Breaking News:

Real-Time School and Business Closings

ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

heavy-rain-night
41°
Drizzle
H -° L 31°
  • heavy-rain-night
    41°
    Current Conditions
    Drizzle. H -° L 31°
  • heavy-rain-day
    Today
    Drizzle. H -° L 31°
  • clear-day
    50°
    Tomorrow
    Clear. H 50° L 30°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

College
Close friend and mentor to Jadon Haselwood shares his view on the 5-star decision
Close

Close friend and mentor to Jadon Haselwood shares his view on the 5-star decision

Close friend and mentor to Jadon Haselwood shares his view on the 5-star decision

Close friend and mentor to Jadon Haselwood shares his view on the 5-star decision

Jadon Haselwood-UGA football-Georgia football-UGA recruiting

Want to attack every day with the latest UGA football recruiting info? That’s what the Intel brings at least four days a week. This play sheet offers up another viewpoint on the upcoming decision from 5-star WR Jadon Haselwood

 

Jadon Haselwood is the nation’s No. 1 WR from the class of 2019 on the 247Sports composite. The one-time UGA commitment will be a part of a Cedar Grove team that will seek a state title against a stout Peach County team on Dec. 11.

Georgia is still in this recruiting race. It seems accurate to include Miami, FSU and Oklahoma among that lot, too. At least.

That is a reporter’s perception of that decision. It must be stated that Haselwood recently said his thoughts were so cloudy he couldn’t even name a top 5. There’s a strong urge out there for readers to follow this recruitment to the very end.

Those that have seen his film realize that he’s just that good of a player. The dramatic twists and turns are just part of the deal with the nation’s top players.

But there’s also a need here to not beat the story to death. He will not decide until he puts on a hat live on NBC from the All-American Bowl on Jan. 5.

Jadon
            Haselwood-UGA recruiting-Georgia recruiting
Darrin Hood sat next to 5-star Jadon Haselwood at the Tennesee game on an unofficial visit this season. (Jeff Sentell/DawgNation)

There has been some pacing to DawgNation’s coverage of Haselwood this season for that very reason.

We recently had a conversation with a source close to Haselwood to get his view of the upcoming decision.

It warranted an update.

Darrin Hood is a close friend and mentor to Haselwood. Those two have known each other since his sophomore year. Hood is at every game and he will travel with him on road trips.

He is a constant presence in his life. The view he shared on this decision helps to balance out several key parts of this recruitment.

Hood, to be clear, still feels his friend is uncertain about his decision.

The thing he is not uncertain about is how Haselwood feels about Georgia.

“UGA still has a huge chance,” Hood said. “Jadon and coach [James] Coley are still very close and he’s a big-time UGA fan. The fact that fans think UGA is out of consideration is crazy. We’re talking about a fan of the ‘Dawgs’ even before even before he had an offer from UGA.”

Hood considered the idea the Bulldogs might be gaining ground on Haselwood since he chose to de-commit in October. Is it that? Are the Bulldogs losing ground? Or are they simply maintaining their appeal?

“I think its still the same,” Hood said. “But he does realize UGA is passing more. He doesn’t miss [checking in on] a UGA game. Even when [we’re on] on the road he’ll ask what’s the score of the UGA game.”

Haselwood, in those instances, will even quiz Hood about the stats from those games.

The 5-star prospect has told DawgNation he is not watching those games, but Hood provides added context that Georgia is still very much on his mind.

Another view on where things stand with Jadon Haselwood

DawgNation collected Haselwood’s thoughts last Friday. He made it clear he was aware the Bulldogs did not have an assistant coach at his state semifinal game.

But the Bulldogs were the only school to do an in-home visit with him last week.  FSU and Miami used their weekly visit quota to check on him at a GHSA Class 3A state semifinal game.

“I personally think its UGA and everyone else,” Hood said. “UGA stands alone. That’s just my personal feeling because I know how he feels about the school but he always says he doesn’t have a top school. Those are just my personal thoughts from being around him.”

Jadon Haselwood-UGA recruiting-Georgia recruiting
Jadon Haselwood will take his final official visit to UGA from Dec. 13-Dec. 15. (Jeff Sentell/DawgNation)

Hood says that he sees Haselwood as having one primary goal. That’s to make it to the NFL and play on Sundays. That will open up so many new possibilities for his life and the lives of those he cares about.

