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podcasts: Dadsplaining, A Fatherhood Podcast

Every week on Dadsplaining we cover all the best, funniest, and grossest aspects of fatherhood. Join two first-time dads as we talk our way through our kids growing up and the adventures of parenthood. Episode topics include: Baby delivery day, what it feels like to be a Dad, supporting the Moms, and Dad Bods.

Most Recent Episode:

Our Birth Stories: Delivery Day Part 1

Topics: Brandon and Jesse relive their kids' delivery days and share tips on how to make the labor experience as smooth as humanly possible for you and mama. Like us on Facebook: //www.facebook.com/DadsplainingPodcast/ Follow us on Twitter: //twitter.com/dadsplainingpod Follow us on Instagram: //instagram.com/dadsplainingpodcast
Posted: September 17, 2018

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More Episodes:

Sleep Deprivation And Sleep Schedules

Topics: Brandon and Jesse give you a crash course in surviving the sleep-deprived first few weeks after bringing your baby home. Learn how to stay alert, be helpful, and keep the whole family (relatively) sane. Tip - get the Baby Daybook app: //www.drillyapps.com/ Like us on Facebook: //www.facebook.com/DadsplainingPodcast/ Follow us on Twitter: //twitter.com/dadsplainingpod

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The Pregnancy Phase: Becoming Dad

Topics: Jesse and Brandon remember the "pregnancy phase" leading up to the births of their sons, David and Noah. We talk about morning sickness, crazy poop stories, and getting used to the idea of someone calling you "Dad." Like us on Facebook: //www.facebook.com/DadsplainingPodcast/ Follow us on Twitter: //twitter.com/dadsplainingpod

