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Coronavirus live updates: 11 veterans die after coronavirus outbreak at state-run veterans care facility in Massachusetts
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Coronavirus live updates: 11 veterans die after coronavirus outbreak at state-run veterans care facility in Massachusetts

‘I Love Rock ‘n’ Roll’ songwriter Alan Merrill dies of complications from coronavirus

Coronavirus live updates: 11 veterans die after coronavirus outbreak at state-run veterans care facility in Massachusetts

At least 722,000 people worldwide – including more than 142,000 people in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. Officials are attempting to contain the COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S. as hospitals brace for unprecedented patient surges.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here.

Live updates for Monday, March 30, continue below:

11 veterans die after coronavirus outbreak at state-run veterans care facility in Massachusetts

Update 10:40 p.m. EDT March 30: Eleven veterans are dead after a coronavirus outbreak at the Holyoke Soldiers Home, a state-run veterans care facility in Massachusetts.

Five of the victims had COVID-19 and health experts are still waiting for test results on the others.

Eleven additional veterans have tested positive for coronavirus.

Five staff members have also tested positive, and another 25 are awaiting results.

The National Guard has been requested to support on-site testing for the residents and expedite the results.

The Soldiers Home superintendent has been placed on administrative leave.

Utah medical group retracts on malaria drugs for coronavirus

Update 10:40 p.m. EDT March 30: A Utah medical association has rescinded a recommendation it made last week on behalf of state health officials for doctors to treat coronavirus patients using malaria drugs that medical professionals across the country have cautioned against using until more testing is done.

The about-face by the Utah Medical Association came after a group of infectious disease doctors pushed back over the weekend against the Friday guidance.

The association said in the first email sent Friday that chloroquine and a similar drug, hydroxychloroquine, had shown “promising data for affecting the course of COVID-19” and that their recommended use was being made at the suggestion of the Utah Department of Health. The association also recommended combining them with zinc.

The association reversed positions in a follow-up email Sunday in which it said the Utah Department of Health had withdrawn the previous guidance after “much collaborative discussion” and based on “a lack of convincing evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of off-label use of hydroxycholorquine.”

Michelle McOmber, CEO of the Utah Medical Association, declined to answer any questions about what led to the change and instead sent only a statement Monday.

“Things are rapidly changing on an hourly, daily and weekly basis. We are doing all that we can to help share the latest information and recommendations to help providers do their jobs and take care of patients,” McOmber said. “We are working to get information out as quickly as possible to help in this crisis and will continue to update and give information that we receive as soon as practicable to help providers on the front lines.”

Pentagon confirms first US service member death

Update 8:50 p.m. EDT March 30: A New Jersey Army National Guardsman that tested positive for COVID-19 passed away Saturday, according to the Pentagon. Army Capt. Douglas Linn Hickok, a physician assistant, had been hospitalized since March 21.

“This is a stinging loss for our military community,” Esper says in a release, “and our condolences go out to his family, friends, civilian co-workers and the entire National Guard community. The news of this loss strengthens our resolve to work ever more closely with our interagency partners to stop the spread of COVID-19.”

US death toll surpasses 3,000

Update 7:50 p.m. EDT March 30:  The death toll due to COVID-19 has risen to over 3,000 Monday evening according to John Hopkins University.

Arizona governor issues stay-at-home order

Update 7:30 p.m. EDT March 30: Arizona Doug Ducey on Monday imposed a stay-at-home order to slow the spread of the new coronavirus that will take effect at the close of business on Tuesday.

But he said grocery stores, pharmacies and other essential services will remain open, restaurants will continue takeout service and the order doesn’t prevent people from going to work, medical appointments or seeking other essential services. He also discouraged hoarding.

Judges slow abortion bans in Texas, Ohio

Update 7 p.m. EDT March 30: A federal judge Monday temporarily blocked Texas’ efforts to ban abortions during the coronavirus pandemic, handing Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers a victory as clinics across the U.S. filed a wave of lawsuits to stop states from trying to shutter them during the outbreak.

A new Ohio order is also unconstitutional if it prevents abortions from being carried out, a separate judge ruled Monday. The ruling instructed clinics to determine on a case-by-case basis if an abortion can be delayed to maximize resources — such as preserving personal protective equipment — needed to fight the coronavirus. If the abortion is deemed necessary and can’t be delayed, it’s declared legally essential.

Taken together, the rulings were signs of judges pushing back on Republican-controlled states including abortion in sweeping orders as the outbreak grows in the U.S. In Texas, the ruling came down after state Attorney General Ken Paxton, a Republican, said abortion was included in a statewide ban on nonessential surgeries.

But U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel said the “Supreme Court has spoken clearly” on a woman’s right to abortion. One abortion provider in Texas, Whole Woman’s Health, said it had canceled more than 150 appointments in the days after the Texas order went into effect.

Trump defends extending virus guidelines

Update 6 p.m. EDT March 30: Siding with public health experts’ dire projections, President Donald Trump on Monday defended his decision to extend restrictive social distancing guidelines through the end of April, while bracing the nation for a coronavirus death toll that could exceed 100,000 people.

“Challenging times are ahead for the next 30 days,” Trump said during a Rose Garden press conference. He called refraining from public outings “our shared patriotic duty” during the outbreak.

The comments came a day after Trump made a dramatic course reversal and announced that he would not be moving to ease the guidelines and get the economy back up and running by Easter, as he said last week he hoped to do.

New York virus death toll rises above 1,200

Update 5 p.m. EDT March 30: As the Navy hospital ship docked in New York City on Monday as the number of coronavirus-related deaths in the state soared to a “beyond staggering” 1,218.

The 1,000-bed USNS Comfort will be used as a “relief valve,” treating non-coronavirus patients while the city’s increasingly stressed hospitals handle people with COVID-19, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.

New York is bracing for an escalation in hospitalizations and deaths in April as the outbreak’s projected “apex” closes in. Cuomo noted the statewide death toll has already shot up by 253 in a single day to just over 1,200.

UN official concerned about COVID-19 in Syria

Update 4:35 p.m. EDT March 30: The U.N. humanitarian chief is warning that the 10 cases of COVID-19 and one death confirmed in Syria are just “the tip of the iceberg” and judging from other countries “a devastating impact” can be expected on vulnerable communities.

Mark Lowcock told the U.N. Security Council that “all efforts to prevent, detect and respond to COVID-19 are impeded by Syria’s fragile health system,” noting only around half of the country’s hospitals and primary health care facilities were fully functional at the end of 2019.

He said efforts to prevent and combat the virus are also are impeded by high levels of population movement, challenges to obtaining critical supplies including protective equipment and ventilators, and difficulties of isolating in crowded camps for the displaced with “low levels of sanitation services.”

Pentagon orders additional 8,000 ventilators

Update 4:15 p.m. EDT March 30: The Pentagon has ordered an additional 8,000 ventilators, with delivery of the first 1,400 by early May. The $84.4 million order was placed with several suppliers under existing Defense Logistics Agency contracts.

A Pentagon spokesman, Air Force Lt. Col. Michael Andrews, identified the four suppliers as Zoll, Combat Medical, Hamilton Medical, and VyAire. Andrews said delivery locations will be prioritized by FEMA and the Department of Health and Human Services. These are in addition to the 2,000 ventilators that the Pentagon previously said it would make available to FEMA from Defense Department stockpiles.

