ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
42°
Few Clouds
H 59° L 40°
  • cloudy-day
    42°
    Current Conditions
    Few Clouds. H 59° L 40°
  • clear-day
    55°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 59° L 40°
  • clear-night
    50°
    Evening
    Clear. H 59° L 40°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Kirk Mellish Blog

    Earlier this month a “Miller A” type winter storm moved from Texas to Virginia over the course of several days.  People become unduly obsessed with “forecast snow maps” without knowing anything about how the algorithms work, how the model computes its output or the reliability or consistency of the guidance. It’s just fun to share “I hear we could get” (insert highest possible number even if it was a worst-case scenario and not a forecast) or share on social media maps from questionable sources of killer amounts where you live without any background info. It’s on a map it must be true! lol smh. There are dozens of different methods to estimate how much snow will fall. There are hundreds of computer models which calculate the estimate in different ways. Here is one tiny example of just one equation: Doesn’t that look simple and easy. If it was we’d never be wrong. There are many other longer more complicated equations.  Let us look at a short series of real world examples from that storm earlier this month. Consider yourself a forecaster or a forecast consumer living there. Below is just one models “forecast snow map” in Oklahoma and Texas. Notice how the snow amounts keep going up and the geography covered increases over just a 24 hour period. Same model run every 6 hours: MORNING OF DECEMBER 5TH 2018 NAM FORECAST SNOW MAP: EVENING OF THE SAME DAY SAME NAM MODEL UPDATED: Brace yourself here it comes.  Now it’s the next morning and the same computer model has run again to produce the latest guidance... MORNING OF DECEMBER 6TH NAM MODEL SNOW MAP: Hmmm? Seems to be a reverse trend from yesterday.  Now it’s the end of that second day and the model is run again to reveal the latest update: EVENING OF DECEMBER 6TH NAM FORECAST SNOW MAP: Sorry kids, most of you may have to go to work and school. Still a big snow for Texas. OK, so what really happened. This: Anywhere from 3-6 inches in worst areas that quickly melted, and more areas got from a trace to 2 inches which quickly melted. Hope you did your homework kids.  As was said about something else, weather forecasting is not for wussies. Not as forecasters or as consumers.  LETS LOOK AT ANOTHER CASE STUDY OF SAME STORM IN THE EAST. Remember you’re a forecaster or consumer living there. GFS MODEL MORNING SNOW FORECAST MAP LEFT AND EVENING MAP RIGHT DECEMBER 7TH: Forecast snow starts to expand North and East in the same model run just 6 hours later.  OK, so what actually happened? This: Snowfall amounts where all much higher than model output and much further east and North. Same storm, two different results. Models forecast way too much snow in Texas and Oklahoma, way too little in North Carolina, West Virginia and Virginia and Maryland.   Synoptic-Dynamic Meteorology or Operational Meteorology are the professional terms for Weather Forecasting. At universities such as UGA and Georgia Tech it is in the Department of Atmospheric Physics or Atmospheric Science or related fields.  Computer model output is referred to as “guidance” for good reason. They are just a guide but they are not the answer key. Many things go into making a forecast not just modeling, and the plain cold hard truth is there is only so much either machine or man can do.  This is why “snow forecast maps” should not be shared on social media.  Mother Nature will always have the upper hand and do what she wants. We make our best estimate of the future. It can go well or poorly.  But we are mature adults who can face it calmly and intelligently with sophistication instead of trolling or going nuts when life including weather goes differently from hope or expectation.  Well some of us.  For more follow me on Twitter @MellishMeterWSB.
