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Live Blog: Follow and interact with the GOP debate

This is a recap rundown of the Fox Business Network/WSJ GOP debate. Follow what the candidates said here! Our moderator, Jared Yamamoto is responding to your questions and statements below.

11:16 p.m. Trump wants to make the country better than it’s ever been and notes that he’s self-funding his campaign.

11:15 p.m. Carson focuses on healthcare reform in his closing remarks.

11:14 p.m. Rubio closes with an alternative to the current path America’s heading down. The focus should be families.

11:14 p.m. Cruz reflects on his family’s immigrant history and how he will win using grassroots activism.

11:13 p.m. Bush closes by saying that we need a real Commander-in-Chief and that he'd be that guy.

11:12 p.m. Fiorina closes by attacking Hillary Clinton saying that she can beat Hillary.

11:11 p.m. Kasich closes with a message of hope and responsibility to reconnect with the American Dream and win the 2016 election.

11:10 p.m. Paul starts the closing remarks, claiming that he’s the only fiscal conservative on the stage and we need to get back to those values.

11:07 p.m. Bush looks for a middle ground in the climate change argument.

11:05 p.m. We’re switching to climate change, Paul doesn’t think that humans have a massive impact on the environment.

11:02 p.m. Trump explains what a corporate inversion is and why companies move around to avoid the rising tax rates.

10:59 p.m. Rubio focuses on the future and the way America should be.

10:55 p.m. Fiorina compares Kasich’s argument to Socialism.

10:53 p.m. Kasich attacks Cruz saying his philosophical argument does not help a crisis.

10:51 p.m. Cruz also wants to bring back the gold standard.

10:49 p.m. Cruz wants to eliminate Washington cronyism in both parties.

10:47 p.m. Kasich believes that values need to be utilized in a free market system.

10:44 p.m. Carson thinks we need to focus on cutting banking regulations.

10:41 p.m. Bush claims the Obama administration’s overreach has led to income inequality.

10:35 p.m. Kasich doesn’t consider China as an enemy, but they are not our friends.

10:33 p.m. The conversation has shifted to cyberattacks.

10:32 p.m. Rubio refers to Putin as a global gangster. Rubio thinks he’s very dangerous.

10:30 p.m. Paul thinks Fiorina’s policies would lead to another lengthy war.

10:28 p.m. Fiorina has a different vision to handle Putin and doesn’t agree with Trump.

10:25 p.m. Bush thinks we need to be leaders, but not the police force of the world.

10:23 p.m. Trump attacks the Iranian nuclear deal and is not against Russian President Putin sending troops to fight ISIS in the Middle East.

10:21 p.m. Bush believes American leadership is needed to fix the Middle East.

10:18 p.m. Carson answers the first question out of the break on adding special operations forces throughout the Middle East. He thinks the current state is ineffective and we need to “make them look like losers.”

10:12 p.m. Paul is getting more airtime this time around. He continues promoting fiscal conservatism.

10:08 p.m. Cruz jumps in saying there is a middle ground between the two arguments.

10:07 p.m. Paul’s attack continues. Rubio thinks we need to focus on spending more on the military.

10:04 p.m. Paul attacks Rubio’s tax plan, questioning his conservatism.

10:02 p.m. Rubio enforces family values in his tax code. He says the family is the core of the American economy.  

9:59 p.m. Bush also thinks the tax code should be simplified. He says 2% economic growth isn’t good.

9:57 p.m. Cruz is the second candidate to plug his website. He focuses on his tax plan.

9:55 p.m. Paul says, "I want a government really really small, so small you can barely see it."

9:54 p.m. Paul would make a tax plan with zero deductions on businesses.

9:52 p.m. Carson explains his tax plan. He thinks it needs to be the same percentage across the board no matter how much you make.

9:47 p.m. Fiorina thinks the ‘free market’ is the best alternative to fix Obamacare.

9:45 pm. The conversation has changed to Obamacare. Fiorina wants it repealed and thinks it prohibits businesses from succeeding.  

9:42 p.m. Cruz attacks the media again for misinterpreting his campaign pledges.

9:40 p.m. Rubio focuses on American business tax rates. He believes they are too high and need to be lowered.

9:37 p.m. Trump says, "If you think walls don't work, all you have to do is ask Israel."

