became infected with the illness. Ronald Wong and his wife Eva Wong, were on board the Grand Princess on Feb. 21 when it left San Francisco. A month after the trip started, Ronald Wong died of COVID-19, USA Today reported. His family said Carnival Cruise Line, the parent company of Princess Cruise Line which operated the ship, should have known a passenger on the cruise that sailed from Mexico and prior to the Wong’s trip. The 71-year-old passenger, who was not named, was the first coronavirus death in California. The suit said 62 passengers from Mexico, as well as, 1,000 crew members, stayed on the ship on its way to Hawaii. The Grand Princess returned to California on March 9 with passengers taken to military bases in California for a 14-day quarantine, USA Today reported. Originally, the Wongs showed no symptoms of the coronavirus, but Ronald Wong developed a fever and cough and was taken to a hospital. Both he and his wife tested positive. Robert Wong died on March 24. Eva Wong recovered. More than 130 passengers on the trip had tested positive for COVID-19 and five died. The lawsuit states that both Princess and Carnival cruise lines knew passengers and crew members were infected with coronavirus and did nothing to stop the spread, KTVU reported. The suit contends another ship owned by the companies, the Diamond Princess, was quarantined in Japan on Feb. 3 after two passengers died and others tested positive, KTVU reported. The suit is asking for damages for medical costs. There are about a dozen suits filed against the companies by either passengers or the family members, USA Today reported.
  • Protests and demonstrations have led to violence in at least 30 cities across the United States in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Floyd, 46, died after he was detained for questioning regarding a possible forgery in progress. Video of his death caught by bystanders showed a Minneapolis police officer, identified as Derek Chauvin, holding his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than five minutes as Floyd pleaded for air, sparking outrage.  As of Monday, at least 40 cities across 16 states have imposed curfews.  Live updates for Monday, June 1 continue below:  Independent autopsy shows George Floyd died of asphyxia from sustained forceful pressure, family attorney says Update 3:25 p.m. EDT June 1: An independent autopsy has found that George Floyd died last week of asphyxia from sustained forceful pressure, Ben Crump, the attorney representing George Floyd’s family, said Monday in a news release obtained by PBS. “Despite how painful these autopsy findings are, especially for George Floyd’s family, we think it is essential that the truth comes out about the manner and the exact manner and science as to how George Floyd was killed,” Crump said Monday at a news conference. Crump and medical professionals held a news conference Monday to discuss the autopsy results. “What you’re going to hear from these renowned pathologists is essentially: George died because he needed a breath,' Crump said. “He needed a breath of air.” George Floyd’s family to announce results of independent autopsy Update 3:05 p.m. EDT June 1: The family of George Floyd and their attorney, Ben Crump, are holding a news conference Monday to announce the results of an independent autopsy performed on the 46-year-old. Atlanta’s curfew extended for another night Update 2:30 p.m. EDT June 1: Officials in Atlanta announced Monday that a curfew enacted amid protests over the death of George Floyd will continue for another night, WSB-TV reported. Tens of thousands of people nationwide have taken to city streets to protest Floyd’s death, which happened last week after a Minneapolis police officer pinned Floyd’s neck under his knee for nearly nine minutes. Most demonstrations have been peaceful, but some have been marred by skirmishes between police and demonstrators, WSB-TV reported. Monday’s curfew will begin Monday at 9 p.m. and last until sunrise, according to WSB-TV. Florida governor activates National Guard Update 2:20 p.m. EDT June 1: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has activated the Florida National Guard after some protests over the death of George Floyd turned violent over the weekend, WFTV reported. The governor’s office said the specially trained units were put on standby Saturday, according to WFTV. More protests against police brutality are expected in Florida and nationwide in the wake of Floyd’s death last week. >> Read more on WFTV.com George Floyd’s brother urges people to vote during peaceful protest in Minneapolis Update 2:05 p.m. EDT June 1: One of George Floyd’s brothers, Terrence Floyd, urged protesters to remain peaceful Monday and told people that the best thing they can do to make change is to vote “not just in the presidential elections.” “If i’m not over here wilding out. If i’m not over here blowing stuff up. If I’m not here messing up my community, what are you all doing?” he asked as the crowd cheered him on. “You’re doing nothing. Because that’s not going to bring my brother back at all.” He compared the recent nights of looting and rioting to drinking. “It might feel good for a moment, like when you drink