  • I love snow. It's why I always love to watch it fall, examine the flakes, and go for a walk in a snowstorm. Beyond its beauty and relative rarity versus rain, I always view it as a miracle. One we can experience first-hand.  I don't think people realize just how      difficult it is to get snow.   No we can't just spray a water bottle into our freezer and make it snow.      Ski resort snow makers and shaved-ice type snow parks are a different animal and are beyond the purpose of this blog post. That stuff is not real snow.  The      microphysics  of real snow from the clouds are amazing. Don't worry this won't be that level of explanation.      Precipitation requires condensation nuclei and the nuclei that grow ice crystals are not activated until the temperature falls to about -10 degrees Celsius. Ice crystals and snow flakes do NOT automatically form once the temp falls below freezing.   Because of that complexity you can get      rain  with an outside temperature of 18F, or have      snow  at a temperature of 39F.     Remember precip doesn't fall from the ground up it's from the sky down. :)  So the gist is snow requires VERY SPECIFIC CONDITIONS to develop! But not just the right temperature, there must also be sufficient 'lift' or upward motion in the air (omega) and moisture saturation. IF      ANY  of those specific requirements are not met at any point in the atmosphere from the ground to ABOVE the clouds, you end up with something      OTHER THAN SNOW.   And as discussed in prior blogs you don't have to miss those requirements by much, just 1% or less can bust the forecast. Everything must be PERFECT to get snow.      For example the ENTIRE AIR MASS can be below-freezing but you just get drizzle. Why? Somewhere one or more of the other requirements were not met. Maybe the lift was too weak or at the wrong level, or the cloud saturation layer was not cold enough or thick enough.  See what I mean? It takes a meteorological miracle so to speak.   When the 90 or so weather balloons are released across the nation twice a day to sample the atmosphere they transmit the conditions they find which we use to create weather charts of current conditions at various layers of the atmosphere as weather observations. We can also plot this trace on a THERMODYNAMIC DIAGRAM, such as a 'Skew-T'. Example below: The computer models generate SIMULATED versions of these based on what it 'thinks' the vertical 3D atmosphere will look like in the future. Forecasters analyze all of this information to first diagnose the state of the atmosphere and then to try to predict its future state.  The 'atmospheric sounding' on the Skew-T diagram below would be one for      SNOW.  Because there is sufficient lifting, the red and green lines of temperature and dew point come together indicating moisture saturation including at -10C or colder, and the atmosphere everywhere is at or below 32F 0C: The sounding below would indicate just      RAIN.  Because there is insufficient saturation and lift in the snow growth zone, and most of the atmosphere is too warm, especially with the warm nose melting any snow that did try to form. The little cold pocket just a little above the earth is too small to refreeze the drops before it agains falls into 36F air at the surface:     In the sounding below the location is     right on the edge  where cold rain could mix with or change to freezing rain:     The sounding below could produce SNOW or a      wintry mix: One of the toughest forecast calls to make is when the vertical profile of the atmosphere is or is forecast to be 'Isothermal' or 'near isothermal'. That means the whole of the atmosphere is largely walking the tight rope line between snow or a cold rain. We get that often here in the Metro Atlanta region. An example of that kind of sounding is below: So there it is, just that simple. Now you give it a shot: EX A EX B EX C I'll give answers in future blog.  Meanwhile, guess what? There are other forecast methods for predicting snow vs. rain or ice! They all have to be used together.  There is dynamic cooling to be considered, evaporative cooling to be considered, air advection to be considered. And of course partial differential thickness analysis to be considered using forecast checklist flow charts and/or a nomogram like this one: And this one using statistical regression analysis which developed the above chart:\ Just that simple.
  • The visible spectrum satellite image above shows our next weather maker taking shape in the lower Great Plains region. It will bring another soaking rain on Friday, but not as heavy as the past couple systems. It also looks like showers will be diminishing Saturday afternoon and Sunday looks dry. No snow for Christmas expected from this distance but at least temperatures look chilly for Atlanta.  FRIDAY MORNING WEATHER CHART: SATURDAY MORNING WEATHER CHART: SATURDAY ESTIMATED RAIN AMOUNTS ENDING 1PM:  3-DAY RAINFALL TOTAL ESTIMATE: EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN ENSEMBLE TEMPERATURE OUTPUT: My winter outlook issued in October still looks to be on track for January-March as I showed on Twitter this morning.  Follow me @MellishMeterWSB. 
  • Fortunately with all the rain runoff temperatures tonight are expected to remain above freezing for most of us so no black ice concerns for the Monday morning rush hours except far North. Creeks and streams will continue high due to continued runoff, many are already at flood stage or over.  GFS AMERICAN MODEL AND ECMWF EUROPEAN MODEL ENSEMBLE TEMPERATURE GUIDANCE: Follow me on Twitter @MellishMeterWSB.
