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Trump signs legislation rolling back Obama-era regulations

Trump signs legislation rolling back Obama-era regulations

President Donald Trump signed a handful of measures Monday rolling back Obama-era regulations under the Congressional Review Act. It's part of a larger GOP effort to eliminate an array of regulations issued during President Barack Obama's final months in office and comes days after Trump's effort to repeal and replace 'Obamacare' failed. Trump has made overturning what he deems government over-reach a centerpiece of his first months in office. 'I will keep working with Congress, with every agency, and most importantly, the American people, until we eliminate every unnecessary, harmful and job-killing regulation that we can find,' Trump said at a White House signing ceremony. 'We have a lot more coming.' Two of the regulations nullified Monday had to do with school performance and teacher preparation programs. One, issued by the Education Department in October, required that federally funded teacher preparation programs be evaluated based on the academic outcomes of those teachers' students. Republican senators opposed the rules, arguing such matters should be left to the states. The other aimed to help states identify failing schools and come up with plans to improve them. Another rule nullified by Trump required federal land managers to consider climate change and other long-term effects of proposed development on public lands. The regulation had been imposed by the Bureau of Land Management, which oversees more than 245 million acres of public lands. Republicans argued the rule, finalized in December, shifted decision-making authority away from state and local officials to the federal government. The signing came the day before Trump was expected to reverse Obama's signature effort to address climate change, the Clean Power Plan, which restricts greenhouse gas emissions at coal-fired power plants. The final rule targeted by Republicans had been aimed at forcing government contractors to disclose violations of federal labor laws as they sought more work. The 'blacklisting rule' required contractors to disclose violations of 14 federal labor laws, including those pertaining to workplace safety, wages and discrimination. The White House argued the rule would 'bog down' the federal procurement process, while business groups said that it would increase compliance costs. Republican lawmakers and the Trump administration have made curbing government regulation a top priority this year. Dozens of resolutions pulling back various Obama-era rules have been introduced under an expedited process established through the Congressional Review Act. Under that process, a regulation is invalidated when a simple majority of both chambers pass a joint resolution of disapproval and the president signs it.

Drugs found in toddler's backpack after mother disappears

Drugs found in toddler's backpack after mother disappears

Friends and family of a missing Gwinnett County mother say they found a large stash of drugs in her son's backpack and they fear she's been kidnapped because of it. Channel 2's Tony Thomas met with a good friend of Beatrize Espinoza on Monday afternoon. Espinoza has been missing since Friday morning. Her 3-year-old son was found wandering near a strip mall on South Norcross-Tucker Road hours after Espinoza was last seen in front of her apartment. Her friend didn't want to be identified but told Thomas that a member of Espinoza's family found pot and meth stuffed under her toddler's clothes in a backpack inside her apartment. 'It is connected, because some guy from Mexico called me and said Beatrize lost $30,000 and they want it back,' her friend said. 'The family fears the worst. I do too. There is no way you can escape alive with this sort of stuff if you are involved with the dealers.' TRENDING STORIES: State refuses to allow parents to use Allah as daughter's last name Teen who threw newborn out window won't serve any jail time Single mother told she can't attend father-daughter dance Thomas was there as a Gwinnett County detective got his first look at the drugs. Investigators say they are still trying to determine if drugs are connected to her disappearance. Officers spoke with Espinoza's two sons, ages 3 and 6, at police headquarters Monday. They also spoke with other family members, trying to figure out where the 25-year-old might be and if she is in trouble. 'Family members have been very cooperative with our investigation so far,' Cpl. Deon Washington said. He said many potential witnesses aren't coming forward because they fear immigration agents will get involved. 'People need not fear that they are going to be deported or be concerned about their immigration status,' Washington said.

