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Entertainment News

  • An HBO biopic starring Al Pacino as late Penn State football coach Joe Paterno will premiere April 7. HBO tweeted the premiere date Friday, along with a trailer to the film directed by Barry Levinson. HBO has said the film will focus on Paterno dealing with fallout from the child sex abuse scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky. The all-time winningest coach in major college football history was fired days after Sandusky's 2011 arrest and died two months later at age 85. A report commissioned by the university and conducted by a team led by former FBI Director Louis Freeh concluded Paterno and three administrators hushed up the allegations against Sandusky. The three administrators were sentenced to jail. Former university President Graham Spanier is appealing his conviction.
  • For anyone wanting to unlock the DNA of Milan ready-to-wear, a new museum exhibition surveying three decades of Italian fashion offers some keys. Echoes of styles and trends on display in the 'Italiana' exhibit at Milan's Palazzo Reale are apparent in big and small ways on the runways during Milan Fashion Week, which runs through Monday with previews of mostly womenswear for next fall and winter. Here are some highlights from Friday's shows, including Versace, Roberto Cavalli, Antonio Marras and Etro: ___ CAVALLI'S NEW PAGE SEES STAPLES REINVENTED Paul Surridge's second womenswear collection for Roberto Cavalli takes the fashion house's tried-and-true battle horses — slinky dresses, glam rock vibes and animal prints — and reinvents them for the next Cavalli generation. Surridge said he started the collection with two adjectives: glamour and sensuality. 'This is a woman who wants to be visible, also respecting social codes,' he said. The looks offered lots of skin and also the promise of more. Tailored jackets and coats were sliced to be revealing. Long clingy dresses with cutouts showed off curves, including an off-shoulder ruched purple dress belted at the side to shown skin, and worn punk-like over a pair of black leggings. On the more romantic side, long pleated, ruffled or fringe chiffon offered a softer, billowing drama. Surridge dipped into the Cavalli archive for animal prints, including lynx, lizard and crocodile, and also included an array of smoky, purple prints that evoke sunsets or deep seas. On the men's side, a skin-tight top in an ethereal blue that bleeds into darkness seemed inspired by the creature in the Oscar-nominated film 'The Shape of Water.' ____ THE EMIGRATION OF MARRAS Antonio Marras explores the story of European emigration in his latest fashion collection, touching on the pain of separation, the anticipation of adventure and the raucous exhilaration of finally being accepted in a new land. It's apt reminder of the cycle of emigration that many Italian families lived as Italy experiences an election campaign in which immigration has proved a divisive issue. The Marras collection for next fall and winter has a decisively vintage feel with looks adorned with ruffles, beading and lace. In modern touches, flaps on a red trench coat were off-skew, argyle patterns on sweaters were knit on the bias, and long pleated skirts had mismatching hemlines. The runway mood ranged from romantic rose prints on black backgrounds to New World plaids, old-time Varsity jackets and sweaters worn over lace and tulle skirts, and finally to fun night-out wear. Each change of mood was portrayed by dancers who transitioned from nostalgic farewells to university frat parties to elegant Great Gatsby-style soirees. ___ 'ITALIANA:' TRACING ITALY'S FASHION DNA At the 'Italiana' exhibit, there's all the building blocks on which fashion houses have turned Milan into a fashion capital: Antonio Marras with a big tulle skirt, Moschino with a smiley face on yellow leather, Roberto Cavalli with animal prints and Prada with black vinyl. With side-by-side suits by Gucci, Versace and Armani from decades past, the exhibit shows that exploring gender roles is not a new concept. 'We think that Italian designers were the first to solve some identity issues, to give an answer to identity, to changes that were happening in society and to new identities that were emerging,' said Stefano Tonchi, curator of exhibit and the director of W Magazine. Armani's soft suits were a revolution of comfort, while Versace's studded leather jackets and dresses promoted sexual freedom and Max Mara's trademark 101801 double-breasted coat gave women a key item for a button-down workplace wardrobe. The exhibit also traces Italy's evolution into an economic powerhouse, as purchasing power grew in the 1950s and '60s. The show runs through May 6 at Palazzo Reale.
  • The Hollywood Foreign Press Association says it is investigating actor Brendan Fraser's claim that its former president, Philip Berk, groped him in 2003. Fraser, 49, best known for his role in 'The Mummy' trilogy, made the accusation in an interview with GQ magazine . A statement from the HFPA, the organization that puts on the Golden Globes, says the interview 'includes alleged information that the HFPA was previously unaware of' and is looking into the accusation. It also stresses that the organization has long had what it calls 'a positive working relationship' with Fraser. Attempts to find a working phone number for Berk were unsuccessful.