  • The above map shows the current Winter Weather Bulletins in effect for Georgia. As I’ve been warning in my blog here all week the rain/snow line is likely to shift even up to the last minute. As I pointed out the models often do not handle the strength of “the wedge” (CAD) well usually being too warm. They have also “tweaked” the models so we don’t know if they will perform better or worse than they used to so that makes it more difficult to make confident human adjustments to their output. As is typically the case, some models show a lot of snow and ice and others show little or none, and they show different locations as well.  We can not rule out that the wintry mix will end up further West and South over most of the Metro area than what is currently being shown so be prepared just in case and stay tuned for updates.  Flood Watch and Wind Advisory for all of Metro Atlanta. Isolated power outages possible tonight and Sunday. Flooding possible for the usual creeks and streams.  It is likely the lines depicted will have to be adjusted in future updates and they could be move South or North.  I’ll have more updates later.  Follow me on Twitter @MellishMeterWSB. Atlanta National Weather Service technical discussion: SURFACE WEATHER CHART SATURDAY AFTERNOON/EARLY EVENING: FORECAST SURFACE CYCLONE TRACK (dots indicate model spread of low center):
  • In the map above dark green is a Flood Watch, blue is a Winter Storm Watch, and pink is a Winter Storm Warning.  SATURDAY SURFACE WEATHER CHART: SUNDAY MORNING SURFACE WEATHER CHART: PREDOMINANT PRECIPITATION TYPE: Low amounts of ice are possible near and north of the yellow line, with the highest amounts of freezing rain sleet and snow near and north of the blue line. Between the green and yellow lines it should be more rain than anything else but a brief mix or change to sleet or freezing rain is possible with no impact. Near and south of the green line just rain.  As always remember the lines could shift North OR South at the last minute so check back for updates.  If you have not already please read the previous blog posts for *important details* I wont repeat here in this blog post.  3 inches of rain, soggy soils and wind gusts over 30 mph late Saturday night into Sunday can cause problems as previously covered.  The usual suspect creeks and streams are likely to flood. A wintry mix could briefly make it as far South as I-20 but it’s not likely. The main area to watch as of now anyway still looks to be North of Athens and East of Jasper Sunday. ESTIMATED AVERAGE RAINFALL ENDING MONDAY MORNING: For more follow me on Twitter @MellishMeterWSB.
  • No major change to what I’ve been outlining since Monday for the weekend as of now. There will likely be revision of the details in the next couple days as the storm comes into better focus. Heavy snow for the Northeast corner of Georgia, more rain than anything else for MOST of Atlanta, but still the risk of some ice accumulation North and East of the perimeter, but especially Hall County and adjacent areas.  As I’ve noted previously, the computer models often do not handle temperature predictions well in a “wedge” (CAD) event like this associated with a “Miller A” winter storm system, they are often too warm. And as I said since NOAA has made changes to the models to try to improve them, it will take a few years for us to learn their new quirks, strengths and weaknesses.  Over the years I’ve tried to educate on how the equations only need to be off the mark by a degree or less for the forecast to go from good to bad. The normal and to be expected margin of error is GREATER than that.  STORM IN QUESTION UNDERWAY TODAY FROM TEXAS EAST: Remember that some typical flooding of the usual suspect creeks and streams will be possible and with soggy soils and winds gusting over 30 mph at times some trees might fall causing a few scattered power outages. Rain totals of 2-3 inches expected on average.  As always the lines of demarcation for precipitation TYPE are not “magic walls in the sky”. They are more a transition ZONE from one type of precipitation to another that is at least 15 miles wide but sometimes only miles and other times 30 miles depending on storm structure, track and 3D thermodynamics.  And naturally they can move North OR South even at the last minute.  Since we KNOW the weekend weather will be wet and cold even if there is no ice or snow anywhere, why not do what ya gotta do by end of day Friday and bunker down safe and sound on the weekend. That’s my plan, That’s always my plan. Better safe than sorry. Plan for the worse hope for the best.  Accumulation of ice of a tenth to a quarter of an inch is possible mainly Northern Hall County and adjacent areas. However, as I said the amounts and locations will likely change in future forecast updates. I’ll have them on the radio Friday through Sunday and next week as needed.  SURFACE WEATHER CHART SATURDAY: SURFACE WEATHER CHART LATE SATURDAY NIGHT INTO SUNDAY: ESTIMATED AVERAGE RAINFALL ENDING MONDAY MORNING: MODEL NOTES: Models differ greatly on where the best evaporative cooling will take place, some say only the NE corner of the state, others say all the way to downtown Atlanta or even South of the airport and to Athens. No way to know which will be right but it makes deciding where to draw the rain vs. ice line very difficult and subject to unexpected changes one direction or another once the rain starts falling in earnest. The synoptic set up is classic with the low tracking east near the Gulf Coast and with high pressure centered over PA to feed colder drier air down the east slopes of the mountains to meet the warm moist air coming in from the South and West where it overrides and lifts up on top of the cooler drier air (”over-running or isentropic lift).If the majority of models are right the warm air will mostly win out and its just a cold rain for the majority of the area, but if the numerical weather prediction equations UNDER estimate the strength of the wedge then the system will over-perform and more of the area will get some ice. As I’ve pointed out for years now the margin of error is very tiny, and the NORMAL error in modeling much larger which is why, unless you are located “in the heart of a system” instead of near the edges its a fine line between being on target or the forecast dart being off into the wall. In the middle of a system forecasts are on more solid ground because the air mass is more uniform. But on the edges like we are so often in Georgia thanks to terrain, geography and storm tracks its more iffy. For more follow me on Twitter @MellishMeterWSB.