Police: 5 officers shoot at suspect at Atlanta apartment complex

Police: 5 officers shoot at suspect at Atlanta apartment complex

Police said they shot a man who was actively firing a gun at a woman held against her will. It happened near apartments on Bent Creek Way early Monday morning. Police said they received a call around 4:30 a.m. from a woman who said she was being held at gunpoint. 'When the officers arrived, they found the suspect actively shooting at the female as she was trying to drive away,' said Atlanta Police Deputy Chief Jeff Glazier. TRENDING STORIES: Family fears worst in Gwinnett County woman's disappearance Man plans 'celebration of life' party, dies the next day Woman flying through Atlanta disappears The victim was shot in the stomach and the hand. Police said the suspect was shot in the stomach and leg, after a running gun battle with five officers. 'The suspect shot multiple times at the officers with the rifle,' Glazer said, 'We had five different Atlanta police officers return fire.' Paramedics took both the 21-year-old suspect and the 23-year-old victim to Grady Memorial Hospital. Police say both will be OK. Neighbors told Channel 2's Sophia Choi they're tired of the violence. The suspect is currently facing aggravated assault charges, with more charges pending for the shootout with officers. Breaking- on scene of officer involved shooting in SW @Cityofatlanta. @wsbtv pic.twitter.com/ph0UT527dC-- Sophia Choi (@SophiaWSB) March 27, 2017 N'bors say officer involved shooting is 3rd violent incident in months near their homes in SW @Cityofatlanta @wsbtv pic.twitter.com/wcedHX7qCZ-- Sophia Choi (@SophiaWSB) March 27, 2017 Update- APD says 5 officers shot at suspect who was actively shooting at woman held against her will in SW @Cityofatlanta. @wsbtv pic.twitter.com/4eD0rU4GYF-- Sophia Choi (@SophiaWSB) March 27, 2017

