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    Police took a middle school student into custody Friday morning on suspicion of firing shots at Indiana’s Noblesville West Middle School, leaving at least two people injured. >> Read more trending news Update May 26, 1:04 p.m. EDT: The student who was shot on Friday has been identified as 13-year-old Ella Whistler, according to WTTV. Her family released her photo and a statement, that she is “doing well” and remains in stable but critical condition. In a statement to RTV6, the family thanked law enforcement but asked for privacy at this time. “We’d like to thank everyone across the country who has prayed for our family today,” the statement read. “We’ve felt those prayers and appreciate all of them.” Update 7:44 p.m. EDT: Jason Seaman, the teacher injured in the shooting, released a statement Friday evening: “First of all, thank you to the first responders from Noblesville and Fishers for their immediate action and care. I want to let everyone know that I was injured (but) am doing great. To all the students, you are all wonderful and I thank you for your support. You are the reason I teach.” Update 2:50 p.m. EDT: The Indianapolis Star identified the teacher injured in Friday’s shooting at Noblesville West Middle School as Jason Seaman. The newspaper reported he was shot three times while knocking the gun out of the hands of a middle school student who fired shots at the school. Jason Seaman’s brother, Jeremy Seaman, told the newspaper that he was not surprised by reports of his brother’s actions. Students have told several news stations that his quick thinking saved an untold number of lives. “He’s not really ever been the person to run away,” Jeremy Seaman told the Star. “When the safety of the kids is at hand, it’s not surprising to me that he was going to do what he had to do.” Jeremy Seaman told the Star that his brother was undergoing surgery Friday. Update 2:39 p.m. EDT: Noblesville police Chief Kevin Jowitt said at a news conference Friday afternoon that the student who opened fire at Noblesville West Middle School earlier in the day asked to be excused from class before returning with a pair of handguns.  Jowitt said the student was quickly taken into custody. Update 2 p.m. EDT: A Noblesville West Middle School student told WXIN that a science teacher sprang into action Friday after a student opened fire at the school, knocking the gun from the shooter’s hand and likely saving lives. The seventh-grade girl, who was not identified, told the news station that “this science teacher bravely swatted that gun away from the gunman’s hands, saving everyone else in that room.” Another seventh-grader, Ethan Stonebraker, told The Associated Press that the shooter walked into his science class while students were taking a test. 'Our science teacher immediately ran at him, swatted a gun out of his hand and tackled him to the ground,' Stonebraker said. 'If it weren't for him, more of us would have been injured for sure.' It was not immediately clear if the teacher was the same one injured in Friday morning’s shooting.  Police said a juvenile and an adult teacher were injured when an unidentified male student opened fire at the school around 9 a.m. Another student also suffered an ankle fracture, according to officials with Riverview Health. Update 11:43 a.m. EDT: Vice President Mike Pence thanked law enforcement officers and shared condolences after a shooting at a middle school in his home state, Indiana. “Karen and I are praying for the victims of the terrible shooting in Indiana,” Pence wrote on Twitter Friday, referring to his wife, Karen Pence. “To everyone in the Noblesville community -- you are in our hearts and in our prayers.” Update 11:28 a.m. EDT: Noblesville police Chief Kevin Jowitt confirmed that a teacher and a juvenile were injured Friday morning in a shooting at Noblesville West Middle School. Police did not identify either of the victims. They were taken to IU Health Methodist Hospital and Riley Hospital, respectively, Jowitt said. Officials with Riverview Health said earlier Friday that a second student was treated for an ankle fracture after the shooting. Authorities had a suspect, identified as a male student, in custody Friday morning. Jowitt said Noblesville West Middle School had been cleared by 11:30 a.m. However, he added that authorities also received reports of a threat made at Noblesville High School. Police are investigating the report. Update 11:18 a.m. EDT: Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb said he and other officials are monitoring the situation in Noblesville after at least two people were injured in a shooting at Noblesville West Middle School on Friday. Authorities are expected to provide additional details about Friday’s shooting in a news conference later in the day. Update 10:55 a.m. EDT: Chad Lancaster, whose eighth-grade daughter and sixth-grade son attend Noblesville West Middle School, told the Indianapolis Star that his daughter called her mother, his ex-wife, while hiding under a desk amid reports of an active shooter on campus. He told the newspaper he has been unable to get in touch with his son. “This is surreal,' Lancaster told the Star. 'This happens in high school, not here.' Officials with Riverview Health said one of the two people injured in Friday morning's shooting was taken to the hospital and transfered to Riley Hospital in stable condition. A second person, a student, was being treated for an ankle fracture. Officials told the Star earlier Friday that an adult was also injured in the shooting. A suspect, who has not been identified, was in custody after the shooting. Update 10:40 a.m. EDT: Indiana University Health officials told the Indianapolis Star that an adult and a teenager were injured in Friday’s shooting at Noblesville West Middle School. The two have not been identified. Indiana State Police said earlier Friday that they were taken to IU Health Methodist Hospital for treatment of their injuries and that their families had been notified. Update 10:20 a.m. EDT: Indiana State Police confirmed two people were taken to a hospital after authorities responded Friday morning to reports of an active shooter at Noblesville West Middle School. Officials said a suspect was in custody after the shooting. Authorities were expected to provide additional details at a news conference later Friday. Original report: Authorities confirmed around 9:40 a.m. that police had a suspect in custody after responding to a report of an active shooter situation at the middle school. Check back for updates to this developing story.
