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Atlanta Hawks

    The Latest from ACC men's basketball media day on Tuesday (all times local): 4:15 p.m. The Atlantic Coast Conference wrapped up media day with coaches and two players from each team participating in the event. Next up for the ACC will be to announce the results of its media picks for preseason favorite and all-conference players on Thursday. The conference lost many of its top players to the NBA, including Zion Williamson, and appears more balanced overall than in years past. One of the main topics of conversation Tuesday is college players being paid for play, a proposal that has gained momentum last month when California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law that goes into effect in 2023. The law will allow athletes at universities in California to make money from their images, names or likenesses beginning in 2023. Commissioner John Swofford says the ACC needs to be 'open-minded' to the idea and several of the league's high-profile coaches agreed with that notion. Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski says college athletics can no longer 'put our heads in the sand' and must have a better game plan moving forward instead of being reactionary. That said, nobody had a solution to a problem many view as a slippery slope. ___ 3:15 p.m. North Carolina will be without three players to start the season — freshmen guards Anthony Harris and Jeremiah Francis and junior forward Sterling Manley, all of whom are battling knee injuries. Coach Roy Williams put no timetable on their returns. North Carolina still has one of the top recruits in the country in freshman Cole Anthony, but injuries have left the Tar Heels thin at the guard position. Along with Harris and Francis being out, Leaky Black and Andrew Platek have also been battling through minor injuries forcing Williams to bring up a player from the JV team for practice. Williams joked 'the day before practice started I didn't even know the guy's name.' ___ 2:25 p.m. Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim is lukewarm to the idea of the ACC changing its schedule to require each team to play 20 conference games instead of 18. Boeheim worries that it could mean the heavily-talented ACC will get fewer teams into the NCAA Tournament. Boeheim says it's been 'proven over time when you talk to people that experts about what you need to do to get into the NCAA Tournament that the more conference games you play doesn't help you any because you have more losses.' Commissioner John Swofford said earlier one of the reasons the league is going to a 20-game schedule is because of the new ACC Network. Syracuse will have a challenge to open the season, hosting defending national champion Virginia in a conference game on Nov. 6. ___ 2:05 p.m. Notre Dame coach Mike Brey says one of the most difficult aspects of his job these days is dealing with parents of basketball recruits. Brey says now more than ever parents are 'really, really involved.' The coach says the difficult part is while recruiting a player you have to develop a close relationship with a player's' parents, but once they're on the team 'I have to try to severe that' to avoid answering constant questions about playing time. Brey says most parents want to know 'what's my return on investment with little Billy, because I have had little Billy traveling all over the country for the last 10 years?' Brey says he constantly has to remind them that they're getting a degree from Notre Dame. ___ 1:45 p.m. Clemson forward Aamir Simms believes college players should be paid to play — but with some limitations. Simms says players bring a lot of attention and money to the school and should be compensated financially within reason. Simms says the danger is if players are getting paid millions of dollars 'they won't really care about playing for the school; they will just care about getting the most endorsements.' Not everyone agrees change is needed. Louisville's Steven Enoch says he has no complaints with his four years of college and how the system is being run. He says that's largely because of the NCAA ruling in 2014 that allows college programs to grant athletes unlimited meals and snacks gives him what he needs to survive. That ruling came about as the result of Shabazz Napier's comments about going to bed hungry because he didn't have enough food while at Connecticut. Enoch says 'that is the one change I am most thankful for.' ___ 1:35 p.m. Miami Hurricanes coach Jim Larrañaga is still mourning the loss of his older brother Bob, who died last Wednesday at age 79. Larrañaga said Tuesday at the ACC men's basketball media day that his brother was 'the greatest guy I have ever known.' Bob Larrañaga played two seasons under renowned St. John's coach Joe Lapchick and young assistant Lou Carnesecca in 1959-60 and 1960-61. Jim Larrañaga, 70, says his brother, who was 9 years older than him, lived at home while attending St John's and made a point to read to him every night from the book 'The Secret Project of Sigrud O'Leary.' He plans to fly to Minneapolis on Thursday to attend the funeral. ___ 11:50 a.m. Georgia Tech coach Josh Pastner says his team is handling the news of a postseason ban and four years of probation for major recruiting violations as well as possible. Pastner says their energy, their enthusiasm has been extremely high, adding: 'Most times when you get punched in the nose and kicked in the shin, it's easy to lay down and just say forget it. These guys have had a good fight about them.' The sanctions handed down on Sept. 26 by the NCAA included a reduction in scholarships, limits on recruiting and a fine of $5,000 plus 2% of the program's budget. The NCAA says former assistant coach Darryl LaBarrie gave $300 to a highly touted prospect for a visit to an Atlanta strip club and arranged for him to meet with a former Georgia Tech athlete who played for the NBA's Atlanta Hawks, including a visit to the player's home and a free meal at a lounge owned by the player. ___ 11:20 a.m. Virginia coach Tony Bennett says just like his team didn't obsess over losing to 16th-seeded UMBC in the first round of the 2018 NCAA Tournament, the Cavaliers won't obsess over winning the national championship this past season. Bennett says when his team became the first to lose in the NCAA Tournament as a No. 1 seed he didn't try to 'sweep it under the rug.' Instead he says his team addressed it and learned from it. Now, as champions, he says they have enjoyed the success of winning it all but won't obsess over it and allow it to impact the upcoming season which he expects will be filled with growing pains after losing three players to the NBA draft. Bennett says 'you don't overdue either, and we are thankful for both extremes.' ___ 11:10 a.m. Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski says he won't be surprised if the NBA expands its annual draft to include more than two rounds in the not-so-distant future. With the league's increasing reliance on the G League to develop young players, Krzyzewski says 'if I'm the owner of an NBA team and I have a G League affiliate I don't want to just protect two guys — I want to protect everybody.' Krzyzewski says that could have an impact on the college game with more players turning professional earlier so they can get paid. He says the NBA isn't going to stand still — and college athletics can't either, adding 'we cannot keep our heads in the sand. ... We are not good game planners. We are very reactionary.' He also says he expects the G League will increase in popularity, predicting it won't be long before its games are broadcast on national television. ___ 10:45 a.m. Atlantic Coast Conference Commissioner John Swofford says he is 'open minded' when it comes to college athletes being paid for endorsement deals. Last month California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law that goes into effect in 2023 allowing athletes at universities in his state make money from their images, names or likenesses. The law also bans schools from kicking athletes off the team if they get paid. Swofford says that California law is 'extreme,' but added that he is not opposed to 'modernizing' rules for amateur athletics. However, he says he would prefer a consistent national approach rather than individual states laws that can vary. Swofford says, 'I don't think this is going to be the end of college athletics by any means. We've been resilient in the past and we will be now and we will be in the future.' ___ 10:15 a.m. The Atlantic Coast Conference will open the season trying to replace a significant amount of star power. The league holds its preseason men's basketball media day on Tuesday in Charlotte, North Carolina. The ACC is coming off its third national championship in five years with Virginia winning that program's first title. Yet the league must replace several big names, including national player of the year Zion Williamson from Duke, the headliner among the league's 10 NBA first-round draft picks in June. Louisville's Jordan Nwora and Notre Dame's John Mooney are the only returning all-ACC players. Tuesday's schedule includes a full day of interviews for players and coaches, which includes Virginia Tech's Mike Young as the lone new coach. The ACC will release media picks for preseason favorite and all-conference players Thursday. ___ More AP college basketball: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://www.twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • Zion Williamson may not be quite as tall as billed. He still soared in his first NBA preseason game Monday night. Showing off the high-flying talents that made him one of the most anticipated rookies in years, Williamson turned in a ferocious slam less than 2 minutes into his debut with the New Orleans Pelicans and dunked it two more times before the first half was done against the Atlanta Hawks. 'This isn't high school or college anymore,' Williamson said. 'You've got to go up strong. So I went up strong and I was able to finish.' It was quite the close-range repertoire. One with the right hand. One with the left hand. One with both hands. Williamson finished with 16 points, seven rebounds, three assists and three steals, helping the Pelicans to a 133-109 victory over the Hawks before a much larger crowd — announced at 15,441 — than what normally be expected in Atlanta for a weeknight exhibition between two teams that failed to make the playoffs last season. 'I didn't expect that many people to come,' Williamson said. Of course, the score was irrelevant. This was chance to see the future of the NBA for the first time — not counting his brief stint in the Las Vegas Summer League — and Williamson did not disappoint, though he's not close to being a finished product after just one college season at Duke. He missed a pair of 3-point attempts, turned it over four times and looked a bit lost defensively. At one point, teammate Jrue Holiday, who has been in the league a decade, gently nudged him into the proper position. Still, it was a tantalizing glimpse of Williamson's skills. 'You know me,' he said, breaking into a big smile. 'It was a lot of fun. The first NBA game. It's not going to count against the record. But the first one of hopefully many. I'm glad I could get that one under my belt.' Just 62 seconds into the game, he took a pass from Lonzo Ball on the pick-and-roll and banked one in while drawing the foul from John Collins. Williamson knocked down the free throw and — voila — he had his first three-point play. A small section of the Atlanta crowd chanted 'Overrated!' but their hearts weren't really in it. Williamson was still listed at 6-foot-7 on the Pelicans roster, though he reportedly measured an inch shorter without shoes as part of the league's push to accurately measure everyone in the league this season. Whatever the case, he turned Hawks 7-footer Damian Jones into the first of what will likely be an abundance of poster victims with his next basket. Sizing up the Hawks from beyond the 3-point arc, Williamson suddenly burst toward the hoop, split a pair of defenders and dunked over the taller Jones with a fearsome right hand that left the fans gasping. 