A 22-year-old police officer died in Oklahoma on Monday morning after he and a man exchanged gunfire when the man ran during a traffic stop Sunday night, Tecumseh police said. >> Read more trending news The officer, identified as 22-year-old Justin Terney, died of his injuries. The suspected gunman remained hospitalized Monday morning. Tecumseh Assistant Police Chief J.R. Kidney said Terney was shot multiple times after stopping a vehicle around 11:30 p.m. Sunday near the intersection of Benson Park Road and Gordon Cooper Drive. Kidney said Terney was working with dispatchers to verify information given by one of the vehicle’s passengers, a man, after becoming suspicious that he might have been giving Terney false information. As dispatchers were telling Terney that it appeared the man had an active warrant for his arrest, the man ran from the stopped vehicle and toward nearby woods, Kidney said. Terney fired a stun gun at the man. “The (stun gun) doesn’t have any effect on (the suspect) and he continues running through a wooded area, over a fence,” Kidney said. “About 25 yards inside that fence area, the officer and the suspect both exchanged gunfire.” Authorities took both the suspect, whose identity was not immediately known, and Terney to a hospital, where Terney underwent surgery for hours overnight. Kidney confirmed that Terney, who had been shot about three times, died Monday morning. The suspected gunman remained in intensive care with four gunshot wounds, according to KFOR. Terney joined Tecumseh’s police force about a year ago. “My department’s not doing good,” Kidney said Monday morning, adding that in the 22 years he has been with the department and the 38 years the chief has been with the department, this is the first officer-involved shooting for Tecumseh police. “We haven’t had to live through this yet,” he said. “We need everybody to rally around and support us.”
A woman fought off a knife-wielding man who broke into her southeast Atlanta home Saturday night. Adrien Gass said she was terrified when the man burst into her home on Memorial Drive and chased her with a knife. 'I said, 'I have money.' He said, 'I don't want no money. I want the car and I want your life.' And I said, 'Not today,'' Gass said. The mother of three told Channel 2's Matt Johnson that she threw a piece of furniture at the intruder, who chased her down the hall. 'I know he's bleeding because I attacked him,' she said. Gass said she locked herself in a bedroom. The attacker kept kicking the door and it hit her in the mouth while she held on to it. 'All my might, yes. I would not let that door go,' she said. Gass said she escaped by jumping out a window and the intruder left with nothing. 'I lifted up the window and pushed out and ran as fast as I could to the neighbor's house,' she said. Atlanta police said just three minutes earlier, a quarter of a mile away on Allendale Drive, someone carjacked a husband and wife at gunpoint. 'He was in the car, got the keys and gone,' Tris Siciginanosaid. Siciginano said the thief stole her husband's car and she believes the two crimes are related. 'It was too much in one night and the descriptions are so close,' she said. Police have not said if the crimes are related, but neighbors said they are staying vigilant. No arrests have been made.
Police have found no evidence that the man who killed four people in London last week was associated with the Islamic State group or al-Qaida, a senior British counterterrorism officer said Monday. Deputy Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu of the Metropolitan Police said Westminster attacker Khalid Masood clearly had 'an interest in jihad,' but police have no indication he discussed his attack plans with others. Basu, who also serves as Britain's senior national coordinator for counterterrorism policing, said Wednesday's attack — in which Masood ran down pedestrians on London's Westminster Bridge before fatally stabbing a policeman guarding Parliament — 'appears to be based on low-sophistication, low-tech, low-cost techniques copied from other attacks.' Masood was shot dead by police after his deadly rampage, which police have revealed lasted just 82 seconds. Police believe Masood — a 52-year-old Briton with convictions for violence who had spent several years in Saudi Arabia — acted alone, but are trying to determine whether others helped inspire or direct his actions. Detectives on Monday continued to question a 30-year-old man arrested Sunday and a 58-year-old man arrested shortly after Wednesday's attack. Both were detained in the central England city of Birmingham, where Masood had recently lived. Prime Minister Theresa May said last week that Masood was 'a peripheral figure' in an investigation into violent extremism some years ago. But Basu said he was not a 'subject of interest' for counterterrorism police or the intelligence services before last week's attack. Masood was born Adrian Elms, but changed his name in 2005, suggesting a conversion to Islam. His mother, Janet Ajao, said Monday she was 'deeply shocked, saddened and numbed' by his murderous actions. In a statement released through the police, Ajao said that 'since discovering that it was my son that was responsible I have shed many tears for the people caught up in this horrendous incident.' Basu said there was no sign Masood was radicalized during one of his stints in prison, the last of which was in 2003. 'I know when, where and how Masood committed his atrocities, but now I need to know why,' Basu said. 