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Entertainment News

  • Michael Bay's 'Transformers: The Last Knight' topped the box office charts, but it was a dubious success. The fifth installment in the series took in a franchise low of $68.5 million in its first five days in theaters, $44.7 million of which came from weekend sales. In second place, 'Wonder Woman' took in an additional $24.9 million in its fourth weekend in theaters, pushing the superhero pic over the $300 million mark. It beat out Disney and Pixar's 'Cars 3,' which fell to $24.1 million in its second weekend, bringing its domestic totally to $98.8 million. Rounding out the top five were the Mandy Moore shark thriller '47 Meters Down' in fourth place with $7.1 million, and 'The Mummy,' in fifth place, with $6.1 million. The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by comScore: 1. 'Transformers: The Last Knight,' Paramount, $44,680,073, 4,069 locations, $10,981 average, $68,475,562, 1 Week. 2. 'Wonder Woman,' Warner Bros., $24,906,310, 3,933 locations, $6,333 average, $318,111,468, 4 Weeks. 3. 'Cars 3,' Disney, $24,074,497, 4,256 locations, $5,657 average, $98,782,390, 2 Weeks. 4. '47 Meters Down,' Entertainment Studios Motion Pictures, $7,088,262, 2,471 locations, $2,869 average, $23,914,194, 2 Weeks. 5. 'The Mummy,' Universal, $6,060,495, 2,980 locations, $2,034 average, $68,744,165, 3 Weeks. 6. 'All Eyez On Me,' Lionsgate, $5,806,975, 2,471 locations, $2,350 average, $38,599,294, 2 Weeks. 7. 'Pirates Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales,' Disney, $5,396,243, 2,453 locations, $2,200 average, $160,161,569, 5 Weeks. 8. 'Rough Night,' Sony, $4,703,261, 3,162 locations, $1,487 average, $16,638,208, 2 Weeks. 9. 'Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie,' 20th Century Fox, $4,284,115, 2,328 locations, $1,840 average, $65,747,291, 4 Weeks. 10. 'Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2,' Disney, $3,023,042, 1,468 locations, $2,059 average, $380,236,369, 8 Weeks. 11. 'Beatriz At Dinner,' Roadside Attractions, $1,759,977, 491 locations, $3,584 average, $2,953,757, 3 Weeks. 12. 'The Book Of Henry,' Focus Features, $948,369, 646 locations, $1,468 average, $3,105,724, 2 Weeks. 13. 'Tubelight,' Yash Raj Films, $930,058, 338 locations, $2,752 average, $930,058, 1 Week. 14. 'It Comes At Night,' A24, $800,325, 819 locations, $977 average, $13,043,493, 3 Weeks. 15. 'Baywatch,' Paramount, $748,404, 480 locations, $1,559 average, $56,656,293, 5 Weeks. 16. 'Paris Can Wait,' Sony Pictures Classics, $572,743, 408 locations, $1,404 average, $4,153,090, 7 Weeks. 17. 'The Big Sick,' Lionsgate, $421,577, 5 locations, $84,315 average, $421,577, 1 Week. 18. 'Alien: Covenant,' 20th Century Fox, $341,308, 294 locations, $1,161 average, $73,334,769, 6 Weeks. 19. 'The Boss Baby,' 20th Century Fox, $330,791, 241 locations, $1,373 average, $173,080,163, 13 Weeks. 20. 'The Hero,' The Orchard, $297,927, 81 locations, $3,678 average, $555,891, 3 Weeks. --- Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.