9:36 p.m. The moderators are losing control after Trump’s response to Kasich. Several candidates are trying to chime in.

9:35 p.m. Kasich disagrees with Trump’s analysis. He doesn’t envision moving 15 million immigrants.

9:33 p.m. Trump turns the conversation to immigration reform and reaffirms that a wall will work on the U.S.-Mexican border.

9:30 p.m. Ben Carson responds to his controversial statements made last week. He turns the conversation into a attack on Hillary Clinton.

9:24 p.m. Sen. Rand Paul opens by attacking the U.S. Federal Reserve. He thinks that rising interest rates are not helping the middle class.

9:21 p.m. Carly Fiorina opens by attacking the size and scope of the ever growing U.S. Government.

9:20 p.m. Gov. Bush wants to focus on small businesses and suggests the economy is not as well as we think.

9:18 p.m. Gov. Jeb Bush is frustrated with Gov. Kasich for taking his opening time.

9:16 p.m. Sen. Ted Cruz opens with a vision of growing the economy.

9:13 p.m. Gov. John Kasich is first to promote his presidential website. He’s seeking ‘middle class’ reform.

9:10 p.m. Sen. Marco Rubio is also against raising the minimum wage. “It only accelerates automated processes.”

9:08 p.m. Ben Carson and Donald Trump respond to raising the minimum wage. Both do not want to see it raised.

9:03 p.m. The candidates and rules are being introduced. Here we go.

