ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
78°
Chance of T-storms
H 90° L 73°
  • cloudy-day
    78°
    Current Conditions
    Chance of T-storms. H 90° L 73°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    90°
    Today
    Chance of T-storms. H 90° L 73°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    91°
    Tomorrow
    Partly Cloudy T-storms. H 91° L 73°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Latest from Sandra Parrish

    In the center of east Cobb County, maybe 50 yards from busy Roswell Road, sits what has been preserved more than 180 years--an arbor where the faithful gather for 10 days every summer to sing hymns and worship. >>LISTEN TO SANDRA PARRISH’S FULL ON-AIR REPORT BELOW. The Marietta Campground was founded by four farmers who gave 10 acres of land each to have a dedicated place to worship and thank God for their bounties.  “They first started meeting on this site in 1837, and then they decided this was going to be something they wanted to make sure they always did. So, this arbor was erected by the next camp meeting in 1838,” says Cheryl Lassiter, president of the Tentholders Association.  She tells WSB’s Sandra Parrish the so-called “tents” are actually cabins that were erected by the first families and grew to 23 over the years. Generations come back every year for the 10-day revival.  “Some of the cabins are over 100 years old,” says Susie Gantt who married into one of those families. Her three children attended the camp meeting when they were young and now their children attend.  “Your kids can run free, everybody watches everybody else’s children. It’s things they never forget and it’s lifelong friends,” she says.  Chuck Johnson, chair of the board of directors, says the camp meetings were only interrupted by the Civil War and on occasion Indians.  “At the first camp meeting they actually set up wagons and brought laying hens and cows and their food with them,” he says.  Now nearly 200 years later, the arbor has electricity and the cabins have working bathrooms. But the singing of old hymns and visiting preachers remains the same.  “It does something to people’s souls to be able to sing those old songs and have the fresh air while we’re worshiping. It’s just an experience like no other,” says Lassiter.  Two camp meetings will be held each day at the site located at 2300 Roswell Road at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. through Sunday.
  • Devon Gales, the Southern University football player paralyzed during a game against the University of Georgia in 2015, is finally in his brand-new handicap-accessible home in Jackson County.  >>LISTEN TO SANDRA PARRISH’S FULL ON-AIR REPORT BELOW. Those who have supported the family the past four years gathered at the home in the Traditions of Braselton subdivision as Gales and his parents were given the keys.  Gales has his own wing in the home which includes a handicap-accessible bathroom, bedroom, and therapy room.  “It’s going to give me more independence. I’m going to be able to do more things on my own, not having to have somebody always looking over my shoulder. Just to be able to get that back--that’s a big, big difference for me,” he tells WSB’s Sandra Parrish.  All of his family including his mother, father, younger brother and sister, will finally be under the same roof again with part of them living in Baton Rouge and the other in Georgia as Gales underwent treatment.  It was Ron Courson, head of UGA’s sports medicine and the first to come to Gale’s aid on the field after the collision with kicker Marshall Morgan, who vowed to one day build the injured player a handicap-accessible home. He was among those at the unveiling.  “I think everybody really rallied around him and they’re such a great family. They blessed us. I know people have blessed them. But just knowing them, they blessed us by the way they responded to adversity in such a positive manner. They inspire me every time I see them,” he says.  Also at the unveiling was Morgan, who has stayed close to the Gales family since the accident.  “They (UGA) just wrapped their arms around him the day the accident happened. Ever since, we’ve been trying to find ways to get this done and today is so exciting because it’s finally done, and they get to see the work that everyone’s been putting in and finally enjoy it,” he says.  Despite a few initial setbacks, the home was made possible through generous donations from the public: Land owner and developer Whit Marshall, who himself was a former UGA player; builder Mike Elrod, who stands on the sidelines during UGA football games administering oxygen to players; and nearly a hundred contractors who came forward to offer their services for free.  “God put me in a certain position to where I’ve had wonderful people come in my circle and bless me with so much joy. There’s nothing to be sad about—I’m just grateful,” says Gales.