  • In a frank and heartfelt speech, U2 bassist Adam Clayton thanked his bandmates of four decades for their support during his treatment and recovery for alcohol abuse years ago, and then joined them for a rollicking rendition of a few hits. 'We have a pact with each other,' said Clayton, 57, who was receiving an award from MusiCares, the charity arm of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. 'In our band, no one will be a casualty. We all come home, or none of us come home. No one will be left behind. Thank you for honoring that promise, and letting me be in your band.' He ended by quoting lyrics that Bono, U2's frontman, had written when the band was starting out: 'If you walk away, walk away, I will follow.' At that, his bandmates came out to join him, performing 'Stuck in a Moment You Can't Get Out Of,' ''Vertigo' and, fittingly, 'I Will Follow.' The evening at the PlayStation Theater in Times Square also featured performances by rapper Michael Franti, Jack Garratt, reggae singer Chronixx, Macy Gray, and The Lumineers, who are currently appearing with U2 on their 'Joshua Tree' tour. Clayton was introduced by British record producer Chris Blackwell as someone who 'lived through addiction and came out the other side, and has been courageous enough to admit it.' Taking the stage, the bassist quipped: 'I'm not used to achieving anything on my own.' Turning serious, he said: 'I'm an alcoholic, addict, but in some ways that devastating disease is what drove me towards this wonderful life I now have. It's just that I couldn't take my friend alcohol. At some point I had to leave it behind and claim my full potential.' He said part of the reason he had a hard time quitting drinking was that, 'I didn't think you could be in a band and not drink. It is so much a part of our culture.' It was Eric Clapton, he said, who finally told him he needed help. 'He didn't sugarcoat it. He told me that I needed to change my life and that I wouldn't regret it,' Clayton said. He credited another friend, The Who's Pete Townshend, for visiting him in rehab, where he 'put steel on my back.' As for his bandmates, Clayton said, 'I was lucky because I had three friends who could see what was going on and who loved me enough to take up the slack of my failing. Bono, The Edge, and Larry (Mullen) truly supported me before and after I entered recovery, and I am unreservedly grateful for their friendship, understanding and support.' Clayton received the Stevie Ray Vaughan Award for his support of the MusiCares MAP Fund, which offers musicians access to addiction recovery treatment. Arriving at the theater earlier, he told reporters the fund was especially important given the current epidemic of opioid addiction. 'MusiCares ... really provides funding for a lot of people to look into those things and find help,' he said. He added that his bandmates had been supporting him for 40 years. 'You know, I guess they loved me before I knew how to love myself,' he said. 'So it's really important that they share this with me.' ___ John Carucci in New York contributed to this report.
  • The stage for Bill Cosby's next legal challenge shifts to California with a hearing scheduled Tuesday to set a trial date in a lawsuit accusing him of sexually assaulting a teen at the Playboy Mansion more than 40 years ago. Judy Huth accused the comedian of forcing her to perform a sex act on him in a bedroom at the mansion around 1974 when she was 15. The hearing comes less than two weeks after a Pennsylvania jury deadlocked on criminal charges against Cosby. A mistrial was declared June 17 on charges Cosby drugged and molested Andrea Constand, the former Temple University director of women's basketball, at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004. Cosby said the encounter was consensual. Cosby's legal team declared victory after the mistrial, though Pennsylvania prosecutors vowed to retry him. The comedian and actor once known as 'America's Dad' for his TV role on 'The Cosby Show' as paternal Dr. Cliff Huxtable has had his reputation tarnished with accusations of sexual abuse by nearly 60 women. In the wake of the criminal trial, though, Cosby is planning town hall meetings in an attempt to restore his legacy. Cosby, 79, is fighting lawsuits by 10 women on both coasts. Three have filed sexual battery or defamation cases in California, and seven have sued for defamation in Massachusetts, where Cosby has a home. He has denied any wrongdoing. Attorney Gloria Allred, who represents Huth, said the judge in Los Angeles Superior Court judge may delay setting a trial date to let Pennsylvania prosecutors pursue the retrial against Cosby first. A second deposition by Cosby was put on hold pending the criminal case. His first deposition in the Huth case is sealed. A spokesman for Cosby didn't immediately return a message seeking comment.
  • The Latest on a retracted CNN story about a supposed investigation in a Donald Trump associated and the head of a Russian investment fund (all times local): 8 p.m. CNN says it has accepted the resignations of three employees involved in a retracted story about a supposed investigation into a pre-inaugural meeting between an associate of President Donald Trump and the head of a Russian investment fund. The story was posted Thursday on CNN's website. It was retracted the next night, and CNN apologized to Anthony Scaramucci, the Trump transition team member named in the story. CNN said the story didn't meet its editorial standards. A network executive, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to discuss personnel issues, said Monday that story author Thomas Frank resigned. Also losing their jobs are Eric Lichtblau, an assistant managing editor at the organization's Washington bureau, and Lex Harris, head of the investigations unit. ___ 10:50 a.m. CNN wasn't saying Monday what led it to retract a story about a supposed investigation into a pre-inaugural meeting between an associate of President Donald Trump and the head of a Russian investment fund. The story posted Thursday on CNN's website said Senate investigators are looking into the meeting between Anthony Scaramucci, a member of Trump's transition team, and Kirill Dmitriev, whose Russian Direct Investment Fund guides investments by U.S. entities in Russia. Scaramucci, in the story, said he exchanged pleasantries in a restaurant with Dmitriev. On Friday night, CNN removed the story, saying it did not meet the news organization's standards. CNN apologized to Scaramucci. It was unclear whether the story by reporter Thomas Frank appeared on any of CNN's television networks.
