On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

cloudy-day
73°
Overcast
H 85° L 70°
  • cloudy-day
    73°
    Current Conditions
    Overcast. H 85° L 70°
  • cloudy-day
    82°
    Afternoon
    Mostly Cloudy. H 85° L 70°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    80°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 85° L 70°
Listen
Pause
Error

News on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

College
Fromm continues to set the standard as Dawgs look for more consistency
Close

Fromm continues to set the standard as Dawgs look for more consistency

Fromm continues to set the standard as Dawgs look for more consistency

Fromm continues to set the standard as Dawgs look for more consistency

Kirby Smart's Georgia Bulldogs got off to another slow start Saturday night in Knoxville, especially on defense, before finally shutting down a feisty Tennessee offense and reeling off 33 unanswered points to take a convincing SEC road win.

Anxiety ran high for a while among some of Bulldog Nation, with fans alarmed by the way the Vols' first-time starter at quarterback, f reshman Brian Maurer, seemed to be having his way with the Georgia pass defense, amassing 205 passing yards in the first half.

The Vols announced they were going to make a game of it with a 73-yard touchdown bomb after Georgia's first, rather methodical scoring drive.

Close

Fromm continues to set the standard as Dawgs look for more consistency

The Dawgs had to settle for a field goal from Mr. Reliable, Rodrigo Blankenship, on their next drive of the game, after a Lawrence Cager TD catch was waved off for offensive pass interference.

That didn't make Georgia fans feel any better, especially after Maurer went right back to work, completing a number of those short-to-medium completions that the UGA defense has allowed all season. The second Tennessee TD drive also was helped along by a really dumb and needless roughing-the-passer infraction.

The Dawgs trailing 14-10 to a team that lost to Georgia State had the orange checkerboard crowd at Neyland Stadium going bonkers, as Larry Munson might have said, and Georgia fans fretting, even after another Blankenship field goal made it 14-13.

Still, the more sanguine elements of the UGA fan base looked at unflappable Georgia quarterback Jake Fromm, who was his usual efficient self, and figured that, once the Dawgs got on track, it wouldn't be much of a game.

They were right.

Fromm set the tone for the Dawgs' offense in the first half, completing 16 of 20 passes for 195 yards and 2 TDs as the Bulldogs tallied 354 yards of total offense on 42 plays.

The Dawgs took back control of the game in the final 4 minutes of the half, reclaiming the lead with 1:59 remaining on a 6-play, 60-yard TD drive capped off by one of Fromm's patented back-shoulder throws to Miami transfer Cager, who appears to have become the QB's favorite target.

The Vols missed a field goal attempt and then Georgia got the ball back at its own 30 with 59 clicks left on the clock. That's when Fromm reminded everyone that he's probably the nation's best 2-minute-offense QB, quickly leading the Dawgs downfield, ending in a 7-yard TD pass to freshman receiver George Pickens. Georgia was stopped on a 2-point conversion try, but the 26-14 halftime lead felt pretty comfortable.

The Georgia defense gave up a season-high 239 yards in the first half, but it was a different story in the second half. Whether it was true halftime adjustments by the Dawgs' D, or just people executing properly, as Smart indicated to Chuck Dowdle of the Bulldogs radio network after the game, the Vols were held to just 15 yards of total offense in the third quarter (only 1 yard rushing), and just 104 yards total in the second half, 70 of those coming on a final futile drive against Georgia reserves when Tennessee had 1 st -and-goal at the Dawgs' 5-yard line and still couldn't score!

The Dawgs offense, meanwhile, couldn't get out of its own way much of the third quarter, with Georgia's first drive of the second half derailed by a couple of penalties, ending in a punt. The second drive also saw a couple more penalties and resulted in another Blankenship field goal. (The officiating crew, which had to swap out referees at halftime due to injury, seemed to think it was getting paid by the flag, but also, as Smart told Dowdle, Georgia "had some dumb penalties that cost us.")

On the Dawgs' third drive of the second half, they turned the ball over on downs after D'Andre Swift was held to 1 yard on 3 rd -and-2 and got nothing on 4 th -and1, indicating that Georgia still has short-yardage concerns. (Considering that, earlier on that drive, freshman back Zamir "Zeus" White had peeled off runs of 10, 17 and 8 yards, you had to wonder if maybe he shouldn't have been the one to carry the ball on the fourth-down play.)

In the fourth quarter, a drive that nicely balanced the running and passing games was punctuated by a Brian Herrien TD.

Close

Fromm continues to set the standard as Dawgs look for more consistency

Meanwhile, the defense made amends for the first half by constantly harassing Maurer (and, on a few plays, former Tennessee starter Jarrett Guarantano), allowing just 68 passing yards. (The Vols basically had no running game against the Dawgs.)