but ... you’re going to wonder what you did,” he said. More than 400 arrested in Santa Monica, California protest; most from out of town, police say Update 1:30 p.m. EDT June 1: Police in Santa Monica, California, said authorities arrested more than 400 people in citywide protests overnight in the wake of George Floyd’s death. Police Chief Cynthia Renaud said 95% of those arrested “reside outside the city.' 30 arrested during protests in Orlando, Florida Update 1:15 p.m. EDT June 1: Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer said up to 30 people were arrested amid overnight protests in the city, according to WFTV. Police Chief Orlando Rolon said some of the arrests were connected to eight businesses that people attempted to break into or vandalize in the city, WFTV reported. Rolon said some demonstrators got onto Interstate 4 on Sunday and threw rocks and other objects at police officers, who responded by deploying tear gas. Dyer said he’s ordered the release of body camera footage from the situation in order to be fully transparent. >> Read more on WFTV.com Memorial for George Floyd scheduled for Thursday Update 1:05 p.m. EDT June 1: A funeral memorial will be held Thursday for George Floyd, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said Monday, according to CNN. “It will be an important event both for the city of Minneapolis and Minnesota and for the nation to watch that process of celebrating a life that was taken in front of us,” he said, according to the news network. Floyd died May 25 after then-Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin pinned his neck under his knee for nearly nine minutes. Video of Floyd begging for air as he lay face-down on the ground surfaced after the situation, prompting widespread protests nationwide and calls for police reform. State of emergency declared in Birmingham, Alabama due to civil unrest Update 12:40 p.m. EDT June 1: Mayor Randall Woodfin of Birmingham, Alabama, declared a state of emergency for the city Monday due to civil unrest after protests over the weekend left behind widespread property damage. At a news conference Monday morning, Woodfin said that he “100 percent (supports) civil disobedience but that is very different from civil unrest.” “I support activism and your right to peacefully assemble, but I don’t support mobs and people destroying things just because,” he said. “And so, moving forward, the City of Birmingham as of today (is) declaring a state of emergency due to civil unrest and will be implementing a citywide curfew starting today at 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. everyday going forward.” On Sunday, demonstrators tried to tear down a Confederate monument in Linn Park and several members of the media were attacked, according to AL.com. Windows were smashed at several businesses, the news site reported. Trump to governors: ‘Most of you are weak’ Update 12:10 p.m. EDT June 1: President Donald Trump is telling the nation’s governors that most of them are “weak” and calling for tougher crackdowns on violence as protests rage across the nation. Trump is speaking to governors on a video teleconference with law enforcement and national security officials. He’s telling them they “have to get much tougher” amid nationwide protests and criticizing their responses, saying: “Most of you are weak.” And he’s chastising them for failing to use the National Guard more aggressively, saying they’re making themselves “look like fools.” Attorney General Bill Barr is also on the call and telling governors they have to “dominate” the streets and control, not react to crowds. He’s calling on them to “go after troublemaker” and use “adequate force.” Curfew will be in effect for next two nights in Washington DC Update 12:05 p.m. EDT June 1: Washington D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser on Monday announced that the city will enforce a 7 p.m. curfew for the next two nights amid protests following the death last week of George Floyd. Bowser has enacted a curfew Sunday that didn’t go into effect until 11 p.m. The decision Sunday sparked criticism from White House Press Secretary Kayleigh MeEnany. “I think when you look at some of the befuddling actions, like right here in D.C., the mayor of D.C. didn’t issue a curfew until 11 p.m.,” McEnany said during an appearance on Fox News’ “Fox and Friends,” according to The Hill. “Well, guess what? At 10 p.m. you had St. John’s Church burning. Several other cities had curfews at 4 p.m., at 5 p.m., at 6 p.m.” Florida police officer suspended after video showed him pushing kneeling protester Update 11:50 a.m. EDT June 1: Interim Fort Lauderdale police Chief Rick Maglione said an officer who appeared to shove a protester without provocation Sunday as she was kneeling near him has been suspended from duty as authorities investigate the situation. Maglione said the situation began when an officer asked for help after she became surrounded by protesters. A short while later, some protesters began to attack a police car, smashing windows and jumping on the vehicle as a police officer sat inside. “In the middle of that event ... our officer, as he passed a female that was on the ground already, appears