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Latest from Sabrina Cupit

    More than 4500 people end up in the emergency room each year because of injuries from pool chemicals, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Inhaling chemicals was the most common injury. CDC examined data on emergency department visits due to pool chemical injuries during 2015- 2017. The top diagnosis was poisoning due to breathing in chemical fumes, vapors, or gases—for example, when opening chlorine containers.
  • No slowdown in the spread of measles in the U-S, according to new numbers from the Atlanta based, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Thomas Clark, CDC says they have had 839 cases reported so far this year. The 75 cases represent a higher bump than the last two weeks, when about 60 additional cases were reported each week. There have been no new cases in Georgia, according to the state health department. Georgia has had a total of six cases in two different families.
  • Cocaine overdose deaths have been rising since 2012 and jumped a staggering 34 percent between 2016 and 2017, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Opioids may carry some of the blame. Many overdose deaths involve someone who took several different drugs, and researchers found that nearly three-quarters of the deaths involving cocaine in 2017 also involved opioids. Deaths also included super-potent drugs such as fentanyl.  Health officials say about 70,000 Americans died of drug overdoses in 2017. Nearly 14,000 involved cocaine, and nearly 48,000 involved some type of opioid.  When it comes to gender and age, the upward trend in fatalities was most pronounced for young women aged 15 to 24, although young men were similarly affected. Cocaine-related deaths were most common in the Midwest, while the West had the highest rate of fatal overdoses involving psychostimulants, the CDC researchers said.
  • Defeat Antibiotic Resistance with the Same Old Antibiotics but Smarter Strategies  In the war on antibiotic resistant bacteria, it’s not just the antibiotics that are making the enemy stronger but also how they are prescribed. A new study suggests that to win against resistance, doctors should keep using the same drugs but as part of more targeted treatments and in combination with other health strategies.   The current broad use of antibiotics helps resistant bacteria strains propagate, but prescribed precisely, the same drugs can help reverse the spread of resistant strains, said researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Duke University, and Harvard University who authored the study. But it can only work if combined with strategies that make sure people carrying resistant strains spread them to fewer people.   The new study delivers a mathematical model to help clinical and public health researchers devise new antibiotic prescription and supporting treatment strategies.   But basing a strategy on antibiotics needs to happen before bacteria resistant to most every known antibiotic become too widespread, rendering antibiotics ineffective. That has been widely predicted to occur by mid-century.   “Once you get to that pan-resistant state, it’s over,” said Sam Brown, who co-led the study and is an associate professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Biological Sciences. “Timing is unfortunately an issue in tackling antibiotic resistance.”   The strategic approach would also help clinicians treat infections effectively by flagging which antibiotics the bacteria are resistant to and which not.   “It’s great for fighting antibiotic resistance, but it’s also good for patients because we’ll always use the correct antibiotic,” Brown said.   The researchers published their study in the journal PLOS ONE on DATE XYZ. The research was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, the Simons Foundation, the Human Frontier Science Program, the Wenner-Gren Foundations, and the Royal Physiographic Society of Lund.
  • Georgia's official state vegetable is officially in season, beloved Vidalia onions can now be found in grocery stores around the world. Grown only from Georgia soil, the Vidalia onion is available for a limited time. Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary W. Black says, 'The sweetest onions on earth are certainly living up to their reputation this year.” He says, “We are proud to offer our sweet Vidalia onions to all those who have been patiently awaiting their arrival.
  • Almost half of all U.S. employers offer some type of health or wellness program, according to a report in the American Journal of Health Promotion. It was the first survey done on the matter in more than a decade. Most on the job health programs focus on physical activity, nutrition and stress management.
  • A new study about America's personal hygiene habits gives Atlanta residents pretty good marks for cleanliness, but reveals some surprising and gross things about Americans in general.Atlanta was ranked 6th overall out of 25 major U.S. cities based on how often residents shower or bathe, brush their teeth, change their bed sheets, put on a fresh shirt and underwear, clean their homes, and wash their hands after using the toilet.
  • A multi drug-resistant fungus is getting a lot of attention after The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention described it as a “global emerging threat” that can cause invasive infection and death.Candida auris is not killed by common anti-fungal drugs, which makes infections difficult to treat. When it enters the bloodstream and spreads throughout the body, it can cause serious invasive infections in the blood, heart and brain, which can be life-threatening. The fungus can spread through contact with infected patients, or contaminated surfaces and equipment.
  • Something is contaminated with e-coli and it's making people sick in five states, including Georgia. The number of cases here has doubled. The state health department says 17 people have gotten sick with three people ending up in the hospital. Cherie Drenzek, State Epidemiologist says the median age is 15 years old.
  • It's late in the season but Flu is not over. Influenza in Georgia is widespread, and the intensity level is high, meaning a lot of people are showing up at the doctor's officer very sick. Nancy Nydam with the Georgia Department of Public Heath says, 'Today we've got a predominate strain of H1N1 and less of the H3N2.' She says we saw H3N2 earlier in the season. 'The good news is both of those strains were contained in the year's flu vaccine,' says Nydam.
  • Sabrina Cupit

    Midday Anchor/ Health Reporter

    Sabrina is WSB's midday news anchor, a position she's held since 2000. She also serves as the station's Health Reporter, and has produced award-winning series on Defibrillators and Elderly Drivers. For the past 5 years, Sabrina has been the CDC correspondent for WSB and CBS Network. You may also recognize Sabrina as one of the familiar Georgia Lottery hosts on WSB-TV. Sabrina joined Cox Radio in 1995, anchoring the news on the morning shows for B98.5-FM, WJZF Jazz Flavors, and WCNN. Around that same time, she served as an anchor for CNN Headline News and CNN Airport News. She's also a recognizable face in infomercials which air in markets including New York and California. Before entering the news business, Sabrina got her start in country music radio, at different times performing stints as morning show host and afternoon drive jock at WNGC in Athens; she also served as the station's Program Director. She spent several years with WDUN in Gainesville as a midday talk show host.