  • The Gwinnett Police Department confirms it’s looking into a huge house party Saturday near Brookwood High School that brought 3,000 guests to a mansion on Dogwood Road--clogging the busy roadway most of the day.  Neighbors who live in the Brookwood Manor subdivision across the street tell WSB’s Sandra Parrish cars were parked on both sides of the road in their neighborhood while guests walked through yards carrying open containers of alcohol and possibly using drugs.  “The traffic was very congested. There were no police officers directing traffic. People were turning around in the middle of the road… speeding through the neighborhood,” says homeowner Amy Baker. Some neighbors also complained those attending the party wore little clothing as they walked up and down the street.  Many of the guests were shuttled to the mansion, which sits on 17 acres, from a nearby church on golf carts and ATV’s driven down the two-lane road. Flyers widely circulated on the internet advertised the “Project X Pool Party” with tickets selling online for $50.  The owner of the mansion, Ty James, daughter of the late singer Rick James, tells Parrish it was just a house-warming party which drew the huge crowd. She denies any problems were caused and apologized to the neighborhood for an inconvenience. James also denies that a promoter was used for the party or that tickets were sold. The police department says it received eight complaints about the party on Saturday ranging from noise and traffic problems to fireworks being set off. But no citations were issued other than for a car accident that happened in front of the property. “We would love for her to be a good neighbor,” says Yvonne Roberts, president of the homeowner’s association. “We assume someone that would buy a $2 million house with nothing but houses around it, wouldn’t want it for a party venue.”
  • Have you gotten your driver’s license renewed lately? If so, you’ve likely noticed some changes. The Georgia Department of Driver Services is rolling out the new licenses in parts of the state including its location in Canton which was part of the pilot project. “It’s a polycarbonate card and it’s one of the most secure cards we’ve ever had here in Georgia,” says Shevanda Leslie, director of Governmental Affairs and Communications. The new card is green with a larger peach, has laser-printed engraving which can be felt by running your finger across it, and includes a hologram in the lower right corner. The license holder’s picture has also changed. “The picture is now black and white instead of color. It’s just a more secure feature and it’s harder for criminals to try and duplicate,” she tells WSB’s Sandra Parrish. When drivers go in to get their license for the first time or get it renewed, they will now receive a full sheet of paper containing their information and picture. Their new license will then be sent in the mail. Terry Holzclaw, of Canton, didn’t know about the new license until he went to get his renewed. But he likes the copy of a new one he was shown. “It looks more difficult (to duplicate)—so many different features to it that are not on the other one,” he says.  Leslie says various DDS locations began rolling out the new license last month and all should have them by next month. But there’s no need to run out and get a new one just yet. “What they have in their wallet right now is sufficient. Your license is good until it expires,” she says.
  • In a bizarre preliminary hearing, the case against a man charged with scamming a woman out of more than $80,000 in Gwinnett County is bound over to Superior court. John Martin Hill took the stand during his preliminary hearing Tuesday which is usually a time just to hear the evidence in the case from investigators.  The 34-year-old is accused of meeting victim Lisa Goodgames on an online dating site and then meeting for the first time in person later that night. He reportedly told her he was a millionaire.  The next day, Gwinnett County Police Detective Shaun Regains testified the couple met at a bank where she he wrote him a check for $75,000 to put a down payment on a house for the two to move in together. “When I looked at his account… before that he had no more than $9 in his account,” says Regains. He says the victim also took out an additional $8,500 in cash and gave to him to furnish the home. Regains says the money was used to buy expensive clothes and meals and to purchase a BMW. On the stand, Hill denied he swindled the money saying the woman gave it to him for the purchase his business which distributes press releases. “She made a certified bank check out to my name and then I incorporated the business paperwork to basically transfer that over to her in the state of Delaware,” he testified. Hill says Goodgames took out the additional money for pocket change for herself. Regains testified a similar fraud case is pending involving another woman in the city of Milton and he has had several arrests throughout the northeast involving fraud. The prosecution pointed that Hill has changed his name five times over the years including Gregory Davis Dutton, Gregory William Davis, George Jesse Junior Hill, and Maverick Bryson McCray. The judge found enough evidence to send the case to Superior Court. His attorney says he will request bond at a later time.
