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Latest from Sabrina Cupit

    Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr is sending out a warning about a scam targeting older, at-risk Georgians with a “Genetic Testing Scheme.”The Attorney General says he wants to raise awareness because the scam is now being reported all across the state. It involves offers for “free” genetic testing and Carr says it’s designed to exploit people’s healthcare concerns. “Unfortunately, victims taken in by this scheme are often providing sensitive personal information, including insurance and financial information, that could be misused in a number of ways,' says Carr.
  • More people are disconnecting their home Internet and just using their phones. USA Today reports 40% of Americans are using cell phone internet exclusively now for service. They’re finding that it works out fine. The cost of home internet service has gone up substantially over the years. WSB Consumer expert Clark Howard says, ' the reality is when you squeeze people too tight they slip right through your fingers.' He says by using your cell phone, you don’t have to worry about data overages. This is a great alternative to paying huge money to a cable monopoly for home internet service.
  • Georgia Tech researchers warn hackers have the ability to gridlock entire cities, like Atlanta by hacking into your car’s computer. The researcher has applied physics in a new study to simulate what it would take for hackers to wreak havoc by randomly stranding cars. They found it wouldn't take much to cause mass mayhem. “Unlike most of the data breaches we hear about, hacked cars have physical consequences,” said Peter Yunker, who co-led the study and is an assistant professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Physics.
  • Subscription contact lens company Hubble is facing scrutiny from doctors and the contact lens industry as a whole. >>LISTEN BELOW TO WSB’s CLARK HOWARD EXPLAIN WHY HE FEELS THE CONTACT LENS INDUSTRY IS ‘IN TERROR.’ The start-up company promises to revolutionize eye care, and has taken social media by storm offering dirt cheap lenses. Hubble offers contact lenses at a tiny fraction of the cost of other lenses.  Ophthalmologists and optometrists say they have seen several patients with eye problems after using Hubble and have criticized the company for switching people from their prescribed lenses to a completely different brand. However, the company says their business is completely legal and that they have spent years researching their product to produce high-quality contact lenses. They require their consumers to have prescriptions before subscribing to their services.  WSB consumer expert Clark Howard is accusing the entire contact lens industry of price fixing. 'The doctor you go to for a contact lens fitting makes the big income not from the exam and fitting, but on selling you massively overpriced contact lens boxes,” he explains, adding, “The industry is in terror because they saw what ‘Dollar Shave Club’ did to Gillette.
  • An E.coli outbreak has sent more than twenty people to the hospital in seven states. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report the sickness is linked to ground bison. State officials have reported sick people from Connecticut, Florida, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. The ground bison and bison patties were supplied by Northfork Bison Distributions Inc. in Saint-Leonard, Quebec, Canada. E.coli may cause diarrhea illness often with bloody stools. Although most healthy adults can recover completely within a week, some people can develop a form of kidney failure called Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children and the elderly. The condition can lead to serious damage and even death.  It is advised distributors, retailers and restaurants not use or serve recalled ground bison. Consumers should check their freezers to see if they have any of the recalled ground bison.  More info here.
  • Various brands of hummus and dips made by Pita Pal Foods out of Houston, Texas are being recalled because they could be contaminated with Listeria. The company has issued a voluntary recall of certain hummus products that were made between May 30th and June 25, 2019. They were sold nationwide under the name brands of Bucee's, Fresh Thyme, Harris Teeter and others. They have a use by date from July 28th through August. Listeria monocytogenes was found at the manufacturing facility during an FDA inspection.
  • New research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta finds two investigational Ebola treatments effective. An antiviral drug called Remdesivir and another antibody treatment called ZMapp, both inhibited the growth of the virus strain in human cells in laboratory studies according to the research in the medical journal Lancet Infectious Diseases. According to the latest figures from the World Health Organization, the Ebola outbreak in Congo is the second biggest outbreak of the disease in history with more than 1600 people killed by Ebola. The largest outbreak was in West Africa in 2014 when 11,000 people died.