Cardinal close to Pope tests positive for virus

Update 3:55 p.m. EDT March 30: Pope Francis’ vicar for Rome has tested positive for the coronavirus in the first case of a cardinal close to the pope known to be infected.

Cardinal Angelo De Donatis had been in touch with Francis in recent weeks over the cardinal’s initial decision to close all Rome churches in line with an Italian government shutdown decree. De Donatis reversed himself after Francis intervened and allowed diocesan churches to remain open for individuals to pray.

The pope is technically bishop of Rome, but he delegates the day-to-day running of the diocese to his vicar, De Donatis, 66. The Rome church said De Donatis was in good condition at Rome's Gemelli hospital and was receiving antiviral treatment.

The Holy See has said six people have tested positive for the virus in the Vatican, none of them the pope or his closest advisers.

San Francisco to order residents indoors until May

Update 3:50 p.m. EDT March 30: Mayor London Breed of San Francisco said Monday that an order barring residents from leaving their homes for less-than-essential reasons will be extended until at least May 1.

The order, which went into effect March 17, had originally been scheduled to end on April 7.

“We’re working to slow the spread of coronavirus in San Francisco, but we know that the challenges we face are going to get tougher," Breed said Monday in a statement posted on Twitter.

Kohl’s extends store closures, furloughs employees

Update 3:40 p.m. EDT March 30: Officials with the department store chain Kohl’s on Monday announced an indefinite extension of the company’s store closures due to the continued threat posed by the 2019 novel coronavirus.

Company officials also announced a temporary furlough of store associates, store distribution center associates and some corporate office associates “whose work has been significantly reduced by the store closures.” Kohl’s will continue to provide health benefits to affected employees.

“It is an incredibly difficult decision to extend our store closures and temporarily furlough some of our associates,” Kohl’s chief executive officer, Michelle Gass, said Monday in a statement. “We look forward to the day that we can reopen our stores to welcome our associates back and serve the millions of families across the country that shop Kohl’s.”

Italy to remain under lockdown until at least mid-April

Update 3:15 p.m. EDT March 30: Italian Health Minister Roberto Speranza said Italy will follow the recommendation of scientists and extend a nationwide lockdown at least until April 12.

The lockdown decree currently runs until April 3, and doctors and other health experts have been cautioning that Italy’s cases of COVID-19 haven’t reached their peak yet, despite some encouraging numbers.

Speranza says the national scientific technical committee recommended “extending the containment measures at least until Easter,” April 12. He added: “The government will move in this direction.”

Italy has more than 100,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus infections and nearly 11,600 deaths of infected persons.

First coronavirus cases reported in Botswana

Update 3 p.m. EDT March 30: Lemogang Kwape, the health minister for Botswana, said on state television Monday that health officials have recorded the country’s first three COVID-19 cases, according to Reuters.

Kwape said the patients were in quarantine Monday. They had recently traveled to Britain and Thailand, Reuters reported.

3,347 new COVID-19 cases reported in New Jersey

Update 2:35 p.m. EDT March 30: Health officials in New Jersey said the number of novel coronavirus cases detected in the state rose Monday by 3,347.

The numbers announced Monday by Gov. Phil Murphy bring the total number of COVID-19 cases in New Jersey to 16,636, the second-highest number in the United States. The only state with more cases of COVID-19 is New York, where 66,497 people have tested positive for the viral infection.

In addition, Murphy said 37 people have died in New Jersey of COVID-19, bringing the state’s coronavirus death toll to 198. Among the victims was New Jersey National Guard Capt. Douglass Linn Hickok, a drilling guardsman and physician’s assistant.

Pennsylvania governor orders schools closed indefinitely

Update 2:30 p.m. EDT March 30: Gov. Tom Wolf of Pennsylvania announced schools across the state would be closed indefinitely amid the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, WPXI reported.

The governor also expanded his previously issued stay at home order to include more counties. The order, which bars people from leaving their homes except for essential activities, will be in effect until April 30, according to WPXI.

Virginia governor issues ‘stay at home’ order

Update 2:25 p.m. EDT March 30: Gov. Ralph Northam of Virginia issued an order Monday instructing residents to stay home as officials work to curb the spread of the 2019 novel coronavirus, WTVR-TV reported.

Like similar orders issued in recent days across the country, the order will allow for people to leave their homes only for essential activities, such as grocery shopping.

“Please stay home as much as possible,” Northam said Monday, according to WTVR-TV. “This is a community-wide effort and I thank you for complying. This is a time of sacrifice. We need everyone to take this seriously and act responsibly.”

US State Department continuing with repatriation

Update 2:20 p.m. EDT March 30: State Department officials said they have successfully arranged the repatriation of some 25,000 American citizens stranded abroad in more than 50 countries due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Department officials said they are continuing to ramp up evacuation efforts and that more than 100 flights for U.S. citizens have been scheduled for the coming weeks. About 9,000 Americans have registered for those upcoming flights and there is still space available on many.

Many of those stranded are in Latin American countries, notably Peru, where some Americans have been quarantined by authorities.

Meanwhile, department health officials said there are 75 confirmed coronavirus cases among employees at the 220 U.S. embassies. Inside the United States, the officials said there are 30 confirmed cases of the virus at State Department offices in nine cities.

Rhode Island schools to be closed through April

Update 1:45 p.m. EDT March 30: Gov. Gina Raimondo of Rhode Island on Monday announced the state’s public schools will remain closed through the end of April in response to the 2019 novel coronavirus, WPRI-TV reported.

The governor also announced the state’s fourth death connected to COVID-19. She said 114 new coronavirus cases were identified, bringing the state’s total to 408, according to WPRI-TV.

“We believe we’re in a fast spread of the virus at this point in Rhode Island,” Raimondo said Monday, according to the news network.

‘What is happening in New York is not an anomaly,’ governor says

Update 1:35 p.m. EDT March 30: Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York cautioned Americans on Monday against believing the disproportionate amount of COVID-19 cases reported in the state will be confined to the area.

“No American is immune,” Cuomo said Monday at a news conference. “What is happening in New York is not an anomaly.”

As of Monday afternoon, 66,497 people have tested positive for COVID-19 in the state, by far the highest number of recorded cases in the U.S. The second highest number of cases have been reported in New Jersey, where 13,386 people had tested positive for the viral infection as of Monday.

Cuomo said the numbers released Monday include 9,517 people who are currently hospitalized because of COVID-19 in New York state. Cuomo said 2,352 patients were in intensive care units.

Officials have discharged 4,204 patients who have recovered from the novel coronavirus, according to authorities.

34 new COVID-19 deaths reported in Louisiana

Update 1:25 p.m. EDT March 30: Health officials in Louisiana reported 34 new deaths connected to the 2019 novel coronavirus, bringing the state’s COVID-19 death toll to 185.

Officials said 4,025 cases of COVID-19 have been reported in the state as of noon local time Monday.

Minor dies of COVID-19 in New York City

Update 12:55 p.m. EDT March 30: Officials with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on Monday announced the death of a minor due to the 2019 novel coronavirus.

Officials did not provide the minor’s exact age, although they said in a data report that he or she had underlying medical conditions. The minor is the first believed to have died in New York City of the coronavirus.

Globally, few minors have died due to COVID-19, which health officials say tends to disproportionately affect older generations. On Saturday, officials in Illinois said an infant died of COVID-19. Earlier in the month, the New England Journal of Medicine reported a 10-month-old infant died in China from the viral infection.

