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podcasts: WSB Traffic Podcast with Doug "Fireball" Turnbull and Smilin' Mark McKay

Doug Turnbull and Mark McKay talk Metro Atlanta traffic issues with the rest of the members of WSB Triple Team Traffic, local transportation officials, and YOU the listener.

Most Recent Episode:

The WSB Traffic Edition of Atlanta's Evening News 8/1/2018

Topics: Doug "Fireball" Turnbull and Smilin' Mark McKay go long form with GDOT Commissioner Russell McMurry and SRTA/Xpress Executive Director Chris Tomlinson on the ins and the outs of the new I-75/I-575 Northwest Metro Express Lanes, how the Peach Pass works, and where these types of lanes will open down the road in Metro Atlanta.
Posted: August 01, 2018

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More Episodes:

Former NASCAR driver Patrick Carpentier on distracted driving

Topics: Carpentier chats with WSB's Doug Turnbull about his new passion to educate teens about distracted driving and why, even with strict laws, it's still an epidemic. He also reflects on his short NASCAR career and how he takes in the sport these days.

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WSB Rapid Fire Round Table on the new Hands-Free law

Topics: Triple Team Traffic's Doug "Fireball" Turnbull, Smilin' Mark McKay, and Ashley Frasca, along with Atlanta Journal-Constitution's transportation writer David Wickert and WSB legal analyst Phil Holloway take more questions on the new distracted driving rules in Georgia and how officials will enforce them.

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Georgia's New Hands-Free Law: The Do's and Don't's of Distracted Driving

Topics: This WSB Radio, Ch. 2 Action News, and AJC roundtable is hosted by WSB Radio & Ch. 2's Mark Arum and Ch. 2's Richard Elliot, featuring Triple Team Traffic's Doug "Fireball" Turnbull and Smilin' Mark McKay and AJC transportation reporter David Wickert. The panel takes audience and social media questions and interviews guests about the July 1st Hands-Free Law.

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The low-down on the Hands-Free Georgia Act 5/23/2018

Topics: Fireball and Smilin' fill-in on The Mark Arum show, talking about and answering questions the July 1st hands-free law. Bill lead sponsor Rep. John Carson joins, along with Steelhorse Law's George Stein on how it will be enforced.

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Three months full! 4/20/2018

Topics: Smilin' and Fireball yak for quite a long time about many subjects, including a terrible I-285 wreck, car maintenance, the importance of AAA, and the I-75 Express Lanes. They also share memories of Jon Lewis and Captain Herb Emory.

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WSB Traffic Podcast 1/26/2018

Topics: In the first episode of the year, Turnbull and McKay discuss the awful crashes in Tuesday's morning drive, the recent winter weather, the underlying reason for truck bottlenecks, and driverless cars.

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The Year in Review for Atlanta Traffic 12/14/17

Topics: Fireball and Smilin' break down the recent snow storm and the nutty year on the Atlanta roads. They also look ahead on what to expect in 2018.

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10/20/2017: The airborne account of the fatal GA-400 tire crash

Topics: Turnbull and McKay are back to talk about the awful traffic in the beautiful weather. McKay gives his airborne account of the terrible death on GA-400 Thursday morning, when a tire from a northbound truck came loose and hit a southbound car.

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Riding in a self-driving with Bryan Mulligan on the North Ave. smart corridor

Topics: WSB's Doug Turnbull interviews Applied Information President Bryan Mulligan about how traffic signals can talk to apps and autonomous cars and how this technology on North Ave. is some of the first in the nation. Mulligan also discusses how his autonomous Tesla interacts with other cars and adjusts for traffic conditions.