'I just saw the lane open up,' Williamson said. A couple of minutes later, Williamson delivered a two-handed slam off another pass from Ball, an enticing display from a young duo that has come together in the Big Easy. In the second quarter, it was a left-handed dunk set up by a dish from Kenrich Williams as the Hawks defense wisely scrambled out of the way. Before the game, the past and future came together. Williamson lingered at midcourt during warmups, clearly eager for a chance to pay his respects to the NBA's senior citizen. Atlanta's 42-year-old Vince Carter, preparing for his record 22nd — and final — season, came over to say a few words to the 19-year-old phenom, pulling him in close to make sure he could hear it all. 'I told to enjoy the moment, have fun and be himself,' Carter said. After the introductions and the national anthem, Williamson took the court with his new team, a franchise that was rocked by Anthony Davis' trade demand but quickly recovered by landing the first overall pick in the draft lottery. Davis was dealt to the Los Angeles Lakers for a haul that included Ball and Brandon Ingram — both of whom joined the teenager in a Pelicans starting lineup that also included Holiday and Derrick Favors. The rebuilding teams featured four of the top 10 picks in this year's draft. The Hawks sent out No. 5 pick De'Andre Hunter as part of their starting lineup, and brought 10th selection Cam Reddish — Williamson's Duke teammate — off the bench. The Pelicans also have No. 8 choice Jaxson Hayes. Williamson was thrilled to get a chance to take the court with Reddish again, even though they are now on opposite teams. 'It's crazy,' Williamson said. 'Just a few months ago, we were in college together, just chillin' and having fun with each other, playing in games, and now we're pros. It was a different feel for sure. But it was great seeing him.' ___ Follow Paul Newberry on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963 His work can be found at https://apnews.com ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Zion Williamson may not be quite as tall as billed. He still soared in his first NBA preseason game Monday night. Showing off the high-flying talents that made him one of the most anticipated rookies in years, Williamson turned in a ferocious slam less than 2 minutes into his debut with the New Orleans Pelicans and dunked it two more times before the first half was done against the Atlanta Hawks. It was quite the close-range repertoire. One with the right hand. One with the left hand. One with both hands. Williamson finished the first half with 11 points, five rebounds and two assists, helping the Pelicans to a 75-61 lead over the Hawks before a much larger crowd than what normally be expected in Atlanta for an exhibition between two teams that failed to make the playoffs last season. Of course, the score was irrelevant. This was chance to see the future of the NBA for the first time — not counting his brief stint in the Las Vegas Summer League — and Williamson did not disappoint, though he's not close to being a finished product after just one college season at Duke. Just 62 seconds into the game, he took a pass from Lonzo Ball on the pick-and-roll and banked one in while drawing the foul from John Collins. Williamson knocked down the free throw and — voila — he had his first three-point play. A small section of the crowd chanted 'Overrated!' but their hearts weren't really in it. Williamson was still listed at 6-foot-7 on the Pelicans roster, though he reportedly measured an inch shorter without shoes as part of the league's push to accurately measure everyone in the league this season. Whatever the case, he turned Hawks 7-footer Damian Jones into the first of what will likely be an abundance of poster victims with his next basket. Sizing up the Hawks from beyond the 3-point arc, Williamson suddenly burst toward the hoop, split a pair of defenders and dunked over the taller Jones with a fearsome right hand that left the fans gasping. A couple of minutes later, Williamson delivered a two-handed slam off another pass from Ball, a tantalizing display from the young duo. In the second quarter, it was a left-handed dunk set up by a dish from Kenrich Williams as the Hawks defense wisely scrambled out of the way. Before the game, the past and future came together. Williamson lingered at midcourt during warmups, clearly eager for a chance to pay his respects to the NBA's senior citizen. Atlanta's 42-year-old Vince Carter, preparing for his record 22nd — and final — season, came over to say a few words to the 19-year-old phenom, pulling him in close to make sure he could hear it all. After the introductions and the national anthem, Williamson took the court with his new team, a franchise that was rocked by Anthony Davis' trade demand but quickly recovered by landing the first overall pick in the draft lottery. Davis was dealt to the Los Angeles Lakers for a haul that included Ball and Brandon Ingram — both of whom joined the teenager in a Pelicans starting lineup that also included Jrue Holiday and Derrick Favors. The rebuilding teams featured four of the top 10 picks in this year's draft. The Hawks sent out No. 5 pick De'Andre Hunter as part of their starting lineup, and brought 10th selection Cam Reddish off the bench. The Pelicans also have No. 8 choice Jaxson Hayes, though he didn't play in the first half. ___ Follow Paul Newberry on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963 His work can be found at https://apnews.com ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Somewhere in Atlanta, people in need are going to get a meal prepared by legends U.S. Rep. John Lewis and NBA star Vince Carter. The civil rights icon and 22-season ballplayer were among the more than 5,000 volunteers who filled State Farm Arena on Saturday to prepare a million meals that will be distributed to locals through seven organizations. The event was hosted by State Farm and the Atlanta Hawks, with help from the group Feeding Children Everywhere, which aims to feed those in need around the world in a healthy and sustainable way. The goal was to alleviate food insecurity, said State Farm spokeswoman Kim Wade, who spent six months planning the event. “We wanted to do something more than write a check,” she said. The volunteers packed a million child portions of jambalaya, which should be shelf-stable for two years. There were 64 assembly-line tables of between 10 and 15 volunteers pouring the ingredients — red lentils, long grain white rice, dehydrated vegetables and pink salt — and then sealing the bags. Dave Green, CEO