  • The surface weather map ABOVE shows the complex weather system out West that is heading our way this weekend. So far I’ve not had to change my outlook from the blog I posted back on Monday morning much at all. While anybody anywhere in the metro area could see some sleet (ice pellets) or snow flakes briefly, most of us just get a cold rain and lots of it.  AS OF NOW, the only area where some accumulation is possible is near and north of a line from Carters Lake to Canton to Athens. Heavy sleet and snow is still possible in the Northeast corner of the Georgia mountains.  Obviously this could change so keep checking back for updates on the radio, here in this blog and in my forecast page online.  Download the WSB Radio APP. NOTES: NE corner of GA snow breaks out Sat night Far North and East suburbs rain mixes with or changes to sleet (ice pellets) by  Sunday There could be a brief period of INSIGNIFICANT sleet or flurries before sunrise Saturday anywhere, then again Saturday night-Sunday morning, and again at times on Monday.  Soggy soils and strong gusty winds mean a few scattered power outages from trees falling  Routine type flooding of the usual creeks and streams will be likely by late Saturday or Sunday, as well as ponding on roads. The highest risk of some accumulation of sleet near and North of a line from Ellijay to Athens, give or take 20 miles or so. But as always those lines could shift North OR South in future updates.  Heavy snow is probable in the Northeast corner of Georgia.  The models usually do a poor job with temperatures in “the wedge” (CAD) pattern like this usually being too warm.  The models have been “tinkered with” so forecasters don’t have experience using the new versions, it will take a few years to learn how the new computer model versions perform and how to adjust them.  SATURDAY MORNING WEATHER CHART: SUNDAY MORNING SURFACE CHART: MONDAY SURFACE WEATHER CHART: FLOOD RISK AREAS: WEEKEND ESTIMATED RAINFALL AVERAGE AMOUNTS: Sunday-Monday is the MAIN period for any frozen precip accumulation but timing is subject to change of course. Again accumulation is most likely in the mountains with some possible for Hall County and adjacent areas. Details may change.  Too early to predict snow sleet or freezing rain amounts but here are the risk levels as of now: More specifics coming in future updates.  Here is the National Weather Service Office discussion: For more Follow me on Twitter @MellishMeterWSB.
  • The above map is all that can be outlined this far in advance of next weekends weather system. Snow sleet and ice are most likely in the Northeast Georgia mountains. But at this distance those lines will certainly shift South OR  North. It’s way too soon to say how much because we don’t know yet what TYPE precipitation will fall. The TIMING is also iffy at this point as it could be anytime next weekend, as of now it looks like both Saturday and Sunday will have precipitation and there could be heavy rain.  I am highly confident there WILL be a storm system, but the temperatures are uncertain not just at the surface but also aloft. Long-time followers or weather enthusiasts/hobbyists who pay attention to these things already have the background from past blogs to understand how a “Miller A” and “Miller B” system impacts our region along with “CAD Events” (Cold-Air Damming) aka “The Wedge”. They also know no two are ever exactly alike.  They also know that if the models are off by just a tenth to a quarter of a degree that can be the difference between a good forecast and a forecast “bust”. They also know that is a tiny tiny margin of error and NO MAN or MODEL is capable of nailing that, the normal and expected margin of error is LARGER than that given the current state of the art of the science.  The system in question is still over the Pacific Ocean West of California: NOTE: the last box is true in states like Kansas where the graphic was made where snow is common and they don’t have the complications we have with the mountains, Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean effects, not true here because of those complications.   A “split-flow” jet stream pattern is typical in an El Nino winter and will often keep the Southern tier of the country in an active weather pattern including winter precipitation risks.  500mb (about 18,000 feet) Jet Stream Forecast ECMWF Ensemble Next Saturday Evening : The system is expected to move into Southern California and move across Northern Mexico and South Texas then track East near the Gulf Coast before turning Northeast up the Atlantic Coast then out to sea Saturday through Monday:   Stay tuned. For more follow me on Twitter @MellishMeterWSB. This is Winter Weather Preparedness Week in Georgia! Learn to prepare here. 