  • Check your smoke detector! Universal Security Instruments 10-year-battery-operated ionization smoke and fire alarms with model numbers MI3050S and MI3050SB and with date codes between 2015JAN19 through 2016JUL11 are being recalled. They may not work. The smoke alarms can have a misaligned internal switch causing the alarms to not activate properly, posing a risk of failure to alert consumers to a fire. The company has received 134 reports of failure to properly activate during installation. Online through specialty wholesalers and others from July 2015 to December 2016 about $20.
  • The most cases ever of acute flaccid myelitis were seen last year. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there were -- 233 confirmed cases in 41 states. There were four confirmed cases in Georgia in 2018. AFM tends to spike between August and October every other year, including outbreaks in 2014 and 2016 with 120 and 149 cases, respectively. So far this year, there have been 11 confirmed cases in eight states out of 57 patients under investigation.The CDC in Atlanta is asking doctors to be on the lookout for it and quickly report suspected cases of a mysterious ailment that afflicts young children, saying delays in identifying possible cases of acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM, are hindering the search for the condition’s cause.
  • Emergency cell phone alerts could be vulnerable to hackers, according to researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder. Researchers decided to test national emergency alerts after an emergency alert mishap in Hawaii. In that instance, residents received false emergency alerts that the state was going to be hit by a missile strike. Researcher, Eric Wustrow learned that when the government or any national emergency alert is sent out to the public, it utilizes a special channel that then reaches people in cell tower ranges. They found that there are huge vulnerabilities between the cell tower and the users. He says an attacker could do this to cause unrest, cruel prank or even some type of terrorist attack.
  • Sabrina Cupit

    Midday Anchor/ Health Reporter

    Sabrina is WSB's midday news anchor, a position she's held since 2000. She also serves as the station's Health Reporter, and has produced award-winning series on Defibrillators and Elderly Drivers. For the past 5 years, Sabrina has been the CDC correspondent for WSB and CBS Network. You may also recognize Sabrina as one of the familiar Georgia Lottery hosts on WSB-TV. Sabrina joined Cox Radio in 1995, anchoring the news on the morning shows for B98.5-FM, WJZF Jazz Flavors, and WCNN. Around that same time, she served as an anchor for CNN Headline News and CNN Airport News. She's also a recognizable face in infomercials which air in markets including New York and California. Before entering the news business, Sabrina got her start in country music radio, at different times performing stints as morning show host and afternoon drive jock at WNGC in Athens; she also served as the station's Program Director. She spent several years with WDUN in Gainesville as a midday talk show host.

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News

  • According to many polls, Americans – especially those who say they are Democrats -- are not that fond of the Electoral College. Neither are many of the Democratic candidates for president. >> Read more trending news  With just over 14 months until the 2020 presidential election, a movement to change the way electoral votes are awarded and who will be elected president has gained some steam. The National Popular Vote Compact (NPV), which has its roots in the most contested presidential election in U.S. history, sets in state law a policy that awards all a state’s electoral votes to the candidate who wins the national popular vote. Under the Electoral College system used today, 48 states have a “winner-take-all” system that awards all the state’s electoral votes to the person who gets a majority of votes in that state. The Electoral College does not take into consideration that national popular vote. Sixteen states, along with the District of Columbia, have passed the NPV agreement. They are California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon and Rhode Island. While legislation has been passed in the 16 states and the District of Columbia, the agreement would not go into effect until states with a collective 270 electoral votes — the number needed to win the presidency — agree to join. Currently, the District of Columbia and the 16 states in the agreement hold a combined total of 196 electoral votes, meaning the pact would need enough new state members to get 74 electoral votes.Supporters say the system would give the person who got the most votes country-wide the presidency he or she deserves. Opponents say states would be forced to hand over electoral votes to a candidate who did not win that state. For instance, in the 2016 election, a state such as Florida, in which President Donald Trump earned more votes, would have had to pledge its 29 electoral votes to Trump’s opponent, Hillary Clinton, who won the national popular vote in the 2016 election. The Electoral College of today was established by the Twelfth Amendment to the Constitution which replaced the method for electing the president and vice president provided in Article II, Section 1, Clause 3. Under the system, when voters cast a ballot for president, they are actually choosing members of the Electoral College, called electors, who are pledged to that presidential candidate. Following the election for president, electors then meet to choose the president. Electors almost always vote for their state’s popular vote winner, and some states have laws requiring them to do so. However, electors are not bound by federal law to vote for a specific candidate – for instance, the one who won the popular vote in their state. In 29 states and the District of Columbia, electors are bound by state law or by a pledge they sign to vote for the candidate who won the popular vote of the state they represent. Five men have won the presidency in the Electoral College while not winning the country’s popular vote: John Quincy Adams in 1824, Rutherford B. Hayes in 1876, Benjamin Harrison in 1888, George W. Bush in 2000 and Donald Trump in 2016. The National Popular Vote campaign goes back to Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore's loss to Bush in 2000, according to The Associated Press. Gore won the popular vote but lost the election over a vote count in Florida.