of Feeding Children Everywhere, said Lewis, who was adding vegetables, was the pacesetter for his table. Green’s group said one in four children in Atlanta are facing hunger, while the number of high poverty neighborhoods in metro Atlanta has tripled since 2000, as the population has grown. “People really struggle in today’s society with the cost of living,” he said. ” … A lot of families, they’re experiencing hunger for the first time.” “It’s a scary thing,” said Hawks guard/forward Carter. “It’s a growing epidemic.” Breanna Nixon, 38, was packing up meals with her husband and their two children, 3-year-old Xavier and 5-year-old Giana. “Our big goal is teaching them to give back and that not everyone is as blessed as we are,” said Nixon, of Duluth. Xavier had a big smile while getting hugs and high-fives from the Hawks cheerleaders. The team and State Farm put out the call a couple months ago for 5,000 volunteers. Each volunteer will get a voucher for a free pair of tickets to a future Hawks home game. All volunteers had to wear a hairnet, even Hawks head coach Lloyd Pierce. “I don’t have any hair, but I guess I got to wear a net,” he said. Hot hand… The Hawks players who attended the event helped pack the jambalaya. So we asked them all: How do you like your jambalaya? Vince Carter, guard/forward: “Not spicy,” adding that he’s “not a seafood guy.” John Collins, forward: “Not too spicy.” Trae Young, guard: He doesn’t eat the stuff, but he knows his grandmother’s is the best due to some secret spice(s?) she has not revealed. De’Andre Hunter, forward: “A little over the top” spicy, adding that it has to have chicken and, of course, sausage.
  • Vince Carter is on the cusp of a revered NBA career record, the most seasons ever played. He promises season No. 22 will be his last. 'I wouldn't let you guys say this is the last one if that wasn't the case,' Carter said Monday at the Atlanta Hawks' media day. 'I don't want to do that. Even if I change my mind now, for me I feel like it's too late, but no, this is it.' When Carter checks into his first game — likely the Oct. 24 opener at Detroit — he will break a tie with Robert Parish, Kevin Willis, Kevin Garnett and Dirk Nowitzki, all of whom played 21 years. Carter, who turns 43 in January, still can't quite comprehend what the record encompasses, but he's glad to have all of training camp and the preseason to sort out what's next. 'Stepping on the court to make it official is going to be kind of crazy,' he said. 'When you see that list and you see that cluster of guys and you see the next number is 22 and to see me passing guys like that — I've been asked that all summer and you'd think by now I'd have a legitimate answer. I don't. I don't. ' Carter, a 6-foot-6 swingman, played a long waiting game before the Hawks signed him in August to a one-year contract for the second straight season. He said several teams expressed interest, but nothing was firm until Atlanta called. The eight-time All-Star is back in a familiar role with the Hawks, giving coach Lloyd Pierce valuable minutes off the bench and mentoring a rebuilding squad that went 29-53 and finished 12th in the Eastern Conference last season. 'I don't want to diminish what he's doing on the court by saying he's a coach,' Pierce said. 'It's kind of like kicking him out. I think what he's doing is being a team leader. He's in the locker room speaking to the guys in their language but he's also trying to support the growth of our organization and showing respect as a professional. 'This is how the coaches are trying to install things, and I'm on board. You guys need to get on board.'' Carter, the No. 5 overall draft pick for Toronto in 1998, exceeded Pierce's expectations last season, averaging 7.6 points, 17.5 minutes and 38.9 percent on 3-point attempts in 76 games. The former North Carolina star was particularly helpful to Atlanta's trio of young talent — Trae Young, John Collins and Kevin Huerter — and he will take the same approach with rookies De'Andre Hunter and Cam Reddish. Huerter raves about how Carter helps out. As a rookie last year, Huerter heard his stories about former players who refused to listen to coaches or got in trouble off the court. He was a constant presence in the film room, cluing in the young players on tendencies of that veteran opposing coaches like Doc Rivers and Gregg Popovich. 'I can think of a whole bunch of other things, too,' Huerter said. 'But the one thing that's most amazing of all is the shape he's in. You come in here to practice and he's still dunking. He's still wind-milling. He shows up the next day with a smile on his face and he's ready to do it again. If guys that are trying to maybe feel bad about themselves or they're coming in a little nicked up and you see him out there dunking, it's a little bit easier to get off the training table and go practice.' Some other things of note as the Hawks begin training camp: GETTING BETTER SLOWLY The Hawks have no immediate timetable for their list of injured players. Reddish (abdomen), Huerter (knee), Collins (hip), Allen Crabbe (knee) and Alex Len (ankle, back) are still limited in workouts. Collins, who led the team in scoring and rebounding last year, might skip the preseason. OLDER AND STRONGER Young, who's listed at 180 pounds on the camp roster, said he added 10 to 11 pounds of muscle during the offseason. He believes that will help him not get pushed around as much when he's going to the rim. REMEMBER ME Jabari Parker, the No. 2 overall pick for Milwaukee in 2014, is with his fourth team in three years. The oft-injured forward said staying healthy is his top objective. ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • As the Atlanta Hawks head into the third year of a massive overhaul, there are definite signs of hope. They might even have a shot at the playoffs in the wide-open Eastern Conference. But, as the team prepares to open training camp with an intriguing core of young players, those in charge aren't in any hurry to rush the process. 'We haven't done anything,' coach Lloyd Pierce said Friday. 