Georgia safety Richard LeCounte, who had been burned badly on the Vols' long TD in the first half, bounced back to snag an interception (though the ensuing drive produced no points), and, in the fourth quarter, sophomore defensive back Eric Stokesput a strip-sack on Maurer, with linebacker Tae Crowderscooping the fumble up and returning it 60 yards for the Dawgs' final touchdown.

Offensively, Georgia never really opened it up the way Smart had hinted they might, but the Dawgs did rack up 526 yards of total offense. Fromm wound up the day completing 24 of 29 passes for 288 yards and 2 TDs. His completion percentage now is an astounding 77.4.While the failures on short-yardage plays continue to be a concern, the Georgia offensive line had a great day protecting Fromm in the passing game.

Cager led the Georgia receivers (with 5 catches for 58 yards and 1 TD), followed by tailback D'Andre Swift(4-for-72 yards). Fromm completed passes to nine different Bulldogs.

Close

Fromm continues to set the standard as Dawgs look for more consistency

In the running game, the Dawgs tallied 159 yards on the ground in the first half and finished the game with 241 yards on 39 attempts (averaging 6.2 yards per run). Herrien led the team with 11 carries for 88 yards (including a 40-yarder on which he broke numerous tackles) and a TD. Swift had 17 carries for 72 yards and a TD to go with his receiving yards. White averaged 8.1 yards per run while Herrien averaged 8 yards and Swift averaged 4.2.

The Georgia defense ended the night with 3 sacks, two of them by redshirt freshman Azeez Ojulari. LeCounte and defensive back Mark Webb tied for the team lead with five tackles apiece.

On special teams, Blankenship continues to provide the Georgia offense with a safety net (hitting on all his PATs and all three of his field goal attempts, including a 50-yarder), but the punting game is still erratic. Jake Camarda did have a 53-yarder, but he also shanked another one for just 18 yards. That inconsistency could hurt the Dawgs big down the road.

Overall, after the Vols' early bomb, which Smart characterized as a "punch in the mouth," the Georgia head coach thought his team did a pretty good job of bouncing back.

"We didn't start the way we wanted tonight, especially not defensively," he said. "But, offensively, I thought Jake did a really nice job and [Offensive Coordinator James] Coley called a really nice game and changed some things up."

Still, there are things to fix, including the short-yardage game, the penalties, pass coverage and punting. If Georgia played against an elite team the way they played early on against Tennessee, they might find themselves in too big a hole to recover.

As Smart summed up, " We've got to keep getting better. We've got to get rid of some of the errors."

The post Fromm continues to set the standard as Dawgs look for more consistency appeared first on DawgNation.