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News

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  • One person was killed and the suspect is dead after a gunman shot 14 people in Toronto’s Greektown neighborhood Sunday, police said. A child was among the injured, police said. Here are the latest updates: Update 1:06 a.m. EDT July 23: The child who was shot, a young girl, is currently in critical condition, according to Toronto police. Police say it is “too early to say whether the shooting is terrorism,” The Associated Press reported. One city official, Councillor Paula Fletcher, said the shooting was not gang-related. Fletcher and Councillor Mary Fragedakis also said the gunman was emotionally disturbed. >> Read more trending news 
  • A man's feud with his grandmother turned into a bizarre and deadly confrontation that ended with a supermarket worker dead and dozens of people held hostage in a store miles away. Gene Evin Atkins, 28, was booked Sunday on suspicion of murder after an explosion of violence that a relative said may have been brewing for weeks. Melyda Corado, 27, was shot to death Saturday at a Trader Joe's market in the Silver Lake neighborhood after a gunfight that shattered the store's glass doors, witnesses said. 'I'm sad to say she didn't make it. My baby sister. My world,' her brother, Albert Corado said on Twitter. On Sunday, grieving family members, co-workers and customers remembered Corado as lively, hardworking and always smiling. A makeshift memorial of flowers, candles and notes grew on the sidewalk outside of the store. 'Yesterday marks the saddest day in Trader Joe's history as we mourn the loss of one our own,' company spokeswoman Kenya Friend-Daniel said in a statement. The violence began when Atkins shot his 76-year-old grandmother several times at their South Los Angeles home after she complained about his having too many television sets on, said a cousin, Charlene Egland. Mary Elizabeth Madison was taken to a hospital in critical condition but Egland said she underwent surgery and was improving Sunday. Madison raised Atkins from the age of 7 and he had never been violent toward her but recently had seemed upset and distant, Egland said. 'He didn't seem right to me,' Egland said. For the past two or three weeks, the two had argued over Atkins' girlfriend, who was staying at their home, Egland said. 'She didn't want the girl over there anymore,' Egland said. Egland said she was walking toward the house when she heard about six gunshots. Another cousin, who lives in the house, came running from the porch and shouted to Egland, 'I think Gene shot my mama!' Police said Atkins' girlfriend was grazed in the head by a bullet, but the injury is not life threatening. Egland ran to call 911 but Atkins allegedly forced his wounded girlfriend into his grandmother's car and drove away. A stolen-car device helped police track the car to Hollywood but Atkins refused to pull over, police said. During the chase, Atkins fired at officers, blowing out the car's back window, and there was more shooting before the car crashed into a pole outside the Trader Joe's, followed by another shootout with police, Police Chief Michel Moore said. Customers and employees frantically dove for cover and barricaded themselves inside storerooms and bathrooms as bullets flew. Glass fragments injured a 22-year-old woman who later took herself to a hospital for treatment, police said. As he heard gunfire, Sean Gerace, who was working in the back of the supermarket, grabbed several of his co-workers and the group made their way into an upstairs storage area. He grabbed a folding ladder and tossed it out a window, helping his colleagues escape to safety, he told KNBC-TV. 'I grabbed an emergency ladder, barricaded the hallway, grabbed a weapon, put the ladder out the window and just tried to get the attention of the SWAT officer,' Gerace told the television station. About three hours later, Atkins — who'd been shot in the left arm — agreed to handcuff himself and walked out the front door, surrounded by four of the hostages. He was being held on $2 million bail Sunday and it wasn't clear if he had an attorney to comment on the allegations. A gun was found inside the store, police said. Trader Joe's said the store — known by customers as a neighborhood hangout with great customer service — would remain closed for the foreseeable future. Atkins, who has two daughters, bounced between several jobs, including working as a security guard, but had been repeatedly fired, Egland said. His grandmother had tried to help him find employment and 'was just trying to make him do better,' she said. ___ Associated Press writers Christopher Weber and Robert Jablon contributed to this report.
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Parts of the region have witnessed some of the driest conditions on record, amid a cycle of high temperatures and low snowmelt that appears to be getting worse, National Weather Service hydrologist Brian McInerney said. The dry conditions have fed wildfires that have destroyed hundreds of buildings across the West. This month, a firefighter was killed battling a blaze near California's Yosemite National Park. The federal Bureau of Land Management — which oversees vast expanses of public land, mostly in the West — says the problem facing wild horses stems from overpopulation aggravated by severe drought. The region is home to roughly 67,000 wild horses. 'You're always going to have drought issues. That's a common thing out on the range,' agency spokesman Jason Lutterman said. 'What really exacerbates things is when we're already over population, because then you already have resource issues.' The agency's emergency roundup in western Utah began a week ago, aiming to remove roughly 250 wild horses from a population of approximately 670. The operation is expected to take several weeks. Once the horses are rounded up, the government gives them veterinary treatment and offers them for sale or adoption. Those that aren't sold or adopted are transferred to privately contracted corrals and pastures for the long term. A similar emergency roundup began this month in central Nevada, where officials said some horses in a herd of 2,100 could die from lack of water in coming weeks. The operation was quickly halted, ironically because of extreme rain, but will likely resume. 'The ground's so dry it's not absorbing that water. It's running off,' bureau spokeswoman Jenny Lesieutre said. Volunteers are also taking action. Since late spring, Netherlands's Salt River group has hauled hay to a dozen locations outside Phoenix to feed a herd of starving wild horses. Roughly 200 miles (320 kilometers) north, a couple near Gray Mountain, on the Navajo Nation, have spearheaded an effort to leave water and food for horses they say would die without human intervention. In western Colorado, volunteers say they're preparing to bring up to 5,000 gallons (18,900 liters) of water per day to a herd of 750 desperate horses. 