'I don't want any our guys thinking we've accomplished anything just yet.' Indeed, the Hawks won just 29 games a season ago, so this is still very much a long-term project. But general manager Travis Schlenk has taken major strides in constructing a totally new roster, one that follows the blueprint laid out by his former employer, the three-time champion Golden State Warriors. Trae Young and John Collins have already established themselves as two of the NBA's brightest young prospects. Kevin Huerter made big strides during his rookie season. De'Andre Hunter, Cam Reddish and Bruno Fernando were drafted this year to further bolster the roster. Former No. 2 overall pick Jabari Parker was signed in free agency. None are older than 24. 'We need to see what this little young core can do together,' Schlenk said. 'Do they fit together? We certainly think they're going to fit together nicely. That's the plan. But we haven't been able to see it yet. We need to see those guys in action. That doesn't mean a month. I'm talking about seeing them together for a whole year.' Schlenk will concede there are no certainties in the rebuilding game, that much of the process is just gut instinct hopefully coupled with a lot of luck. When he was at Golden State, no one knew that Stephen Curry would develop into one of the NBA's biggest stars. But the front office began to sense something special was happening when a sixth-seeded team won a playoff series and took San Antonio to six games in the second round in 2013, so the decision was made to pursue a risky trade for Andre Iguodala. Two seasons later, the Warriors won the first of what would be three titles in a run of five straight trips to the NBA Finals. Remembering how the Iguodala trade fell into place, Schlenk said, 'We could continue to go with these young guys, but we have a veteran who wants to come play with these young guys. We knew that would speed up the timeline, but we felt like we had a chance with that acquisition to become a really good team.' The Hawks aren't in that position. Not yet anyway. The big push could come next year, when expiring contracts will free up some $64 million for free agency or trades. 'We're not going to really know until we see this young group play together,' Schlenk said. 'I can't sit here and say today, unless you're one of a handful of teams, that we have a chance to be special.' When training camp begins on Tuesday, the Hawks will be keeping a watchful eye on several of their young players. Collins is dealing with a right hip strain, so his workload will be limited during the preseason. The same goes for Huerter, who returned to Atlanta late last month complaining of a sore knee. An MRI showed no structural damage, but the Hawks won't take any chances. Then there's Reddish, the No. 10 overall pick out of Duke. While he has been fully cleared to resume on-court activities after undergoing core muscle surgery, the team will carefully monitor his workload leading up to the regular season. Pierce said it's vital that the Hawks keep everyone healthy if they're going to take the next step in their development. 'It's hard when you're putting a team together, especially a young team, if you can't see them all out there together,' he said. 'It's really hard to see what to expect moving forward and having that breakthrough moment. That's part of the reason why we're being cautious and will remain cautious with every guy. We're in no rush to advance anyone. We don't want to skip steps. Health is at the forefront of everything we do, then take it from there.' ___ Follow Paul Newberry on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963 His work can be found at https://apnews.com ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Georgia Tech coach Josh Pastner still has the support of his athletic director even after the Yellow Jackets basketball team was slapped with NCAA sanctions Thursday, including a ban on postseason play for upcoming season. Dealing a major blow to Pastner's efforts to rebuild the struggling Atlantic Coast Conference program, the NCAA hit Georgia Tech with four years of probation for major recruiting violations committed by Pastner's former assistant coach and an ex-friend. The sanctions handed down by the NCAA also included a reduction in scholarships, limits on recruiting and a fine of $5,000 plus 2% of the program's budget, Pastner was not directly named in the NCAA's findings and was largely cleared in Georgia Tech's own investigation. 'We admonish Josh for his poor judgment' in allowing his former friend, Ron Bell, 'to get close to the program in the first place,' athletic director Todd Stansbury said. That was the extent of any punishment for Pastner. 'I continue to support Josh as our men's basketball coach,' Stansbury said. While Georgia Tech is considering an appeal, the lead investigator said the penalties could have been more severe. 'Quite frankly, if you look at the penalties that were prescribed, they are ... in most cases at the lower level of level one standards,' said Joel Maturi, the chief hearing officer for the NCAA's committee on infractions. 'We're trying to be as fair and consistent as we can.' But Stansbury said some sanctions could unfairly impact current players. He expects a decision on a possible appeal within 10 days. 'I just think the breadth of the penalties as well as the length, in my opinion, are I feel more severe than I was anticipating,' Stansbury said. 'We are in the process of digesting the penalties to determine which ones may be subject to appeal.' The NCAA said former assistant coach Darryl LaBarrie gave $300 to a highly touted prospect for a visit to an Atlanta strip club and arranged for him to meet with a former Georgia Tech athlete who played for the NBA's Atlanta Hawks, including a visit to the player's home and a free meal at a lounge owned by the player. The NBA player was not identified, but Jarrett Jack was on the Hawks' roster in 2016. He never played for Atlanta, which waived him during training camp as he struggled to return from a serious knee injury. Maturi said the use of a strip club for recruiting purposes was disturbing. 