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News

  • A retired four-star general is President Donald Trump's pick to be the new U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia. Trump announced Tuesday that he's nominating John Abizaid (AB'-ih-zayd), the longest-serving commander of the U.S. Central Command. The post has been empty since former ambassador Joseph Westphal left in January 2017. The nomination comes at a time U.S.-Saudi relations are being tested by the slaying of a journalist critical of the royal family in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. If confirmed by the Senate, Abizaid would become ambassador as the Trump administration weighs the U.S. response to the killing of Washington Post contributor Jamal Khashoggi (jah-MAHL' khahr-SHOHK'-jee). Turkish officials claim Khashoggi was killed by a 15-member assassination squad sent from Riyadh on orders from the highest levels of the Saudi government.
  • A Dallas woman went to Mexico for surgery on her nose late last month and returned home in a coma, with doctors telling her family to take her off life support or attach feeding and breathing tubes to keep her alive.  >> Read more trending news  Laura Avila was a singer, dancer and real estate agent, her family told WFAA-TV, until she went to Juarez, Mexico, on Oct. 30 with her fiancé for plastic surgery on her nose.  Her sister said Avila went to Mexico for the procedure because it was cheaper. “The price of course compared to those in the U.S. was less than a third,” Angie Avila said, but the cheaper cost wasn’t worth her life or the suffering the botched surgery is causing her family. Something went terribly wrong after Avila was given anesthesia, her fiancé, Enrique Cruz, told WFAA. 'I was kind of getting upset and worried because they would not let me see her or anything,” Cruz said. Eight hours later he was still waiting. When a doctor finally arrived, he told Cruz Avila had suffered a cardiac arrest, the news station reported. >> Trending: Brain aneurysm disguised as migraine suddenly kills mother of four  'They injected anesthesia in her spine at the clinic and instead of flowing down her body, it went into her brain, which caused severe swelling,' Angie Avila said. She was eventually taken to a hospital in Juarez, but it took four days for the facility to agree to transfer her back to the U.S. When Avila arrived in El Paso, doctors told her family that she had suffered severe brain damage and would never be the same, according to WFAA. The family was asked to either take her off life support or agree to feeding and breathing tubes. >> Trending: Man blames case of flesh-eating bacteria on Arizona splash park 'They told us she would never be able to walk or eat for herself again or speak,” Angie Avila said. The family is praying for a miracle and have hired an attorney to try to hold the clinic in Juarez accountable.
  • Authorities doing the somber work of identifying the victims of California's deadliest wildfire are drawing on leading-edge DNA technology, but older scientific techniques and deduction could also come into play, experts say. With the death toll from the Northern California blaze topping 40 and expected to rise, officials said they were setting up a rapid DNA-analysis system, among other steps. Rapid DNA is a term for portable devices that can identify someone's genetic material in hours, rather than days or weeks and more extensive equipment it can take to test samples in labs. A 2017 federal law provided a framework for police to use rapid DNA technology when booking suspects in criminal investigations, and some medical examiners have started using it to identify the dead or are weighing deploying it in disasters. 'In many circumstances, without rapid DNA technology, it's just such a lengthy process,' says Frank DePaolo, a deputy commissioner of the New York City medical examiners' office, which has been at the forefront of the science of identifying human remains since 9/11 and is exploring how it might use a rapid DNA device. The technology, and DNA itself, has limits. It is sometimes impossible to extract DNA from incinerated remains, and trying to identify remains through DNA requires having a sample from the person when alive or building a profile by sampling close relatives. But that doesn't mean there's no hope of identifying the dead without DNA. 'There's two ways to approach it: You could do a DNA-led identification effort ... (or) more traditionally, the medical examiner and their team of people will try to establish the biological profiles of the unidentified and try to identify them through more traditional methods,' says Dr. Anthony Falsetti, a George Mason University forensic science professor and forensic anthropologist and a specialist in evaluating human remains. In fact, more traditional methods, such as examining dental records, are often a first step. Partially, that's because victims might have dental X-rays but not personal DNA profiles. Other medical records — of bone fractures, prosthetics or implants, for instance — also can be helpful. And after a disaster, a crucial part of identifying victims is developing a manifest of the missing people, studying the site for clues as to who might have been there and meticulously searching for remains, sometimes by having a forensic anthropologist sift carefully through the debris, DePaolo said. 'Ultimately, you may be able to identify that you have a female, a male, a child' from studying the remains, but science won't give them a name, he said. In such cases, authorities may have to rely on reasoning to match what's known about the remains to who is known to be missing. 'That manifest may ultimately be the only thing you have to potentially identify that the victims that were recovered from that location could be those victims,' he said. New York medical examiners have worked to match nearly 22,000 fragments of human remains to the 2,753 people killed at the World Trade Center. More than 17 years later, 40 percent of the dead have never had any of their remains identified. But the painstaking process still yields results: The remains of one victim, 26-year-old Scott Michael Johnson, were identified in July for the first time. Whatever the process proves to be for California authorities, DePaolo said, 'it's a tough and complex job that they have ahead of them, and our condolences go out to them.