4 more deaths, 126 more COVID-19 cases reported in Georgia

Update 12:50 p.m. EDT March 30: Officials in Georgia said that as of noon Monday, 2,809 cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed in the state, up 126 from the number of cases reported Sunday night, WSB-TV reported.

Officials said four more deaths have also been reported, bringing Georgia’s total death toll connected to the novel coronavirus to 87, according to WSB-TV.

The youngest person to die of the illness in Georgia was 29 years old. Dougherty County has reported the most deaths at 17 victims. The median age of people who have died from the virus is 68.

More than 100,000 COVID-19 cases reported in Italy

Update 12:30 p.m. EDT March 30: Reports of the 2019 novel coronavirus have topped 100,000 in Italy, making the nation the second to have case numbers in the six-digit range.

Officials with the Italian Ministry of Health said Monday that 101,739 coronavirus cases have been reported in the country. Authorities said 11,597 people have died in the country of the viral infection while 14,620 people have recovered.

The numbers put Italy second only to the United States in terms of confirmed COVID-19 cases. In the U.S., more than 144,000 novel coronavirus cases have been confirmed as of Monday afternoon, according to figures compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

693 new coronavirus cases reported in Pennsylvania

Update 12:20 p.m. EDT March 30: Health officials in Pennsylvania announced 693 new novel coronavirus cases in the state Monday, according to WPXI-TV.

The new cases bring the total number of viral infections to 4,087 in the state, WPXI-TV reported. In addition to the new cases, 11 more deaths have been reported. The statewide death total is now at 49.

USNS Comfort arrives in New York

Update 12 p.m. EDT March 30: A Navy hospital ship has arrived in New York City to help relieve the coronavirus crisis gripping New York City’s hospitals.

The USNS Comfort has 1,000 beds and 12 operating rooms that could be up and running within 24 hours. It's expected to bolster a besieged health care system by treating non-coronavirus patients while hospitals treat people with COVID-19.

New York City, the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, reported Sunday that its toll had risen to 776.

Macy’s to furlough most employees due to COVID-19 pandemic

Update 11:55 a.m. EDT March 30: Officials with Macy’s Inc. announced Monday that the company will furlough most of its 125,000 employees as the country reels from the economic impact of the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak.

The company previously announced a closure of all of its stores, including Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s, beginning March 17. Company officials said they would focus on supporting the company’s online retail.

“While the digital business remains open, we have lost the majority of our sales due to the store closures,” officials said Monday in a news release. “Across Macy’s, Bloomingdales, and Bluemercury brands, we will be moving to the absolute minimum workforce needed to maintain basic operations. This means the majority of our colleagues will go on furlough beginning this week.”

Macy’s Inc. will continue to provide health care coverage for furloughed employees through at least May.

“We expect to bring colleagues back on a staggered bases as business resumes,” company officials said.

Mnuchin says small businesses could get directions for coronavirus relief Monday

Update 11:35 a.m. EDT March 30: Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told Fox Business News that owners of small businesses could see instructions for filing for federal aid beginning as soon as Monday.

“These loans will be available starting on Friday,” Mnuchin said in an interview Monday with Fox Business News. “We hope later today we’ll be releasing the documents and instructions."

Krispy Kreme giving free doughnuts to health care workers

Update 11:15 a.m. EDT March 30: Company officials have announced that beginning Monday, Krispy Kreme will give away a dozen of its Original Glazed doughnuts for health care workers through May 11.

“Just go to a Krispy Kreme drive-thru, tell us what you need and show us your employer badge,” Krispy Kreme officials said in a news release. “That’s it. Pick up some free dozens on the way to work for you and your colleagues, or maybe a free dozen on your way home to family after a long shift.”

Maryland governor issues ‘stay at home’ order for state

Update 11:10 am. EDT March 30: Gov. Larry Hogan of Maryland announced Monday that he signed a “stay at home” order for the state amid the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak.

The governor announced the order, which bars residents from leaving their homes for less-than-essential reasons, as health personnel in the state deal with 1,413 confirmed cases of the 2019 novel coronavirus. Hogan said the cases include a month-old infant who has been diagnosed with the viral infection.

“No Maryland resident should be leaving their home unless it’s for an essential job or an essential reason, such as obtaining food or medicine, seeking urgent medical attention or other essential purposes,” Hogan said.

Fifteen people have died of COVID-19 in Maryland, according to officials.

Governor announces ‘safer at home’ order for southeast Florida

Update 11 a.m. EDT March 30: Gov. Ron DeSantis of Florida announced Monday that he plans to sign a “safer at home” order for four counties in the southeast of the state which account for 60 percent of the state’s COVID-19 cases, according to WPLG.

The order will ensure the area, including Palm Beach and Monroe counties, is 'operating under the same sheet of music," DeSantis said, WPLG reported.

DeSantis also announced Monday that he plans to sign an order allowing for retired law enforcement and medical professionals to return to join the fight against the novel coronavirus, WJAX-TV reported.

Trump presses need for extra month of social distancing

Update 10:40 a.m. EDT March 30: A day after changing course and moving to extend social distancing guidelines through the end of April to fight the coronavirus, President Donald Trump told Fox News that Americans must do their part to help hold down the number of deaths from the virus outbreak.

“It’s hard work to stay in place, to distance yourself,” the president said in a Monday morning phone call to “Fox and Friends.”

“And hopefully, we will keep the deaths down to a minimum,” Trump said. On Sunday, the president told Americans that if his administration can keep deaths from the virus to 100,000, that would be a “good job.”

USNS Mercy begins accepting patients in Los Angeles

Update 10:25 a.m. EDT March 30: A floating U.S. Navy hospital began accepting its first patients Sunday after docking in Los Angeles to help relieve the strain on hospitals on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic.

"The men and women embarked on board Mercy are energized, eager, and ready to provide relief to those in need,” Capt. John Rotruck, Mercy’s Military Treatment Facility commanding officer, said Sunday in a news release.

The ship is one of two U.S. Navy hospital ships deployed to support hospitals grappling with the COVID-19 outbreak. Personnel on the ship and on the USNS Comfort, which docked Monday morning in New York City, will treat non-coronavirus patients to ease the strain on local hospitals.

Vincent van Gogh painting stolen from museum closed due to COVID-19 outbreak

Update 10:15 a.m. EDT March 30: Officials with the Singer Laren museum in Amsterdam said Monday that a painting by Dutch master Vincent Van Gogh had been stolen in an overnight raid. The museum had been closed to help stymie the spread of the 2019 novel coronavirus, according to The Associated Press.

The AP reported Van Gogh’s “Spring Garden” was taken early Monday.

Spain surpasses China with more than 85,000 coronavirus cases

Update 10:10 a.m. EDT March 30: Numbers released Monday by Spanish health officials show the country has overtaken China in the number of reported COVID-19 cases.

According to authorities, 85,195 novel coronavirus cases have been reported in Spain, making it the country with the second-most cases in the world. Chinese health officials have reported 82,356 cases, according to the World Health Organization. In the country with the most number of COVID-19 cases, the United States, 143,055 coronavirus cases have been reported, according to figures compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

In Spain, 7,340 people have died of COVID-19. The number makes Spain the country with the second-highest number of reported deaths behind Italy, which has reported more than 10,000 fatal infections.

Prince Charles ends isolation period for virus

Update 9:50 a.m. EDT March 30: Prince Charles has ended his period of isolation after testing positive for the coronavirus.

