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Hurricane Irma pushes Georgia patients inland 
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Hurricane Irma pushes Georgia patients inland 

Hurricane Irma pushes Georgia patients inland 
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Hurricane Irma pushes Georgia patients inland 

The Georgia Department of Health is already in the process of getting patients along the Georgia coast to facilities that are more inland.  

Dr. Patrick O'Neal with the Georgia Department of Public Health says they are concerned about the impact this monster storm may have on hospitals and nursing homes along the coast. 

“We are in the process of evacuating a lot of those facilities inland,” O’Neal says. 

They have evacuated babies from the neonatal nursery at Memorial Health center in Savannah. 

O’Neal says nearly 60 babies had to be moved. He adds that about a half a dozen or so were brought to Children Healthcare of Atlanta. 

“In a previous evacuation, we actually had seven deaths that were actually associated with difficulties that occurred during the evacuation itself,” O’Neal says.

The hope is to have all the patients in a safe place before the storm hits.

For more from the Georgia Department of Public Health, click here.

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News

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  • Prosecutors with special counsel Robert Mueller’s office have until midnight Friday to make recommendations about the sentencing for President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, who pleaded guilty to several charges last year. >> Read more trending news Prosecutors are expected to file the sentencing memo in federal court in Washington, where Manafort pleaded guilty in September to charges including conspiracy against the United States and conspiracy to obstruct justice through witness tampering. >> More on Robert Mueller's investigation  Manafort agreed to fully cooperate with Mueller’s team as part of a plea agreement with prosecutors; however, authorities later said Manafort lied to investigators. Prosecutors are not expected to recommend leniency for him. Manafort’s attorneys will have until midnight Monday to file their own sentencing memo. A judge is expected to hand down Manafort’s sentence March 13 at a 9:30 a.m. hearing before U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson. >> Judge rules Paul Manafort intentionally lied after agreeing to cooperate In a separate case that also stemmed from Mueller’s investigation, a jury in Virginia found Manafort guilty last summer of tax and bank fraud charges in a case related to work he and an associate did for pro-Russia political forces in Ukraine. Prosecutors last week recommended Manafort serve between 19.5 and 24.5 years in prison and be fined as much as $24 million for those crimes. Manafort is scheduled to be sentenced in that case during a 9 a.m. hearing March 8 before U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis, according to a court filing. >> Mueller recommends Paul Manafort be sentenced to 19.5-24.5 years in prison and $24M fine Last month, defense attorneys said Manafort has been kept in solitary confinement for his own safety. He’s had severe gout for several months of his incarceration, according to his attorneys, and it’s sometimes been severe enough to require him to use a wheelchair. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
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  • Three Butler County men were arrested and charged in a stolen baby formula conspiracy case. UPDATE at 10:31 a.m. FBI agents Friday are searching a Liberty Township home in connection to that investigation, said a spokesperson for the U.S. Attorney's Office in Cincinnati. The men were identified as Khalil Yacub, 44, of Liberty Township.; Khalil Jaghama of West Chester Township; and Jasser Saleh, 41, of Liberty Township. According to an affidavit filed in support of the criminal complaint, Yacub’s family owns and operates the Pit Stop, a convenience store in Colerain Township. >> Read more trending news  Employees of the Pit Stop, including Yacub, Jaghama and Saleh, would allegedly pay individuals, many of them drug addicts, to work as “boosters” to steal baby formula. The defendants would pay boosters with cash from the convenience store register for the stolen formula. For example, boosters might sell cans of stolen baby formula to the Pit Stop for $5 per can. On June 30, 2018, alone, one woman brought 40 cans of baby formula to the Pit Stop to be sold. Before the defendants would purchase the stolen baby formula from boosters, they would often take a photo of the booster driver’s license or state ID in order to prevent the boosters from reporting co-conspirators to the police, officials said. Defendants also allegedly brandished a handgun and used a taser to intimidate and control buyers. It is alleged that between 2017 and January 2019, the defendants stored and shipped hundreds of cans of baby formula for resale to other parts of the country. The defendants used a storage facility to warehouse the stolen goods. A GPS monitor placed on an Enfamil can in the storage facility showed that the product was transported interstate to the west coast. The defendants are charged with conspiring to transport and transporting stolen goods. The transporting of stolen goods is a crime punishable by up to 10 years in prison. Conspiracy to commit the crime is punishable by up to five years in prison. The defendants are also charged with unlawful possession of a means of identification, which carries a potential maximum sentence of five years in prison. ORIGINAL REPORT: 10:21 a.m. The FBI is serving a search warrant at a Liberty Twp. home this morning, according to the Butler County Sheriff’s Office. The sheriff’s office is assisting with the serving of the warrant, which is happening at a home on Peakview Court.