  • Despite the  'Black Swan Event' snow last December in the NW suburbs, and even a White Christmas in 2010 when the  Atlanta Metro area saw between 1-3 inches - the first measurable snow on Christmas Day since 1881, snow is very rare in Georgia in December.  The more common months for it to occur are January-March. I’ve lived here for over 3 decades and over that time there have been more winters with no snow or just a tease than winters with significant snow.  The map above is the American GFS Ensemble snow forecast to December 7th. The map below is the European Ensemble model snowfall anomaly forecast to December 13th showing in green where snow amounts are projected above-normal (it looks right to me): You already knew if you read previous blogs and tweets that the pattern was trying to be favorable even in the South through the first part of December. But it still looks to me like the most favorable area will stay North of Georgia for at least the next 7 days or so.  GFS ENSEMBLE MODEL SNOW TO DECEMBER 7TH: ECMWF ENSEMBLE SNOW TO DECEMBER 12TH: GFS ENSEMBLE SNOW ENDING DECEMBER 16TH: ECMWF 6-WEEK ENSEMBLE SNOWFALL OUTPUT: I am NOT forecasting the snow shown in these models as I currently have good reason to doubt them, doesn’t meant it can’t happen but long time followers know I do not like to be a fear-monger or a rumor starter when it comes to snow and ice just to get attention. Models are a tool but just one tool and I practice METEOROLOGY not MODELOLOGY.  So I DO NOT see snow for Atlanta and probably not for all of Georgia through at least December 7th. Beyond that is more uncertain but I do not buy the model output as of now.  This *potential* has been on my radar (pun intended) for a long while now, here is the email I sent to my bosses November 16th as a behind the scenes heads up for planning just in case: However, with a split-flow jet stream pattern expected to develop there is some potential for ice or snow but there is NO storm to track at this time.   IF it gets to the point I think there’s a realistic chance I will blog about it.  Below is the 15 day temperature guidance from both the GFS and ECMWF ensembles: Some discrepancy in the ECMWF climate model and ensemble for DECEMBER: Based on research and analogs on things like Stratospheric polar vortex disruption (weakening then restrengthening), Mountain-torque changes to global angular momentum, and a wave-train in the Pacific jet stream extension it looks like a milder period will return for mid December after a cold start, then it may end turning colder again into January. “I am dreaming of a White Christmas, just like the ones I almost never know” For more follow me on Twitter @MellishMeterWSB.

News

  • DeKalb County officer Edgar Flores paid the ultimate price and today, the community will honor his sacrifice. The first of two funerals for the fallen officer will begin at 11 a.m.  We'll explain how you can show your respect to the fallen officer, on Channel 2 Action News This Morning Investigators said 33-year-old Brandon Taylor shot and killed the 24-year-old officer during a traffic stop last week. Today, Flores would have turned 25 years old. He was engaged to be married and is being remembered as a hero. [ RELATED: Law enforcement escorts fallen DeKalb County officer on his final trip home] DeKalb County officers will form a procession at their police headquarters. That will be followed by a funeral at All Saints Catholic Church in Dunwoody. A second service will be held 11 a.m. Wednesday at Prince of Peace Catholic Church in Flowery Branch. Fellow officers have set up a GoFundMe account to help pay for funeral expenses. 