What comes after that? According to Hood, it is something that goes beyond stats.

“His goal is to win a national championship one day,” Hood said.

Is that really what he wants most?

“I know that’s what he wants most,” Hood said. “… He talks about playing in the national championship and embracing all the pressure that comes with it.”

Another nugget about the Jadon Haselwood decision

This one has to do with timing. There are some of those internet detectives out there that feel they can read their favorite crystal balls better than their Twitter timelines.

There’s a working theory out there that some sleuthing could unlock Jadon Haselwood’s eventual decision long before his announcement moment on Jan. 5. Those folks can:

  • Study who Auburn offers and signs at WR during the early period
  • Check who FSU offers and signs at WR during the early period
  • Note who Georgia offers and signs at WR during the early period
  • Observe who Oklahoma signs at WR during the early period
  • See who Miami offers and signs at WR during the early period
Jadon Haselwood-UGA recruiting-Georgia recruiting
Jadon Haselwood de-committed from UGA back in October. (Jeff Sentell/DawgNation)

Those clues could potentially reveal the decision that Haselwood made during the early period well in advance of his All-American Bowl reveal.

The real CSI-types can even study the student phone directories at those schools.

That no longer sounds logical. The school that signs Haselwood will need to prioritize a scholarship for him during the early period to enroll early in January.

“All the potential schools know that he’s not doing anything until he puts on a hat on January 5,” Hood said. “If they can’t wait until then I feel like it’s their loss. No moves will be made until then because he’s undecided on which school it will be.”

According to Hood, Haselwood will not sign anywhere during the early period.

“January 5 is going to be a good day for some team,” he said.

Remembering Jadon Haselwood after the Oklahoma win

Hood’s view of Haselwood being a fan brings to mind a story from last January. That was when Georgia knocked off Heisman Trophy winner Baker Mayfield and Oklahoma.

The nation’s No. 1 receiver celebrated like a fan. Haselwood even did so before Sony Michel ran for the deciding touchdown.

His party began after Lorenzo Carter blocked that kick in The Rose Bowl.

“I went outside,” Haselwood said earlier this year. “It was 30-something degrees and I was running down the street. I was happy for them. It has been a long time coming.”

And he was guilty of premature celebration that night. Shirtless.

“When ‘Zo blocked that field goal, that’s when I knew we had it won,” Haselwood said at the time. “I knew it was over with. I was excited. It was cool outside, but I didn’t feel it like that. I had so much adrenaline running through me that night.”

What else is going on with UGA recruiting? 

DawgNation published a lengthy set of recruiting notes yesterday regarding the many things going on right now around the program.

The biggest of those was the affirmation that 4-star DE Bill Norton feels about the fact he will be at Georgia next season. His chances of remaining in the UGA class have been widely discussed of late.

That update also included at least a half-dozen “blips” about what DawgNation was hearing regarding both the 2019 and 2020 class. It was a busy day yesterday and one of those that didn’t make that list was the news that 4-star LB Rian Davis now plans to no longer

  • Take an official visit to Alabama this week
  • Take any other official visits
  • He feels good about being shut down in his recruitment
  • Davis will be at UGA from Dec. 13-15 for his official visit with other key targets and 2019 commits

Dillon Gabriel, the 2-star QB prospect from Hawaii, welcomed Bulldog QB coach James Coley on Tuesday. He will take his official visit to UGA this weekend. We had a brief update on him in that previous link, but it makes sense to also drop his senior film right here.

It should balance out the concerns about the pursuit of a 2-star QB who had been committed to Army for a time. He’s listed at 6 feet and 185 pounds on his Hudl highlight profile page.

While on the subject of QBs, it makes sense to bring up the name of 4-star QB commit John Rhys Plumlee out of Oak Grove High School in Mississippi. His team lost 31-27 to 5-star ILB Nakobe Dean and his squad for the Class 6A state championship in the Magnolia State last Friday.

Plumlee, of all things, not only worked under center but he also punted, returned kicks and played some at safety for Oak Grove that night.

Plumlee finished 18 of 34 through the air for 337 yards with four touchdowns. He threw one interception, but also added 32 rushing yards on his nine carries.

For the season, he completed 64 percent of his passes for 2,834 yards, 33 touchdowns and three interceptions. He also covered 8.9 yards per attempt for 1,444 rushing yards and another 19 scores.