  • Fans of all things Disney are in Anaheim for the D23 Expo. And news of future development for the properties at the Disney Parks around the world has already started being released. Inside the Disney Parks 'Imagining Tomorrow, Today' Pavilion at the 2019 D23 Expo visitors will be able to see what is coming next to the Disney Parks around the world. While there are a lot of cool things to share, in this post we are going to focus on the upcoming additions coming to Walt Disney World! There is an all-new Star Wars vacation experience coming to Walt Disney World!  >> Read more trending news  The Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser will be a new, first-of-its-kind vacation experience where guests will check in for a two-night adventure aboard a glamorous starship called the Halcyon.  Once onboard, guests will interact with characters and become active participants in stories that unfold around them on their galactic journey.  Also in the pavilion is a model of the multi-year transformation of Epcot complete with new experiences, 'that will make the park more Disney, more family, more timeless, and more relevant.' The reinvention of Epcot will include several new additions, and the first one we learned about was a new attraction called Journey of Water which is inspired by 'Moana.' This first-ever attraction based on the Walt Disney Animation Studios film, 'Moana,' will let guests interact with magical, living water in a beautiful and inspiring setting. And this October, guests will be able to visualize all the exciting plans for Epcot at a new experience center in the Odyssey Events Pavilion called Walt Disney Imagineering presents the Epcot Experience. Inside this first-of-its-kind offering within a Disney park, guests will discover engaging and interactive exhibits that allow you to step inside excitement to see some never-before-revealed details driving the future of Epcot during this unprecedented period of transformation. The Disney Parks pavilion also features other upcoming Walt Disney World attractions including TRON Lightcycle Run coming to Magic Kingdom Park as well as Mickey & Minnie's Runaway Railway coming to Disney's Hollywood Studios. On Sunday, August 25, we'll find out more details on these and other announcements during the Disney Parks, Experiences, and Products presentation at D23 Expo 2019!
  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has undergone radiation therapy to treat a malignant tumor discovered during routine blood tests in early July, according to a statement from the court. >> Read more trending news  Ginsburg, 86, began a three-week course of radiation therapy Aug. 5 at New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. 'The Justice tolerated treatment well,' Supreme Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said in a statement. 'She cancelled her annual summer visit to Santa Fe, but has otherwise maintained an active schedule.' Arberg said doctors noted an abnormality during a routine blood test in early July and that a subsequent biopsy on July 31 confirmed a 'localized malignant tumor' on her pancreas. After Ginsburg underwent treatment, Arberg said, 'There is no evidence of disease elsewhere in the body.' 'Justice Ginsburg will continue to have periodic blood tests and scans,' she said. 'No further treatment is needed at this time.' In January, Ginsburg missed arguments in the Supreme Court for the first time since joining the court in 1993 while recovering from surgery to remove cancerous growths from her left lung. She previously underwent surgery for colorectal cancer in 1999 and pancreatic cancer in 2009, according to the Associated Press. Ginsburg is the eldest person serving on the Supreme Court and leads its liberal wing.
