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Latest from Sabrina Cupit

    It's that time of year, wedding season! June is the most popular month for weddings. Amazon has become the 'go to ' for couples tying the knot. The on-line retailer is dominating the $19 billion business of wedding registries. 54% of couples in a recent survey said they registered at Amazon. Most couples who are engaged register at more than one place.
  • In 2017, 3 .6 million middle and high school students said they are current tobacco users. That number is down from about 4.5 million in 2011. “Despite promising declines in tobacco use, far too many young people continue to use tobacco products, including e-cigarettes,” said CDC Director Robert R. Redfield, M.D. “Comprehensive, sustained strategies can help prevent and reduce tobacco use and protect our nation’s youth from this preventable health risk.”E-cigarettes have been the most commonly used product among teens since 2014.
  • Having trouble getting your kids to eat their fruits and vegetables? Try using toys. New research from the University of Georgia suggests that fun can motivate kids to try new foods and ultimately eat more fruits and vegetables.
  • Dekalb county offers free curbside pickup for bulky items throughout the month of June. It's part of the 'Operation Spring Clean Sweep 2018' campaign.  Pauline Andrea with Dekalb county says, 'We are going throughout the county and collecting pretty much anything at the curb.' They pick up furniture, appliances and anything. The only thing they won't pick up is hazardous materials.  Residential customers whose regularly scheduled collection day is Monday will be serviced on Friday, June 8, and Saturday, June 9.  Residential customers whose regularly scheduled collection day is Tuesday will be serviced on Friday, June 15, and Saturday, June 16.  Residential customers whose regularly scheduled collection day is Wednesday will be serviced on Friday, June 22, and Saturday, June 23.  Residential customers whose regularly scheduled collection day is on Thursday will be serviced Friday, June 29, and Saturday, June 30.  For any missed collections based on this schedule, residents should to call 404-294-2900 to be placed on a bulky item collection escalation list.  For more information on Operation Spring Clean Sweep 2018 activities and events, contact the Sanitation Division’s customer service team at 404-294-2900 or sanitation@dekalbcountyga.gov, visit www.dekalbsanitation.com, or follow the Sanitation Division on Twitter @DKalbSanitation. Dekalb county offers free curbside pickup for bulky items throughout the month of June. It's part of the 'Operation Spring Clean Sweep 2018' campaign. Pauline Andrea with Dekalb county says, 'We are going throughout the county and collecting pretty much anything at the curb.' They pick up furniture, appliances and anything. The only thing they won't pick up is hazardous materials.
  • Each year in the United States, more people die from smoking than from murder, AIDS, suicide, drugs, car crashes, and alcohol—combined.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says those graphic anti-smoking ads that feature real smokers appear to be working. The TIPS campaign has been underway since 2012.
  • The American Cancer Society said Wednesday it changed the recommendation for colorectal screening from 50 to 45 years old. The change is based on new information about the rise in colon and rectal cancer among younger adults. Colon and rectal cancers have increased 51% among adults under age 50 since 1994, the cancer society said.
  • Georgia is among the top ten states for moving fraud complaints filed with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. The FMCSA received more than forty-one hundred moving fraud complaints last year.
  • As you head on vacation this summer, beware of the hotel pool. One in three swimming-related disease outbreaks occur at hotels, according to a report from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.  Of the 493 outbreaks reported during this period, there were 27,219 people who became sick and another eight died. The most common outbreaks were associated with Cryptosporidium, Pseudomonas and Legionella.  “Swallowing just a mouthful of water with Crypto in it can make otherwise healthy kids and adults sick for weeks with watery diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea, and vomiting,” said Michele Hlavsa, R.N., M.P.H., chief of CDC’s Healthy Swimming Program. “Chlorine cannot kill Crypto quickly. We need to keep it out of the water in the first place. Don’t go into the water, and don’t let your kids go into the water, if sick with diarrhea.” The CDC's tips for healthy swimming:  Don’t swim or let your kids swim if sick with diarrhea. If Crypto is the cause of diarrhea, wait until 2 weeks after diarrhea has stopped to go swimming. Check the pools, hot tubs, and water playground inspection scores. Before getting in the water, use a test strip from your local retailer or pool supply store to check if the water’s pH and bromine or free chlorine levels are correct. Don’t swallow the water. Take kids on bathroom breaks hourly, and change diapers in a diaper-changing area and away from the water.
  • It's graduation season and student loan debt is totaling $1.38 trillion, according to personal finance website WalletHub. 42% of students say credit card debt worries them more than student loan debt. 63% say their school is not doing enough to educate them about personal finance. One on four students say excellent credit is more important than a college degree.  WSB consumer expert Clark Howard says, 'My worry is not the credit card debt for college students, it's the total amount of borrowing for student loans that's the real hassle, the real problem.' He says student loan debt can add up to such a huge amount of money that it can end up impacting what you hope to do for the rest of your life.  The average Class of 2017 graduate came away $39,400 in the hole, which represents a 6% increase from the previous year.  WSB's Clark Howard has help for handling student loans here :  https://clark.com/education/student-loan-guide/
  • A new rabies test that was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention could mean people exposed to potentially rabid animals could forego the weeks long regime of shots to prevent the deadly disease. The new test, designed for use in animals, can more easily and precisely diagnose rabies infection. The new LN34 test is simpler and easier to use than the current test.  “Many of the areas hardest hit by rabies are also the areas least prepared to run current tests to diagnose it,” said Crystal Gigante, a microbiologist in CDC’s Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology and the study’s first author. “The LN34 test has the potential to really change the playing field. Quickly knowing who needs to receive rabies treatment– and who does not – will save lives and families’ livelihoods.” Currently, if rabies tests are inconclusive, the bitten person usually is given a rabies vaccine as part of post-exposure prophylaxis, at an individual cost often over $3,000. LN34 could decrease the number of inconclusive and false positive tests, thus eliminating unnecessary vaccine use. Experts estimate that rabies testing, prevention, and control cost $245 to $510 million annually in the United States. About 40,000-50,000 people get rabies PEP in the United States annually. Worldwide, rabies kills about 60,000 people each year.
  • Sabrina Cupit