He is credited with having true 4.4 speed in the 40-yard dash. Plumlee now rates as the nation’s No. 8 dual-threat QB prospect for 2019 on the 247Sports composite ratings. That slots him as the nation’s No. 266 overall prospect for this class.

Did you see “Before the Hedges” on Wednesday? 

There’s so much going on right now it requires a weekly live recruiting special where DawgNation staffers interact for an entire hour with our online community.

We call it “Before the Hedges” and more than 21,000 folks have viewed the show on Facebook alone. Not to mention on the DawgNation Youtube channel and on Twitter.

We’re thankful to everyone who joined our show on Wednesday afternoon. We covered several topics, including:

  • 5-star OL Clay Webb’s impending decision on Dec. 10
  • The early enrollee picture and what that looks like
  • Key dates to track with UGA recruiting up ahead
  • 5-star WR Jadon Haselwood

 

Miss any Intel? The DawgNation recruiting archive will get you up to speed just as fast as former Georgia All-American LB Roquan Smith found the ball after the snap.

The post Close friend and mentor to Jadon Haselwood shares his view on the 5-star decision appeared first on DawgNation.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

News

  • A hiker walking in the woods in Windham, Maine, this month spotted a rare albino porcupine and managed to capture it on video. >> Read more trending news  Greg Strand told WCSH-TV that he heard a commotion and quickly hid to see what was coming. Strand said he saw a large adult porcupine and then was surprised to discover a smaller beast following it. He said the smaller animal practically blended in with the snow on the ground as it moved behind the larger animal. It was a rare albino porcupine. Stand’s wife posted the video of the encounter on Facebook. An official with the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife told WCSH that it’s very unusual to see an albino animal in the state. >> Related: Rare white baby reindeer captured in photos in Norway Albino animals, regardless of species, are pretty rare,” agency official Ryan Robicheau said.       
  • A co-founder of the Shepherd Center died “peacefully” Monday morning, the hospital confirmed. James Harold Shepherd Sr., 90, was a fourth-generation Atlantan who helped found the private nonprofit hospital that specializes in spinal cord injury treatment and research, hospital spokeswoman Jane Sanders said in a news release. Shepherd, who had five siblings, started Shepherd Construction Company with his brothers, and his family oversaw the construction of hundreds of miles of interstate highways in Georgia and several surrounding states in addition to thousands of miles of city and county streets since 1949, the release said. In 1973, Shepherd sustained a spinal cord injury in a bodysurfing accident, which helped motivate him to found the Shepherd Center along with his wife, Alana, their son, James, and Dr. David F. Apple Jr., the release said. The center opened in 1975.  “He wanted to be here, talk to people, to be around the hospital and watch as it grew,” said Julie Shepherd, his granddaughter, who is a case manager at Shepherd Center. “He often talked about how proud he was of Shepherd Center. His construction career had been rewarding in one way, but he was even prouder of what they’d done here (at the hospital) and the lives they’d changed.” The Georgia General Assembly unanimously approved a resolution to designate a section of Peachtree Road in Buckhead to be renamed J. Harold Shepherd Parkway. A memorial service will be held at 2:30 p.m. Thursday at Peachtree Presbyterian Church at 3434 Roswell Road. 
  • President Donald Trump's intensifying legal troubles are unnerving some of his fellow Republicans. Despite his brash stance, they believe the turmoil has left him increasingly vulnerable as he gears up for what is sure to be a nasty fight for re-election. Trump, ever confident of his ability to bend story lines to his will, mocks the investigations into his conduct as candidate and president as a 'witch hunt' and insists he will survive the threats. But a shift began to unfold over the weekend after prosecutors in New York for the first time linked Trump to a federal crime of illegal hush payments. That left some of his associates fearful that his customary bravado is unwarranted. For some Republicans, the implication that the president may have directed a campaign finance violation, which would be a felony, could foreshadow a true turning point in the Republican relationship with him when special counsel Robert Mueller releases his report on the Russia investigation. 'I'm sure there's going to be a lot more that's going to come out from the Southern District (of New York) and from, at some point, from the Mueller investigation as well,' Sen. John Thune of South Dakota, the chamber's incoming No. 2 Republican, said Monday. 