to shove her as he goes by her,” Maglione said. “That officer has been removed from any contact with the public. He is relieved from duty, basically, while this matter is investigated.” Maglione said officials with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement have opened a criminal investigation into the situation. Mayor Dean Trantalis said he thought the situation was “offensive” and “should never have happened.” “I appreciate the fact that the department has relieved him of duty while this investigation happens,” he said at a news conference Monday. “I understand the state attorney has opened a file, an investigation to make sure that we get to the bottom of this and If it’s determined by those agencies that something wrong was done we will follow with swift disciplinary action.” New York City mayor: Police cars driving into crowd of protesters Saturday ‘unacceptable’ Update 11:20 a.m. EDT June 1: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday that two police cars caught on video driving into a crowd during a protest Saturday of police brutality was “dangerous” and “unacceptable,' according to The Guardian. “There is no situation where a police vehicle should drive into a crowd of protesters or New Yorkers of any kind,” the mayor said, according to the newspaper. In a video that went viral Saturday, protesters could be seen carrying a yellow metal barricade to block a police SUV in Brooklyn, The New York Times reported. While some demonstrators began to throw things at the vehicles, both of them sped up into the crowd, according to the Times. The newspaper reported it was not clear whether anyone was injured in the incident. De Blasio said he had directed city officials to investigate the situation, the Times reported. Obama: Protests and political action necessary ‘if we want to bring about real change’ Update 11:10 a.m. EDT June 1: Former President Barack Obama said people need to be active in both protests and the political process if they want to bring about real, lasting change as protests erupted nationwide due to the death last week of George Floyd. “If we want to bring about real change, then the choice isn’t between protest and politics,” Obama said in a post published Friday on Medium. “We have to do both. We have to mobilize to raise awareness, and we have to organize and cast our ballots to make sure that we elect candidates who will act on reform.” Obama noted that while the focus is often on the federal government’s response to events like Floyd’s death, “the elected officials who matter most in reforming police departments and the criminal justice system work at the state and local levels.” “The more specific we can make demands for criminal justice and police reform, the harder it will be for elected officials to just offer lip service to the cause and then fall back into business as usual once protests have gone away,” Obama said. “I recognize that these past few months have been hard and dispiriting — that the fear, sorrow, uncertainty, and hardship of a pandemic have been compounded by tragic reminders that prejudice and inequality still shape so much of American life. But watching the heightened activism of young people in recent weeks, of every race and every station, makes me hopeful. If, going forward, we can channel our justifiable anger into peaceful, sustained, and effective action, then this moment can be a real turning point in our nation’s long journey to live up to our highest ideals.” At least 12 arrested during demonstrations in Portland, Oregon Update 10:20 a.m. EDT June 1: Police in Portland, Oregon, said they arrested at least a dozen people after peaceful protests in the city spurred by the death of George Floyd turned violent. Authorities said they also detained two juveniles during Sunday night’s protests. Police said thousands of demonstrators marched Sunday to the city’s Justice Center. The gathering remained peaceful until around 11:30 p.m., when authorities said some demonstrators began to throw things at officers. When the crowd refused to disperse, police said they deployed “Riot Control Agents to disperse the crowd.” In response, some demonstrators threw what police described as fireworks at officers before the crowd broke into smaller groups, some of which set fires, smashed storefront windows and vandalized buildings and parked vehicles, authorities said. Police Chief Jami Resch said she met Sunday with demonstration leaders. “We agreed that the majority of demonstrators AND the police want a peaceful protest and are frustrated by those who are engaging in violence and destruction because it is not helpful for change efforts,” she said in a statement. “Unfortunately, while we were meeting, some individuals started to engage in violent acts toward Officers, which continued despite warnings to disperse. Officers deployed riot control agents to disperse the crowd for the safety of all.' NBA coaches: ‘We cannot treat this as an isolated incident of outrage’ Update 9:40 a.m. EDT June 1: The National Basketball Coaches Association released a statement Monday sharing condolences and prayers for the family of George Floyd and condemning his death. “The events of the past few weeks -- police brutality, racial profiling and the weaponization of racism are shameful, inhumane and intolerable,” the group said. “Witnessing the murder of George Floyd in cold blood and in broad daylight has traumatized our nation, but the reality is that African Americans are targeted and victimized on a daily basis. As NBA coaches, we cannot treat this as an isolated incident of outrage.” Coaches said in the statement that they will work with local leaders, officials and law enforcement agencies in the cities where they are based “to create positive change in our communities.” “We have the power and platform to affect change, and we will use it,” the statement said. 1 dead after authorities, protesters exchange fire in Kentucky; police investigating Update 9:20 a.m. EDT June 1: Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear said Monday that he’s authorized an investigation into a police-involved shooting that left one person dead during protests over the death of George Floyd. Beshear said the Louisville Metro Police Department and the Kentucky National Guard were dispatched around midnight to 26th Street and Broadway. “While working to disperse a crowd, LMPD and the Kentucky National Guard were fired upon,” the governor said. “LMPD and the Kentucky National Guard returned fire resulting in a death. Given the seriousness of the situation, I have authorized the Kentucky State Police to independently investigate the event.” DC mayor: Some protesters brought tools, supplies with them Update 9 a.m. EDT June 1: Mayor Muriel Bowser of Washington D.C. said Friday that some protesters brought “tools and supplies” with them to demonstrations Sunday over the death of George Floyd. “We know that we have people that came here with tools and supplies and they re-upped their supplies,' Bowser said during an interview Monday with NBC’s “Today” show. 'They went to different parts of the city. So, we think there was a mix of people here but certainly people here who do this type of protest and demonstration.” Ask if the demonstrators were believed to have been “professional protesters,” Bowser told the “Today” show, “We’ve seen some of these tactics before so we know that they were among the groups here.” She described the tactics used as “the types of tools they use, restocking, setting fires here and there to try to draw in the police to various locations.” 2 killed, police officer injured during protests in Iowa Update 8:35 a.m. EDT June 1: Two people died and a police officer is injured Monday following a series of shootings reported during protests overnight in Davenport, Iowa, police said. One person died in a shooting reported at the Walmart on West Kimberly Road and one person died in a separate shooting in the 1100 block of West 15th Street, according to police. Officials said rioters ambushed police officers in a vehicle around 3 a.m., firing several shots, some of which hit a police car while officers were inside. Police Chief Paul Sirkorski said one officer was injured. Police were later able to find the vehicle and arrested several people after it crashed during a pursuit. Sirkorski said the officer was “doing okay” Monday morning. “What we experienced tonight, last night was completely unacceptable and it does not honor the memory of Mr. Floyd,” Sirkorski said at a news conference Monday. Mayor Mike Matson said that in light of the overnight violence, a curfew will be enacted for all of Scott County on Monday. He said he has also requested the help of the Iowa National Guard. Facebook pledges $10 million toward ‘efforts committed to ending racial injustice’  Update 7:51 a.m. EDT June 1: Facebook will donate $10 million to “efforts committed to ending racial injustice,” the social media juggernaut announced early Monday. Several Boston police officers injured, more than 3 dozen protesters arrested Sunday night Update 5:37 a.m. EDT June 1: The Boston Police Department has confirmed multiple officers were injured during Sunday night’s protests, and 40 demonstrators were arrested. According to the department, at least seven officers were transported to local hospitals for treatment of injuries, numerous others were treated at the scene of the violent clashes and at least 21 police cruisers were damaged during the protest.  Citing ‘violence and thefts,’ Washington county declares state of emergency Update 5:14 a.m. EDT June 1: Washington’s King County, which includes the city of Seattle, declared a state of emergency early Monday due to “violence and thefts associated with some of the local protests.” “King County values and respects the peaceful expression of political views, and supports all people in exercising their First Amendment rights,” the county government said in a news release. Derek Chauvin’s 1st court appearance postponed 1 week Update 4:55 a.m. EDT June 1: The first court appearance for the former Minnesota officer charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd has been postponed until June 8. Chauvin, the officer seen in a video kneeling on Floyd’s neck, originally had a hearing set for 1 p.m. Monday. Court records cite no specific reason for the delay. Chauvin was moved to the Hennepin County Jail from the Ramsey