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News

  • The Latest on flooding in areas affected by Florence (all times local): 10 a.m. South Carolina's governor plans to meet with top Department of Defense leaders to discuss the state's response to Florence. The South Carolina National Guard says in a news release that Gov. Henry McMaster was to meet Tuesday with U.S. Air Force Gen. Terrence J. O'Shaughnessy at the state's emergency response headquarters. O'Shaughnessy is Commander of the U.S. Northern Command and North American Aerospace Defense Command. Also scheduled to attend Tuesday's briefing are the chief of the National Guard Bureau and the adjutant general of South Carolina. McMaster flew over parts of the state Monday in a National Guard helicopter, observing areas already experiencing flooding from Florence. Officials say flooding could continue to worsen for several days as water flows into the state from flooded areas in North Carolina. ___ 1 a.m. Officials are about to begin distributing food, water and tarps in Wilmington, North Carolina, which remains mostly cut off by floodwaters from Hurricane Florence. County officials say workers will begin handing out supplies to stranded residents in the city of 120,000 people beginning Tuesday morning. One road was opened into Wilmington at least briefly, and items have been brought into the city by big military trucks and helicopters. The death toll from Florence has risen to at least 32 people in three states, with 25 fatalities in North Carolina. Remnants of the once-powerful Category 4 hurricane are now a rainy, windy mass of low pressure. The system has speeded up on a path toward the heavily populated Northeast. ___ Follow AP's complete hurricane coverage at https://apnews.com/tag/Hurricanes
  • A federal judge said forcing Georgia to scrap its electronic voting machines in favor of paper ballots for the upcoming midterm elections is too risky, though she said the state needs to move quickly to address concerns about the security of the machines and its elections system. U.S. District Judge Amy Totenberg's Monday ruling means the state won't have to use paper ballots for this year's midterm elections, including a high-profile gubernatorial contest between the state's top elections official, Republican Secretary of State Brian Kemp, and Democrat Stacey Abrams, a former state House minority leader who's trying to become the country's first black, female governor. Totenberg said the voting rights advocates who sought the change to paper ballots have demonstrated 'the threat of real harms to their constitutional interests,' but that she worried about the 'massive scrambling' required for a last-minute change to paper ballots. Early voting starts Oct. 15 for the Nov. 6 midterm elections. 'Ultimately, any chaos or problems that arise in connection with a sudden rollout of a paper ballot system with accompanying scanning equipment may swamp the polls with work and voters — and result in voter frustration and disaffection from the voting process,' she wrote. 'There is nothing like bureaucratic confusion and long lines to sour a citizen.' Voting integrity advocates had sued state and county election officials, arguing that the touchscreen voting machines Georgia has used since 2002 are vulnerable to hacking and provide no way to confirm that votes have been recorded correctly because there's no paper trail. They had sought an immediate change to paper ballots for the midterm elections while the case is pending. Coalition for Good Governance executive director Marilyn Marks and David Cross, a lawyer who represents a small group of voters, both noted that Totenberg found merit in their arguments and that they plan to continue fighting for a secure voting system. Both said they're reviewing the decision to decide whether to appeal. The case is being watched closely because Georgia is among five states, along with more than 300 counties in eight other states, that exclusively use touchscreen voting machines that provide no paper record, according to Verified Voting, a nonprofit group focused on ensuring the accuracy of elections. 'My view is that this ruling has huge national significance,' said Larry Schwartztol with Protect Democracy, which has brought a similar case in South Carolina. 'The court acknowledged that states violate the Constitution if they fail to provide an election system that can stand up to modern cyber-threats.' Totenberg chastised the state, saying it had been slow to respond to 'serious vulnerabilities of its voting system' as well as software and hardware issues that have long been evident and said 'further delay is not tolerable in their confronting and tackling the challenges before the State's election balloting system.' Kemp said in an emailed statement that the state will move forward 'to responsibly upgrade Georgia's secure — but aging — voting system.' The judge noted a general consensus among cybersecurity experts and federal officials about the insecurity of electronic voting machines with no paper record, specifically pointing to a Sept. 6 report from the National Academy of Sciences report that says all elections should be conducted with 'human-readable paper ballots' by 2020 with every effort made to use them in this year's general election. 'Advanced persistent threats in this data-driven world and ordinary hacking are unfortunately here to stay,' she wrote, adding that state elections officials 'will fail to address that reality if they demean as paranoia the research-based findings of national cybersecurity engineers and experts in the field of elections.' Kemp, who rejected federal offers of assistance with election system security in 2016, has conceded that the current machines should be replaced. He established a commission earlier this year to look into a change and last month called for proposals to implement a system with voter-verifiable paper records in time for the 2020 presidential election. But he and other election officials argued the machines are still secure and a last-minute change would be costly and cause chaos. In addition to worries about the machines, Totenberg seemed concerned that the state did not seriously address the impact of a breach of a state election server in its arguments. Security experts last year disclosed a gaping hole that exposed personal data for 6.7 million Georgia voters, as well as passwords used by county officials to access election-staging files. That hole still wasn't fixed six months after it was first reported to election authorities. Kemp's office blamed the Center for Elections Systems at Kennesaw State University that managed the system. But ultimately, it reported to his office. Less than a week after the lawsuit was filed in July 2017 demanding the touchscreen system be replaced, the server that had been accessed was wiped clean by staff at Kennesaw State. Kemp denied ordering the data destruction or knowing about it in advance.
  • Television host and producer Julie Chen is leaving “The Talk,” CBS’s daytime talk show, following her husband Les Moonves’s resignation as CEO of the television network, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending new It was not immediately clear when Chen planned to officially announce her departure. Citing an unidentified source, Page Six reported Monday that Chen would step down in the coming weeks. However, CNN reported that Chen was expected to announce her departure in a videotaped message to viewers Tuesday. The news network reported she will continue to act as host on the reality show “Big Brother.” >> CBS CEO Les Moonves resigns after new accusations surface “She has decided that her main focus needs to be clearing her husband’s name from accusations made 25-30 years ago and tending to her son,” an unidentified person told CNN. After 20 years with CBS, Moonves stepped down as the network’s CEO earlier this month amid a slew of sexual misconduct allegations. At least a dozen women told The New Yorker they were sexually harassed or assaulted by Moonves. >> CBS investigating after chairman Les Moonves accused of sexual misconduct by 6 women Chen supported her husband after allegations first surfaced over the summer. “Leslie is a good man and a loving father, devoted husband and inspiring corporate leader,” Chen said in a statement released in July. “He has always been a kind, decent and moral human being. I fully support my husband and stand behind him.” Chen was absent for the season premiere of “The Talk,” which aired on Sept. 10, one day after her husband left CBS. In a statement, she said she would be off for a few days, but she did not address the allegations against her husband. Chen has co-hosted “The Talk” alongside actress Sara Gilbert and media personality Sharon Osbourne since the show premiered in October 2010. Comedian Sheryl Underwood and musician Eve also co-host the program.