'Most importantly, so do the victims and families.' As Basu appealed for anyone who spoke to Masood on the day of the attack to come forward, the British government repeated calls for tech companies to give police and intelligence services access to encrypted messages exchanged by terrorism suspects. Masood used the messaging service WhatsApp just before he began his attack. Home Secretary Amber Rudd said Sunday that such services must not 'provide a secret place for terrorists to communicate with each other.' Tech companies have strongly resisted previous calls to create back-doors into encrypted messaging, arguing that to do so would compromise the secure communications underpinning everything from shopping to tax returns to online banking. Rudd is due to hold a previously scheduled meeting with internet companies on Thursday. Prime Minister Theresa May's spokesman, James Slack, said tech firms 'should be helping us more' to prevent terrorism. 'The ball is now in their court,' he said. Slack said that if agreement was not reached with the companies, the government 'rules nothing out,' including legislation. Meanwhile, the families of the dead and injured set about the difficult task of going on with their lives. The family of an American victim expressed gratitude Monday for the kindness of strangers as they insisted some good would come from the tragedy. A dozen members of Kurt W. Cochran's family gathered to face the media, sharing their shock and sense of loss. Cochran, from Utah, was on the last day of a European trip celebrating his 25th wedding anniversary when he was killed on Westminster Bridge. Cochran's wife, Melissa, suffered a broken leg and rib and a cut head, but is steadily improving. The family offered profuse thanks to first responders, British and American authorities and people who had sent notes, prayer and donations. 'Last night we were speaking as a family about all this, and it was unanimous that none of us harbor any ill will or harsh feelings towards this,' said Sarah McFarland, Melissa Cochran's sister. 'So we love our brother. We love what he brought to the world, and we feel like that this situation is going to bring many good things to the world.' ___ Jonathan Shenfield contributed to this story.
Jennifer Williamson was trying to fly out of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport with her son Aaron. While going through Transportation Security Administration (TSA) screening, Williamson requested that her son, who has Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), be screened through a method alternative to a pat down. Despite her request, a TSA agent proceeded with a pat down, which Williamson then recorded. The ordeal is a bit uncomfortable to watch. RELATED: The TSA puts a more personal touch on their pat-downs in this “Late Night” sketch In a Facebook post, Williamson said that her son did not set off any alarms. She went into more detail of the scene: He is still several hours later saying “I don’t know what I did. What did I do?” I am livid. Please, share… make this viral like the other children’s videos with TSA… I wish I had taped the entire interchange because it was horrifying. We had two DFW police officers that were called and flanking him on each side. Somehow these power tripping TSA agents who are traumatizing children and doing whatever they feel like without any cause, need to be reined in. The TSA has faced severe backlash over accusations of overly aggressive screening, including one popular 2016 incident with a disabled teenager. The agency has also faced accusations of ineffectiveness, as a 2015 report showed that the TSA failed 95 percent of undercover airport security tests, missing weapons and explosives.
Russell Westbrook hit a pull-up jumper with seven seconds left and the Oklahoma City Thunder erased a 13-point deficit in the final four minutes to beat the Dallas Mavericks 92-91 on Monday night. Westbrook scored 37 points, including 16 in the fourth quarter, with 13 rebounds and 10 assists for his third straight triple-double and 37th of the season. The Thunder finished on a 14-0 run, capped when they gained possession on a replay reversal with 13 seconds to go and Westbrook hit the decisive shot from just beyond the free throw line over Wesley Matthews. Westbrook scored 12 of the final 14 points. Dallas didn't call a timeout, and Harrison Barnes missed a long 3-pointer just before the buzzer, clinching the first losing season for the Mavericks (31-42) since 1999-2000, the season that owner Mark Cuban bought the team with Dirk Nowitzki in his second year. The Thunder (42-31) won for the seventh time in nine games since a four-game losing streak that matched a season high. They kept at least a 1 1/2-game lead over Memphis for the sixth seed in the Western Conference. Mavericks rookie Yogi Ferrell scored 11 of his 13 points in the fourth quarter, capped by a 3-pointer for a 91-78 lead with 3:31 remaining. Dallas didn't score again. Westbrook started the stunning run with a breakaway dunk, followed by a 3. After Steven Adams tipped in Westbrook's missed 3, the star guard hit a floater on a three-point play to get the Thunder to 91-88. The Mavericks had possession with the shot clock off after Westbrook missed a jumper, but Dallas got stuck in the backcourt and had to call timeout. With just three seconds to get the ball past midcourt, an inbounds pass for J.J. Barea was tipped by Westbrook, who immediately signaled Oklahoma City ball even though the initial call went Dallas' way. Nerlens Noel and Matthews scored 15 points each to lead the Mavericks. TIP-INS Thunder: Went scoreless for the first 5:25 of the second and finished with 10 points in the period, their lowest for any quarter this season. ... Victor Oladipo scored 15 points, and Taj Gibson had 13. Mavericks: G Seth Curry was a late scratch with a left shoulder injury. He had started 34 straight games, and Dallas was 20-14 in those games after a horrid start for an injury-plagued team. ... Dallas went on a 31-9 run over more than a quarter in the first half. UP NEXT Thunder: At the Orlando Magic on Wednesday to finish a three-game trip in four nights. Mavericks: At the New Orleans Pelicans on Wednesday to start season-ending stretch that features seven of nine on the road. ___ For more NBA coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/NBAbasketball
White House: Trump not giving up on overhaul of Obama health law