  • Advocates for Abraham Lincoln's museum pleaded with Illinois lawmakers Tuesday to use state funds to help keep a throng of historic artifacts in his hometown despite questions about whether one of the relics — a stovepipe hat — actually belonged to the 16th president. Lawmakers grilled Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation leaders over the $9.2 million it still owes on the loan it took in 2007 to buy a collection of as many as 1,500 Lincoln-related items from private collector Louise Taper. The note comes due in October 2019, and the foundation has said it will have to auction parts of the collection if it can't raise the balance. But fundraising isn't easy in the face of negative publicity. A report this fall found that the foundation had secretly sought expert advice and a DNA test on a period stovepipe hat in Lincoln's size that failed to delineate a clear connection. Questions about whether administrators of the museum and library were properly informed have strained relations . The Taper collection is a smorgasbord of Lincoln memorabilia. Along with thousands of pages of documents dating to the president's grandfather, Col. Abraham Lincoln, it includes the bloodied kid gloves Lincoln had in his pocket the night he was killed at Ford's Theater, the quill pen left on his desk; his presidential seal, replete with wax left on it from its last use; and a notebook with his earliest known writings. 'Lincoln always knew he would come back to Springfield and that's where his most iconic personal effects deserve to stay, right here in the land of Lincoln,' foundation CEO Carla Knorowski testified. In a line borrowed from Lincoln's first inaugural address, she added an 'appeal to the better angels of your nature.' The foundation has sought $5 million from the hotel occupancy tax money collected for tourism promotion. Knorowski said Gov. Bruce Rauner's administration agreed in May but has since backed off. Rauner spokeswoman Elizabeth Tomev said the Republican supports a 'vibrant' Lincoln museum but his staff is waiting for a detailed business plan and other debt-repayment data requested last spring.  Sold for $25 million, Taper donated $2 million worth of items. The foundation borrowed $23 million and has paid $13 million in principal and $8 million in interest. The loan has been refinanced — once at a higher rate for a shorter term, Rep. Jeanne Ives noted — and it stands at $9.2 million despite annual foundation fundraising collections averaging $3.5 million. 'I don't understand how your foundation directors have allowed this to go on for so long,' said Ives, a Wheaton Republican. Ives read from an appraisal in 2017 that questioned the authenticity not only of the hat but of a clock allegedly from Lincoln's Springfield law office and a hand fan Mary Lincoln took to the theater the night her husband was shot. State historian Samuel Wheeler, who called the collection 'world class,' said research continues on all three items. Despite questions, the foundation said an appraisal of just 40 items that it hasn't identified found a fair-market value of $10.3 million. Knorowski said it's unclear how many items would have to be sold to satisfy the debt. The foundation is seeking an auction house to be ready for a sale. Adding a touch of theater to the proceedings was Lincoln presenter Randy Duncan of Carlinville , invited by Rep. Ann Williams, the Chicago Democrat who chairs the House Tourism, Hospitality and Craft Industries Committee. Duncan appeared this time without the traditional Lincoln-style top hat, a nod to the ongoing controversy. 'There's more to my legacy than just a hat,' the Lincoln portrayer said. ___ Follow Political Writer John O'Connor at https://twitter.com/apoconnor .
  • Oakland's Bob Melvin was voted Manager of the Year for the third time, winning the American League honor Tuesday after leading the Athletics to the playoffs despite the lowest opening-day payroll in the major leagues. Atlanta's Brian Snitker won the National League award following the Braves' surprising first-place finish. Melvin received 18 first-place votes, 19 seconds and one third for 121 points from the Baseball Writers' Association of America. He is the eighth manager to win three or more times and is one shy of the record shared by Bobby Cox and Tony La Russa. Melvin won with Oakland in 2012 and took the NL honor with Arizona in 2007. His A's went 97-65 — a 22-win improvement over 2017 — even with a $68.6 million payroll when the season began. They overcame a 34-36 start to go a big league-best from June 16 on, even though Jharel Cotton, A.J. Puk, Sean Manaea, Brett Anderson and several other starting pitchers got hurt. They lost to the New York Yankees in the AL wild-card game. Boston's Alex Cora was second with seven firsts and 79 points after leading the Red Sox to a team-record 108 wins. Tampa Bay's Kevin Cash, whose innovation of using a reliever as an 'opener' was copied by other teams — including Oakland — later in the season, was next with five firsts and 57 points. Snitker received 17 firsts, nine seconds and one third for 116 points, the only manager picked on every NL ballot. Milwaukee's Craig Counsell was second with 11 firsts and for 99 points. Colorado's Bud Black was third with 41 points. A 63-year-old baseball lifer who played in Atlanta's minor league system from 1977-80, Snitker has spent 42 seasons with the Braves, managing at every level and serving as the big league third base coach from 2007-13. He was managing at Triple-A Gwinnett when took over Atlanta in May 2016 after Fredi Gonzalez was fired for a 9-28 start. The Braves went 59-65 during the rest of the season, and Snitker was given the job full-time. Atlanta went 72-90, and then improved to 90-72 this year, when the Braves lost to the Los Angeles Dodgers in a four-game Division Series. Cy Young Award votes will be announced Wednesday. The New York Mets' Jacob deGrom, Washington's Max Scherzer and Philadelphia's Aaron Nola are finalists in the NL, and Tampa Bay's Blake Snell, Houston's Justin Verlander and Cleveland's Corey Kluber top the AL contenders. ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/tag/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Congratulations to Atlanta Braves manager Brian Snitker on winning the 2018 National League Manager of the Year Award!  The Braves skipper beat out Milwaukee's Craig Counsell and Colorado's Bud Black for the honor. It is the second award for the Braves this postseason after phenom Ronald Acuna Jr. was named 2018 National League Rookie of Year. [RELATED: Braves superstar Ronald Acuña, Jr. wins N.L. Rookie of the Year Award] It is the first time a Braves manager has won the award since Bobby Cox took it home in 2005. Cox won the award three times in his career.  The Braves announced last month a new two-year contract for Snitker, who has been with the Braves organization for 43 seasons. In 2018, Snitker led the Braves to a 90-72 record and their first NL East Division title in five years. Snitker isn't the only Atlanta manager to win league honors this season. Atlanta United manager Gerardo 'Tata' Martino was named MLS Coach of the Year on Tuesday too.  [RELATED: Atlanta Braves, manager Brian Snitker agree to 2-year contract]