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Latest from Sabrina Cupit

    The Free Application for Federal Student Aid – also known as the FAFSA – rolls out today (Oct. 1st) for students who plan on attending college in fall 2020. While college application deadlines may be months away, experts stress that students and their families should file their FAFSAs as soon after Oct. 1 as possible. https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/fafsa Filling out the form is not an easy task. 'What a pain,' says WSB consumer expert Clark Howard. He says you will need to set aside time with no distractions and access to all your financial records. Howard says, 'the more accurate you are in what you post, the more credible your application is going to be.'  The FAFSA is a financial aid form administered by the Department of Education that helps students qualify for loans and financial aid. Household data from the FAFSA –such as annual income and savings – is crunched by the Education Department to determine how much a family could pay toward college. Colleges also receive data from the FAFSA, which serves as the basis for their financial aid offers to applicants, as well as state agencies. Howard says don't depend only on FAFSA. He says apply for other scholarships to supplement FAFSA. They can be hard to find. Hs says one place to go is fastweb.com. 
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging people to avoid vaping, particularly THC, until it’s determined what’s making people sick. According to the CDC, THC containing products were the most prominent link among patients. Dank Vapes, TKO and other THC vaping brands have been linked to serious lung illnesses. THC, or the compound that produces a high in marijuana, was used by patients in most of the cases, CDC Principal Deputy Director Anne Schuchat told reporters Friday. She says 77% of the people sickened reported using THC or both THC and nicotine containing products.
  • Millions of heart patients may soon be able to simply 'step on a scale' to monitor their hearts. A new study from researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta is studying 43 patients with heart failure right now. They say a future marketable version of the medical monitoring scale would ideally notify a doctor, who would call the patient to adjust his or her medication at home, hopefully sparing him a long hospital stay and needless suffering.  The scale works by monitoring the pulsing and bobbing signal called a ballistocardiogram (BCG), a measurement researchers took more commonly about 100 years ago but gave up on as imaging technology far surpassed it. The researchers are making it useful again with modern computation.  Heart failure affects 6.5 million Americans and is a slow-progressing disease, in which the heart works less and less effectively. Many people know it as congestive heart failure because a major symptom is fluid buildup, which can overwhelm the lungs, impeding breathing and possibly causing death.  Omer Inan, the study's lead researcher says, “In someone with decompensated heart failure, the cardiovascular system can no longer compensate for the reduced heart function, and then the flow of blood through the arteries is more disorderly, and we see it in the mechanical signal of the BCG,” Inan said. “That difference does not show up in the ECG because it’s an electrical signal.”  “The most important characteristic was the degree to which the BCG is variable, which would mean inconsistent blood flow. If you chop up the recording into 20-second intervals and the individual segments differ from each other a lot, that’s a good marker of decompensation,” Inan said.
  • Three more people have died after using e-cigarette products, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The deaths have been in Illinois, Oregon and Indiana.    Officials on Friday said they had identified 450 possible illnesses in 33 states, including Georgia. The CDC reports that a majority of the patients are young (18-35), are male and admit to using a device that contained THC , nicotine, or both, 90 days before seeing symptoms.   The CDC is urging Americans not to use vaping products.   The Food and Drug Administration said it has collected 120 e-cigarette samples with the hope of finding a common device or substance that is causing the pulmonary illnesses.   The FDA says no single vaping device, liquid or ingredient has been tied to all the illnesses. Many of the sickened - but not all - were people who had been vaping THC, the chemical that gives marijuana its high.    Anyone who uses e-cigarette products should monitor themselves for symptoms that include cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain or fever. If you have symptoms seek medical attention immediately.    CDC and FDA encourage the public to submit detailed reports of any unexpected health or product issues related to tobacco or e-cigarette products to the FDA at this link: https://www.safetyreporting.hhs.gov/SRP2/en/Home.aspx?sid=1f34e68a-d115-4835-a574-d792a7ed7728
  • Tens of thousands of glass stovetops are being recalled because they can just turn on without you knowing it. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says there have been more than a hundred incidents of the glass top stoves automatically turning on. More than a dozen fires or heat damage has been reported.
  • One of the biggest health achievements in the nation's history could be in jeopardy. Measles was eliminated in 2000 by The World Health Organization and now the Centers for Disease and Control says there is a reasonable chance the United States will lose that status. A measles outbreak in New York started September of 2018 and there have been outbreaks in 29 other states in the past year. WHO removes the elimination status when measles has been spreading continuously for a year.
  • The nation's first death possibly linked to vaping has been confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Illinois Department of Public Health says an adult person who recently vaped died after being hospitalized with 'severe respiratory illness.' The agency didn't give any other information about the patient, including a name or where the person lived. The CDC says there are currently 193 potential cases in 22 states, including Georgia. Patients reported similar symptoms – shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and vomiting in some cases – and some were admitted to the intensive care unit.
  • Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr is sending out a warning about a scam targeting older, at-risk Georgians with a “Genetic Testing Scheme.”The Attorney General says he wants to raise awareness because the scam is now being reported all across the state. It involves offers for “free” genetic testing and Carr says it’s designed to exploit people’s healthcare concerns. “Unfortunately, victims taken in by this scheme are often providing sensitive personal information, including insurance and financial information, that could be misused in a number of ways,' says Carr.
  • More people are disconnecting their home Internet and just using their phones. USA Today reports 40% of Americans are using cell phone internet exclusively now for service. They’re finding that it works out fine. The cost of home internet service has gone up substantially over the years. WSB Consumer expert Clark Howard says, ' the reality is when you squeeze people too tight they slip right through your fingers.' He says by using your cell phone, you don’t have to worry about data overages. This is a great alternative to paying huge money to a cable monopoly for home internet service.
  • Georgia Tech researchers warn hackers have the ability to gridlock entire cities, like Atlanta by hacking into your car’s computer. The researcher has applied physics in a new study to simulate what it would take for hackers to wreak havoc by randomly stranding cars. They found it wouldn't take much to cause mass mayhem. “Unlike most of the data breaches we hear about, hacked cars have physical consequences,” said Peter Yunker, who co-led the study and is an assistant professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Physics.
  • Sabrina Cupit