The prince’s Clarence House office says Charles is in good health after completing the seven-day quarantine recommended by U.K. health authorities for people with COVID-19 symptoms.

Royal officials said last week the 71-year-old heir to the British throne was showing mild symptoms of COVID-19 and self-isolating at the royal family’s Balmoral estate in Scotland. His wife, Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, tested negative but will be in self-isolation until the end of the week.

Charles’ mother Queen Elizabeth II, 93, is at her Windsor Castle home west of London with her 98-year-old husband, Prince Philip.

Saudi Arabian health officials report 154 new COVID-19 cases

Update 9:45 a.m. EDT March 30: Officials in Saudi Arabia announced 154 new coronavirus cases Monday, bringing the total number of cases in the country to 1,453.

According to the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Health, health personnel have linked 16 of the new cases to travel. Officials said 138 cases stemmed from direct contact with a person previously diagnosed with COVID-19.

Eight people have died of the 2019 novel coronavirus in Saudi Arabia.

93 new coronavirus deaths reported in the Netherlands

Update 9:35 a.m. EDT March 30: Health officials in the Netherlands recorded 93 new deaths related to the 2019 novel coronavirus on Monday, raising the country’s COVID-19 death toll to 864.

Officials with the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment also reported 884 new COVID-19 cases. Health authorities have reported 11,750 coronavirus cases in the country so far. Of those cases, 3,990 have prompted hospital admissions.

USNS Comfort to arrive in New York on Monday

Update 9:30 a.m. EDT March 30: The USNS Comfort, a U.S. Navy floating hospital, is set to arrive in New York on Monday to help relieve the pressure on hospitals dealing with the COVID-19 outbreak.

The ship was scheduled to dock around 10 a.m., according to WNBC. Officials said they expected to begin taking patients 24 hours after the ship’s arrival.

Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York City said Sunday that the ship “will right away be making a difference.”

“We are so, so grateful to the Navy, to the military that this new help will be arriving in our city,” he said.

The ship, staffed with more than 1,100 Navy medical personnel and support staff along with over 70 civil service mariners, will be open to patients who are not infected with COVID-19.

Field hospital being built in New York’s Central Park

Update 8:55 a.m. EDT March 30: Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York announced Sunday that officials are building a field hospital in New York City’s Central Park to help respond to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

“We’re adding hospital beds,” de Blasio said Sunday. “You’ll see an unusual sight in Central Park. We’re working with Mount Sinai (Health System) to open a field hospital in Central Park’s East Meadow.”

Officials said the 68-bed hospital will begin to accept patients from Mount Sinai Hospital on Tuesday.

Trump weighs in on coronavirus response in new interview

Update 8:38 a.m. EDT March 30: President Donald Trump weighed in on the coronavirus pandemic in a Monday morning interview with “Fox and Friends.”

When asked whether the country has enough equipment to deal with the crisis, he pointed to efforts to build a 2,900-bed mobile hospital and medical centers in New York City, and said “massive planeloads” of deliveries and thousands of ventilators were on the way.

"We're delivering so much equipment, nobody's ever really seen anything like it," he said, touting his relationship with governors of states that have been hit hard by the virus.

Trump said he expected the pandemic to peak in the U.S. “around Easter,” and by June 1, “the deaths will be at a very low number.”

He said that he reassessed his initial "15 days to slow the spread" plan after listening to advice from National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci and coronavirus response coordinator Dr. Deborah L. Birx.

“We picked the end of April as the day where we can see some real progress,” he said of the new timeline to continue social distancing through April 30.

He added that if the government hadn't "shut [the economy] down," up to 2.2 million people here could have died from the virus.

Trump also said new, rapid coronavirus tests could be available as soon as this week.

Additionally, he slammed House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's criticism of his response to the outbreak, calling her "a sick puppy."

“I think it’s a disgrace to her country, her family,” he said.

Israeli prime minister self-isolating after possible coronavirus exposure

Update 8:30 a.m. EDT March 30: Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel was self-isolating Monday after one of his aides tested positive for the novel coronavirus, according to multiple reports.

Officials told Reuters that Netanyahu was scheduled to take a coronavirus test Tuesday. He previously tested negative for COVID-19 on March 15, according to Reuters.

Officials said in a statement obtained by CNN that Netanyahu’s doctor would determine when to end the self-isolation.

Tokyo Olympics rescheduled for 2021

Update 8:15 a.m. EDT March 30: Organizers announced Monday that the Tokyo Olympics, which had been set to take place over the summer, have been rescheduled for 2021.

Tokyo organizers said Monday the opening ceremony will take place on July 23, 2021 — almost exactly one year after the games were due to start this year.

“The schedule for the games is key to preparing for the games," Tokyo organizing committee president Yoshiro Mori said. “This will only accelerate our progress.”

Adviser to British PM Boris Johnson experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, self-isolating

Update 7:26 a.m. EDT March 30: Just days after British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced he tested positive for coronavirus, one of his chief advisers is experiencing symptoms and has decided to self-isolate.

According to The Associated Press, Dominic Cummings said he started feeling sick over the weekend and has been staying at home.

Meanwhile, Johnson took to Twitter on Monday morning to say he’s “been working from home and continuing to lead the government’s response to coronavirus."

>> See the tweet here

FDA issues ‘emergency use authorization’ of anti-malaria drugs for coronavirus treatment

Update 6:45 a.m. EDT March 30: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued an “emergency use authorization" to allow two anti-malaria drugs donated to the Strategic National Stockpile to possibly be used to treat coronavirus patients, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced in a news release Sunday.

HHS said it “accepted 30 million doses of hydroxychloroquine sulfate donated by Sandoz, the Novartis generics and biosimilars division, and 1 million doses of chloroquine phosphate donated by Bayer Pharmaceuticals" on Sunday.

The authorization allows the donated drugs “to be distributed and prescribed by doctors to hospitalized teen and adult patients with COVID-19, as appropriate, when a clinical trial is not available or feasible,” the release said.

In addition, the authorization “requires that fact sheets that provide important information about using chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate in treating COVID-19 be made available to health care providers and patients, including the known risks and drug interactions,” according to the FDA’s website.

Read more here or here.

New York City to fine people who violate social-distancing rules

Update 5:20 a.m. EDT March 30: New York City will fine those who fail to follow social-distancing guidelines, officials said.

According to WPIX-TV, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the news in a Sunday news conference.

“We’re going to give people every chance to listen, and if anyone doesn’t listen, then they deserve a fine at this point,” he said, adding that people could face fines of $250 to $500 if they continue to violate the rules after receiving a warning from police.

The city has already shut down nonessential businesses and instructed to residents to stay inside when possible, WPIX reported.

Budget airline EasyJet grounds entire fleet

Update 4:32 a.m. EDT March 30: British airline EasyJet announced that it is grounding all of its 344 planes amid the coronavirus pandemic, ITV is reporting.

According to CNN, the budget carrier’s decision takes effect Monday.

“At this stage, there can be no certainty of the date for restarting commercial flights,” the Luton-based airline said in a statement.

The carrier tweeted Monday that entitlements for customers whose flights were canceled “are available for up to a year after your flight was originally due to depart.”

>> See the tweets here

'I Love Rock 'n' Roll' songwriter Alan Merrill dies of complications from virus

Update 3:23 a.m. EDT March 30: Alan Merrill, best known for writing the hit song “I Love Rock 'n' Roll,” died Sunday morning after experiencing coronavirus complications. He was 69.

