Coronavirus:

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Latest from Sabrina Cupit

    Aviation is an international industry and as a result involves multiple languages. However, as deemed by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), English is the official language of aviation. The industry considers that some pilots may not be fluent English speakers and as a result pilots are obligated to participate in an English proficiency test. The problem is that each country has their way of deciding proficiency, says Georgia State linguistics professor, Eric Friginal. He says the question is how do you make it globally standard. 'In the U-S we have the FAA but in various other countries, they have their own thing, ' says Friginal.  Communication breakdowns have contributed to at least three deadly plane crashes in the past several decades. This issue is not necessarily life-and-death all the time, but intercultural communication can be complicated if one or both parties are non-native speakers. Here is actual audio from an exchange between a pilot and air traffic control where communication is a problem: Through its International Civil Aviation Organization, the United Nations has developed recommendations for international aviation, but in terms of the actual implementation there is not always clear oversight. So, for example, Brazil’s air traffic controllers may have different protocols from those in China or another country. Friginal says, 'currently, no one is technically monitoring and analyzing these things.' And the problem could only grow as demand for pilots grows globally. If you look at Asia alone, there will soon be up to 300,000 new pilots needed in the region.  'We would love to partner with Delta Airlines, since the hub is right here in Atlanta', says Friginal. The ultimate goal is to develop an Aviation English Research Center based at Georgia State in collaboration with other institutions. Friginal adds, 'with expanded funding and partnerships, we could continue to make major contributions to this field of research.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the influenza vaccine this year is offering protection. This season, the vaccine has been 45% effective against both types of flu that are circulating across all ages.The vaccine has been more than 50% effective in preventing flu illness severe enough to send a child to the doctor’s office. Health experts consider that pretty good.
  • The risk to Georgians is very low. So far, the only people infected in the U.S. with the new virus have been those who have traveled to the region in China where the virus first turned up in humans or those who've had prolonged close contact with them. You should be more concerned about influenza than this new coronavirus, according to health experts.
  • New guidelines for doctors and other healthcare providers concerning flu and EVALI. This new guidance is necessary because symptoms of vape-related lung injury and flu can be very similar. EVALI can cause symptoms that resemble those of pneumonia or the flu, the CDC warns, including the following:
  • Never before has fewer Americans smoked cigarettes, according to new data from the government's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Cigarette smoking has reached an all-time low of 13.7 percent in 2018. That's a decline of about two-thirds in the more than 50 years since the first Surgeon General's report warned of the health issues related to lighting up.
  • The government releases an antibiotic threat list. The list of 18 germs includes two new urgent threats; drug resistant Candida auris and carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter, bringing the number of urgent threats to five.
  • 13-year-old Kincaid Eaker is in desperate need of a kidney. He was born with a disorder called polycystic kidney disease. His mother, Audra was going to donate her kidney but 3 years ago she was shot and killed by her husband as the they were driving down highway 92 in Woodstock.
  • There’s been a significant discovery in the outbreak of lung illnesses and deaths linked to e-cigarettes. Vitamin E acetate has been found in all of the samples of fluids from the lungs of those who have gotten sick. No other potential toxins were detected in the testing so far. Of 28 lung tissue samples tested, all contained the additive and 23 contained THC. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's, Dr. Anne Schuchat says, 'these new findings are significant.
  • Wawona Frozen Foods recalls packages of frozen raspberries and frozen berry mixes containing raspberries sold at Aldi Grocery Stores: https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/wawona-frozen-food-voluntarily-recalls-frozen-raspberries-due-possible-health-risk
  • Dunwoody police needs your help identifying a suspicious person who tried to get a child into her car on Waterford Drive.
  • Sabrina Cupit

    Midday Anchor/ Health Reporter

    Sabrina is WSB's midday news anchor, a position she's held since 2000. She also serves as the station's Health Reporter, and has produced award-winning series on Defibrillators and Elderly Drivers. For the past 5 years, Sabrina has been the CDC correspondent for WSB and CBS Network. You may also recognize Sabrina as one of the familiar Georgia Lottery hosts on WSB-TV. Sabrina joined Cox Radio in 1995, anchoring the news on the morning shows for B98.5-FM, WJZF Jazz Flavors, and WCNN. Around that same time, she served as an anchor for CNN Headline News and CNN Airport News. She's also a recognizable face in infomercials which air in markets including New York and California. Before entering the news business, Sabrina got her start in country music radio, at different times performing stints as morning show host and afternoon drive jock at WNGC in Athens; she also served as the station's Program Director. She spent several years with WDUN in Gainesville as a midday talk show host.