  • Jennifer Lopez and Marc Anthony’s twins are growing up so fast! Max and Emme celebrated their 10th birthday on Feb. 22, and Lopez was right there to celebrate with her kids, sharing multiple posts on Instagram.  >> Read more trending news  Sharing a video of her kids’ -- whom she affectionately calls her coconuts -- cutest moments throughout the years, Lopez wrote, “It's hard to get my head around the fact that it's been 10 years since these two forces of nature came into my world and changed my life forever... you healed my soul and rejuvenated my existence... you taught me about love and life and myself in a way I never imagined... and I am forever in love with those beautiful faces...” The proud mother shared two other tributes to her children in their own posts on Instagram with individual heartfelt messages. “Max you are my heart, my love and my light,” Lopez wrote to her son. “You brighten up every day for me with your kindness and caring, your love and awareness… your energy is unmatched, your sense of humor makes everyone around you laugh, and I marvel at your depth of understanding of people and the world… my old soul, my beautiful boy, Happy 10th Birthday I know you are getting so big but you will always be my precious coconut.” For her daughter, Lopez celebrated Emme’s “independence and strength,” writing, “Emme you are my soul, my inner child personified the most joyful deep and sensitive human being I have ever met…and I adore everything about you…your artistry, your independence, your strength and your sensitive spirit… Happy 10th Birthday my marshmallow princess…I know you’re growing up so much but you will always be my precious coconut.” Proud dad Marc Anthony reposted his former wife’s video tribute to Max and Emme on his Instagram page Feb. 22. According to TMZ, Lopez ceebrated her twin’s milestone birthday Thursday at the Sugar Factory in Las Vegas. From 5 p.m. - 9 p.m., 30 guests celebrated with custom cakes for each child. 
  • President Donald Trump says he goes to great lengths to hide the bald spot revealed in a recent photo. Speaking before the Conservative Political Action Conference Friday, Trump turned around onstage and smoothed the back of his famous hair. He said, 'I try like hell to hide that bald spot, folks.' The crowd cheered as Trump glanced at a monitor and added, 'Doesn't look bad. Hey, we're hanging in.' During the 2016 campaign, Trump let a woman tug the hair on top of his head to prove it is attached. The president's bald spot was exposed Feb. 2 when he turned away from cameras to climb aboard Air Force One. As Trump climbed the stairs, a wind gust blew aside a flap of hair.

News

  • One of three nursing home employees accused of repeatedly ignoring a World War II veteran’s last pleas for help before his death has surrendered to authorities. Wanda Nuckles, 61, of Buford, turned herself in to the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office on Friday, sheriff’s spokeswoman Cynthia Williams said. RELATED: Nursing home employees indicted in death of neglected World War II vet Nuckles was a licensed practical nurse at the time of the incident four years ago that left James Dempsey, 89, dead in his room at Northeast Atlanta Rehabilitation Center. She no longer has her credentials, Williams said. She is charged with depriving an elder person of essential services and concealing a death.  Nuckles, Loyce Pickquet Agyeman and Mable Turman were recently indicted in the incident. Agyeman and Turman remain at large, Williams said. VIEW: Map of crime in metro Atlanta NEW: Join the discussion at the AJC's Crime & Safety Facebook group Know what’s really going on with crime and public safety in your metro Atlanta community, including breaking news, trial coverage, trends and the latest on unsolved cases. Sign up for the AJC’s crime and safety newsletter delivered weekly to your inbox. In other news:
  • Latest updates, results, photo galleries and stories from the 2018 Winter Olympic Games.
  • President Donald Trump renewed his criticism of John McCain for the senator's dramatic thumbs-down deciding vote last year against the GOP health care repeal. Without using McCain's name, Trump spoke of his move in December that effectively defeated the overhaul in a close vote. The president told the Conservative Political Action Conference that 'except for one Senator, who came into a room at three o'clock in the morning and went like that,' Trump gave a thumbs-down, 'we would have had health care (reform), too.' The crowd booed. Trump added, 'I won't use his name.' McCain was diagnosed with brain cancer last summer and is in Arizona battling the disease. His daughter, Meghan McCain, said Friday on ABC's 'The View,' that she'd address Trump's remarks with her mother, Cindy, next week.
