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Man arrested digging up Civil War artifacts at Kennesaw Mountain
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Man arrested digging up Civil War artifacts at Kennesaw Mountain

Man arrested digging up Civil War artifacts at Kennesaw Mountain
Photo Credit: Andrew McMurtrie / Special
The Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park stands as more than a scenic memorial to one of the Civil War's defining battles. It was the most-visited battlefield site in the nation in 2012, surpassing Gettysburg for the year. The park is a 2,923 acre National Battlefield that preserves a Civil War battleground of the Atlanta Campaign. Opposing forces maneuvered and fought here from June 19, 1864 until July 2, 1864. For directions to Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park, please visit the National Park Service's website: http://www.nps.gov/kemo/planyourvisit/directions.htm. -- Information and text from NPS.gov

Man arrested digging up Civil War artifacts at Kennesaw Mountain

Apparently a Cherokee County man thought, if there was ever a good time to look for Civil War artifacts at Kennesaw Mountain, a partial government shutdown would be perfect.

He was wrong.

Rangers are still on the job at national battlefield on Cheatham Hill Road. They caught the man taking his metal detector to the park and digging up artifacts.

A Cobb County police officer spotted the man heading into one of the most “archeological sensitive areas of the park,” said Park Ranger Anthony Winegar.

Rangers waited until the man returned to his car with his goodies.

“He did appear to have several objects that were from the Civil War time period,” Winegar told Channel 2 Action News.

The suspect, only described as a man from Cherokee County, is facing several federal charges. The items have been seized.

Warnings are up in several spots around the battlefield to warn people that digging for artifacts is illegal.  This area is where the main union assault of the Kennesaw Mountain campaign took place.

Rangers say stealing the items is like stealing from history.

“A particular bullet fired from particular style of gun can tell us where the round was fired from and what types of equipment of the lines was issues,” said Winegar. “That’s very valuable for historians for recreating the battle later on.”

Normally, an archaeologist would be called in to check out the area where the suspect found the items, but because of the shutdown, that is on hold.

 

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  • A truck exploded Saturday morning in a Walmart parking lot. >> Read more trending news  In a video, bystanders could be heard yelling at a man who appeared to be the truck's owner to get away from the truck. 'I got thousands of dollars of tools in there,' the man could be heard saying. Firefighters were able to quickly douse the flames. The cause of the fire is unknown. There were no injuries, officials said.
  • The discovery of two Civil War-era ships in Lake Michigan this summer were found miles away from where they were thought to have gone down in 1878 and may have sunk after a collision. >> Read more trending news  The schooners St. Andrews and Peshtigo were reportedly lost in Lake Huron in the eastern Straits of Mackinac almost 150 years ago, but the ships were discovered 50 miles away in northern Lake Michigan, off Charlevoix, when an explorer found a virtual ship graveyard, according to a news release from Shipwreck World. Longtime diver and explorer Bernie Hellstrom located an “obstruction” on the lake floor in 2010 and saw the wrecks firsthand with an underwater camera this summer. Hellstrom found the two ships in “an amazing state of preservation” within 10 feet of each other, with intertwined masts and a massive hole in the hull of one of the ships, indicating “the vessels had collided and sank quickly,” Shipwreck World reported. The Peshtigo’s cargo of coal was strewn across the lake bottom. News accounts at the time said a collision between the two ships occurred just after midnight on June 25, 1878, in dark, hazy conditions, the publication reported.  The confusion about the location of the collision developed after the wreck of the St. Andrews was misidentified in Lake Huron. The St. Andrews was carrying a load of corn from Chicago to Buffalo and the Peshtigo was hauling coal from Erie, Pennsylvania, to Chicago.
  • An Atlanta woman was arrested after allegedly threatening students at her son’s bus stop with a baseball bat and pulling a teen’s hair during a fight, authorities said. Tiara Jones was booked Thursday on charges of simple battery and making terroristic threats, Fulton County jail records show. The charges stem from bus stop altercations Jones and her 15-year-old son were allegedly involved in on Monday and Tuesday, Channel 2 Action News reported. Cellphone footage obtained by the station appears to show the woman looking on and encouraging her son as he fights with another teen Tuesday afternoon.Shouts of “keep fighting” can be heard as the Grady High School students roll around on the ground.  The video also appears to show Jones walk up behind a student and yank him by his hair. The day before, Jones allegedly came to the bus stop with a baseball bat and threatened students who had been arguing with her child, authorities said. “She was twirling the bat, telling him she was gonna bust him in his head,” parent Alycia Aldridge said. “You don’t get to chase people’s children and approach them with bats.” Jones’ son is also wanted in connection with the bus stop brawl, but Atlanta police are still searching for him, according to Channel 2. His name has not been released because he is a minor.  Jones remained in the Fulton County jail Saturday on a $60,000 bond. In other news: 
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