ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
64°
Partly Cloudy
H 73° L 61°
  • cloudy-day
    64°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 73° L 61°
  • cloudy-day
    73°
    Today
    Partly Cloudy. H 73° L 61°
  • heavy-rain-day
    70°
    Tomorrow
    Chance of Rain. H 70° L 44°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Technology
Is Facebook down? Users report problems worldwide
Close

Is Facebook down? Users report problems worldwide

Photo Credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
5 Things About Facebook You Didn't Know You Could Do

Is Facebook down? Users report problems worldwide

Thousands of social media users across the globe reported that Facebook was down on Wednesday morning.

>> Read more trending news

Instagram users also reported problems with the photo sharing social media site starting around 11:05 a.m. EDT, according to downdetector.com, a website that tracks site issues.

Problems with Facebook first surfaced around 8:20 a.m. EDT, according to downdetector.com. A map compiled by the website showed reports were most prevalent in the United States, Europe and parts of South America.

Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Close

Is Facebook down? Users report problems worldwide

Photo Credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

News

  • A South Dakota woman who works as a clinical psychologist is accused of trying to kill herself and her 6-month-old son in a car crash out of fear the baby has an attachment disorder, court documents allege.  Julia Jacquelyn Alzoubaidi, 34, of Sioux Falls, is charged with attempted premeditated first-degree murder and abuse or cruelty to a child under the age of 7, records show. The Argus Leader reported that bail has been set at $250,000.  According to the court documents, computer data from Alzoubaidi’s Mazda CX-5 indicate she accelerated from 50 mph to 70 mph just before the crash. She never hit the brakes, the arrest affidavit says.  KELO-TV in Sioux Falls said that Avera Health confirmed Alzoubaidi is a psychologist within the health care system. By Thursday morning, her profile page on the system’s website had been removed.  “Our hearts go out to the Alzoubaidi family during this incredibly difficult time, and we are holding them in our prayers,” Avera Health said in a statement obtained by The Argus Leader.  Sioux Falls police spokesman Sam Clemens said 911 dispatchers received a call around 3:30 a.m. Tuesday about a vehicle that had left Interstate 229 near Minnesota Avenue and rolled into a ditch. The scene of the crash is close to the Big Sioux River.   The court documents say that Minnesota state troopers were first on the scene.  “As they made their way to the SUV, they heard splashing and moaning near the river,” the arrest affidavit said.  One of the troopers found Alzoubaidi facedown in the river under a bridge that crossed a culvert, the document said. He pulled her to shore, where he found her unresponsive, but breathing and shivering.  The temperature at the time was 37 degrees, with a wind chill of 32 degrees, the affidavit said.  Alzoubaidi’s 6-month-old son was found on the bank of the river, wet, cold and not breathing. The affidavit says the troopers began CPR and continued performing it until Sioux Falls fire medics arrived. Both Alzoubaidi and the baby were taken to Avera McKennan Hospital & University Health Center for treatment. According to the arrest affidavit, the baby was rushed into the pediatric intensive care unit, where he was treated for hypothermia and aspiration pneumonia, or water in his lungs.  Meanwhile, the first responders were unsure if there were more victims in the water. Clemens told reporters the morning of the crash that the uncertainty of the situation resulted in a large response -- 15 patrol cars from the Highway Patrol and Sioux Falls Police Department, as well as two fire trucks and a rescue unit.  “I think part of it was they thought it was going to be a water rescue,” Clemens said. “Both of them had been in the water at some point in time. I think that was probably part of the response.” Initially, first responders also believed more people might have been involved in the crash, but Alzoubaidi’s husband, when reached by police, was able to confirm his wife and son were likely the only people in the vehicle, Clemens said.  See Clemens brief the media on the crash and the charges against Alzoubaidi below, courtesy of The Argus Leader. The troopers noted that all the doors on the SUV were closed, except the door next to the infant boy’s child safety seat, and they determined that Alzoubaidi and her son were not ejected into the water. A suicide note was found in the vehicle, the affidavit says. The note, the contents of which were included in the affidavit, indicated that Alzoubaidi believed her son had signs of reactive attachment disorder.  According to the Mayo Clinic, reactive attachment disorder is a rare but serious condition in which an infant or young child fails to establish healthy attachments with his parents or caregivers.  “Reactive attachment disorder may develop if the child's basic needs for comfort, affection and nurturing aren't met and loving, caring, stable attachments with others are not established,” the Mayo Clinic website says. Signs of the disorder include a failure to smile, a listless appearance, failure to seek comfort or respond when comfort is given, failure to engage in social interaction and a failure to reach out when picked up.  “The prognosis is poor and I couldn’t let him live a life of misery and pain,” Alzoubaidi wrote in her suicide note. “Most kiddos I know with the disorder are institutionalized, suicidal and homicidal and tortured souls. (Name redacted) doesn’t deserve that.” The note also indicated she blamed herself for her son’s condition and believed she’d caused her husband nothing but pain, the affidavit says. Read the affidavit seeking an arrest warrant for Julia Alzoubaidi below.  According to the document, Alzoubaidi told emergency room staff treating her that she believed her son had the disorder because he did not enjoy being held.  “When she picked the baby up, he would cry,” the affidavit reads. “The defendant told the ER staff that her solution was to kill the baby and herself.” Alzoubaidi’s husband told investigators that he did not worry when his wife was not in bed because she often woke during the night to feed their son or pump breast milk, the affidavit said. He did not realize anything was wrong until he was awakened by police officers knocking on the door around 4 a.m. He told officers he was aware that his wife was concerned about the possibility of reactive attachment disorder, but he did not know his wife intended to harm their son or herself, the document says.  >> Read more trending news Alzoubaidi reiterated her concerns when investigators interviewed her in the hospital, the affidavit says. She said the lack of bonding she felt with her son made her feel “inadequate as a mother.” “(Alzoubaidi) sought assistance and advice from her peers and colleagues,” the affidavit says. “This intervention helped for a time, and then she stated her thoughts would eventually turn to ending her life.” Alzoubaidi’s husband told detectives his wife suffered from anxiety and depression, but that she had gone off her medication during her pregnancy and while breastfeeding their son, the document said.  As of Wednesday, both Alzoubaidi and her son remained hospitalized, KELO-TV reported. 
  • Spouses of foreign workers in the U.S. on H-1B visas could lose their ability to work under proposed rule changes from the Trump administration.  President Donald Trump signed an executive order Tuesday, directing U.S. agencies to propose rules to prevent immigration fraud and make changes so that H-1B visas are awarded to the “most-skilled or highest-paid applicants.” >> Read more trending news  The changes, part of Trump’s Buy American and Hire American initiative, could impact nearly 100,000 foreign citizens working as H-4 employees, the San Jose Mercury News reported. H-4 workers are the spouses of foreign workers using H-1B visas.  “Some U.S. workers would benefit from this proposed rule by having a better chance at obtaining jobs that some of the population of the H-4 workers currently hold,” the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration said in a notice.  The public will be given the ability to comment on proposed rule changes, L. Frank Cissna, citizenship and immigration director wrote in a Sept. 6 letter to the Internet Association, whose members include Facebook and Google, which employee many foreign workers on H-1B visas. The H-1B visa is an employment-based, non-immigrant visa allowing foreigners in specialty fields to work in the United States on a temporary basis for up to six years. There were 199,000 applicants this year vying for the 85,000 H-1B visas available, officials said Monday.  “With this action, we are sending a powerful signal to the world,” Trump said. “We are going to defend our workers, protect our jobs and finally put America first.” The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • President Donald Trump on Friday ordered the government to speed up environmental reviews and streamline regulations that he says are hindering work on major water projects in the Western United States. Trump signed a memorandum aimed at helping the Central Valley Project and the California State Water Project in California, the Klamath Irrigation Project in Oregon and the Columbia River Basin system in the Pacific Northwest. 'We will resolve the issues blocking the completion of the Central Valley project,' Trump said in Arizona during a swing through Western states. 'I hope you enjoy the water that you're going to have.' The announcement is a boost for endangered Republican lawmakers in California's Central Valley facing tough challenges from Democrats looking to take control of the U.S. House. Officials did not discuss specific work that the administration aims to speed up for any of the projects. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which manages most federal water projects in the West, referred questions to the Interior Department. That department did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment. The Central Valley Project is a federally managed water storage and delivery system that primarily benefits agricultural users in California's rich farming country in the center of the state. The State Water Project serves agricultural and urban water users, including Los Angeles and much of sprawling Southern California. The Klamath Irrigation Project is in California and Oregon. The Columbia River system includes the Columbia Basin Project, which serves about 1,050 square miles (2,700 square kilometers) of farmland in east central Washington. The project includes the Grand Coulee Dam and three power plants. The president's announcement is likely to inflame an ongoing battle in California over divvying up water between cities, farms and environmental needs like the protection of fish. Farming interests have long pushed to raise Shasta Dam, which holds back California's largest reservoir as part of the Central Valley Project, by more than 18 feet (5.5 meters). The project is opposed by environmentalists who say it would harm threatened fish species and by the Winnemem Wintu tribe, which says it would flood sacred sites. Several other dams are proposed including Sites Reservoir near Sacramento and Temperance Flat Dam north of Fresno. ___ Cooper reported from Sacramento, California.