    Midday Anchor/ Health Reporter

    Sabrina is WSB's midday news anchor, a position she's held since 2000. She also serves as the station's Health Reporter, and has produced award-winning series on Defibrillators and Elderly Drivers. For the past 5 years, Sabrina has been the CDC correspondent for WSB and CBS Network. You may also recognize Sabrina as one of the familiar Georgia Lottery hosts on WSB-TV. Sabrina joined Cox Radio in 1995, anchoring the news on the morning shows for B98.5-FM, WJZF Jazz Flavors, and WCNN. Around that same time, she served as an anchor for CNN Headline News and CNN Airport News. She's also a recognizable face in infomercials which air in markets including New York and California. Before entering the news business, Sabrina got her start in country music radio, at different times performing stints as morning show host and afternoon drive jock at WNGC in Athens; she also served as the station's Program Director. She spent several years with WDUN in Gainesville as a midday talk show host.

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News

  • Two brothers accused of at least seven robberies across metro Atlanta in May are no ordinary criminals: they’re identical twins. Marquavious and Juntavious Burton, 20, were arrested in early June. According to Fulton County jail records, the twins have been arrested multiple times since 2015 on charges such as aggravated assault and theft by receiving stolen property. The latest charges include seven counts of armed robbery and a charge of participating in criminal street gang activity. Police believe they may be responsible for even more recent robberies. The Burton twins have also been accused of shooting at some of the robbery victims, Channel 2 Action News reported.  In other news:
  • Two Cobb County siblings were killed after their 17-year-old sister allegedly lost control of the family’s SUV on a South Carolina interstate, police said Monday.  Jessica Wolwark was driving a Chevrolet northbound on I-85 in Anderson County when she ran off the highway and the SUV overturned Saturday morning, according to police.  Wolwark and her mother, Natalia Anggraeni, were both wearing seat belts and were seriously injured in the crash. Two other family members died from their injuries after being ejected, police said.  Kirana “Kiki” Wolwark, 15, and 12-year-old Nate Wolwark were both killed, a family friend posted on a Go Fund Me page. The family was traveling from their Kennesaw home to Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C., where the girls were to attend a religious retreat, according to Chrissy Concepcion, who set up the fundraising page for the family. The family does not have medical insurance, she said. The South Carolina medical examiner was unable to confirm the identities of those killed, but family friends confirmed the names and ages of the Wolwark siblings.  “Kiki was a joy to be around, and spread her love for animals to everyone she knew,” Concepcion posted. “Nate was the perfect boy; always helpful, caring, and accepting of everyone around him.” The driver and her mother were both taken by helicopter to a Greenville hospital, where both remained Monday. Anggraeni has a broken neck and several broken ribs, Concepcion said. Jessica Wolwark has torn ligaments in her arm, but is expected to be released from the hospital this week.  The South Carolina Highway Patrol is investigating the crash.  In other news: 
  • Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross made a trade betting that the stock in a shipping company with Russian-government ties would fall, a transaction coming just days after he learned of a possible negative news story about his investment in the company. Ross reported on a government form released Monday, as required by federal ethics rules, that he shorted stock in Navigator Holdings in October. The New York Times reported Tuesday that the transaction came three business days after a Times reporter submitted questions to Ross about Navigator. The transaction, listed as worth between $100,000 and $250,000, was first reported Monday by Forbes. Ross rebuffed any suggestions that he shorted the Navigator stock based on confidential information to make a profit. He said the transaction was part of his effort to divest from Navigator and that he did not stand to gain if the stock fell, or lose if it rose, at the time. In short selling, a person borrows shares of a stock and sells them. The aim is to then replace the borrowed shares with others bought