Read More

News

  • An off-duty volunteer firefighter is being hailed as a hero after he rescued a baby while swimming at a Maryland park. According to the Oakland Volunteer Fire Department, one of its firefighters, Andrew Bell, heard a woman shouting as he swam at Swallow Falls State Park while off-duty on Sunday.  'A raft that a baby was floating on had flipped over, and the baby went into the water,' the department said in a Facebook post Sunday night.  Bell quickly found the baby, who was unconscious, the Cumberland Times-News reported.  'I put it on its back for a little bit, and it started spitting up water,' Bell told the newspaper.  Bell then called an ambulance and continued to help the family until rescue crews arrived, the Fire Department said. 'It's our understanding that baby is going to be OK,' the department added. 'Great work, FF Bell!' Bell told the Times-News that even though he wasn't on duty at the time of the incident, it was still his 'duty to go help that person.' Read more here or here.
  • A PGA golf pro, his son and two stepchildren were among the eight people who died in an Idaho plane crash Sunday, multiple news outlets are reporting. According to KPTV, Oregon residents Sean Fredrickson, 48; son Hayden Fredrickson, 16; and stepchildren Sofia Olsen, 15, and Quinn Olsen, 11, were killed Sunday afternoon when two planes collided over Idaho's Lake Coeur d'Alene and crashed into the water. All eight people on the two planes died in the crash, the Kootenai County Sheriff's Office said. Authorities said Fredrickson and the children were on board a Brooks Seaplane piloted by 58-year-old Neil Lunt of Liberty Lake, Washington, at the time of the crash, the Spokesman-Review reported. Officials have not yet identified a sixth person who also was on the plane.  The two people on board the other plane, a Cessna TU206G, have been identified, but officials have not publicly released their names, according to the Spokesman-Review. As of Tuesday, crews were still working to recover two of the victims' bodies, the newspaper reported.  Fredrickson, the Pacific Northwest PGA Section's president, was the lead golf pro at Oregon's Oswego Lake Country Club, according to KPTV. “A rising star in the PGA, Sean led the Section through an unprecedented time, first taking the reins a year early as president and then leading us wisely through this pandemic,” the Pacific Northwest PGA Section said in a statement. “We are all better because of Sean’s leadership over the past 12 years.” Fredrickson's wife, April Fredrickson, told KPTV that her family 'died while they were on an adventure.' 'I think that, at the end of the day, they died doing what they loved, which was ... being together,' she told the news outlet. Read more here or here.
  • Atlanta police released a new video and surveillance photos from its investigation into the shooting death of an 8-year-old girl. According to WSB-TV, Secoriea Turner was shot while riding in a car with her mother and her mother’s friend Saturday night. The shooting happened not far from the Wendy’s on University Avenue where Rayshard Brooks was shot and killed last month. The video shows a Black man in a white shirt carrying what police identified as an AR-15. Lt. Pete Malecki said the man is just one of several persons of interest in the case. “We believe there is going to be a minimum of three additional suspects. That number could change,” he said. “Although we have a lot of work to identify the remaining individuals responsible, this is the first step in that process.” Investigators said Secoriea Turner was riding in a Jeep Cherokee Saturday night when the driver tried to get around a “makeshift roadblock that was manned by numerous armed individuals.” Malecki said they believe the shots were fired intentionally into the car. At a news conference Sunday, Secoriea Turner’s mother said that her daughter died in her arms. “She was only 8 years old,” Charmaine Turner said. “She would have been on Tik Tok dancing on her phone, just got done eating. We understand the frustration of Rayshard Brooks. We didn’t have anything to do with that. We’re innocent. My baby didn’t mean no harm.” Secoriya Williamson, Secoriea Turner’s father, also spoke out. “They say Black lives matter,” Williamson said. “You killed your own this time. You killed a child. She didn’t do nothing to nobody.” Police are offering a $20,000 reward for information leading to Secoriea Turner’s killers. Information can be submitted anonymously to the Crime Stoppers Atlanta tip line at 404-577-TIPS (8477) or online at www.StopCrimeATL.com. Hours following the police news conference, the community came together for a prayer vigil.
  • A 17-month-old girl was killed in a pit bull attack last weekend during a Fourth of July party in Illinois, authorities said. According to The Associated Press and WMAQ-TV, the incident occurred early Sunday in the bedroom of a family friend's Joliet home. The toddler, whose parents were attending a holiday gathering at the residence, was in a playpen when two dogs somehow got free from the basement, Joliet police said. After hearing a noise, the homeowner went into the bedroom to find one of the two dogs – both pit bull mixes – biting the child, the AP reported. Authorities responded to the home shortly before 1:30 a.m. and found the girl unresponsive with multiple bite wounds, the Herald-News reported. Crews rushed her to a nearby hospital, where she later died. The Will County Coroner's Office identified the victim as Marley Wilander, according to the newspaper. The dog is now in the custody of Animal Control, police said.  – The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. was hospitalized briefly after suffering a fall last month at a Maryland country club, a Supreme Court spokesperson confirmed Tuesday night. Roberts, 65, required an overnight stay, The Washington Post reported. Roberts suffered the fall June 21 at the Chevy Chase Club in Maryland and required stitches, the newspaper reported. He was released from an area hospital after staying overnight for observation. “The Chief Justice was treated at a local hospital on June 21 for an injury to his forehead sustained in a fall while walking for exercise near his home,” Kathleen Arberg, public information officer for the Supreme Court, said in a statement. “The injury required sutures, and out of an abundance of caution, he stayed in the hospital overnight and was discharged the next morning. His doctors ruled out a seizure. They believe the fall was likely due to light-headedness caused by dehydration.” Roberts experienced seizures in 1993 and 2007, the Post reported. Roberts has not publicly mentioned the hospitalization.
  • Mary Kay Letourneau, a Washington state teacher convicted of having sex with her 12-year-old student 23 years ago and later marrying him, died of cancer Monday, her attorney said. Attorney David Gehrke said Letourneau was 58. Letourneau was teaching at Shorewood Elementary School in Burien when she raped her sixth-grade student, Vili Fualaau, in June 1996, KIRO-TV reported. Police discovered Letourneau and Fualaau, then 12, in a minivan parked at the Des Moines Marina. Letourneau said the boy was 18. The two were taken to a police station and later released. At that time, Letourneau was a married 34-year-old mother of four. On Feb. 25, 1997, following a tip, police interviewed Fualaau. Letourneau was pulled out of a teacher’s meeting and arrested for statutory rape. In August 1997, in an agreement with prosecutors, Letourneau pleaded guilty to child rape in exchange for a 3-month jail sentence and probation. Judge Linda Lau accepted the deal on condition that Letourneau have no contact with Fualaau. By that time, Letourneau had given birth to a girl fathered by Fualaau. Letourneau and Fualaau were married in Woodinville on May 20, 2005. after she was released from prison. At that time, Letourneau was 43 and Fualaau was 22. Fualaau filed for separation in 2017, and a divorce was finalized last year. The couple had two children together.