  • The busiest road in Midtown Atlanta will be partially closed the day before the Super Bowl for an awards show. There are detours planned and years of thought has gone into it. Officials just want residents to put some thought into their plans as well. More than a million people are expected to navigate the streets of downtown Atlanta for the Super Bowl. “We've been meeting for about two years on how best to tackle this here in Atlanta,” said Super Bowl Host Committee official Amy Patterson. Channel 2 Action News received a glimpse of the plan to minimize the inconvenience. At least 14 roads in midtown and downtown Atlanta will be partially affected by either road or lane closures. We'll show you the areas you will need to avoid, on Channel 2 Action News This Morning
  • ’Tis the season for eating, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture is warning consumers to stay away from “cannibal sandwiches” -- a dish featuring raw ground beef, garnished with onions and spices and served on bread or crackers. >> Read more trending news  It seems to be a tradition in Wisconsin, and the state’s Department of Health Services warned there have been eight outbreaks of people becoming sick from the raw meat since 1986. More than 150 people were affected during a 1994 outbreak, the department said on its website. The meal can be dangerous because it is uncooked and could contain harmful bacteria that can only be killed by cooking the meat at a minimum temperature of 160 degrees, the USDA said. The dish, also known as Tiger meat or steak tartare, is never safe to consume because it is raw meat, the USDA reported. The USDA recommends that steaks, chops and roasts that use beef, pork, lamb and veal as their main ingredients should be cooked at a minimum temperature of 145 degrees. Ground beef, pork, lamb and veal should be cooked at 160 degrees, while any kind of poultry should be heated at 165 degrees. If you have a question about preparing a safe alternative to cannibal sandwiches, the USDA suggests calling the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 888-674-6854 or chatting live online at AskKaren.gov from from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday.
  • A local high school student says a school resource officer choked and tackled him for stealing a candy bar. Cellphone video showed the officer force the student to the floor. The officer seen in the video is under investigation and the student and others are facing criminal charges. The mother of one of these students told Channel 2’s Tom Regan she will fight the charges and that officer who wrestled her son to the ground used unwarranted excessive force. The incident happened last week at Alcovy High School in Covington. Video captured the moment when 14-year-old Asah Glenn is confronted by a school resources officer and flipped to the floor.  Moments earlier, officials said he and a crowd of other student grabbed snacks from an open vending machine without paying. We're hearing from the teen's mother about the incident, on Channel 2 Action News This Morning
  • A Minnesota couple in a horse-drawn buggy died after their vehicle was hit from behind by a pickup truck Sunday afternoon, KMSP reported. >> Read more trending news  Robert Alois Keppers, 72, and Mary Joan Keppers, 66, both of Avon, were killed in the crash, the St. Cloud Times reported, citing a media release from the Stearns County Sheriff's Office. Their identities were released Monday afternoon. The horse also died at the scene, the newspaper reported.. According to Sheriff Don Gudmundson, a Ford F150 driven by Marc Lucas Knapp, 23, of Avon was traveling north behind the buggy, the Times reported. The buggy was also traveling north along the shoulder.  'Knapp struck the buggy from behind, sending it into the east ditch,' Gudmundson said. The crash remains under investigation by the Sheriff’s Office, KMSP reported.
  • An account manager for a Georgia dental corporation is accused of abusing her power and stealing more than $84,000 from customers.  >> Read more trending news  The scam allegedly went on for five years and involved dozens of victims.  Essence Boatwright, 40, was an account manager for Carestream Dental. From May 2012 to January 2017, Boatwright allegedly used her position to steal tens of thousands of dollars. “Well, you can always get away with it for a long time, but eventually you’re always gonna get caught,” said KC Rowe of with Katella Investigations. The Cobb County Sheriff’s Office said Boatwright accessed customers’ Carestream Dental profiles by using her company log-in and password.  According to an arrest warrant, Boatwright accessed 35 customers’ accounts and made refunds totaling $84,750. 'You’ve got 35 alleged victims, possibly more,' Rowe said. Instead of refunding the money to customers, investigators said the refunds were credited to Boatwright’s checking account.  “She had access to approve and deny, so she could manipulate. And there needs to be some type of checks and balances happening,” Rowe said. Rowe is not assigned to this case, but he frequently works with attorneys and local companies on internal audits. “Start doing a review, from 2012 allegedly is when it started. You’re gonna have to go back to do some digging,” Rowe said. The Sheriff’s Office said Boatwright had the authority to approve Carestream credit applications. She also had access to banking and credit card information.  According to court records, Boatwright was arrested at an office in Buckhead. She was released on a $93,000 bond.