County Jail Sunday. Birmingham protesters tear down Confederate monument, set fire to Thomas Jefferson statue Update 4:32 a.m. EDT June 1: Protesters in Birmingham, Alabama, were captured on video Sunday night looping a rope around the neck of a monument to a Confederate naval captain before dragging it to the ground. The statue, depicting Charles Linn, could be seen in the aftermath lying face down with “BLM” painted in large red letters along the back of his leg, The Washington Post reported. In addition to smashing the namesake of Birmingham’s Linn Park, protesters also set a statue of Thomas Jefferson ablaze. Police fatally shoot man at Louisville protest they say opened fire first Update 4:12 a.m. EDT June 1: A man has been shot and killed during protests in Louisville, Kentucky. According to the Louisville Metro Police Department, shots were fired at them first. The shooting occurred around 12:15 a.m., and the victim has not been identified. Washington activates statewide National Guard Update 3:38 a.m. EDT June 1: Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has called up the National Guard for statewide deployment. “We must not let these illegal and dangerous actions detract from the anger so many feel at the deep injustice laid so ugly and bare by the death of George Floyd,” Inslee said in a statement. He also noted that members of the Guard engaged in crowd control must remain unarmed to ensure public safety. “But we also will not turn away from our responsibility to protect the residents of our state,” Inslee said in the statement. Florida police officer suspended after shoving kneeling protester Update 3:14 a.m. EDT June 1: A police officer has been suspended after video showed him shoving a kneeling woman during a Sunday afternoon protest in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. According to The Washington Post, the video shows police walking through throngs of protesters as several people dropped to their knees and held their hands overhead. As one officer passed a black woman kneeling at his feet, he reached down and shoved the back of her head, sending her falling forward into the pavement. Nearby protesters erupted in shouts and several people threw water bottles at the police. The officer retreated, followed by other officers who appeared to be yelling at him over his actions, the Post reported. George Floyd's son says heart ‘really touched’ by mass protests Update 2:59 a.m. EDT June 1: Quincy Mason Floyd had not seen his father, George, since he was a young child. On Sunday night, the younger Floyd attended a Bryan, Texas, protest and spoke with CNN affiliate KBTX. 'Everyone is coming out and showing him love. My heart is really touched by all this,” Quincy Mason Floyd told the local station. DC’s historic St. John’s church set ablaze during Sunday protests Update 2:51 a.m. EDT June 1: A fire was set in the basement of historic St. John’s Episcopal Church, across Lafayette Square from the White House, during Sunday night demonstrations calling for justice in the death of George Floyd. Tanker truck driver who plowed into crowd of Minnesota protesters charged with assault Update 2:32 a.m. EDT June 1: Bogdan Vechirko, the man who drove a tanker truck into a crowd of protesters on a Minnesota interstate Sunday, has been charged with assault, according to Hennepin County Jail records. The Minnesota Department of Public Safety described Vechirko’s actions as “inciting a crowd of peaceful demonstrators.”  He is being held without bail. The Massachusetts National Guard arrives in Boston Update 2:02 a.m. EDT June 1: The Massachusetts National Guard has arrived in Boston to disperse the remaining protesters, Massachusetts State Police spokesman David Procopio told CNN. Police have already made two arrests after two protesters jumped a fence and tried to get onto State House property, the network reported. Austin police fire on protesters after a day of peaceful demonstrations Update 1:42 a.m. EDT June 1: Police in Austin, Texas, opened fire on protesters early Sunday with what demonstrators described as rubber bullets, The Washington Post reported. The clash followed a day of peaceful protests in the Texas capital with witnesses stating the shots were fired by a group of officers on a nearby overpass at protesters who had been descending on police headquarters. .At least three people were struck by the projectiles, including a young woman who was hit in the back of the head, the Post reported. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Pat Dye, who led Auburn’s football team to four Southeastern Conference championships during his 12-year coaching career at the university, died Monday. He was 80. Dye had tested positive for the coronavirus while he was hospitalized in Atlanta with kidney issues, his son told ESPN last month. Dye’s death was first reported by 247Sports. Dye led the Tigers to a 99-39-4 record from 1981 to 1992, winning at least a share of SEC championships in 1983, 1987, 1988 and 1989. His Auburn teams won at least 10 games in a season four times and won six bowl games. Dye was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2005. He also was the university’s athletic director from 1981 to 1991. Former Auburn Athletic Director David Housel said in a statement that Auburn “will be forever better because of (Dye).” “People will talk about all the games he won, the championships and bowl games, but his greatest contribution, his legacy, is the difference he made in the lives of the people who played for him and worked with him,” Housel said in a statement. 