  • Wisconsin attorneys asked a federal appeals court Monday to keep an inmate featured in the Netxflix series 'Making a Murderer' behind bars while they fight a second ruling overturning his conviction. The state Department of Justice's filing argues Brendan Dassey should remain in prison because his case is far from settled. The agency will appeal the ruling to the full 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals within the next two weeks, has the right to seek review in the U.S. Supreme Court or could retry him, the filing said. A Wisconsin jury also found Dassey guilty of 'heinous crimes,' which points to keeping him locked up, the filing added. 'Dassey's release pending full resolution of this appeal would harm the public interest, as he has been convicted of rape, murder, and mutilation of a corpse, thereby establishing his dangerousness to the public,' the filing said. Dassey's attorneys, Laura Nirider and Robert Dvorek, didn't immediately respond to email messages seeking comment. Dassey told detectives that he helped his uncle, Steven Avery, rape and kill photographer Teresa Halbach at the Avery family's salvage yard in eastern Wisconsin's Manitowoc County on Halloween 2005. A jury in 2007 convicted him of first-degree intentional homicide, mutilating a corpse and second-degree sexual assault. He was sentenced to life. Avery was sentenced to life as well in a separate trial. A federal magistrate judge overturned Dassey's conviction in August 2016, finding his confession was coerced. Investigators took advantage of his below-average intelligence and his age — he was 16 when Halbach died — to obtain his statements, the judge found. He has remained behind bars while the state Department of Justice appealed. A three-judge panel from the 7th Circuit ruled 2-1 Thursday that the confession was indeed coerced. Dassey's attorneys asked the court to release him immediately. They contend that he's now 27 and keeping him locked up while state attorneys continue to appeal could cost him more months or even years. Dassey and Avery have long maintained police framed them. Their cases burst into the national consciousness after the 'Making a Murderer' series debuted in December 2015. The filmmakers cast doubt on the legal process in the cases, sparking widespread speculation about their innocence. Both men have accumulated thousands of fans on social media. Authorities who worked the cases insist the documentary was biased. Prosecutor Ken Kratz wrote in his book 'Avery' that Dassey was 'a shuffling, mumbling young man with bad skin and broken-bowl haircut' who could have rescued Halbach but instead involved himself in her rape and murder. Avery, he wrote, is 'by any measure of the evidence, stone guilty.' Avery is pursuing his own appeal. ___ Follow Todd Richmond on Twitter at https://twitter.com/trichmond1

News

  • The Latest on the Republican legislation overhauling the Obama health care law (all times EDT): 7:15 p.m. Threats of opposition from three Republican senators are casting doubt on whether GOP leaders have enough support to move ahead on the Senate health care bill. The Senate has to hold a procedural vote to move forward, most likely on Wednesday. Sen. Susan Collins of Maine tweeted after the Congressional Budget Office analysis on Monday that the Senate bill won't fix the flaws in the current bill. She says she will vote no on the 'motion to proceed.' Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin says he has 'a hard time believing I'll have enough information for me to support a motion to proceed this week.' Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky says it's worse to 'pass a bad bill than to pass no bill.' Republicans can't afford more than two defections. ___ 6:35 p.m. The White House says the Congressional Budget Office's projection that 22 million more people will be uninsured in 2026 'must not be trusted blindly.' The White House is again trying to undermine the analysis of the CBO, questioning the office's predictions that millions of more Americans would be uninsured under a Senate health care proposal compared with President Barack Obama's health care law. The White House says the CBO 'has consistently proven it cannot accurately predict how health care legislation will impact insurance coverage.' It says the office has a 'history of inaccuracy,' and cites its 'flawed report on coverage, premiums and predicted deficit arising out of Obamacare.' ___ 6:30 p.m. Hawaii Democratic Sen. Mazie Hirono is decrying the Republican health care bill as 'mean, ugly' a day ahead of her own surgery. Speaking on the Senate floor Monday, Hirono says people typically figure health insurance is a concern for someone else until they get sick. Hirono announced in May that she was being treated for kidney cancer. She says she will have surgery Tuesday to remove a lesion on her rib. But first she joined several Democratic senators in criticizing the GOP health care bill, saying it was a 'tax cut for the rich bill.' Hirono says health care is a right, not a privilege. And in light of the budget analysis that found 22 million more Americans would be uninsured, Hirono says, 'it's as bad as we thought.' ___ 6 p.m. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is focusing on the tax cuts, deficit reduction and lower premiums cited in a nonpartisan analysis of the Senate's health care bill, and making no mention of the 22 million more Americans who would be uninsured. McConnell put out a brief statement Monday after the release of the Congressional Budget Office report. He says Americans need relief from the 'failed Obamacare law,' and says the Senate will soon act on a bill to give Americans better care. The Kentucky Republican says the bill would lower premiums by 30 percent in 2020, cut taxes by $700 billion and reduce the deficit by $331 billion. His statement omits any mention of the CBO prediction that 22 million more Americans would be uninsured in 2026 than under President Barack Obama's health care law. ___ 4:20 p.m. The Senate health care bill would result in 22 million more uninsured Americans over the next decade compared to current law. That's according to an analysis Monday from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. The figure may further complicate Senate GOP leaders' plans to pass their bill this week. It's barely an improvement upon the health care bill that passed the House — which would have resulted in 23 million more uninsured. Several GOP senators have said they want to see their bill cover more people than the House version. And President Donald Trump himself called the House bill 'mean' — though he's lent his support to the Senate version and is lobbying for passage. ___ 2:15 p.m. The nation's largest doctors' group is outlining its opposition to the Senate Republican health care bill. The American Medical Association sent a letter Monday to Senate leaders saying the draft legislation violates the medical oath to 'first, do no harm.' The letter says the Republican plan is likely to lead to higher costs and greater difficulty in affording care for low- and middle-income patients. The doctors' group says the Senate bill's Medicaid payment formulas threaten to 'limit states' ability to address the health care needs of their most vulnerable citizens' and won't keep up with new medical innovations and epidemics such as the opioid addiction crisis. The letter is signed by Dr. James L. Madara, the group's CEO. The AMA has about a quarter-million members. __ 2 p.m. One of the nation's biggest health insurers says the Senate health care bill will 'markedly improve' the individual insurance market's stability and moderate premium hikes. Blue Cross-Blue Shield insurer Anthem says the bill will help in part by appropriating money for cost-sharing reduction payments and eliminating a health insurance tax. Cost-sharing reduction payments help cover expenses like deductibles for people with modest incomes. President Donald Trump has discussed ending these payments, and insurers planning to return to the exchanges next year want a guarantee that the payments also will return. Anthem Inc. sells coverage in key markets like New York and California. It has said tough market conditions have forced it to pull out of exchanges in three states for 2018: Ohio, Wisconsin and Indiana. __ 1:10 p.m. Senate Republicans have issued a revised version of their health care bill. The changes include a penalty for people who let their insurance lapse. Under the new package, people who lacked coverage for at least 63 days in the past year and then buy a policy would face a six-month delay before it takes effect. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell released his initial measure last week. It had no penalty for people who let their coverage expire. The waiting period is designed to prompt healthy people who might not otherwise buy insurance to do so. That helps insurance companies pay for sicker customers who are more expensive to cover. McConnell is hoping to push the measure through the Senate by the end of this week, but some Republicans are rebelling. __ 12:55 p.m. An outside group backing President Donald Trump will begin targeting more Republican holdouts on the Senate's health care bill. America First Policies is expanding its campaign against Nevada Sen. Dean Heller to include Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, Utah Sen. Mike Lee and Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson. Those lawmakers came out against the bill as written when it was made public last week. A senior official with America First Policies says online and social media ads will remind voters that Republicans have promised to repeal President Barack Obama's signature health care legislation. The official demanded anonymity to discuss the plan. The group also is preparing radio and television ads to run ahead of the vote, which could come at the end of this week. — Julie Bykowicz __ 11:19 a.m. A conservative Republican senator who doesn't back the GOP health care bill is using unusually sharp tones to criticize party leaders. Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson is accusing top Republicans of trying to jam the legislation through the Senate. He says the leadership effort is 'a little offensive' and says conservatives haven't had input into the proposal. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell introduced legislation last week rolling back much of President Barack Obama's health care law. Johnson is among four conservatives and a moderate who said they don't back the measure but haven't ruled out supporting it if it's changed. McConnell is working this week to make revisions to win over votes. The bill will win approval if just two of the 52 Senate Republicans support it. All Democrats oppose it. __ 10:54 a.m. A nonpartisan group representing Republican and Democratic state officials who administer Medicaid programs says the GOP health care legislation advancing toward a Senate vote will not work. In a strongly worded statement that reflects the 'unanimous' views of its board, the National Association of Medicaid Directors said the Republican health care bill would be 'a transfer of risk, responsibility, and cost to the states of historic proportions.' While the group's members differ over the concept of federal spending limits on the health program for low-income people, the board agreed that the inflation adjustments in the Senate bill 'are insufficient and unworkable.' Medicaid has become perhaps the key sticking point in the congressional debate. The group said Congress should focus on stabilizing insurance markets for now, and tackle Medicaid overhaul later in a more thoughtful manner. __ 2:54 a.m. Senate Republicans skeptical about a GOP health overhaul bill are expressing some doubt about holding a vote on the measure this week. Lawmakers are awaiting a key analysis from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. President Donald Trump is making a final push to fulfill a key campaign promise, insisting that Republicans are not 'that far off' and signaling that last-minute changes are coming to win votes. So far, five Republican senators are expressing opposition to the Senate GOP plan that would scuttle much of former President Barack Obama's health law. That's more than enough to torpedo the measure developed in private by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The holdouts are expressing willingness to negotiate, but many of them are pushing revisions that could risk alienating moderate Republicans in the process.
  • Police are looking for the person who sprayed bullets into a home filled with children. Newnan police told Channel 2 Action News that four girls were inside the home on Reynolds Street having a sleepover when someone outside fired a gun into the home around 11:30 p.m. Two of the girls, both 11, were hit by gunfire. 'We ask you to have a heart, understand that we want to speak to you. We will hopefully track down leads and locate you and this is your opportunity to come forward and let us know what happened in your own words,' said Newnan's deputy police chief. Kocoyo Elder, who lives in the neighborhood, was home watching TV with her grandkids when she heard the gunshots. 'We paused the TV and we heard the sirens, and we came on the porch and saw a lot of police and there were a lot of people walking this way,' she said as she described the scene to Channel 2's Lori Wilson. One of the girls were hit in the cheek, the other was shot in the thigh. They were taken to Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston. Both are listed as stable. TRENDING STORIES: From Mexico to metro Atlanta: Bust nets $1M in meth, $250K in cash Teen missing for more than a year found at Duluth home Police continue to search for duo seen punching woman, daughter One of the girls' mothers was home at the time. 'When you arrive and you find that two 11-year-old girls were enjoying a sleepover with family and freinds and they've been shot now, that tugs at your heart,' Deputy Chief Cooper said. Investigators believe the gun used was a 9mm. Police were able to count seven bullet holes in the home. 'I couldn't sleep until I got up this morning and knew they was OK,' one of the mothers said. Neighbors are hoping for justice but worry about an attempt at retaliation. 'It grieves my spirit knowing that two young ladies could have possibly lost their life in this area. That's not right,' said Pastor Render Godfrey, who lives in the area. More than anything, they want the violence to stop. One neighbor who asked Wilson to go by her first name Jackie says she constantly worries living in this area. 'I've been terrified for years because every other month there's always something going on,' she said.