Three days after a GOP health care bill melted down in the U.S. House before a vote, the White House said President Trump is not giving up on his desire to overhaul the Obama health law, as Republicans in the Congress also urged the President to keep pushing ahead on major health insurance changes.

“I don’t think it’s dead,” said White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said of the failed GOP health bill, which foundered even after repeated efforts by the President to twist the arms of reluctant Republican lawmakers.

“We’re at the beginning of a process. I don’t think [More]

 
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Jay Black is the producer of Atlanta’s Morning News and sports director for WSB Radio.
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Get ready to say goodbye to Abby Lee Miller, “Dance Moms” fans. People reported that the dance instructor took to Instagram on Sunday to share the news that she has resigned from the Lifetime series and accused the network of treating her “like dirt.” >> Read more trending news “I will no longer take part in ‘Dance Moms,’” Miller wrote. “For the past six years/seven seasons I have asked, begged, and even demanded creative credit for all the ideas, award winning routines, themes and costuming – to no avail!” “I just have a problem with being manipulated, disrespected, and used day in and day out by men who never took a dance lesson in their lives and treat women like dirt,” she wrote. The network has not yet responded to the announcement. Miller is also in the middle of a bankruptcy fraud case. In October 2015, Miller was charged after she attempted to hide $775,000 of income from her Lifetime series, “Dance Moms,” and the spin-off, “Abby’s Ultimate Dance Competition,” during her bankruptcy proceedings. She allegedly hid the extra money in several bank accounts and was accused of having her friends hide money in plastic bags in their luggage in 2014, according to a report from The Associated Press. Her sentencing court date was postponed in February.
Disney's live-action 'Beauty and the Beast' performed even better than expected in its second weekend in theaters, adding $90.4 million to its North American grosses, which now tally at $319 million. 'Beauty and the Beast' easily topped the crop of newcomers — including Lionsgate's 'Power Rangers,' which got off to a solid start with $40 million — and a few less successful debuts as well. The sci-fi thriller 'Life,' starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Ryan Reynolds opened in fourth place, behind 'Kong: Skull Island,' with a middling $12.5 million, while the big screen take on 'CHIPS' only managed to bring in $7.7 million in its first weekend in theaters for a seventh place start. The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by comScore: 1. 'Beauty And The Beast,' Disney, $90,426,717, 4,210 locations, $21,479 average, $319,032,604, 2 Weeks. 2. 'Power Rangers,' Lionsgate, $40,300,288, 3,693 locations, $10,913 average, $40,300,288, 1 Week. 3. 'Kong: Skull Island,' Warner Bros., $14,670,653, 3,666 locations, $4,002 average, $133,747,891, 3 Weeks. 4. 'Life,' Sony, $12,501,936, 3,146 locations, $3,974 average, $12,501,936, 1 Week. 5. 'Logan,' 20th Century Fox, $10,334,390, 3,163 locations, $3,267 average, $201,644,986, 4 Weeks. 6. 'Get Out,' Universal, $8,851,845, 2,474 locations, $3,578 average, $147,669,880, 5 Weeks. 7. 'Chips,' Warner Bros., $7,722,802, 2,464 locations, $3,134 average, $7,722,802, 1 Week. 8. 'The Shack,' Lionsgate, $3,859,551, 2,330 locations, $1,656 average, $49,146,595, 4 Weeks. 9. 'The Lego Batman Movie,' Warner Bros., $2,100,951, 1,638 locations, $1,283 average, $170,972,203, 7 Weeks. 10. 'The Belko Experiment,' OTL Releasing, $1,878,370, 1,341 locations, $1,401 average, $7,648,935, 2 Weeks. 11. 'Hidden Figures,' 20th Century Fox, $753,140, 640 locations, $1,177 average, $167,015,012, 14 Weeks. 12. 'The Last Word,' Bleecker Street, $535,493, 380 locations, $1,409 average, $988,218, 4 Weeks. 13. 'John Wick: Chapter Two,' Lionsgate, $457,414, 403 locations, $1,135 average, $90,851,421, 7 Weeks. 