'I am one of them. He made a difference in my life. “He came to Auburn at a time when Auburn needed leadership and focus. He provided that leadership and focus.” Dye’s first SEC title was won with the help of running back Bo Jackson and was the program’s first football conference title in 26 years, the Opelika-Auburn News reported. In 1982, Jackson’s goal-line leap allowed Auburn to defeat Alabama and snap a nine-game losing streak to the Tigers’ in-state rivals. Dye was instrumental in moving the Iron Bowl from Legion Field to Jordan-Hare Stadium in 1989 after the game had been played annually in Birmingham since 1948, AL.com reported. “When I saw Coach (Bear) Bryant when I first got to Auburn, the first thing he said to me, very first thing, he said, ‘Well, I guess you’re going to want to take that game to Auburn,’” Dye told AL.com in 2019. “I said, ‘We’re going to take it to Auburn.’ “He said, ‘Well, we’ve got a contract through (19)88. … I said, ‘Well, we’ll play ’89 in Auburn.’” Dye was a three-time SEC coach of the year and 1983 national coach of the year. Dye was an All-American high school football player at Richmond Academy in Augusta, Georgia, and led his team to the Class 3A state championship in 1956, WRBL reported.
  • A convicted felon is now facing murder charges after police accused him of fatally shooting a man at a LaGrange home.  Charlestavious Dyer, 31, was arrested Friday in the death of 56-year-old Willie Render Jr., LaGrange police said in a statement.  Police found Render with a gunshot wound to the chest at a home on Brown Street just before 10:30 p.m., officials said. Emergency responders took him to Wellstar West Georgia, and he was later pronounced dead.  A witness at the scene gave police a description of the suspects in the shooting and said they had left in a car, according to authorities. Officers later found the car with the suspects inside, police said.  Investigators identified Dyer as the shooter in the case. Police said the incident began with an argument over drugs and turned violent.  Dyer had previously been arrested 18 times in Fulton County, according to jail records. LaGrange police said he was on probation at the time of the fatal shooting.  Dyer was taken to the Troup County Jail, where he remains. In addition to murder, he is charged with possession of a weapon during certain crimes and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon.  Details about his previous conviction and the other suspects found in the car with Dyer were not immediately available. We’re working to learn more. You may find this story and more at AJC.com. In other news: 
  • One of the Atlanta Police Department officers fired Sunday for forcibly arresting two college students had previous complaints of excessive force that were upheld after an internal review, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has learned. Mark Gardner, who joined APD in 1997, was the subject of four citizen complaints from Richard Williams. Two of the complaints against Gardner were for 'maltreatment or unnecessary force' and two were for violation of the department's policy on personal weapons.  The charges were sustained in 2016, according to APD data previously provided to the AJC. The officer received written reprimands for two of the complaints; no action was taken on the other two allegations. Gardner and Ivory Streeter, the other officer fired Sunday, were investigators with the department’s fugitive squad, APD spokesman Carlos Campos said.  Streeter, with APD since 2003, had just completed a class on “de-escalation” tactics, according to records kept by the state Peace Officer Standards and Training Council.  He also completed a 6-hour course on use of force on May 7. Gardner took a 2-hour de-escalation class and a 3-hour class on use of force in late March 28, POST records show.  >>Click HERE for updates from The Atlanta Journal Constitution. 
  • June 1 marks the official start of the hurricane season. At the same time, a storm, which may develop into the third named storm of the year, is starting to churn. If the weather pattern continues, the storm would be named Cristobal. The National Weather Service is watching an area over southern Mexico. Experts say it has an 80% chance of developing, CNN reported. It had been named Tropical Storm Amanda when it developed in the Pacific but had dissipated. It is now in the Atlantic Ocean basin, hence the potential name of Cristobal, CNN reported. There have already been two named storms that developed in May before the official start of the season, WTVJ reported. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said 2020 will be an above-normal year with between 13 and 19 named storms, six to 10 will be hurricanes and three to six will be major hurricanes with at least 111 mph winds. Hurricane season runs until Nov. 30.