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News

  • Hobby Lobby is closing all its stores nationwide and furloughing employees without pay. The arts and crafts store released a statement Friday saying it’s closing its doors due to the coronavirus pandemic. Hobby Lobby also said in the statement that it will be furloughing a large portion of corporate and distribution employees. Hobby Lobby will remain closed after 8 p.m. Friday until further notice. Hobby Lobby statement: 'As the country continues efforts to manage and mitigate the devastating health and economic impacts of the COVID-19 virus, Hobby Lobby will, after careful consideration, close the remainder of its stores, and furlough nearly all store employees and a large portion of corporate and distribution employees, effective Friday, April 3rd, at 8:00 p.m. The stores will remain closed until further notice. HOBBY LOBBY OFFICIAL STATEMENT “In order to allow our furloughed employees to take full advantage of the Pandemic Unemployment Compensation and Recovery Rebates provided to eligible employees by the federal government, we are ending emergency leave pay and suspending use of Company provided paid time off benefits (PPTO and Vacation) in accordance with the requirements outlined in the CARES Act (subject to State law requirements). However, we will maintain medical, dental, life, and long-term disability benefits for employees while furloughed through at least May 1, 2020, and will pay the cost of employee premiums for these benefits on behalf of employees while furloughed without pay. We encourage furloughed employees to file their claims with their State’s unemployment commissions as soon as possible. Upon return, employees will retain their original dates of hire and any accrued PPTO and Vacation. Our sincere gratitude goes out to our dedicated employees at this difficult time, and we look forward to the day when we can welcome them back, once we are able to reopen. HOBBY LOBBY OFFICIAL STATEMENT “We know our customers relied on us to provide essential products, including materials to make personal protective equipment, such as face masks, educational supplies for the countless parents who are now educating their children from home, and the thousands of small arts and crafts businesses who rely on us for supplies to make their products. Over the past several weeks, we implemented several best practices to provide a safer shopping environment, including the installation of physical barriers between customers and cashiers, enhanced cleaning, and the enforcement of social distancing measures. We are prepared to reopen our stores in a responsible way when the current situation improves, and look forward to welcoming our valued customers back to our stores. Until then, we pray for those affected by the virus, protection for the health care professionals caring for the sick, economic security for all impacted businesses and employees, and wisdom for our leaders.” HOBBY LOBBY OFFICIAL STATEMENT 'As the country continues efforts to manage and mitigate the devastating health and economic impacts of the COVID-19 virus, Hobby Lobby will, after careful consideration, close the remainder of its stores, and furlough nearly all store employees and a large portion of corporate and distribution employees, effective Friday, April 3rd, at 8:00 p.m. The stores will remain closed until further notice.”
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed its guidance late Friday concerning the wearing of cloth face masks while out in public. The CDC, according to President Donald Trump, said that people, when going to public locations, should now wear “non-medical, cloth face coverings.” The action is voluntary, Trump said in his afternoon press briefing. Since the beginning of the battle against COVID-19, the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had said that people didn’t need to wear masks unless they were sick and coughing, The New York Times reported prior to Trump’s announcement. Thursday evening, Trump had said his administration would have regulations when it came to the general population and the wearing of masks. Some opportunities for wearing masks while in public would be when going to pharmacies and grocery stores, the Times reported. Many people may now be looking for ways to make their own personal protective equipment or to make PPE for those working the front lines. There are many designs to make, from no-sew options to ones that need some needle and thread. No Sew Supplies: A bandanna or piece of finished cloth Hair elastics Sewn versions Supplies: Paper, to make a pattern Cotton fabric Fusible interfacing Elastic Pins Sewing machine The New York Times has an alternate pattern. Click here for step by step instructions. Kaiser Permanente has also shared a design approved by the health system for donation to hospitals, The Washington Post reported.