later at a lower price, reaping a profit from the difference. Navigator counts a Russian gas producer with ties to the Kremlin among its major customers. President Donald Trump tapped Ross, a billionaire investor in distressed companies, to be his administration's point man on trade and manufacturing as Commerce chief. His spokesmen said in November that Ross planned to completely divest from Navigator, although he wasn't required to do so under his ethics agreement as an incoming Cabinet member, because he wanted to avoid any possible perception of a conflict of interest. Ross says now that he has completely divested his Navigator holdings. In a statement Tuesday, Ross said it would be 'completely false' to imply that the transactions involved insider trading using nonpublic information. The Times reporter 'contacted me to write about my personal financial holdings and not about Navigator Holdings or its prospects,' he said. 'I did not receive any nonpublic information due to my government position, nor did I receive any nonpublic information from a government employee. Securities laws presume that information known to or provided by a news organization is by definition public information,' Ross' statement said. Ross said he had been in the process of selling off his holdings in the company when he learned in late October that there were additional shares belonging to him in an account opened by the company. Because the shares were 'in electronic form' and he didn't have physical access to them to deliver them to the broker on time, he said he 'technically sold them short.' When he received the physical shares on Nov. 16, Ross said he delivered them to the broker to close the transaction. 'Therefore, it made no economic difference to me whether the shares went up or down between the sale date and the date I delivered them,' he said. The owners of Sibur, the Russian gas producer that is a major customer of Navigator, have included two Russian oligarchs close to President Vladimir Putin and a businessman believed to be Putin's son-in-law. Navigator ships products from Sibur. Navigator is one of a few companies in the world that can transport liquefied petroleum gas in cold and icy conditions. Russia is known for its brutal winters as well as its giant, state-controlled oil and gas producers.
  • President Donald Trump took a dig at Rep. Mark Sanford, a South Carolina Republican who has been critical of the president, during a meeting with House Republicans on Tuesday night. Trump told the lawmakers in a closed-door Capitol Hill meeting that he wanted to 'congratulate Mark on a great race,' according to two attendees. Another attendee said Trump's remarks elicited some boos from members of the House Freedom Caucus, a conservative group in the House. The three attendees spoke on condition of anonymity to describe the private meeting focused on immigration. Sanford, a Freedom Caucus member, said he was unable to attend because his flight was delayed at the Charleston, South Carolina, airport. 'The president has his own style. You gotta give him credit. He's an equal opportunity insulter. He gets just about everybody,' said Rep. Randy Weber, R-Texas. Sanford lost his primary bid last week to South Carolina state Rep. Katie Arrington and blamed his defeat on Trump, who urged Republicans to dump the former South Carolina governor. Trump tweeted on the day of the primary that the congressman had been unhelpful to him, adding, 'He is better off in Argentina.' That was a reference to Sanford's surprise disappearance from the state when he was governor, which he later revealed was to continue his affair with an Argentine woman. Sanford had called Trump untrustworthy and culturally intolerant, prompting Arrington's primary challenge. The congressman later said support for Trump had become a litmus test in GOP primaries. __ Associated Press writers Lisa Mascaro and Matthew Daly contributed.
  • Three months after a tornado rumbled through a South Fulton County neighborhood and destroyed people’s homes and lives, several neighbors told Channel 2 Action News they’re still recovering.  We’ve learned they’re on their own because the storm didn’t fit the criteria to be considered for state or federal disaster relief funds, on the Channel 2 Action News Nightbeat at 11.    TRENDING STORIES: Sole witness to deadly shooting says Tex McIver 'needs to be in hell' 2 dead, others injured in I-285 crash in South Fulton County Man arrested after beating, stabbing 15-year-old sister to death, police say