'It goes without saying that we as a committee firmly believe that adult entertainment has no place in college sports,' he said. LaBarrie was given a three-year show-cause ban from coaching for failing to cooperate in the investigation. The NCAA said he denied any involvement during his first interview with the enforcement staff and also tried to get the prospect to lie about what happened. LaBarrie later acknowledged that he arranged the illegal benefits, the investigation found. The committee said Bell provided two players and a potential transfer athlete with $2,424 in shoes, clothes, meals, transportation and lodging. As for Bell, the NCAA found that Pastner repeatedly cautioned against providing any illegal benefits, though the coach allowed him to continue interacting with the program. Bell warned the three players to never tell Pastner about the gifts and benefits, according to the report. The NCAA report also noted that Pastner reported the violations after they were revealed to him by Bell. Georgia Tech has permanently cut ties with the booster. The postseason ban seems largely symbolic, though it also includes the ACC Tournament. The Yellow Jackets haven't appeared in the NCAA Tournament since 2010 and made their last postseason appearance in 2017, during Pastner's first season at Georgia Tech. That squad won 21 games and reached the NIT final, but the Yellow Jackets slumped to records of 13-19 and 14-18 the last two years, including a 12-24 mark in the ACC. The recruiting restrictions for each year of probation include: — The loss of one scholarship. — An eight-week ban on unofficial visits and a three-visit reduction from the number of official visits. — An eight-week ban on recruiting communications. — A reduction of 19 recruiting-person days from the allowed number. Some of the allegations were made public during the 2016-17 season, Pastner's first year at Georgia Tech. LaBarrie was placed on leave early that season and resigned in February 2017. Two former players, Josh Okogie and Tadric Jackson, were suspended for six and three games, respectively, for accepting benefits including apparel, meals and transportation. The NCAA ruled that Georgia Tech must also vacate all wins in which ineligible players were used. The school was given 14 days to provide that information to the governing body. The allegations against Bell led to an exchange of lawsuits between Pastner and Bell and his girlfriend, Jennifer Pendley. Pastner filed a defamation lawsuit against Bell and Pendley early in 2018, saying the Tucson-area couple was trying to defame and blackmail him by accusing him of breaking NCAA rules. The countersuit from Bell and Pendley claimed Pastner sexually assaulted Pendley in February 2016 when he was head coach at Memphis. Pastner denied the charges, saying there was 'zero truth to any of those disgusting, bogus allegations.' The lawsuits were dropped this year. Bell and Pendley now face charges for trying to extort Pastner. The NCAA sanctions against the men's team cap a tumultuous year for both basketball programs at Georgia Tech. Longtime women's coach MaChelle Joseph was suspended late last season and then fired after the school said it learned of alleged mistreatment of players and staff, as well as possible NCAA violations. Joseph denied the allegations, saying she was punished for complaining about gender equity issues and was the victim of a double standard since Pastner was still on the job despite his well-documented troubles with the NCAA. ___ More AP college basketball: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • Plans for a $1 billion Emory University medical complex in Brookhaven have received initial approval from the city’s staff — but on the condition that Emory install some major infrastructure improvements. The city’s desires, which include a pedestrian bridge over I-85, were made public in documents released ahead of Wednesday night’s Planning Commission meeting. Commission members — and representatives for Emory — were expected to discuss the development plans and possibly vote whether to approve them. The plans would still need a final vote by the Brookhaven City Council. Emory announced in May that it hopes to build a hospital, hotel, apartments and miles of walking trails and paths on 60 acres of land in southern Brookhaven in the Executive Park area. The new development, the university said, could be gradually built over 15 years. According to plans filed with the city, the complex could include a 140-bed non-emergency inpatient hospital; an apartment building with more than 700 units, a 200-room hotel and more than 40 acres of medical/office space. The complex would connect with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta’s new North Druid Hills complex. To make that grand-scale vision a reality, Emory needs approval from the city to rezone the property to fit their “mixed-use” needs. The plots are currently zoned for a mix of office, commercial and residential and are mostly vacant. Brookhaven’s community development department recommended the rezoning be approved, with several conditions aimed at executing the city’s “vision” for the North Druid Hills Road and Buford Highway area. Specifically, the city is asking that Emory work with the city and state to install a pedestrian bridge across I-85, connecting the medical site with West Druid Hills Drive. It would be just south of North Druid Hills Road and let out near the future Peachtree Creek Greenway. Officials also want Emory to help build a pedestrian bridge across North Druid Hills Road, connecting to the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta campus. The documents did not specify who would pay for the bridges. The staff also said Emory should build a “transit center” within its development that will serve any future MARTA bus rapid transit system in the area, according to the documents. Emory already operates medical offices in Executive Park, including a sports medicine and training facility opened in 2017 in partnership with the Atlanta Hawks. Brookhaven Mayor John Ernst previously heralded the project, but said it needs to address transportation needs in the area. Officials envision the campus as comparable to “Pill Hill,’’ the Sandy Springs health care destination that includes Northside, Emory Saint Joseph’s and Children’s Scottish Rite hospitals. “This could be Pill Hill Two or Brook Hill,” Ernst told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution in May. If approved by the Planning Commission on Wednesday, the plans could go before the City Council as early as Sept. 24 for a public hearing.