  • California moved a step closer Friday to allowing marijuana deliveries in communities that have banned retail sales of the drug as regulators rebuffed cities and police chiefs opposed the rule. The proposal is a major issue that could ultimately end up in court as the state continues to assemble pieces in the pot regulatory puzzle since recreational sales became legal Jan. 1. Cities have been able to ban retail sales, but state law says local governments cannot prevent cannabis deliveries on public roads so the state — at this point — rejected the plea from opponents who said it would increase crime and cause other problems. California police chiefs, the League of Cities and other groups launched an online petition this summer opposed to the proposal that showed wide-eyed children gesturing toward a pot delivery van outside a school. Regulators received thousands of comments about a raft of proposed regulations, but half of those were aimed at the delivery issue, said Alex Traverso, spokesman for the Bureau of Cannabis Control. 'There was a lot on both sides of the dial, but the determination was to leave statewide delivery as it was,' he said. The proposed delivery rule and changes in other draft regulations now face a 15-day public comment period. The rules are expected to be finalized in December.
  • Kamala Harris came to South Carolina with the stated intent of boosting turnout for the midterm elections, but many voters here wanted to talk to the California senator about her role in the battle over Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation, and her next political moves. Perhaps that's no surprise for Harris's first trip as a potential presidential candidate to the state that hosts the South's first presidential primary. 'This is an inflection moment in the history of our country,' she told Democratic Party volunteers at a phone bank Friday, adding that the November midterms are about 'fighting for the best of who we are.' At an afternoon rally, Harris bemoaned Republican efforts to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, blasted the GOP's tax overhaul for being tilted to the rich and cited unnamed forces trying to sow 'hatred and division' in American society. But the former prosecutor invoked the language of the legal profession to 'reject the premise' that the U.S. actually is as divided as it often appears. 'We have so much more in common than what divides us ... let's speak that truth,' she said to a crowd that would later serenade her with 'Happy Birthday.' Harris turns 54 on Saturday. Harris is among several potential Democratic presidential contenders in the state this week. New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker on Friday finished a two-day swing in South Carolina. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who sought the Democratic nomination in 2016, is scheduled to be in the state Saturday. Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg was here Thursday. Former Vice President Joe Biden campaigned for South Carolina Democrats last weekend. South Carolina has proven critical in Democratic politics, offering the first opportunity for would-be president to face a significant number of black voters. Harris and Booker are the only two black Democratic senators. The state helped propel both Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton to the 2008 and 2016 nominations, respectively. Harris steered clear of White House campaign talk in her first stops, though she's expected to make a decision about 2020 sometime soon after the Nov. 6 midterms. The senator also did not focus on her — and Booker's — appearances in the national spotlight as the Senate Judiciary Committee debated Kavanaugh's confirmation. But several women thanked Harris for how she handled Christine Blasey Ford's allegations of sexual assault against Kavanaugh. Harris said from the outset that she believed Ford's accusation that Kavanaugh assaulted her when they were in high school. Kavanaugh vehemently denied the accusation. Bridgette Watson, 33, shed tears as she met with Harris. 'I just appreciate so much that she treated Dr. Ford with respect,' Watson told The Associated Press afterward, describing herself as a sexual assault survivor. 'The way she addressed her was empowering for women who have never told their stories...I didn't tell mine until this year.' Harris said she has experienced many such encounters since the Ford-Kavanaugh hearings, despite Kavanaugh's eventual confirmation. 'People who might have said hello (to me) are now telling their story,' she said. In Charleston, Booker finished a South Carolina itinerary that he called an 'empowering experience.' 'I came down here to help, and folks in South Carolina really gave me a gift of spirit while I'm here,' he said. ---- Kinnard reported from Charleston, South Carolina. ---- Follow Barrow and Kinnard on Twitter at https://twitter.com/BillBarrowAP and https://twitter.com/MegKinnardAP.