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News

  • A man accidentally fatally shot his 23-year-old daughter as she was trying to enter the family home early Sunday morning. >> Read more trending news  Investigators said Nadeja Jermaineque Pressley was coming home around 1:15 a.m. when she was shot through the door by her father, who thought an intruder was trying to get inside, WYFF reported.  The Greenville County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the shooting.
  • Emergency crews are investigating after a reported incident occurred on board a plane at Charlotte Douglas International Airport. In a statement to WSOC, airport officials said, “There is an investigation of a security incident on board an aircraft. More information to come.” Dozens of people were escorted off the plane and first responders came to the aircraft.  >> Read more trending news  Officials have confirmed the investigation involved a Jet Blue airplane departing from Charlotte, North Carolina, heading to New York on Sunday morning.  A JetBlue spokesperson told to WSOC the flight has been delayed. “JetBlue Flight 218, scheduled to depart from Charlotte to New York this morning, has been delayed for additional security screenings out of an abundance of caution. Local law enforcement is on-site and we are working to get customers on their way to New York as soon as possible.” According to David Lathan, a passenger on the plane from Rockingham, North Carolina, the aircraft was taxiing to the runway when the pilot had to stop. Lathan claims the pilot told the passengers there had been a bomb threat and gave them directions. “He said that there's been a bomb threat,” Lathan told WSOC., adding that the pilot said, “There’s going to be a policeman come up to the door. They’re going to open the door. When they do, get your luggage, and exit the airplane.” No other information has been released.  The investigation is ongoing, WSOC reported.
  • Two men are behind bars facing charges of inducing panic after allegedly surfing on the swollen Great Miami River. >> Read more trending news  Passersby spotted the men in the water shortly before 5 p.m. Saturday. Andrew S. Cook Jr., 25, and Garrett M. Pickiering, 26, said they also had asked someone to call for help after they apparently fell into the river in the area of State Route 47 and Port Huron Drive. “We had prepared for a water rescue,” Sgt. Joel Howell, of the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office, said. “We weren’t exactly sure if they were in the water.” Deputies received word that the pair, who were wet and carrying an oar, were just south of town. “They ended up going to jail for inducing panic, the reason being they left after asking somebody to call for help for them,” said Howell, who added that Cook and Pickiering apparently admitted to seeing at least one deputy respond. Cook and Pickiering were each booked into the Shelby County Jail on suspicion of inducing panic. They await Monday morning court dates, according to online records. Howell said the river is especially dangerous because it is flooded over the banks, full of debris and has a swift current.
  • A Mississippi teen is fighting for her life after being shot in a drive-by shooting in Jonestown, Mississippi. >> Read more trending news  Family members said Lamonshae Williams was shot in the stomach during a graduation party overnight. She was rushed to Regional One in critical condition. Williams graduated from Coahoma Early College High School on Saturday. Relatives told FOX13 she graduated sixth in her class.  Another victim who was shot at the scene was treated at a local hospital and is expected to be OK. Lamonshae's mother Luetisha Gardner said she is heartbroken about the situation. She told FOX13 that Lamonsha's older sister was killed a few years ago. Jonestown has very limited police coverage, so Coahoma County deputies are currently handling the case. Officers have not identified any suspects at this time. This is a developing story. Check back for updates.
  • A year ago, the world watched as Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were married at Windsor Castle’s historic St. George’s Chapel. Less than a year after their nuptials, they welcomed their first child, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor. On Sunday, the couple celebrated their first wedding anniversary. >> Read more trending news  Harper’s Bazaar reported that the couple has shared behind-the-scenes moments from their big day in an Instagram post on Sussex Royal. Related: Prince Harry and Meghan Markle: A relationship timeline The video slideshow begins with a series of black-and-white photos that include images of Markle holding hands with her mother, Doria Ragland, and Prince Harry pretending to hitchhike to his wedding. Audio of “This Little Light of Mine,” which Sussex Royal said was selected by the couple for their recessional, can be heard as the images are displayed. The video slideshow ends in color images of the big day and wedding bells. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex also shared a message to supporters, saying, “Thank you for all of the love and support from so many of you around the world. Each of you made this day even more meaningful.” Watch the video below.
  • Billionaire Robert F. Smith, who received an honorary doctorate from Morehouse College at institution’s Sunday morning graduation exercises, had already announced a $1.5 million gift to the school.  But during his remarks in front of the nearly 400 graduating seniors, the billionaire technology investor and philanthropist surprised some by announcing that his family was providing a grant to eliminate the student debt of the entire class of 2019.  >> Read more trending news  “This is my class, and I know my class will pay this forward,” he said. He received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters at the ceremony. The announcement elicited the biggest cheers of the morning. Tonga Releford, whose son, Charles Releford III, is a member of the class of 2019, estimates that her son’s student loans are around $70,000. “I feel like it’s Mother’s Day all over again,” she told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Smith’s gift has been estimated at $40 million. Tonga Releford’s husband, Charles Hereford Jr., is also a Morehouse graduate. He said their younger son, Colin, is a junior at Morehouse, an all-male historically black college. The father said he doesn’t know who the keynote speaker will be at Colin’s graduation ceremony but is hoping for a return performance by Smith.  “Maybe he’ll come back next year,” he said.