  • A Brooklyn landlord waived this month’s rent for hundreds of his tenants. Mario Salerno posted signs on the 18 buildings he owns throughout the borough letting tenants know they do not have to pay April’s rent, The New York Times reported. “My concern is everyone’s health,” Salerno told the Times. “I told them just to look out for your neighbor and make sure that everyone has food on their table.” Salerno had not calculated how much he would be losing from not collecting rent on the 80 apartments, but it’s likely hundreds of thousands of dollars, the Times reported. “I’m really not concerned about the rent right now, I’m concerned about people’s health,” Salerno told Greenpointers.com. “Not only are we up against an epidemic, these poor people have no jobs and they’re worried about getting sick. I didn’t think it was much on a person like me, who God was good to, to help them all out.” It has helped ease the stress for some tenants who are out of work because of the coronavirus. Tenant Paul Gentile has lived four years in one of Salerno’s buildings. He works as an attorney but lost his job when the courthouses closed March 18. “You don’t see that, especially in a landlord-tenant relationship in New York City,” Gentile told the Times. “He’s amazing.”
  • A Michigan sugar company purchased $131,000 worth of gift cards from restaurants in communities where it operates. The Michigan Sugar Co. gave each of its 1,300 employees a $100 gift card from more than 50 restaurants, MLive reported. “We hope this helps ease the pain of this pandemic for those businesses just a little bit,” Michigan Sugar Co. Board Chairman Adam Herford told MLive. The company has also donated personal protection equipment including masks, gloves and safety glasses to Michigan-area health care facilities.
  • A Detroit bus driver who complained about a coughing passenger in a video posted on social media, has died from the coronavirus. Jason Hargrove got sick four days after posting the video on March 21 where he went on a profanity-laced tirade about a woman who coughed repeatedly while on the bus. The bus drivers’ unions said Hargrove, 50, died Wednesday. The coronavirus can spread through the air, health officials have said. “Public workers doing our job, trying to make (an) honest living, take care of our families,” Hargrove said in the video. “For you to get on the bus ... and cough several times without covering up your mouth and you know (we’re) in the middle of a pandemic — that lets me know that some folks don’t care.” The city stopped collecting fares March 17. The buses were to be more thoroughly cleaned and passengers were required to enter and exit from the rear door only. Mayor Mike Duggan expressed condolences and urged others to watch Hargroves’ video. “He was infected before we closed the front doors (on buses),” Duggan said. “Some of his language is graphic, but I don’t know how you can watch it and not tear up. He knew his life was being put in jeopardy ... by someone who didn’t take this seriously and now he’s gone.”
  • A Pennsylvania man who lost a lung to cancer about a decade ago has survived another health battle -- this time, with the coronavirus. It started as what he assumed was just a cold, but when Richard Botti, 61, started to feel lung pain in early March, he thought his cancer had returned. It turned out to be COVID-19 instead. Because of his previous bout with cancer, he was at higher risk. His family told WPXI they got very concerned when his conditioned started to worsen. “It slowly got worse and he wasn’t getting out of bed,” said Vanessa Venezie, his daughter. “You immediately think the worst because of everything you’re seeing and reading.” He soon tested positive for the coronavirus and had to be hospitalized. However, he pulled through, spending 11 days at Heritage Valley Hospital hooked up to oxygen. Botti’s daughter wanted to share not all coronavirus outcomes are grim. “We’re just really happy and we want people to know there is hope for them,” Venezie said. “Stay focused on the positive. Do things that make you feel good. We can all get trapped in the negative.” Botti was taken back home by medics in an ambulance equipped to handle COVID-19 cases. He has to self-isolate in his room away from his family for two weeks.