According to USA Today, Merrill’s daughter, Laura, said in a Facebook post that her father died at a New York City hospital.

“I was given two minutes to say my goodbyes before I was rushed out,” she wrote of Merrill, who also was a guitarist and vocalist. “He seemed peaceful, and as I left, there was still a glimmer of hope that he wouldn’t be a ticker on the right-hand side of the CNN/Fox News screen.”

She said she walked home and received the news of his death by the time she reached her apartment.

“I’ve made a million jokes about the ‘Rona’ and how it’ll ‘getcha’ ... boy, do I feel stupid,” she continued. “If anything can come of this, I beg of you to take this seriously. Money doesn’t matter. People are dying. You don’t think it’ll happen to you or your strong family. It has.”

>> See the post here

I’ve been trying to sleep but I can’t. I woke up normally yesterday with the world at my feet and now today I lay here...

Posted by Laura Merrill on Sunday, March 29, 2020

″I Love Rock 'n' Roll" was originally released by the Arrows, a band Merrill was part of, in 1975, according to “Entertainment Tonight.” Seven years later, rocker Joan Jett and the Blackhearts released a version of the song, which reached No. 1 on the Billboard charts, the outlet reported.

Jett took to Twitter to pay tribute to Merrill on Sunday, sending “thoughts and love” to his loved ones and the music community.

“I can still remember watching the Arrows on TV in London and being blown away by the song that screamed hit to me,” Jett wrote. “With deep gratitude and sadness, wishing him a safe journey to the other side.”

>> See the tweet here

News of Merrill’s death came the same day that country music star Joe Diffie died from the virus, “ET” reported.

Costco to temporarily change store hours

Update 1:31 a.m. EDT March 30: In an effort to help protect its customers, Costco announced it will temporarily implement new weekday closing hours for its locations nationwide.

Beginning Monday, all its warehouses will close at 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and its gas stations will close at 7 p.m.

However, it said some specific locations’ hours would be different.

The wholesale giant said its weekend hours would remain the same.

For its members ages 60 and older and those with physical impairments, Costco has special operating hours from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

Costco said it has made some temporary department changes to create more space for social distancing and is following CDC recommendations to minimize risk to its members and employees.

Beginning Monday, March 30, U.S. Costco locations will temporarily implement new weekday closing hours. We will close at...

Posted by Costco on Thursday, March 26, 2020

U.S. cases soar past 142,000, including more than 2,500 deaths

Update 12:39 a.m. EDT March 30: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States soared past 142,000 across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands early Sunday.

According to researchers at Johns Hopkins University, there are at least 142,502 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 2,506 deaths. Worldwide, there are 722,435 confirmed cases and 33,997 deaths from the virus. U.S. cases outnumber those in any other nation, including the 97,689 reported in Italy and the 82,149 confirmed in China.

Of the confirmed deaths, 966 have occurred in New York, 200 in Washington state, 161 in New Jersey and 151 in Louisiana.

In terms of diagnosed cases, New York remains the hardest-hit with at least 59,746 confirmed cases, followed by New Jersey with 13,386, California with 6,284 and Michigan with 5,488.

Four other states have each confirmed at least 4,000 novel coronavirus cases, including:

• Massachusetts: 4,955, including 48 deaths

• Florida: 4,950, including 60 deaths

• Illinois: 4,596, including 66 deaths

• Washington: 4,493, including 200 deaths

Meanwhile, Louisiana and Pennsylvania have confirmed at least 3,000 novel coronavirus infections each, while TexasGeorgia and Colorado have confirmed at least 2,000 cases each.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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News