  • A man known as the 'stocking strangler,' who was convicted of raping and choking to death three elderly women four decades ago in Georgia is set for execution next month. Carlton Gary was convicted and sentenced to death for the 1977 slayings of 89-year-old Florence Scheible, 69-year-old Martha Thurmond and 74-year-old Kathleen Woodruff. Gary, 67, is scheduled to die March 15 at the state prison in Jackson, state Attorney General Chris Carr said Friday in a news release. Gary's lawyers maintain that the wrong man was arrested, that their client didn't commit the attacks. But state and federal courts have repeatedly rejected their arguments over the years. For eight months, from September 1977 to April 1978, a string of violent attacks on older women terrified the west Georgia city of Columbus. The women, ranging in age from 59 to 89, were beaten, raped and choked, often with their own stockings. Seven died and two were injured in the attacks. Police arrested Gary six years after the last killing, in May 1984. A charismatic and talented musician, he was popular with the ladies and good looking enough to model for a local store. He became a suspect when a gun stolen during a 1977 burglary in the upscale neighborhood where all but one of the victims lived was traced to him. Authorities have said he confessed to participating in the burglaries but he said another man committed the rapes and killings. Gary had been behind bars on and off since his teens and had escaped prisons in upstate New York and South Carolina. A jury in August 1986 convicted him on three counts each of malice murder, rape and burglary and sentenced him to die. While prosecutors only charged him in three of the attacks, they have consistently said they believe he was solely responsible for all nine of the so-called stocking strangler crimes and they presented evidence of the other attacks at trial. Prosecutors argued that common factors established a pattern. The victims were all older white women who lived alone and were sexually assaulted and choked, usually with stockings. They were attacked at home, usually in the evening, by someone who forced his way inside. All but one lived in the Wynnton neighborhood, and all lived near where Gary lived at the time of the crimes. Prosecutors also presented evidence that they said connected Gary to similar crimes in New York state. Gary came within hours of execution in December 2009, when the Georgia Supreme Court stepped in, ordering a lower court to consider DNA testing. Following the testing and more hearings, a judge last September denied Gary's request for a new trial. The state Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal of that ruling. In a November filing with Georgia's high court, Gary's attorneys said physical evidence that wasn't available at the time of his trial — either because new testing is now available or because the state didn't disclose it to the defense — 'at least raises reasonable doubts' about his guilt. That new evidence includes a DNA test of semen found on the sleeping gown of one of the victims that doesn't match Gary. That's significant, his lawyers argue, because that victim survived the attack and dramatically identified him at trial as her attacker. Gary was not charged in her attack. His lawyers also say a bite mark found on one of the victims didn't match Gary's teeth and that a shoe print found at one of the scenes was much too small to be Gary's. They also question the validity of fingerprint evidence presented in the case and an unrecorded and unsigned confession. Lawyers for the state disputed those claims, saying Gary's case has been repeatedly reviewed by the courts, which have rejected his claims. They noted in a filing with the high court that the state now has even more evidence that proves Gary's guilt and that the judge who denied him a new trial found that none of the evidence Gary's lawyers cited would likely have changed the verdict. Gary would be the first inmate put to death by the state of Georgia this year.
  • The White House has been placed on lockdown following an incident with a vehicle which rammed the security barrier near the building. 
  • A Nevada judge is due to hear arguments Friday in a lawsuit seeking enforcement of a voter-approved gun background-check law that has not been enforced since it passed in November 2016. The measure sought to close a legal loophole that proponents said let people skip background screening when buying guns from another person or online. About two dozen protesters gathered outside the courthouse ahead of the hearing. Former Las Vegas-area sheriff Bill Young, a longtime proponent of the gun-control measure and a protest speaker, accused Nevada politicians of blocking enactment of the measure both before and after a gunman in a high-rise casino shot into an concert crowd on the Las Vegas Strip last Oct. 1, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds more. Protest organizer Andrew Woods also pointed to the Feb. 14 shooting at a school in Parkland, Florida, that killed 17 people. 'This is going on all over the United States,' Young said ahead of the protest. 'But I'm concerned about Las Vegas and Nevada. The politicians are not smarter and do not know more than the citizens of our state.' They concede the measure wouldn't have prevented the Las Vegas gunman from legally obtaining the cache of assault-style weapons he used to unleash the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. But they say it could help keep guns away from other people who shouldn't have them by requiring background checks through a licensed gun dealer when most firearms change hands. Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval and GOP state Attorney General Adam Laxalt call the initiative legally flawed because they say Nevada can't force the FBI to expend federal resources to conduct gun buyer background checks through the National Crime Information Center. 'Clearly, the voters of Nevada have indicated that they want background checks for the private party sale of firearms,' the governor said in a statement Friday. He vetoed a legislative measure in 2013 similar to the initiative that passed in by less than 1 percentage point. Sandoval said Nevada is still conducting state background checks with a system that he called more thorough than federal background checks because it includes buyer mental health and criminal records relating to domestic violence, misdemeanor crimes, arrest reports and restraining orders that are not included in the federal review.