'What they're implying there, obviously, is something I assume at some point the president will have an opportunity to respond to.' Thune continued: 'Campaign finance violations are something that ... they are serious matters, but obviously it depends a little bit on how it gets treated.' As the legal drama plays out, political challenges that could threaten Trump's re-election are piling up. Republicans are still coming to terms with their drubbing in last month's House elections and looking for someone to blame. The departure of John Kelly as White House chief of staff has set off a disorganized search for a replacement who could stay in the job through the 2020 campaign. After Trump's top choice, the vice president's chief of staff Nick Ayers, passed on the job, few of the remaining candidates have political experience. Also, Democrats will soon take control of the House of Representatives, wielding subpoena power and potentially exploring impeachment proceedings. Meanwhile, financial markets have been jittery, in part because of Trump's trade wars and concerns that higher borrowing costs could ultimately trigger a recession. Facing pressure from Mueller and an impending onslaught of Democratic investigations, Trump could hew even further to the right, catering exclusively to the base of voters he is concerned about losing, according to a Republican close to the White House who has consulted on the early re-election efforts. That instinct would echo the president's double-down, scorched-earth response to the crises that hit his 2016 campaign, including the Access Hollywood tape about forcing himself on women, and could make it harder to woo the independent voters or disaffected Democrats he may well need. Could Trump face a primary election challenge from within his own party? He doesn't seem concerned. The president is eager to unleash his re-election machinery and begin to collect pledges of loyalty from across the GOP to quell any hint of an insurrection, according to a campaign official and a Republican familiar with the inner workings of the campaign but not authorized to speak publicly. The Trump team has discussed the possibility of a challenge from someone such as outgoing Ohio Gov. John Kasich or Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake. A week after the midterm elections, Kasich traveled to New Hampshire for a public speech and private meetings with prominent Republicans. Flake, who has tangled repeatedly with Trump, isn't making any personal commitment, but his feelings about a challenger are clear. 'Somebody needs to run' against Trump, he said Monday. 'I hope somebody does.' While some Democrats eying the White House are expected to announce campaigns in the first few weeks of 2019, a Republican challenger could move more slowly, according to two GOP operatives who have been involved in hypothetical discussions about taking on Trump. Waiting until early spring, for example, could give Republicans time to assess whether Trump will be weakened by Mueller's investigation or a downturn in the economy. One leading House Republican said the situation surrounding Trump remains volatile and has urged colleagues to wait for the Mueller report, which some believe could emerge early next year. That Republican, who demanded anonymity to assess the situation candidly, has urged fellow GOP lawmakers to not defend the indefensible but to also not believe every charge. The lawmaker expressed hope that the special counsel's findings come out sooner rather than later so there will be more time before the 2020 elections. For all the private and not-so-private party worries, many close to Trump predict he not only will survive the Russia investigation but will be re-elected in two years. They point to his remarkable ability to shake off scandal, the sway he continues to hold over his base of GOP voters, the fear his Twitter account has instilled among many Republican elected officials and what they believe is the lack of top-shelf talent among Democrats who could face him in 2020. Echoing the president, they contend the special counsel has come up empty-handed in his efforts to prove Russian collusion and is ready to settle for a campaign finance charge they believe is minor and will be ignored or not understood by most voters. The president has said the lesson of the 2018 midterms is that Republican candidates abandon him at their own peril. And the Republicans who remain in Congress after that election aren't likely to back away from him. 'Remember that the Republicans who are left have won in fairly solid Republican, Trump districts,' said moderate Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida, who is retiring. 'So he is very popular with the base. I would not think that they would want to distance themselves or have any fear of associating with him.' ___ Associated Press writers Julie Pace and Zeke Miller in Washington contributed to this report. ___ Follow Lemire on Twitter at http://twitter.com/@JonLemire and Fram at http://twitter.com/@asfram