  • The family of a man who died of the coronavirus is now suing the cruise line after he became infected with the illness. Ronald Wong and his wife Eva Wong, were on board the Grand Princess on Feb. 21 when it left San Francisco. A month after the trip started, Ronald Wong died of COVID-19, USA Today reported. His family said Carnival Cruise Line, the parent company of Princess Cruise Line which operated the ship, should have known a passenger on the cruise that sailed from Mexico and prior to the Wong’s trip. The 71-year-old passenger, who was not named, was the first coronavirus death in California. The suit said 62 passengers from Mexico, as well as, 1,000 crew members, stayed on the ship on its way to Hawaii. The Grand Princess returned to California on March 9 with passengers taken to military bases in California for a 14-day quarantine, USA Today reported. Originally, the Wongs showed no symptoms of the coronavirus, but Ronald Wong developed a fever and cough and was taken to a hospital. Both he and his wife tested positive. Robert Wong died on March 24. Eva Wong recovered. More than 130 passengers on the trip had tested positive for COVID-19 and five died. The lawsuit states that both Princess and Carnival cruise lines knew passengers and crew members were infected with coronavirus and did nothing to stop the spread, KTVU reported. The suit contends another ship owned by the companies, the Diamond Princess, was quarantined in Japan on Feb. 3 after two passengers died and others tested positive, KTVU reported. The suit is asking for damages for medical costs. There are about a dozen suits filed against the companies by either passengers or the family members, USA Today reported.
  • Protests and demonstrations have led to violence in at least 30 cities across the United States in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Floyd, 46, died after he was detained for questioning regarding a possible forgery in progress. Video of his death caught by bystanders showed a Minneapolis police officer, identified as Derek Chauvin, holding his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than five minutes as Floyd pleaded for air, sparking outrage.  As of Monday, at least 40 cities across 16 states have imposed curfews.  Live updates for Monday, June 1 continue below:  Doctor says evidence shows Floyd died of ‘mechanical asphyxia’ Update 3:30 p.m. EDT June 1: Dr. Allecia Wilson, director of autopsy and forensic sciences at the university of Michigan, said Monday that evidence shows that George Floyd died of mechanical asphyxia. “We acknowledge that additional medical information including toxicology and further investigation are necessary for a final report, however, the evidence is consistent with mechanical asphyxia as the cause of death and homicide as the manner of death,” she said. A preliminary autopsy mentioned by authorities in charging documents filed against former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin found “no physical findings that support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation.” Authorities said Floyd had likely died from a combination of being restrained by police, underlying health conditions and 'any potential intoxicants in his system.” Independent autopsy shows George Floyd died of asphyxia from sustained forceful pressure, family attorney says Update 3:25 p.m. EDT June 1: An independent autopsy has found that George Floyd died last week of asphyxia from sustained forceful pressure, Ben Crump, the attorney representing George Floyd’s family, said Monday in a news release obtained by PBS. “Despite how painful these autopsy findings are, especially for George Floyd’s family, we think it is essential that the truth comes out about the manner and the exact manner and science as to how George Floyd was killed,” Crump said Monday at a news conference. Crump and medical professionals held a news conference Monday to discuss the autopsy results. “What you’re going to hear from these renowned pathologists is essentially: George died because he needed a breath,' Crump said. “He needed a breath of air.” George Floyd’s family to announce results of independent autopsy Update 3:05 p.m. EDT June 1: The family of George Floyd and their attorney, Ben Crump, are holding a news conference Monday to announce the results of an independent autopsy performed on the 46-year-old. Atlanta’s curfew extended for another night Update 2:30 p.m. EDT June 1: Officials in Atlanta announced Monday that a curfew enacted amid protests over the death of George Floyd will continue for another night, WSB-TV reported. Tens of thousands of people nationwide have taken to city streets to protest Floyd’s death, which happened last week after a Minneapolis police officer pinned Floyd’s neck under his knee for nearly nine minutes. Most demonstrations have been peaceful, but some have been marred by skirmishes between police and demonstrators, WSB-TV reported. Monday’s curfew will begin Monday at 9 p.m. and last until sunrise, according to WSB-TV. Florida governor activates National Guard Update 2:20 p.m. EDT June 1: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has activated the Florida National Guard after some protests over the death of George Floyd turned violent over the weekend, WFTV reported. The governor’s office said the specially trained units were put on standby Saturday, according to WFTV. More protests against police brutality are expected in Florida and nationwide in the wake of Floyd’s death last week. >> Read more on WFTV.com George Floyd’s brother urges people to vote during peaceful protest in Minneapolis Update 2:05 p.m. EDT June 1: One of George Floyd’s brothers, Terrence Floyd, urged protesters to remain peaceful Monday and told people that the best thing they can do to make change is to vote “not just in the presidential elections.” “If i’m not over here wilding out. If i’m not over here blowing stuff up. If I’m not here messing up my community, what are you all doing?” he asked as the crowd cheered him on. “You’re doing nothing. Because that’s not going to bring my brother back at all.” He compared the recent nights of looting and rioting to drinking. “It might feel good for a moment, like when you drink but ... you’re going to wonder what you did,” he said. More than 400 arrested in Santa Monica, California protest; most from out of town, police say Update 1:30 p.m. EDT June 1: Police in Santa Monica, California, said authorities arrested more than 400 people in citywide protests overnight in the wake of George Floyd’s death. Police Chief Cynthia Renaud said 95% of those arrested “reside outside the city.' 30 arrested during protests in Orlando, Florida Update 1:15 p.m. EDT June 1: Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer said up to 30 people were arrested amid overnight protests in the city, according to WFTV. Police Chief Orlando Rolon said some of the arrests were connected to eight businesses that people attempted to break into or vandalize in the city, WFTV reported. Rolon said some demonstrators got onto Interstate 4 on Sunday and threw rocks and other objects at police officers, who responded by deploying tear gas. Dyer said he’s ordered the release of body camera footage from the situation in order to be fully transparent. >> Read more on WFTV.com Memorial for George Floyd scheduled for Thursday Update 1:05 p.m. EDT June 1: A funeral memorial will be held Thursday for George Floyd, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said Monday, according to CNN. “It will be an important event both for the city of Minneapolis and Minnesota and for the nation to watch that process of celebrating a life that was taken in front of us,” he said, according to the news network. Floyd died May 25 after then-Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin pinned his neck under his knee for nearly nine minutes. Video of Floyd begging for air as he lay face-down on the ground surfaced after the situation, prompting widespread protests nationwide and calls for police reform. State of emergency declared in Birmingham, Alabama due to civil unrest Update 12:40 p.m. EDT June 1: Mayor Randall Woodfin of Birmingham, Alabama, declared a state of emergency for the city Monday due to civil unrest after protests over the weekend left behind widespread property damage. At a news conference Monday morning, Woodfin said that he “100 percent (supports) civil disobedience but that is very different from civil unrest.” “I support activism and your right to peacefully assemble, but I don’t support mobs and people destroying things just because,” he said. “And so, moving forward, the City of Birmingham as of today (is) declaring a state of emergency due to civil unrest and will be implementing a citywide curfew starting today at 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. everyday going forward.” On Sunday, demonstrators tried to tear down a Confederate monument in Linn Park and several members of the media were attacked, according to AL.com. Windows were smashed at several businesses, the news site reported. Trump to governors: ‘Most of you are weak’ Update 12:10 p.m. EDT June 1: President Donald Trump is telling the nation’s governors that most of them are “weak” and calling for tougher crackdowns on violence as protests rage across the nation. Trump is speaking to governors on a video teleconference with law enforcement and national security officials. He’s telling them they “have to get much tougher” amid nationwide protests and criticizing their responses, saying: “Most of you are weak.” And he’s chastising them for failing to use the National Guard more aggressively, saying they’re making themselves “look like fools.” Attorney General Bill Barr is also on the call and telling governors they have to “dominate” the streets and control, not react to crowds. He’s calling on them to “go after troublemaker” and use “adequate force.” Curfew will be in effect for next two nights in Washington DC Update 12:05 p.m. EDT June 1: Washington D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser on Monday announced that the city will enforce a 7 p.m. curfew for the next two nights amid protests following the death last week of George Floyd. Bowser has enacted a curfew Sunday that didn’t go into effect until 11 p.m. The decision Sunday sparked criticism from White House Press Secretary Kayleigh MeEnany. “I think when you look at some of the befuddling actions, like right here in D.C., the mayor of D.C. didn’t issue a curfew until 11 p.m.,” McEnany said during an appearance on Fox News’ “Fox and Friends,” according to The Hill. “Well, guess what? At 10 p.m. you had St. John’s Church burning. Several other cities had curfews at 4 p.m., at 5 p.m., at 6 p.m.” Florida