  • One of the biggest tourist towns in North Georgia becomes the latest to pass restrictions on short term rentals like those through Airbnb and VRBO.  The council vote 4-1 last week to ban short term rentals inside the city limits except those within the Central Business District and those with a commercial zoning. Rentals in unincorporated Fannin County are not affected.  “We’ve had concerns and we’ve had a few folks that wonder about why there’s so much traffic in and out of some of the homes. That’s how we’ve actually discovered there’s some nightly rentals in those places,” Mayor Donna Whitener tells WSB’s Sandra Parrish.  Current rentals that have been paying sales tax to the city for 12 consecutive months would be grandfathered in and other homes could go before the city to seek a variance to allow it.  >>LISTEN TO SANDRA PARRISH’S FULL REPORT BELOW. Homeowners like Richard Arnold complain it takes away the rights of property owners. He manages several Airbnb rentals and worries about the affect it will have on those owners’ ability to sell in the future.  “They can continue to rent their property because they’re grandfathered in because they’ve paid their city lodging taxes. But it affects their ability to be able to sell their property to someone who wants to do the same thing,” he says.  Pam O’Dell who runs the Short Term Rental Owners Association of Georgia expects it to having chilling effect on investors and tourism. She believes investors will no longer want to buy and renovate homes in the downtown area to use as rentals.  “A lot of people love downtown Blue Ridge. It is a pretty place and many people in the downtown area have worked long and hard to make it that way. That’s what attracts people. And if you have no place to stay, that’s an issue,” she says.  Whitener has until the end of this week to sign the ordinance or veto parts of it, which she says it likely.  “We’re not trying to cause anyone a hardship, but we also want to protect our residents. We do have residents with major concerns. They want to know who their neighbors are,” she says.
  •  A favorite eatery in downtown Canton is up for sale after nearly 50 years of making everybody’s favorite sandwich.  Mike DeLuca and his sister Donna operate R & M Hoagie Shop which their parents opened on the square in 1972. DeLuca says it’s time for a change and for somebody new to run it. “We just work all the time, and that’s just part of owning your own business. What we do is part of a young man’s sport. I want to travel for a while and see the world and not worry about having to be at work every day,” he tells WSB’s Sandra Parrish. DeLuca has seen generations of families patronize the shop over the years, many he grew up with including Michael Holland. “A lot of people come into town just for this,” says Holland.  But for many its more than just an eatery. Bill Proud says it’s about small-town life. “It’s an institution. It makes the downtown area and I think it just helps to promote the small-time atmosphere that this town has. It will be a big plus if the new owners keep the character of this restaurant,” he says. DeLuca says nothing is final yet and the shop will continue to run the way it has the last 47 years for now. “We want to continue it on. I’ve talked to some good people and that’s the whole game plan—just keep everything going the way it’s always been,” he says.
  • The new law allows him to hire consultants to customize waivers from the federal government aimed at expanding Medicaid to those making around $12,000 a year and to help lower premiums for those with existing health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. “Georgians know that one-size-fits-all healthcare doesn’t fit at all. Through the Patients First Act, we will address Georgia problems with innovative Georgia solutions,” he says. Kemp budgeted a $1 million for the consulting process and expects to begin quickly. The bills passed both the House and Senate mostly along party lines with Democrats calling for a full expansion of Medicaid instead.
  • A bill to bring new voting machines to Georgia is headed to Gov. Brian Kemp’s desk.The State House gave final passage to the measure Thursday calling for new touch-screen voting machines with a paper ballot that would then be scanned to record the vote. The bill passed along party lines 101-69 with Democrats voting against it.
  • In an impassioned and sometimes emotional speech, Georgia House Speaker David Ralston took to the well of the House Monday morning to address his fellow lawmakers over accusations that he’s abused a law that allows attorneys in the Legislature to delay court cases.A resolution was filed by Buford Republican Rep. David Clark last week, with ten others signing on, calling for Ralston’s resignation after an investigation by WSB TV and the AJC found more than 50 cases over the past two years have been delayed for clients he represents.
  • Sandra Parrish

    News Anchor Reporter

    Sandra Parrish has been a reporter for WSB Radio since 1995 and covers political, legislative, transportation, and educational news. She graduated from the University of Georgia's Grady College of Journalism in 1989 and worked as an anchor/news director for WPLO in Lawrenceville, an anchor/assistant news director for WNGC in Athens and an anchor/reporter for WDUN in Gainesville before joining the WSB news team. Over the years, she has received over a dozen Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for "Best Use of Sound", "Best Series", and "Best Sports Reporting". She's also received numerous awards from the Associated Press, Georgia Association of Broadcasters, Society of Professional Journalists, and National Association of Black Journalists. Sandra is a former member of the board of the Georgia Associated Press Broadcast Association. She is married with two daughters.