    Midday Anchor/ Health Reporter

    Sabrina is WSB's midday news anchor, a position she's held since 2000. She also serves as the station's Health Reporter, and has produced award-winning series on Defibrillators and Elderly Drivers. For the past 5 years, Sabrina has been the CDC correspondent for WSB and CBS Network. You may also recognize Sabrina as one of the familiar Georgia Lottery hosts on WSB-TV. Sabrina joined Cox Radio in 1995, anchoring the news on the morning shows for B98.5-FM, WJZF Jazz Flavors, and WCNN. Around that same time, she served as an anchor for CNN Headline News and CNN Airport News. She's also a recognizable face in infomercials which air in markets including New York and California. Before entering the news business, Sabrina got her start in country music radio, at different times performing stints as morning show host and afternoon drive jock at WNGC in Athens; she also served as the station's Program Director. She spent several years with WDUN in Gainesville as a midday talk show host.

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News

  • A woman is recounting a terrifying and vicious dog attack at a park in Pineville, North Carolina, Monday and when police tried to seize that dog, the owner took off, leading police on a slow-speed chase for miles.  >> Read more trending news  Abryana Heggins said she remembers all the thoughts that were rushing through her mind as a huge dog attacked her at a Pineville dog park.  'I just kept thinking 'What's happening? Why is this happening? How am I gonna get this dog off of me,'' Heggins said.  She said it all started when a very large dog owned by Terilyn Jackson started attacking a husky in the park.  'At first, he grabbed the husky by the back of its neck and then, grabbed its tail and started shaking its head aggressively,' Heggins said. 'The woman got a whistle and blowing at him.' She and her friend Jaylen rushed to get their dogs out of the park, but suddenly, she said she felt pressure on her arm.  'I just ended up being dragged across the ground by the dog, and he started shaking and locked onto my arm and there's people yelling, and she's yelling and Jaylen is trying to rip the dog off my arm,' Heggins said.  Her friend jumped on top of the dog and fought it until Pineville police arrived. Officers told Jackson they needed to take her dog into custody, but they said she took her dog and drove off.  Officers turned on their lights and sirens and followed her. They said she drove the speed limit the entire time, but refused to stop.  At one point, they said she tried to hit their patrol car. Six miles later, she arrived at an animal hospital on Archdale Drive in Charlotte.  Eventually, police arrested Jackson.  'I could have been an 8-year-old or a child and that would be worse than what I got or Jaylen,' Heggins said. Her friend Jaylen suffered several bites and broke a finger during all of this.  The dog is under what is called a 'rabies quarantine.' Animal control officials are monitoring it while police look into its background and decide if it should be put down. 
  • Pete Burdon received a call from his daughter about a post circulating on Facebook that was getting a lot of attention.  >> Read more trending news  Gunnery Sgt. John Guglielmino, a Marine Corps veteran from Clay County, Florida was sick in the hospital and his daughter’s final plea was to get as many visitors as she could to say goodbye to her dad.  “I contacted her right away and I said would this be a good time to go over there,” said Pete Burdon, a retired Navy civilian who spent 37 years working with the Navy. Burdon said he responded to the call because it felt like it was important to say goodbye to a fellow veteran, even if he didn’t know him personally. Last week he gave him a hat and a hero’s salute. “When I joked with him you can see that he tried to smile and then he tried to salute after he put that hat on, that was really a touching moment for me,” Burdon said.  His daughter Katherine Boccanelli told me her father served three tours in Vietnam. She said he suffered a stroke back in April and he was diagnosed with cancer from exposure to Agent Orange. She didn’t want him to feel alone with his last few days on earth so she put the post out on social media.  What she didn’t expect was to see the outpour from the community.  “For her it was a step she didn’t know was going to happen when she put it out there, about a 100 people showed up in that short time,” Burdon said.  Burdon says he said goodbye to Guglielmino in the hospital and he’ll be there tomorrow to say his final farewell at the funeral.  The funeral will be Wednesday at 11 a.m. at Crossroads to Victory Church in Raiford, Florida.  Guglielmino’s family says any veterans who visited who wanted to come out and pay their respects are welcome to attend. To contribute to the funeral services, click here. 