police officer suspended after video showed him pushing kneeling protester Update 11:50 a.m. EDT June 1: Interim Fort Lauderdale police Chief Rick Maglione said an officer who appeared to shove a protester without provocation Sunday as she was kneeling near him has been suspended from duty as authorities investigate the situation. Maglione said the situation began when an officer asked for help after she became surrounded by protesters. A short while later, some protesters began to attack a police car, smashing windows and jumping on the vehicle as a police officer sat inside. “In the middle of that event ... our officer, as he passed a female that was on the ground already, appears to shove her as he goes by her,” Maglione said. “That officer has been removed from any contact with the public. He is relieved from duty, basically, while this matter is investigated.” Maglione said officials with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement have opened a criminal investigation into the situation. Mayor Dean Trantalis said he thought the situation was “offensive” and “should never have happened.” “I appreciate the fact that the department has relieved him of duty while this investigation happens,” he said at a news conference Monday. “I understand the state attorney has opened a file, an investigation to make sure that we get to the bottom of this and If it’s determined by those agencies that something wrong was done we will follow with swift disciplinary action.” New York City mayor: Police cars driving into crowd of protesters Saturday ‘unacceptable’ Update 11:20 a.m. EDT June 1: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday that two police cars caught on video driving into a crowd during a protest Saturday of police brutality was “dangerous” and “unacceptable,' according to The Guardian. “There is no situation where a police vehicle should drive into a crowd of protesters or New Yorkers of any kind,” the mayor said, according to the newspaper. In a video that went viral Saturday, protesters could be seen carrying a yellow metal barricade to block a police SUV in Brooklyn, The New York Times reported. While some demonstrators began to throw things at the vehicles, both of them sped up into the crowd, according to the Times. The newspaper reported it was not clear whether anyone was injured in the incident. De Blasio said he had directed city officials to investigate the situation, the Times reported. Obama: Protests and political action necessary ‘if we want to bring about real change’ Update 11:10 a.m. EDT June 1: Former President Barack Obama said people need to be active in both protests and the political process if they want to bring about real, lasting change as protests erupted nationwide due to the death last week of George Floyd. “If we want to bring about real change, then the choice isn’t between protest and politics,” Obama said in a post published Friday on Medium. “We have to do both. We have to mobilize to raise awareness, and we have to organize and cast our ballots to make sure that we elect candidates who will act on reform.” Obama noted that while the focus is often on the federal government’s response to events like Floyd’s death, “the elected officials who matter most in reforming police departments and the criminal justice system work at the state and local levels.” “The more specific we can make demands for criminal justice and police reform, the harder it will be for elected officials to just offer lip service to the cause and then fall back into business as usual once protests have gone away,” Obama said. “I recognize that these past few months have been hard and dispiriting — that the fear, sorrow, uncertainty, and hardship of a pandemic have been compounded by tragic reminders that prejudice and inequality still shape so much of American life. But watching the heightened activism of young people in recent weeks, of every race and every station, makes me hopeful. If, going forward, we can channel our justifiable anger into peaceful, sustained, and effective action, then this moment can be a real turning point in our nation’s long journey to live up to our highest ideals.” At least 12 arrested during demonstrations in Portland, Oregon Update 10:20 a.m. EDT June 1: Police in Portland, Oregon, said they arrested at least a dozen people after peaceful protests in the city spurred by the death of George Floyd turned violent. Authorities said they also detained two juveniles during Sunday night’s protests. Police said thousands of demonstrators marched Sunday to the city’s Justice Center. The gathering remained peaceful until around 11:30 p.m., when authorities said some demonstrators began to throw things at officers. When the crowd refused to disperse, police said they deployed “Riot Control Agents to disperse the crowd.” In response, some demonstrators threw what police described as fireworks at officers before the crowd broke into smaller groups, some of which set fires, smashed storefront windows and vandalized buildings and parked vehicles, authorities said. Police Chief Jami Resch said she met Sunday with demonstration leaders. “We agreed that the majority of demonstrators AND the police want a peaceful protest and are frustrated by those who are engaging in violence and destruction because it is not helpful for change efforts,” she said in a statement. “Unfortunately, while we were meeting, some individuals started to engage in violent acts toward Officers, which continued despite warnings to disperse. Officers deployed riot control agents to disperse the crowd for the safety of all.' NBA coaches: ‘We cannot treat this as an isolated incident of outrage’ Update 9:40 a.m. EDT June 1: The National Basketball Coaches Association released a statement Monday sharing condolences and prayers for the family of George Floyd and condemning his death. “The events of the past few weeks -- police brutality, racial profiling and the weaponization of racism are shameful, inhumane and intolerable,” the group said. “Witnessing the murder of George Floyd in cold blood and in broad daylight has traumatized our nation, but the reality is that African Americans are targeted and victimized on a daily basis. As NBA coaches, we cannot treat this as an isolated incident of outrage.” Coaches said in the statement that they will work with local leaders, officials and law enforcement agencies in the cities where they are based “to create positive change in our communities.” “We have the power and platform to affect change, and we will use it,” the statement said. 1 dead after authorities, protesters exchange fire in Kentucky; police investigating Update 9:20 a.m. EDT June 1: Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear said Monday that he’s authorized an investigation into a police-involved shooting that left one person dead during protests over the death of George Floyd. Beshear said the Louisville Metro Police Department and the Kentucky National Guard were dispatched around midnight to 26th Street and Broadway. “While working to disperse a crowd, LMPD and the Kentucky National Guard were fired upon,” the governor said. “LMPD and the Kentucky National Guard returned fire resulting in a death. Given the seriousness of the situation, I have authorized the Kentucky State Police to independently investigate the event.” DC mayor: Some protesters brought tools, supplies with them Update 9 a.m. EDT June 1: Mayor Muriel Bowser of Washington D.C. said Friday that some protesters brought “tools and supplies” with them to demonstrations Sunday over the death of George Floyd. “We know that we have people that came here with tools and supplies and they re-upped their supplies,' Bowser said during an interview Monday with NBC’s “Today” show. 'They went to different parts of the city. So, we think there was a mix of people here but certainly people here who do this type of protest and demonstration.” Ask if the demonstrators were believed to have been “professional protesters,” Bowser told the “Today” show, “We’ve seen some of these tactics before so we know that they were among the groups here.” She described the tactics used as “the types of tools they use, restocking, setting fires here and there to try to draw in the police to various locations.” 2 killed, police officer injured during protests in Iowa Update 8:35 a.m. EDT June 1: Two people died and a police officer is injured Monday following a series of shootings reported during protests overnight in Davenport, Iowa, police said. One person died in a shooting reported at the Walmart on West Kimberly Road and one person died in a separate shooting in the 1100 block of West 15th Street, according to police. Officials said rioters ambushed police officers in a vehicle around 3 a.m., firing several shots, some of which hit a police car while officers were inside. Police Chief Paul Sirkorski said one officer was injured. Police were later able to find the vehicle and arrested several people after it crashed during a pursuit. Sirkorski said the officer was “doing okay” Monday morning. “What we experienced tonight, last night was completely unacceptable and it does not honor the memory of Mr. Floyd,” Sirkorski said at a news conference Monday. Mayor Mike Matson said that in light of the overnight violence, a curfew will be enacted for all of Scott County on Monday. He said he has also requested the help of the Iowa National Guard. Facebook pledges $10 million toward ‘efforts committed to ending racial injustice’  Update 7:51 a.m. EDT June 1: Facebook will donate $10 million to “efforts committed to ending racial injustice,” the social media juggernaut announced early Monday. Several Boston police officers injured, more than 3 dozen protesters arrested Sunday night Update 5:37 a.m. EDT June 1: The Boston Police Department has confirmed multiple officers were injured during Sunday night’s protests, and 40 demonstrators were arrested. According to the department, at least seven officers were transported to local hospitals for treatment of injuries, numerous others were treated at the scene of the violent clashes and at least 21 police cruisers were damaged during the protest.  