  • A service is set for next week for the three members of a prominent Atlanta family killed in an apparent double murder-suicide.  Marsha Edwards, 58, and her two children, 24-year-old Christopher Edwards II and 20-year-old Erin Edwards, will be remembered during a memorial Wednesday in southwest Atlanta, according to a spokesman for the family.  The service is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. at Cascade United Methodist Church, which is at 3144 Cascade Road.  Investigators believe Marsha, the former wife of surgeon and civic leader Christoper Edwards, shot and killed the couple’s children before turning the gun on herself. Their bodies were found by police Wednesday inside her upscale Vinings townhouse after officers were asked to perform a wellness check. RELATED: Ex-wife of Atlanta Housing chairman killed 2 children, herself, police say Lots of questions remained unanswered Friday. Among them: • Who requested the wellness check? • When did the shootings take place? • What kind of gun was used? • Who is the registered owner of the gun? • What evidence prompted authorities to classify the investigation as a double murder-suicide? It could be weeks before autopsy and toxicology results shed light on those and other questions. “Dr. Edwards, his extended family and friends are in a state of grief and shock, and privacy of the family is paramount as arrangements are being made,” spokesman Jeff Dickerson said Thursday in an emailed statement. A longtime fixture in the Atlanta medical community, Edwards serves on the board of trustees of the Morehouse School of Medicine and was formerly on the board of Grady Memorial Hospital. He is the chairman of the Atlanta Housing Authority board. As news of the deaths spread, condolences poured in from those who knew the family and strangers touched by the tragedy. Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and her husband were among the mourners.  Erin Edwards, a Boston University student, was an intern in the mayor’s communications office last summer. Christopher Edwards II joined the Atlanta film and entertainment office in 2018 as a digital content manager.  Both were Woodward Academy graduates. They were “promising young adults and budding NABJ media professionals,” said Sarah Glover, the former president of the National Association of Black Journalists. Glover said on Twitter she met the siblings at a conference in 2017.  Their mother, a medical equipment provider, was also a member of the organization, which advocates for and supports black journalists.  AJC.com has reached out to Cobb police for additional information about the deaths.  — Please return to AJC.com for updates.
  • Volkswagen AG has issued a recall of 679,000 cars sold in the U.S. since 2011. >> Read more trending news  The recall deals with electrical issues where a driver could take out the key after coming to a stop, even if the car was not in park. Silicate can build up on the shift lever micro switch and cause the problem, Reuters reported. The car will show that it is in park but it is still in gear, CNET reported. The car could then roll away, according to Reuters. The recall involves the following Volkswagen models: Jetta Beetle Beetle Convertible Golf Golf SportsWagen GTI. The cars affected come from various model years, from 2011 to 2019. Dealers will turn off a micro switch, install a different switch outside of the gear lever housing and add a new circuit board, CNET reported. Owners of affected vehicles will be alerted about the issue on or after Oct. 11, according to CNET.
  • Health officials in Illinois said Friday that a person who was hospitalized with lung problems after vaping has died in what might be the first death linked to e-cigarettes and similar devices in the United States. >> Read more trending news  The Illinois Department of Public Health said in a statement that the unidentified individual, who was between 17 and 38 years old, had been hospitalized with a severe respiratory illness shortly after vaping. 'The severity of illness people are experiencing is alarming and we must get the word out that using e-cigarettes and vaping can be dangerous,' Illinois Department of Public Health Director Ngozi Ezike said Friday. In Illinois alone, health officials said at least 22 people between the ages of 17 and 38 have experienced respiratory illnesses after vaping. Officials with the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention arrived Tuesday in Illinois to help state health officials investigate, Ezike said. In a statement released Wednesday, officials with the CDC said that between June 28 and Aug. 20, nearly 150 cases of severe lung illnesses linked to e-cigarettes were reported in 15 states. Health officials continue to investigate the illnesses. According to the CDC, no specific product or compound has been linked to all of the cases and it remained unclear Friday whether the cases shared a common cause. Poison control officials have been concerned about exposure to vaping products, including e-cigarettes and liquid nicotine, in recent years due to the high concentration of nicotine when compared with other tobacco products, according to the American Association of Poison Control Centers. Association officials said that as of July 31, poison control centers have managed 2,439 cases connected to e-cigarette devices and liquid nicotine this year. Last year, officials fielded 2,470 such cases, according to figures from the association.