    Read More

News

  • It's been a major distraction for drivers on Florida’s Turnpike in Osceola County. They don't know if she has a home, but a dog, whom some are now calling Ozzy, certainly has a lot of people watching out for her. >> Read more trending news  Dispatchers at the turnpike’s Traffic Management Center have spent months doing everything they can to catch the dog before she or a driver gets hurt. On Friday, Florida Turnpike officials said she was captured. She is very calm and quiet. There's a whole team of people watching hundreds of cameras along the turnpike and keeping an eye out for anything that may be dangerous for drivers. But consistently since May, in one particular part of the road, they kept seeing the same dog over and over. Road Ranger Jonathon Hester patrols a stretch of the turnpike near the Yeehaw Junction. “Our No. 1 job is safety,' Hester said. He's usually routing drivers around wrecks or helping with a flat tire. But lately, he's been determined to find the furry fugitive. 'This one has just evaded us for a long time and we keep trying to find him,” Hester said. For about two months, dispatchers were seeing the yellow Labrador between mile markers 196 and 205 on the turnpike, headed southbound. 'And just kind of runs up and down the roadway. It's a big distraction for the motorists driving by,” Hester said. “People see it and slam on their brakes.' Officials said they have no idea where she came from. 'It's possible it could've come from a vehicle crash,” Hester said. “A motorist could've been traveling with this dog, and crashed and the dog got scared and ran away.' Because she's been living on the road in Osceola County, they have affectionately named her Ozzy. Osceola County Animal Control let Hester borrow a trap in an effort to catch Ozzy. Now that the dog is caught, they plan to scan Ozzy for a chip to see if she has a home. If not, Ozzy may be up for adoption.
  • The Jacksonville Game Center has been burglarized twice in less than a month with thieves making off with nearly $10,000 worth of Magic the Gathering cards.  >> Read more trending news  Store owners told Action News Jax that both times, the thieves busted through a wall to get in. Hector Ortiz is a regular at the game center. Action News Jax caught up with him as customers and staff were preparing for their Friday night Magic the Gathering tournament. “The place is pretty packed, we have anywhere from 20-plus players,” Ortiz said. “It’s like a second home. A lot of people come to get away from issues.” So, when these crimes occur, Ortiz said the customers take it as a personal attack. “The first time it happened was really heartbreaking,” Ortiz said. Action News Jax first reported three weeks ago when thieves busted a hole in the wall to take more than $5,000 rare Magic the Gathering cards. The owner said they came back again overnight Friday. Surveillance video showed the glow of their flashlights. The owner said this time, they left another hole in the wall and stole more than $3,000 in those same, valuable cards.  He said they busted through the wall at the restaurant next door. Friday, Hunan Wok had a board up in the window where the thieves broke their glass to get in.Ortiz had a message for the thieves. “Just grow up,” Ortiz said. “It’s not necessary. You’re attacking us for a quick buck. Just go out there and get a job, man.
  • A woman is in jail facing felony charges after Clayton County authorities said she allegedly sneaked a firecracker into a courtroom and threatened to blow up the place.  >> Read more trending news  Whitney Jefferies, 32, was arrested Monday night after a judge saw the threat the woman allegedly posted on social media, Channel 2 Action News reported.  Judge Michael Garrett said Jefferies was in the front row in his courtroom. He told Channel 2 she seemed agitated that it was taking so long for her case to be called.  Later, he saw a video she posted on her social media page in which she held up a firecracker and said she was going to blow the courtroom apart, the news station reported.  It is not clear how Jefferies got the firecracker into the courtroom, and Clayton County Sheriff Victor Hill has not commented on the situation. Deputies went to Jefferies’ condo in Morrow to arrest her, Channel 2 reported. Nobody answered when agents first knocked on her door, according to the news station.However, deputies realized someone was inside the home when a pizza was delivered to the house later that evening, Channel 2 reported.  Deputies went back to Jefferies’ door and brought her out in handcuffs, the news station reported.  Jefferies was booked into the Clayton jail, where she remains held on a $35,000 bond. She face three charges, including making terroristic threats and possession of a destructive device.