14. 'Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,' Disney, $446,992, 267 locations, $1,674 average, $531,314,491, 15 Weeks. 15. 'Passengers,' Sony, $397,472, 506 locations, $786 average, $99,886,692, 14 Weeks. 16. 'Lion,' The Weinstein Company, $394,481, 320 locations, $1,233 average, $50,736,321, 18 Weeks. 17. 'T2: Trainspotting,' Sony, $389,453, 59 locations, $6,601 average, $622,727, 2 Weeks. 18. 'Wilson,' Fox Searchlight, $336,227, 310 locations, $1,085 average, $336,227, 1 Week. 19. 'The Sense Of An Ending,' CBS Films, $276,816, 235 locations, $1,178 average, $1,031,040, 3 Weeks. 20. 'Phillauri,' Fox International Productions, $260,982, 74 locations, $3,527 average, $260,982, 1 Week. --- Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.
Viacom Inc. named Jim Gianopulos the new chairman and chief executive officer of Paramount Pictures, turning to the former Fox chief to revive the flagging movie studio. Gianopulos will succeed Paramount's former chairman, Brad Grey, who was ousted in February. Viacom Chief Executive Bob Bakish said Monday that Gianopulos will be able to deliver the recovery needed to 'begin the next chapter in Paramount's storied history.' But hits have lately been lacking for Paramount, which has trimmed its release schedule and seen its standing in Hollywood slide. Along with overseeing production, marketing and distribution at the studio, Gianopulos has been tasked with setting a new strategy for Paramount. The studio lost $445 million in its 2016 fiscal year. 'Looking ahead, I see a strong opportunity to position the studio for success by creating valuable franchise opportunities, developing fresh creative ventures, and mining Viacom's deep brand portfolio to bring exciting new narratives to life,' Gianopulos said in a statement. Gianopulos was pushed out of 20th Century Fox last year when Stacey Snider was promoted to lead the Fox Filmed Entertainment Group. At Fox, Gianopulos notably oversaw the likes of 'Avatar' and the 'X-Men' franchise in his 16 years of running the studio. Though Paramount had a number of critically acclaimed Oscar contenders last year ('Fences,' ''Arrival'), it has struggled to find the franchise blockbusters studios depend on for the lion's share of its ticket sales. Paramount's biggest movie last year was the so-so performing 'Star Trek Beyond,' which made $343.5 million worldwide. But it released a string of clunkers, including 'Zoolander 2,' ''Ben-Hur' and 'Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows.' Formerly under Sumner M. Redstone, Viacom wasn't willing to plunk down the kind of money other studios, like the Walt Disney Co., have invested in sought-after intellectual properties. Instead, the studio has turned to financing partners and China to claw its way back. But some of those efforts haven't panned out. A ballyhooed $1 billion co-financing deal with Chinese firms, Huahua Media and Shanghai Film Group, has, at least for now, stalled. Gianopulos is expected to have bigger budgets to work with and to increase the studio's annual output. He will also be called on to better leverage Viacom's other properties (among them Comedy Central, MTV, BET and Nickelodeon) on the big screen. Viacom's TV business, though, has also recently struggled. Bakish, who was named chief executive in December, has led a restructuring intended to refocus the media conglomerate on its core brands.
Drake, who was the most streamed act on Spotify last year, has started 2017 strong — his new album, 'More Life,' has broken the U.S. record for the number of online streams from a single album in one week. The rapper's 22-track album recorded 385 million streams across all platforms in its first week, beating the previous record holder — Drake. His 2016 album, 'Views,' had owned the title with 245 million streams until 'More Life' showed up on March 18, according to Nielsen Music. 'More Life' is Drake's seventh consecutive album to debut at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart. It had competition from new albums by Ed Sheeran, Rick Ross and the soundtrack for 'Beauty and the Beast.