Citing ‘violence and thefts,’ Washington county declares state of emergency Update 5:14 a.m. EDT June 1: Washington’s King County, which includes the city of Seattle, declared a state of emergency early Monday due to “violence and thefts associated with some of the local protests.” “King County values and respects the peaceful expression of political views, and supports all people in exercising their First Amendment rights,” the county government said in a news release. Derek Chauvin’s 1st court appearance postponed 1 week Update 4:55 a.m. EDT June 1: The first court appearance for the former Minnesota officer charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd has been postponed until June 8. Chauvin, the officer seen in a video kneeling on Floyd’s neck, originally had a hearing set for 1 p.m. Monday. Court records cite no specific reason for the delay. Chauvin was moved to the Hennepin County Jail from the Ramsey County Jail Sunday. Birmingham protesters tear down Confederate monument, set fire to Thomas Jefferson statue Update 4:32 a.m. EDT June 1: Protesters in Birmingham, Alabama, were captured on video Sunday night looping a rope around the neck of a monument to a Confederate naval captain before dragging it to the ground. The statue, depicting Charles Linn, could be seen in the aftermath lying face down with “BLM” painted in large red letters along the back of his leg, The Washington Post reported. In addition to smashing the namesake of Birmingham’s Linn Park, protesters also set a statue of Thomas Jefferson ablaze. Police fatally shoot man at Louisville protest they say opened fire first Update 4:12 a.m. EDT June 1: A man has been shot and killed during protests in Louisville, Kentucky. According to the Louisville Metro Police Department, shots were fired at them first. The shooting occurred around 12:15 a.m., and the victim has not been identified. Washington activates statewide National Guard Update 3:38 a.m. EDT June 1: Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has called up the National Guard for statewide deployment. “We must not let these illegal and dangerous actions detract from the anger so many feel at the deep injustice laid so ugly and bare by the death of George Floyd,” Inslee said in a statement. He also noted that members of the Guard engaged in crowd control must remain unarmed to ensure public safety. “But we also will not turn away from our responsibility to protect the residents of our state,” Inslee said in the statement. Florida police officer suspended after shoving kneeling protester Update 3:14 a.m. EDT June 1: A police officer has been suspended after video showed him shoving a kneeling woman during a Sunday afternoon protest in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. According to The Washington Post, the video shows police walking through throngs of protesters as several people dropped to their knees and held their hands overhead. As one officer passed a black woman kneeling at his feet, he reached down and shoved the back of her head, sending her falling forward into the pavement. Nearby protesters erupted in shouts and several people threw water bottles at the police. The officer retreated, followed by other officers who appeared to be yelling at him over his actions, the Post reported. George Floyd's son says heart ‘really touched’ by mass protests Update 2:59 a.m. EDT June 1: Quincy Mason Floyd had not seen his father, George, since he was a young child. On Sunday night, the younger Floyd attended a Bryan, Texas, protest and spoke with CNN affiliate KBTX. 'Everyone is coming out and showing him love. My heart is really touched by all this,” Quincy Mason Floyd told the local station. DC’s historic St. John’s church set ablaze during Sunday protests Update 2:51 a.m. EDT June 1: A fire was set in the basement of historic St. John’s Episcopal Church, across Lafayette Square from the White House, during Sunday night demonstrations calling for justice in the death of George Floyd. Tanker truck driver who plowed into crowd of Minnesota protesters charged with assault Update 2:32 a.m. EDT June 1: Bogdan Vechirko, the man who drove a tanker truck into a crowd of protesters on a Minnesota interstate Sunday, has been charged with assault, according to Hennepin County Jail records. The Minnesota Department of Public Safety described Vechirko’s actions as “inciting a crowd of peaceful demonstrators.”  He is being held without bail. The Massachusetts National Guard arrives in Boston Update 2:02 a.m. EDT June 1: The Massachusetts National Guard has arrived in Boston to disperse the remaining protesters, Massachusetts State Police spokesman David Procopio told CNN. Police have already made two arrests after two protesters jumped a fence and tried to get onto State House property, the network reported. Austin police fire on protesters after a day of peaceful demonstrations Update 1:42 a.m. EDT June 1: Police in Austin, Texas, opened fire on protesters early Sunday with what demonstrators described as rubber bullets, The Washington Post reported. The clash followed a day of peaceful protests in the Texas capital with witnesses stating the shots were fired by a group of officers on a nearby overpass at protesters who had been descending on police headquarters. .At least three people were struck by the projectiles, including a young woman who was hit in the back of the head, the Post reported. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Pat Dye, who led Auburn’s football team to four Southeastern Conference championships during his 12-year coaching career at the university, died Monday. He was 80. Dye had tested positive for the coronavirus while he was hospitalized in Atlanta with kidney issues, his son told ESPN last month. Dye’s death was first reported by 247Sports. Dye led the Tigers to a 99-39-4 record from 1981 to 1992, winning at least a share of SEC championships in 1983, 1987, 1988 and 1989. His Auburn teams won at least 10 games in a season four times and won six bowl games. Dye was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2005. He also was the university’s athletic director from 1981 to 1991. Former Auburn Athletic Director David Housel said in a statement that Auburn “will be forever better because of (Dye).” “People will talk about all the games he won, the championships and bowl games, but his greatest contribution, his legacy, is the difference he made in the lives of the people who played for him and worked with him,” Housel said in a statement. 'I am one of them. He made a difference in my life. “He came to Auburn at a time when Auburn needed leadership and focus. He provided that leadership and focus.” Dye’s first SEC title was won with the help of running back Bo Jackson and was the program’s first football conference title in 26 years, the Opelika-Auburn News reported. In 1982, Jackson’s goal-line leap allowed Auburn to defeat Alabama and snap a nine-game losing streak to the Tigers’ in-state rivals. Dye was instrumental in moving the Iron Bowl from Legion Field to Jordan-Hare Stadium in 1989 after the game had been played annually in Birmingham since 1948, AL.com reported. “When I saw Coach (Bear) Bryant when I first got to Auburn, the first thing he said to me, very first thing, he said, ‘Well, I guess you’re going to want to take that game to Auburn,’” Dye told AL.com in 2019. “I said, ‘We’re going to take it to Auburn.’ “He said, ‘Well, we’ve got a contract through (19)88. … I said, ‘Well, we’ll play ’89 in Auburn.’” Dye was a three-time SEC coach of the year and 1983 national coach of the year. Dye was an All-American high school football player at Richmond Academy in Augusta, Georgia, and led his team to the Class 3A state championship in 1956, WRBL reported.
  • A convicted felon is now facing murder charges after police accused him of fatally shooting a man at a LaGrange home.  Charlestavious Dyer, 31, was arrested Friday in the death of 56-year-old Willie Render Jr., LaGrange police said in a statement.  Police found Render with a gunshot wound to the chest at a home on Brown Street just before 10:30 p.m., officials said. Emergency responders took him to Wellstar West Georgia, and he was later pronounced dead.  A witness at the scene gave police a description of the suspects in the shooting and said they had left in a car, according to authorities. Officers later found the car with the suspects inside, police said.  Investigators identified Dyer as the shooter in the case. Police said the incident began with an argument over drugs and turned violent.  Dyer had previously been arrested 18 times in Fulton County, according to jail records. LaGrange police said he was on probation at the time of the fatal shooting.  Dyer was taken to the Troup County Jail, where he remains. In addition to murder, he is charged with possession of a weapon during certain crimes and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon.  Details about his previous conviction and the other suspects found in the car with Dyer were not immediately available. We’re working to learn more. You may find this story and more at AJC.com. In other news: 
  • One of the Atlanta Police Department officers fired Sunday for forcibly arresting two college students had previous complaints of excessive force that were upheld after an internal review, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has learned. Mark Gardner, who joined APD in 1997, was the subject of four citizen complaints from Richard Williams. Two of the complaints against Gardner were for 'maltreatment or unnecessary force' and two were for violation of the department's policy on personal weapons.  The charges were sustained in 2016, according to APD data previously provided to the AJC. The officer received written reprimands for two of the complaints; no action was taken on the other two allegations. Gardner and Ivory Streeter, the other officer fired Sunday, were investigators with the department’s fugitive squad, APD spokesman Carlos Campos said.  Streeter, with APD since 2003, had just completed a class on “de-escalation” tactics, according to records kept by the state Peace Officer Standards and Training Council.  He also completed a 6-hour course on use of force on May 7. Gardner took a 2-hour de-escalation class and a 3-hour class on use of force in late March 28, POST records show.  >>Click HERE for updates from The Atlanta Journal Constitution. 
  • June 1 marks the official start of the hurricane season. At the same time, a storm, which may develop into the third named storm of the year, is starting to churn. If the weather pattern continues, the storm would be named Cristobal. The National Weather Service is watching an area over southern Mexico. Experts say it has an 80% chance of developing, CNN reported. It had been named Tropical Storm Amanda when it developed in the Pacific but had dissipated. It is now in the Atlantic Ocean basin, hence the potential name of Cristobal, CNN reported. There have already been two named storms that developed in May before the official start of the season, WTVJ reported. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said 2020 will be an above-normal year with between 13 and 19 named storms, six to 10 will be hurricanes and three to six will be major hurricanes with at least 111 mph winds. Hurricane season runs until Nov. 30.