  • ATLANTA (AP) - The Atlanta Hawks have given general manager Travis Schlenk an extra title: president of basketball operations. Owner Tony Ressler announced the promotion on Monday, saying he is 'extremely pleased with the direction that Travis and our entire basketball operations team has us heading as a franchise.' As he goes into his third year with the Hawks, Schlenk has totally overhauled the roster and assembled an impressive core of young players through the draft, including Trae Young, John Collins and incoming first-round picks De'Andre Hunter and Cam Reddish. The Hawks have endured two straight losing seasons but Ressler says the massive rebuilding job has provided 'the cap space, draft picks and financial flexibility needed to have long-term success in the NBA.' ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

News

  • Kenny Dixon, the longtime drummer for Georgia-raised country music star Kane Brown was killed in a car accident, the band confirmed Sunday. >> Read more trending news  Dixon was from Dalton, Georgia. It's unclear where the crash happened but his bandmates say he died Saturday. 'It is with profound sadness and disbelief that we confirm we lost our drummer Kenny this weekend in a tragic car accident,' the band wrote in a statement. 'Kenny was a member of our family from the very beginning, and our hearts are with his fiancée Sarah, his son and everyone who knew and loved him. He was truly one of the greatest and kindest people on and off stage we’ve ever known.” Dixon's fiance, Sarah Hendrick, also confirmed the musician's death in an Instagram post on Sunday. 'I’m at a loss of words. I don’t even know how to write this or ever thought I would have to. Kenny passed away last night in a car accident. I know I have to be strong for Levi and God is gonna pull us through this. We have a forever guardian angel watching above us now. Please keep Levi, my family, and Kenny’s family in your prayers,' she wrote. Dixon and Hendrick were set to wed Nov. 30 in Dalton, according to the couple’s wedding website on The Knot. They were parents to a son, Levi. Brown also commented on the drummer’s death on social media.
  • A former University of Georgia student pleaded guilty Friday to running a Ponzi scheme that defrauded investors, including fellow students and their families, from his Athens fraternity house. >> Read more trending news  Syed Arham Arbab, 22, of Augusta, admitted to defrauding 117 people in a scheme that attracted about $1 million from investors, prosecutors said. A news release said Arbab spent funds on clothes, shoes, adult entertainment and gambling trips to Las Vegas. “The defendant engaged in a pattern of deceit to gain the trust of unwitting investors who gave him their hard-earned money for what they believed was a sound investment,” Charlie Peeler, U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Georgia, said in the release. From May 2018 to May of this year, Arbab sought investors for Artis Proficio Capital Management and Artis Proficio Capital Investments. Prosecutors said Arbab issued false account statements and misrepresented the size of the funds and returns. Among his false claims, prosecutors said, Arbab said a former UGA athlete and NFL star was among his investors. Arbab pleaded to a single count of securities fraud. He is scheduled for sentencing in January. In late May, the Securities and Exchange Commission initiated a civil complaint against Arbab, which is pending. In June, a federal judge froze Arbab’s assets and those of his investment funds. At the time, the SEC alleged Arbab defrauded at least eight investors of $269,000, but warned that the size of the scheme could be larger. In text messages, Arbab allegedly told investors his firm was “different because we target young investors/college kids,” and he charged lower commissions, the SEC complaint said. Arbab allegedly told investors he guaranteed investments of up to $15,000. The SEC said Arbab also sold “bond agreements,” which were like loans. Instead, Arbab allegedly deposited funds in his bank account and used new proceeds to pay off previous investors who sought money. A bio on the website for Artis Proficio stated that Arbab graduated cum laude from UGA with a degree in cellular biology, and that at the time, he working on a masters of business administration at UGA’s business school. Prosecutors said Arbab had in fact been rejected from the MBA program at UGA’s Terry College of Business.