  • Within the past month, residents in Virginia-Highland have told police there were a dozen sightings of a peeping Tom in their neighborhood. Police have now released a photo of a person of interest, Channel 2 Action News reported. Neighbors who live on Greenwood Avenue have called police to report sightings of the man peeping into windows since September, Channel 2 reported. In some cases, he’s allegedly climbed on top of air conditioning units to try to look into bathroom windows. “There was a man standing and looking directly at me through the cracks in my blinds,” a woman, who asked the news station to remain anonymous, said. “We came face to face in the window. It’s very, very violating.” Last Thursday about midnight, another neighbor’s Ring doorbell camera spotted the man near her home, Channel 2 reported. The 12 sightings happened along the same street but at three different buildings. The most recent sighting was Saturday about 11 p.m., when a resident chased the man off while holding a screwdriver, the news station reported. “My fear is that eventually he’s going to get bored with just peeping into people’s windows,” the woman said. Anyone with information on the person of interest is asked to contact CrimeStoppers at 404-577-8477 or online at www.StopCrimeATL.com. Tips can be sent anonymously and information that leads to an arrest and indictment in this investigation can earn tipsters up to $2,000. In other news:
  • Officers with the Kissimmee Police Department banded together to help save a choking baby's life last week.  Kissimmee police said the child's mother approached a patrol vehicle in the area of North Clyde Avenue and Mabbette Street on Saturday and said that her 1-year-old child was not breathing or responsive after choking on a goldfish cracker. >> Read more trending news  Video captured the moments an officer began thrusting on the baby's back repeatedly as other officers responded for assistance. The baby soon became responsive and was transported to an area hospital for treatment. Officials said the baby was crying at the hospital and seemed to be doing well. 
  • More than $4,000 worth of fake Nike Air Max, Nike Air Jordan and Balenciaga shoes were seized by U.S.Customs and Border Protection officers recently at the Port of Vicksburg/Jackson. CBP said in a Tuesday news release that the shoes were from Hong Kong and found by officials in an express consignment facility. They were in four separate packages labeled 'casual shoes.' >> Read more trending news  Real Balenciaga shoes are sold online at prices ranging from $700 to $1,000. The price for legitimate Air Jordans ranges from $100 to $1,000.  'Counterfeit brand-name shoes is a multi-million dollar criminal industry that preys on consumers looking for deals,' CBP Vicksburg/Jackson Port Director Michael Morris said in a statement. “It’s best to keep in mind that if a product seems too good for the price, it may not be legitimate.” Days earlier, CBP said it seized more than $2.2 million worth of counterfeit shoes in Los Angeles.
  • Update 7 p.m. EDT Oct 22:  Police in Sumter, South Carolina found the remains of missing 5-year-old Nevaeh Adams in a landfill after searching for over two months. >> Read more trending news According to WIS-TV, police discovered the remains on Friday, and through DNA testing, determined that they belonged to Adams. Daunte Maurice Johnson, the man suspected of killing Adams' mother, told officers he killed Adams in August. Update 2:25 p.m. EDT Aug. 7: Police said Johnson told detectives he dumped Navaeh's body in a trash bin at a Sumter apartment complex Monday after killing her and her 29-year-old mother, Sharee Bradley, The Associated Press reported. Authorities said the bin had been unloaded by a trash truck before reports of Bradley's death and Navaeh's disappearance first surfaced. Authorities were searching Wednesday through 46,000 pounds of garbage in Richland and Sumter counties, Sumter police Chief Russell Roark said, according to the AP. Roark told reporters police were also searching other areas for signs of Navaeh. “We keep hope that perhaps she’s still alive,” Roark said, according to WIS. 'We’re going to continue to search. We’re going to continue to take information. But based on what we know now, based on the information he’s provided us, she would be deceased.' Update 3:25 p.m. EDT Aug. 6: Daunte Maurice Johnson, the man who had been in custody after being seen running from the apartment building, is being held in the Sumter Lee Dentition Center and is facing murder charges, WIS reported. Police said Johnson admitted to killing Sharee Bradley and Nevaeh Lashy Adams and provided information where the little girl's body was located, WPDE reported. Original report: Police are desperately searching for a missing 5-year-old girl from South Carolina after her mother was found dead in their apartment in Sumter County. Police were called Monday evening after a family member found the body of Sharee Bradley, WACH reported. But her daughter, Nevaeh Lashy Adams was not there.  Police are now looking for the little girl who is described as 4 feet, 3 inches tall and weighing 50 pounds. She has black hair that is braided and has colored beads, The State reported. An autopsy is scheduled Tuesday on the girl's mother to find out the cause of her death, the newspaper reported. A man was seen running from the apartment and was taken into custody, but no charges were announced against him and police are not sure if he had anything to do with Bradley's death, The State reported. Anyone with information about Nevaeh Lashy Adams is being asked to call Sumter Police Department at 803-436-2700 or their nearest law enforcement agency, WIS reported.