  • The son of former Atlanta Braves infielder Keith Lockhart is fighting for his life after he was hit in the face with a baseball.According to a post by the family on social media, Jason Lockhart, 15, was hit on June 17 when he was playing in a baseball tournament in South Carolina.Channel 2 Action News has learned when Lockhart touched home plate, the catcher was throwing the ball back to the pitcher. It hit Jason in the face, breaking his nose.In a Facebook post written by his sister, we learned Jason was initially given stitches but on June 19 when he visited the doctor's office for X-rays, his nose began to bleed profusely. Doctors could not stop the bleeding and even after going to urgent care, he was ultimately taken to the Scottish Rite hospital in Atlanta.A CT scan determined the fracture was more severe than doctors originally thought. The results showed a laceration on his artery. Sydney Lockhart says a surgeon was brought in to stitch up a laceration in his nose and reset his broken nose the next day.In an update on Wednesday, Sydney Lockhart wrote that an artery was cut by the fracture and Jason was sedated for two days. He was put on a ventilator to help his body rest but the bleeding continued.On Friday, he was heavily sedated in a paralytic state and put on life support so doctors could monitor and contain any bleeding. In Facebook post written by his mother, she said doctors determined the blood was coming from his nose, not his brain. Jason also developed a fever, which doctors say is common when the body is fighting a condition as severe as this.Jason was originally scheduled to have surgery Monday but doctors have moved it to Tuesday according to his sister's Facebook page. Sydney Lockhart says although there was no bleeding since Sunday's surgery, his body is responding a bit slower than anticipated. Doctors are also backing off several medications, according to the post written Monday afternoon.The procedure is to remove and replace packing in his nose and will closely look inside to figure out if there is an area behind the packing that could cause more bleeding. TRENDING STORIES: From Mexico to metro Atlanta: Bust nets $1M in meth, $250K in cash Teen missing for more than a year found at Duluth home Police continue to search for duo seen punching woman, daughter Support has been flooding social media with messages from inside the baseball community to friends and family.Keith Lockhart played several seasons for the Braves.Braves Vice Chairman John Schuerholz issued a statement on Twitter offering prayers for Jason and his family and encouraged fans to do the same.The family asks for prayers and support saying:We are really staying positive that this is the best way to give Jason the most comfort possible and the least stress. Thank you again for standing with us in the biggest and scariest situation our family has ever encountered. With Love and Appreciation, The Lockhart family Our top 3 requests or goals right now are: 1. Keeping Jason at this calm paralytic state with no movements 2. No bleeding 3. Making it to Monday and letting Jason's body do all the clotting itself Thanks so much for all the outpouring prayers & support for Jay. It's been rough, a few surgeries but we're confident he's going to be ok.-- Keith Lockhart (@klocky7) June 24, 2017 Jason had a good night last night still had some bleeding but manageable no surgery. Hoping and praying for the same today.#staystrongJ-- Keith Lockhart (@klocky7) June 24, 2017 Jason just came out of surgery Dr.'s located 3 areas of bleeding &stopped the flow of blood. We are all encouraged about today!#staystrongJ-- Keith Lockhart (@klocky7) June 25, 2017 I don't think y'all understand how much of a champion this child is 💛 pic.twitter.com/TaGn7XPFq5-- syds (@SydneyLockhart) June 21, 2017 Braves Vice Chairman John Schuerholz statement on Jason Lockhart, son of Braves alumni @klocky7: pic.twitter.com/JiIxyZgoN1-- Atlanta Braves (@Braves) June 26, 2017
  • 1. WHAT MAY CONSTITUTE A 'BONA FIDE RELATIONSHIP' Those permitted into the United States under the partially reinstated travel ban may include those who have an American job, school enrollment or a close relative. 2. WHO HOLDS KEY TO HEALTH CARE BILL PASSAGE Trump's campaign promise to repeal and replace 'Obamacare' is now in the hands of a key group of GOP senators who are opposing — or not yet supporting — the legislation. 3. WHITE HOUSE WARNS ASSAD AGAINST CHEMICAL ATTACK The White House claims 'potential' evidence that Damascus is preparing for a gas attack similar to the one that killed dozens in April; Syria dismisses the statement. 4. INDICTMENT SLAMS BRAZILIAN PRESIDENT Prosecutors describe a scheming, arrogant and corrupt Michel Temer who lined his pockets with illegal money while neglecting the office he represented. 5. 'I DID IT FOR NOTHING' Two South Carolina inmates lured four fellow blockmates into their cell, killing them in cold blood, with one of the inmates telling AP he did it because he was tired of life behind bars and wanted to land on death row. 6. SAUDIS DEMOLISH HISTORIC SHIITE HOMES Officials say al-Awamiya has become a hideout for militants, but the move is stoking sectarian tensions that resonate around the Persian Gulf and the region. 7. WHY LIU XIAOBO SUPPORTERS ARE ANGRY The Nobel Peace laureate has late-stage liver cancer, leading to questions whether China's best-known political prisoner received adequate care while incarcerated. 8. NEXT LEGAL CHALLENGE FOR COSBY: CALIFORNIA A hearing is scheduled to set a trial date for a lawsuit accusing him of sexually assaulting a teen at the Playboy Mansion more than 40 years ago. 9. CROWD-FUNDING CAMPAIGN SAVES JORDANIAN BOOKSTORE A local landmark in Amman, customers linger over rare treasures, stay to chat and often pay as they please. 10. MOVE OVER, 'BIG O' Russell Westbrook, who broke Oscar Robertson's record for triple-doubles in a season, captures NBA MVP honors.