  • When Stoneham firefighters arrived at a two-alarm fire around 12:30 p.m. Saturday, a woman living at the single-family home was on her roof overhang escaping the flames. >> Read more trending news   Stoneham police officers instructed her to jump from the overhang, and she was caught by Stoneham police officers Stephen Aprile and John Burton. She was the only person at the home at the time of the fire. 'Today marks the last day of Fire Prevention Week and the theme for this year covered how important it is for people to have an escape plan to get out of their home,' says Stoneham fire Chief Matthew Grafton. 'The resident who was at home at the time of (Saturday's) fire is an excellent example of someone who knew to find an available escape route and got herself safely out of the house as quickly as possible.' The fire was in the kitchen on the first floor and smoke was billowing from all windows. Crews from the Woburn, Melrose, Wakefield, Winchester and Reading fire departments helped on scene while Saugus, Medford and Malden firefighters helped with station coverage. Firefighters prevented the flames from spreading to the rest of the house, but the home sustained heavy damage from smoke and water, estimated at $150,000 to $200,000. The family of six who lived at the home is being helped by family and friends in the area. One dog was rescued and taken to a vet for evaluation. The cause of the fire is under investigation.
  • The final day of the Atlanta Air Show is canceled after a pilot ejected from a plane Sunday afternoon. The airshow began Saturday and was scheduled to continue Sunday afternoon at Tara Field near the Atlanta Motor Speedway in Hampton.  >> Read more trending news  Capt. Kevin Domon-Grenier, a pilot with the Canadian Forces Snowbirds, ejected from his aircraft shortly before the squadron was due to perform, the Snowbirds announced on Twitter on Sunday.  Domon-Grenier’s CT-114 Tutor crashed prior to the show’s opening, Airshow officials said. He made it safely to the ground and is OK, the CF Snowbirds said.  Nobody was injured when the plane crashed in an unpopulated area, according to the Snowbirds.
  • New Birth Missionary Baptist Church plans to redirect a donation it received from rap artist Kanye West to Atlanta’s Morris Brown College, officials said.  Rev. Jamal Harrison Bryant on Sunday announced a financial contribution to the HBCU’s general scholarship fund, according to a New Birth spokesman.  The announcement came during the 9:30 a.m.  church service. Bryant, senior pastor of New Birth in Stonecrest, said the funds  will be used to make a financial contribution in honor of the Grammy Award-winning artist’s late mother Donda West, who previously served on the faculty at Morris Brown.  The size of the donation wasn’t immediately announced. Morris Brown College has struggled financially since losing its accreditation in 2002. Only a few dozen students attend the college, down from as many as 2,700 in the mid-1990s. Among Historically Black Colleges and Universities, it is the only one in Georgia founded by African Americans. Kevin James, the college’s interim president, told New Birth’s congregation Sunday that Morris Brown was approved Friday as a higher learning institution by the Nonpublic Postsecondary Education Commission. He called it a “major step” toward accreditation.  “When you lose your accreditation, you close,” James said during the Sunday service. “But for some reason, for the past 17 years, Morris Brown College has been able to survive. We will be the first historically black college in history ... since 1837 to actually come back and be fully accredited under these circumstances.”   Kanye West visited New Birth Sept. 15 for a popup Sunday performance as a part of his “Sunday Service” series. Lines waiting outside New Birth began forming several hours before the service. RELATED: Kanye West brings ‘Sunday Service’ to Atlanta West has been making such appearances on Sundays this year, including one in Dayton, Ohio, to help that community in the wake of a mass shooting and on Easter Sunday to bring a message of faith to those attending the music festival Coachella. The announcement from New Birth came a day after West brought his Sunday Service series to Howard University, a prestigious HBCU in Washington, D.C.  It also came weeks after West defended his endorsement of President Donald Trump, whose support of HBCUs has been mixed.  MORE: HBCUs and Trump: up and down relationship “I went into prayer, and it dawned in me in prayer that Dr. Donda West, who was the mother of Kanye West, is a former professor at Morris Brown College,” New Birth’s Bryant said during Sunday’s service.  Donda West started her teaching career at Morris Brown College as an English instructor in the 1970s, and later became the department chair, according to an obituary. “I know what Dr. Donda West represented while at Morris Brown, and her mind for African American literature, was to empower, equip and engage students to be something radical that can change community and change society,” Bryant said.  In other news: 
  • Robert Downey Jr.'s first film since leaving the Marvel Universe still involves CGI, but of the animal variety. The former Iron Man is the title character in Universal Pictures' 'Dolittle.' It's the latest movie version of the story about the doctor who can communicate with animals. >> Read more trending news  Antonio Banderas appears to have a role in the film as an antagonist to Dolittle, while Octavia Spencer, Kumail Nanjiani, Ralph Fiennes, Emma Thompson, John Cena, Selena Gomez and Downey Jr.'s Marvel co-star Tom Holland lend their voice talents. Downey Jr. executive produces the film, which will be released Jan. 17, 2020. Watch the trailer below.