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Woman facing charges for reporting fake kidnapping
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Woman facing charges for reporting fake kidnapping

Woman facing charges for reporting fake kidnapping
Photo Credit: innovatedcaptures/Getty Images/iStockphoto
Close up of a robbers hands holding a knife. The man is on a black background so he is coming out of the shadows. The knife is sharp and dangerous. The hand complexion looks like it belongs to a muscular dark male criminal.

Woman facing charges for reporting fake kidnapping

A Gwinnett County woman, who reported to police she had been kidnapped at knifepoint, is now facing felony charges for making it all up.

Detectives with the Gwinnett Police Department are waiting for 33-year-old Hillary Black to turn herself in on charges of falsely reporting a crime.

Cpl. Michele Pihera says she told investigators a Hispanic man used a box cutter to threaten his way into her car after she withdrew money from the ATM at the Publix on Lawrenceville-Suwanee Road.

“He (then) gave her turn by turn directions to an abandoned shopping center,” Pihera tells WSB’s Sandra Parrish.

Fearing she would be sexually assaulted, the woman told police she pepper-sprayed the man and he fled her car. She then drove to a nearby Walmart where she flagged down someone to call police.

“It wasn’t until after the detective presented the surveillance images from the Publix, that she decided to come forward and say the incident never happened,” says Pihera.

Gwinnett Police spent close to 40 hours investigating the case and Black gave no reasons as to why she made up the story.

Pihera says Black told investigators she planned to turn herself in over the weekend, but as of Monday morning, still had not done so.

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