  • A Charlotte, North Carolina woman and her Australian boyfriend were murdered while they were traveling the world, officials said. >> Read more trending news  Chynna Deese, 24, and her boyfriend, Lucas Fowler, 23, were found shot and killed on a remote western Canadian highway Monday near their broken down van, WSOC-TV reported. Officials said they were exploring Canadian national parks and heading to Alaska. Police said this does not appear connected to any other crimes. Friday night, WSOC-TV interviewed Chynna's mother Sheila Deese, who said despite not knowing how her daughter died, she's comforted in knowing her daughter and Fowler were together until the end. 'It is a love story, a southern girl goes out of the country, meets this Australian and they were just the same personality,' Sheila Deese said. Canadian Police said they don't know if Deese and Fowler were targeted or if this was random. They said they are working with the FBI to find the couple's killer. 
  • A 77-year-old convicted murderer who was released from prison after being deemed 'too old' to kill again was convicted this week of fatally stabbing a Maine woman. >> Read more trending news  Albert Flick was found guilty Wednesday of killing 48-year-old Kimberly Dobbie in July 2018 outside a Lewiston laundromat. The attack happened in front of Dobbie's 11-year-old twin boys. 'I'm glad the verdict is done and over and I'm glad he'll never be able to walk the streets again,' said Dobbie's friend James Lipps, NBC News reported. This is Flick's second murder conviction. Flick was convicted in the 1979 death of his wife, Sandra. Similar to Dobbie's death, Flick stabbed his wife as her daughter watched, CNN reported. Flick was sentenced to 25 years in prison for the 1979 murder. He was released and was released in 2000 after 21 years for good behavior, The Washington Post reported.  By 2010, when he was in his late 60s, Flick had been convicted of assaulting two other women. Despite his record, the judge in the 2010 case sentenced him to four years. “At some point Mr. Flick is going to age out of his capacity to engage in this conduct,” Maine Superior Court Justice Robert E. Crowley said, according to the Portland Press Herald. “And incarcerating him beyond the time that he ages out doesn’t seem to me to make good sense.” Judge Crowley retired in 2010. He hasn't responded to media requests for comment. Flick is scheduled for sentencing August 9. He faces 25 years to life behind bars. “I firmly believe this could have been prevented,” Elsie Clement, whose mother was stabbed to death by Flick in 1979, told the Press Herald last year of Dobbie's death. “There is no reason this man should have been on the streets in the first place, no reason.”
  • Public school students in New Hampshire will be provided with free menstrual products thanks to the passage of a new law. SB 142, signed into law Wednesday by Gov. Chris Sununu, will require public schools to provide feminine hygiene products in women’s and gender-neutral bathrooms in high schools and middle schools starting January 1, The Concord Monitor reported.  >> Read more trending news  “This legislation is about equality and dignity,” Sununu said. “SB 142 will help ensure young women in New Hampshire public schools will have the freedom to learn without disruption – and free of shame, or fear of stigma.” The idea for the law came from 17-year-old Caroline Dillon, a high school student in Rochester, N.H. The high schooler was inspired to act after learning in U.S. History class about 'period poverty,' where those who can't afford feminine hygiene products miss work or school during menstruation. “It was sad to think about,” Dillon told The Monitor. “Girls in middle and high school would never dream of telling somebody that they have to miss school or use socks because they can’t pay for pads.” Dillon approached state Sen. Martha Hennessey with her idea, and Hennesey became a main sponsor of the bill. Educating some lawmakers was initially awkward, Dillon said. Most lawmakers are men, and wanted to avoid words like 'menstruation,' 'tampon' and 'feminine hygiene products,' The Monitor reported. “They would say ‘the thing’ or just try to avoid saying it all together,” Dillon said. “I would say to them, ‘If this makes you uncomfortable, think about how uncomfortable it is to be in this situation yourself. If you can't really picture it yourself, think about any woman in your life: your mom, your daughter, your aunt – think about how uncomfortable she feels – you are in the position to make it so these women don’t have to feel that way.’ ”  Dillon's efforts were ultimately successful. Funding for the new measure will come from school districts' budgets, according to CNN. Districts can partner with nonprofit organizations to provide the feminine hygiene products. Opponents of the bill said its amounts to an unconstitutional unfunded mandate,  USA Today reported. Similar laws currently exist in New York, Illinois and California.