  • Chancellor Angela Merkel's center-left rivals said Tuesday they would seek a parliamentary vote this week on legalizing gay marriage after the German leader backed off her conservatives' long-standing refusal to budge on the issue. Germany has allowed same-sex couples to enter civil partnerships since 2001. Other European countries have since allowed full gay marriage, but much of Merkel's conservative bloc remained reluctant until now. Merkel said Monday that she could see lawmakers taking up the issue in the future as a 'decision of conscience,' deciding in a free vote rather than along party lines. That comment came ahead of a Sept. 24 election in which all of Merkel's potential coalition partners, including the center-left Social Democrats of her challenger, Martin Schulz, are calling for same-sex marriage to be legalized. Parliament's upper house and the opposition Greens and Left Party have proposed legislation legalizing same-sex marriage, but it has been stuck in the lower house's legal affairs committee because the current 'grand coalition' government of Merkel's conservatives and the Social Democrats was divided. The Social Democrats leapt on Merkel's comments, which came as the outgoing parliament — in which there's likely a majority for gay marriage — prepares for its last session this week. 'Angela Merkel made ... a move yesterday and we are taking her at her word,' Schulz told reporters. The 'change of heart ... should be concluded this week,' he added. Schulz spoke after the conservatives' chief whip, Michael Grosse-Broemer, said there was 'no need for a rushed decision.' In nearly 12 years as chancellor, Merkel has moved her party to the center and away from conservative orthodoxy, speeding up Germany's exit from nuclear power and ending military conscription among other moves. Merkel's comments were welcomed by some conservatives, though one prominent lawmaker in her bloc said he didn't want the issue brought to parliament at all. 'Germany has other problems,' Peter Ramsauer, a member of the Bavaria-based Christian Social Union, told the daily Rheinische Post. 'But the (party) leadership should be wary of destroying the last conservative values.
  • The European Union's competition watchdog slapped a record 2.42 billion euro ($2.72 billion) fine on internet giant Google on Tuesday for breaching antitrust rules with its online shopping service. European regulators said 'Google has abused its market dominance as a search engine by giving an illegal advantage to another Google product, its comparison shopping service.' It gave the Mountain View, California, company 90 days to stop or face fines of up to 5 percent of the average daily worldwide turnover of parent company Alphabet. The European Commission, which polices EU competition rules, alleges Google elevates its shopping service even when other options might have better deals. The Commission said Google 'gave prominent placement in its search results only to its own comparison shopping service, whilst demoting rival services. It stifled competition on the merits in comparison shopping markets.' Google maintains it's just trying to package its search results in a way that makes it easier for consumers to find what they want. 'When you shop online, you want to find the products you're looking for quickly and easily. And advertisers want to promote those same products. That's why Google shows shopping ads, connecting our users with thousands of advertisers, large and small, in ways that are useful for both,' Kent Walker, senior vice president at Google, said in a statement. 'We will review the Commission's decision in detail as we consider an appeal, and we look forward to continuing to make our case,' he said. The fine is the highest ever imposed in Europe for anti-competitive behavior, exceeding a 1.06 billion euros penalty on Silicon Valley chip maker Intel in 2009. But the penalty is likely to leave a bigger dent in Google's pride and reputation than its finances. Alphabet has more than $92 billion (82 billion euros) in cash, including nearly $56 billion (50 billion euros) in accounts outside of Europe.