  • Elizabeth Smart says she's been assured that the woman who helped kidnap her when she was 14 and stood by as she was sexually assaulted will be watched when she's released from prison. In an interview Tuesday on 'CBS This Morning,' Smart says she believes Wanda Barzee remains a danger. Barzee is expected to be freed Wednesday after 15 years in custody because Utah authorities had miscalculated the amount of time the 72-year-old woman should serve. Smart says that she doesn't know all the conditions of Barzee's release but that she's been told that a federal agent will keep a 'close eye' on Barzee and that she would be returned to prison 'as soon as she messes up.' Barzee was married to Brian David Mitchel when he kidnapped Smart in 2002. He is serving a life sentence.
  • An up-and-coming golfer has been found dead, her body discovered on a golf course in Iowa.  Police found Celia Barquin Arozamena’s body was found Monday night at Coldwater Links golf course in Ames, Iowa, ABC News reported. >> Read more trending news  The discovery of Barquin Arozamena’s body came after golfers found a golf bag on the course earlier that morning, but no one was around it, ABC News reported. Police said Barquin Arozamena was found “some distance away” and had been assaulted, KCCI reported. But police did not say exactly how she died, KCCI reported. Police arrested Collin Richards Monday night and charged him with first-degree murder in connection to her death, ABC News reported. Barquin Arozamena was the 2018 Big 12 champion and was named Iowa State Female Athlete of the Year, the Des Moines Register reported. She was a senior at Iowa State and was from Puente San Miguel, Spain, according to her Iowa State biography. >> Read more trending news  She will be honored at Saturday’s Iowa State football game. Her funeral arrangements have not been released yet. Barquin Arozamena had qualified for the U.S. Women’s Open this summer. The Alabama event was a LPGA Tour major. She didn’t advance past the first two rounds, ABC News reported.
  • In a rare move, the U.S. government has approved the importation of marijuana extracts from Canada for a clinical trial, highlighting a new avenue for American researchers who have long had trouble obtaining the drug for medical studies. The University of California San Diego's Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research announced Tuesday the Drug Enforcement Administration has OK'd its plans to import capsules containing two key cannabis compounds — CBD and THC — from British Columbia-based Tilray Inc . to study their effectiveness in treating tremors that afflict millions of people, especially those over 65. Marijuana remains illegal under federal law, and researchers aren't allowed to simply obtain it through providers licensed under state law. The U.S. has a program for supplying it for research through the National Institute on Drug Abuse, with cannabis grown by the University of Mississippi, but scientists have long complained about the difficulty of obtaining it, as well as the quality and limited variety of the pot available. The University of California San Diego researchers spent years planning and seeking approval for their study from the DEA and the Food and Drug Administration. Paul Armentano, deputy director of the marijuana law reform organization NORML, said that illustrated how badly American researchers need alternative sources for cannabis. 'It's very telling that you have researchers in the U.S. willing to exert the patience and go through the regulatory hurdles to make this happen at the same time the United States has its own domestic supply source,' Armentano said. Medical marijuana is federally legal in Canada, and the country will allow recreational sale and use beginning next month. Marijuana compounds have been imported for clinical trials before, including by Britain-based GW Pharmaceuticals, which won approval this year to sell its purified CBD capsule, Epidiolex, to treat severe forms of epilepsy — the first cannabis drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. While GW Pharmaceuticals developed that drug in-house before bringing it to the U.S. for testing, Tilray, which recently became the first marijuana company to complete an initial public stock offering in the U.S., said it can work with researchers to develop the cannabis formulations they hope to study. 'It's a really big milestone for Tilray and also just for the whole industry,' said Catherine Jacobson, Tilray's director of clinical research. 'Researchers in the U.S. have really been limited to doing research using dried flower. We have been able to prove to the FDA that we can manufacture investigational study drugs containing cannabinoids that meet their standards.' Neither the FDA nor the DEA had immediate details on how often the agencies have approved the import or use of foreign-made cannabis drugs in research, but DEA spokeswoman Katherine Pfaff says: 'It is done. There are definitely situations where, when there's no source in the U.S., a registrant can import a cannabis-derived drug from another country.' The National Institute on Drug Abuse usually provides marijuana as bulk flower or joints to be vaporized or smoked. NIDA, which does intend to expand how much marijuana the University of Mississippi grows for research, does not yet provide marijuana compounds in capsules, said Don Stanford, assistant director of the Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the university. Researchers say it's tough to measure the dose someone receives when they inhale pot. Dr. Fatta Nahab, a neurologist at the University of California San Diego Health's Movement Disorder Center, is the principal investigator on the tremor study. He said he worried that the seniors he expected to recruit as participants wouldn't want to inhale marijuana, and the researchers have spent the past two years on paperwork and regulatory hurdles to obtain the capsules. There is no specific drug to treat essential tremor, a shaking condition. Unlike Parkinson's disease, which causes shaking when someone is not moving, people with essential tremors shake when they are, making everyday activities like writing, drinking and speaking difficult. The condition afflicts 10 million people nationally and millions more across the globe, according to the International Essential Tremor Foundation. Many patients try to control the shaking by repurposing other drugs, such as blood pressure medicine, with limited success. 'There is a huge need to come up with something,' Nahab said. Nahab said he started looking into whether marijuana could be used to treat essential tremor after two patients showed sudden improvement after smoking pot or consuming CBD purchased online. The FDA application outlined the drug formula — a 20:1 ratio of CBD to THC, to minimize any high study participants might feel — as well as its purity, toxicity, shelf life and other details. They also had to get safety approvals from the university and present their plans to a California research advisory panel. The university is still recruiting patients and hopes to have 16 to 20 enrolled. Researchers monitor the tremors with a device placed on the wrist and will record changes in the severity of the shaking, among other things. Tilray is providing the drug and limited financial support but said it will have no role in reviewing the study's results. 'Essential tremor is ten times more common than Parkinson's and yet nobody really knows about essential tremor,' Nahab said. 'That we're finally getting to a potential therapeutic option in an area that is untapped is a big deal.' ___ Johnson is a member of AP's marijuana beat team. Follow him at https://twitter.com/GeneAPseattle . Follow Julie Watson at https://twitter.com/watson_julie . Find complete AP marijuana coverage here: http://apnews.com/tag/LegalMarijuana .