'Springs are drying up that have never dried up,' said Cindy Wright, co-founder of Colorado conservation group Wild Horse Warriors for Sand Wash Basin. Horses in the area stalk the dry earth with their ribs exposed, desperate for a drop, she said. Wild horse advocates have balked at the Bureau of Land Management's insistence that wild horse populations are too high. Critics say the agency is using dry conditions as a smoke screen to shrink horse populations in response to pressure from ranchers whose livestock compete with the horses for grazing land. 'I do have a concern about the larger numbers that they're pulling off, and then a bigger concern about the BLM under this administration using all kinds of excuses to pull off horses,' said Suzanne Roy, executive director of the American Wild Horse Campaign, an advocacy organization. The agency is prohibited from euthanizing the wild horses it rounds up, though President Donald Trump has proposed allowing the animals to be killed or sold for slaughter. Activists in Nevada held a rally last Tuesday at the bureau's state headquarters in Reno to protest a planned roundup later this year. Critics want the government to instead use birth control to manage wild horse populations. The bureau says the fertility treatment, which must be administered yearly and fired from a dart gun at close range, is too difficult for use except in certain cases where herds are easy to approach and have markings that make horses distinguishable from one another. Whatever the long-term answer, volunteers say their efforts can't go on forever. Trucking in water and food could cost several thousand dollars per month and make horses overly dependent on humans, they said. 'If we don't have a very good fall with a lot of rain — and it's also warm so that our fall vegetation grows — we're going to lose horses,' Wright said. ___ Associated Press writers Felicia Fonseca in Flagstaff, Arizona, and Scott Sonner in Reno, Nevada, contributed to this report.
  • President Donald Trump warned Iranian President Hassan Rouhani early Monday that he will face dire consequences for threatening the United States. Trump tweeted about the dangers to Iran of making hostile threats after Rouhani said Sunday 'American must understand well that peace with Iran is the mother of all peace and war with Iran is the mother of all wars.' Trump responded with a tweet that warned: 'NEVER EVER THREATEN THE UNITED STATES AGAIN OR YOU WILL SUFFER CONSEQUENCES THE LIKE OF WHICH FEW THROUGHOUT HISTORY HAVE EVER SUFFERED BEFORE.' Trump earlier this year pulled the United States out of the international deal meant to prevent Tehran from developing a nuclear weapon and ordered increased American sanctions. Rouhani had warned Trump Sunday to stop 'playing with the lion's tail' and threatening Iran, 'or else you will regret it.' Trump has suggested Iranian leaders are 'going to call me and say 'let's make a deal'' but Iran has rejected talks. Rouhani has previously lashed out against Trump for threatening to re-impose the sanctions, as well as for moving the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem and banning travel to the U.S. from certain Muslim-majority countries. Trump's tweet suggested he has little patience with the trading of hostile messages with Iran, using exceptionally strong language and writing an all-capitalized tweet. 'WE ARE NO LONGER A COUNTRY THAT WILL STAND FOR YOUR DEMENTED WORDS OF VIOLENCE & DEATH. BE CAUTIOUS!,' he wrote. Trump has a history of firing off heated tweets that seem to quickly escalate long-standing disputes with leaders of nations at odds with the U.S. In the case of North Korea, the public war of words cooled quickly and gradually led to the high profile summit and denuclearization talks. On Sunday in California, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was strongly critical of Iran. He called the religious leaders of Iran 'hypocritical holy men' who amassed vast sums of wealth while allowing their people to suffer, part of a highly critical broadside issued as the republic approached the 40th anniversary of its Islamic revolution and the U.S. prepared to reimpose the economic sanctions. In a speech at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum, Pompeo castigated Iran's political, judicial and military leaders, too, accusing several by name of participating in widespread corruption. He also said the government has 'heartlessly repressed its own people's human rights, dignity and fundamental freedoms.' He said despite poor treatment by their leaders, 'the proud Iranian people are not staying silent about their government's many abuses,' Pompeo said. 'And the United States under President Trump will not stay silent either. In light of these protests and 40 years of regime tyranny, I have a message for the people of Iran: The United States hears you,' he said. 'The United States supports you. The United States is with you.
  • Police are investigating a stabbing the victim says was likely racially motivated. The victim, Humberto Sanchez, 26, needed 25 stitches and told Channel 2's Michael Seiden he believes he is targeted because of his skin color. The assault happened at a bar in Kennesaw on July 13. Sanchez, who works in construction and lives in Marietta, said he had just spent a night out with coworkers when two white men approached him and started making racist comments, asking if him if he had any drugs for sale. He said they accused him of being a member of a Mexican drug cartel  “They were like, 'Yeah, you have it. Can I get some?’ I was like, ‘No. I don’t even know what you're talking about,” he said. RELATED STORIES: Man accused of groping woman at Roswell park turns himself in Man found malnourished, children unsupervised in southwest Atlanta home, police say Boaters' window shot out while cruising on Lake Lanier Sanchez said he felt uncomfortable and decided to start walking toward his car, parked at another bar about a mile away. But about five minutes into his walk, Sanchez said a car pulled up from behind him and someone got out. 'That’s when I got hit from the back and I got cut. I didn’t even second guess what was going on. I ran, I ran,' he said. Sanchez ran for his life and immediately called his family who alerted police He said he believes his attackers are the same men who confronted him outside the bar. “I just want to get everything over with, hopefully these guys get caught,' he said. An employee at the bar told Seiden racism won't be tolerated and said they handed over surveillance video to police in hopes of identifying the attackers.