  • Officials from Volunteers of America Ohio & Indiana are still figuring out how much damage an agitated naked man caused Sunday to its Dayton residential re-entry facility. >> Read more trending news   The naked man, who police haven’t identified, spent more than four hours on the roof of the organization’s Gettysburg Avenue facility after he disrobed and burned his clothing, officials said. The man, who was a resident at the center, also stabbed himself several times with a sharp object and wrote “Pig for Life” in his own blood on a wall, witnesses and police said. The man is expected to face criminal charges, possibly including felony vandalism after he damaged multiple cameras, windows and other equipment, police said. “This certainly was an unusual and very out-of-the-ordinary Sunday afternoon for us,” said Nicole Knowlton, vice president of communications for Volunteers of America Ohio & Indiana. At about 11:30 a.m. Sunday, staff at the Volunteers of America called police after a resident climbed a chain-link fence and managed to get onto the roof of the facility, located at 1931 S. Gettysburg Ave. The facility provides programming and treatment to help ex-offenders integrate back into the community, Knowlton said. The organization has four half-way houses in the state, including the Gettysburg facility, which can hold about 120 people. >> Related: Naked man on top of Dayton building causes disturbance for more than 4 hours The man shed and then burned his clothing, police said. He jumped from rooftop to rooftop while naked. He stabbed himself with a sharp object and smeared blood on the top of the one-story building, officials said. Volunteers of America Ohio & Indiana locked down the facility and restricted where clients could go for their safety, Knowlton said. The man broke two security cameras, six windows, some wiring and the fans of the heating and cooling units, Knowlton said. Officers lined up mattresses on the sidewalk below the roof to try to cushion a potential fall. Authorities used a ladder truck to eventually retrieve the man. Knowlton said she believes he remains in the hospital.
  • A polygamous group based on the Utah-Arizona border is letting go of the sprawling building where its members worshipped, in the latest sign that the sect run by imprisoned leader Warren Jeffs is crumbling and losing control of the community it ruled for a century. The group known as the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, or FLDS, now has nowhere to gather for worship services after the nearly 53,000 square-foot (4,900 square-meter) building was taken over last week as part of government-ordered evictions that have taken away about 200 homes and buildings from members who refuse to pay property taxes and $100-a-month occupancy fees. The meetinghouse with capacity for several thousand people is valued at $2.8 million and sits on about 7 acres (2.8 hectares) in the remote red rock community, on the Arizona side of the border. The building has a stage, a church-like setup for services and classrooms for religious education but has not been used for at least six months, Jeff Barlow said Monday. He is the executive director of a government-appointed organization that oversees a former church trust that has properties in the sister cities of Hildale, Utah, and Colorado City, Arizona. The FLDS doesn't have a spokesperson to comment about the development. The sect is experiencing a major leadership void with Warren Jeffs serving a life sentence for sexually assaulting underage girls he considered brides and his brother Lyle Jeffs serving nearly a five-year sentence for his role in carrying out an elaborate food stamp fraud scheme and for escaping home confinement while awaiting trial. Members have said they have been worshipping at home on their own. The lack of local leaders meant nobody stepped up to take responsibility for the building when Barlow's organization warned an eviction was imminent, said Christine Katas, who lives in the community and serves as an intermediary between Barlow's organization and the FLDS. Rank-and-file members don't believe they have the authority to do so, she said. 'It's very sad for the FLDS. I've seen people cry over it,' Katas said. 'Both sides are stuck between a rock and a hard place. Everybody wishes there was a different outcome.' The evictions have led many FLDS members to take refuge in trailers around town or move away, while former members have purchased the homes and buildings and moved back. Group members don't believe they should have to pay for what belonged to a communal church trust that the state of Utah took over more than a decade ago amid mismanagement. The evictions are part of the shifting demographics in the sister cities of about 7,700 people. Non-sect members last year won control of the mayor's office and town council in Hildale, Utah and nearly did the same in municipal elections in Colorado City. The town government and police are being watched closely by court-appointed monitors after a jury found past town and police leaders guilty of civil rights violations. Sprawling homes that used to belong to Warren Jeffs have been converted into beds and breakfast and sober living centers. Members of the group still consider their leader and prophet to be Warren Jeffs, even though he has been in jail in Utah or Texas continually since 2006. Polygamy is a legacy of the early teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, but the mainstream church abandoned the practice in 1890 and now strictly prohibits it. The Salt Lake Tribune first reported the eviction of the meetinghouse. Barlow said the board of the organization he runs, called the United Effort Plan (UEP) Trust, will meet on Jan. 5 in a public meeting to discuss what to do with the building, constructed in 1986, Barlow said. One possibility is converting it to a civic center, though that would likely require seeking grant funds, he said. The UEP board will make the final decision.