  • Police are searching for a missing woman with a mental illness.   Police in South Fulton County sent Channel 2 Action News a picture of Lauree Chapman, 62.    She suffers from paranoid schizophrenia.  Police said she was last seen walking around 4 p.m. Thursday on Rock Lake Drive. She was wearing a light blue shirt, tan vest, tan pants, and black sneakers.   Call 911 if you have seen her.  #MISSING: South Fulton Police need help locating Lauree Chapman. She was last seen on the 5000 block of Rock Lake Drive on 05/24/2018. She was wearing a light blue shirt, tan vest, tan pants, and black sneakers. If you know her whereabouts, call 911. Please RT! pic.twitter.com/QL8Vlwo058 — WSB-TV (@wsbtv) May 25, 2018  
  • A video game that gives the player the choice to be an elite SWAT team member or take the role of an active shooter during a mass casualty event is drawing national and international backlash.  >> Read more trending news “Active Shooter,” developed by Revived Games and offered through the Steam video game platform, is a point-of-view simulation game that allows the player to lead a team to extract civilians and neutralize the shooter, or play as the mass shooter, according to its description.  “I have been stormed with accusations and heavy (criticism) from people across the globe,” the video game publisher, Acid, wrote. “First of all, this game does not promote any sort of violence, especially any sort of a mass shooting. Originally when this game started its course of the development, I (had) planned on having SWAT only based game-play. Then I thought about adding more gameplay to it by adding additional roles: of the shooter and the civilian. While I can see people's anger and why this might be a bad idea for the game, I still feel like this topic should be left alone. After receiving such high amount of critics and hate, I will more likely remove the shooters role in this game by the release, unless if it can be kept as it is right now.” In addition to commenters on the video game storefront on Steam disgusted with it, a petition on change.org trying to stop its release has garnered more than 5,350 signatures.  Infer Trust, a United Kingdom charity, asked Valve, the company behind the Steam game store, to drop the title ahead of its June 6 release.  'It's in very bad taste,” an Infer Trust spokeswoman told the BBC. “There have been 22 school shootings in the U.S. since the beginning of this year. It is horrendous. Why would anybody think it's a good idea to market something violent like that, and be completely insensitive to the deaths of so many children? We're appalled that the game is being marketed.' The video game developer also has made other titles including “Tyde Pod Challenge” and “White Power: Pure Voltage.” Neither game has anything to do with laundry detergent fads or racism.
  • A secret backchannel led by a veteran Republican Senate staffer and a flamboyant Venezuelan official nicknamed 'Dracula' broke through hostile relations between the two governments to secure the release of American prisoner Joshua Holt, who traveled to the South American country for love and ended up in jail, without a trial, for two years. A week ago the chances of Holt's long ordeal ending any time soon looked slim. On the eve of Venezuela's May 20 presidential election, the Utah native appeared in a clandestinely shot video from jail railing against Nicolas Maduro's government, saying his life had been threatened in a prison riot. In retaliation, he was branded the CIA's spy boss in Latin America by the head of the ruling socialist party. Hours earlier Maduro expelled the top American diplomat over the refusal of the U.S. to recognize his re-election. But the arrival in Caracas on Friday of Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, led to a surprise breakthrough. Maduro handed over Holt and his wife, Thamara Caleno, to Corker in what his government said was a goodwill gesture to promote dialogue and mutual respect between the two antagonistic governments. Holt, 26, traveled to Caracas in June 2016 to marry a fellow Mormon he had met online while looking to improve his Spanish. The couple was waiting for Caleno's U.S. visa when they were arrested at her family's apartment in a government housing complex for what the U.S. considered trumped-up charges of stockpiling an assault rifle and grenades. Although Corker sealed the deal in a few tense hours in Venezuela's collapsing, crime-filled capital, the push to secure Holt's release began months earlier by Corker's top Latin American policy aide, Caleb McCarry, who both Corker and Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, credited with leading the painstaking, behind-the-scenes negotiations. McCarry leveraged a 15-year-old relationship with Maduro from their time together on the Boston Group, an informal gathering from across the political spectrum — Democrats, Republicans, socialists and capitalists — from both countries that worked discreetly to repair relations between the two countries following a coup in 2002 against then-President Hugo Chavez. Relationships formed in the now-defunct group were also instrumental in securing the release of another American accused of spying, documentary filmmaker Tim Tracy, who spent a month in a Venezuelan jail in 2013. McCarry secretly traveled to Venezuela in February to discuss Holt's imprisonment with Maduro and first lady Cilia Flores. The U.S. Embassy was kept at an arm's length, for fear of derailing the talks, although the initiative was backed by Undersecretary of State Thomas Shannon, who also knew Maduro from his days as political officer in Caracas at the outset of Hugo Chavez's revolution in the 1990s, several senior U.S. officials said. Holding McCarry's hand throughout the delicate talks was 'Dracula' — Rafael Lacava, the governor of central Carabobo state and a trusted ally of Maduro who also was close to the Boston Group members. Shortly after McCarry's visit, Lacava traveled to Washington in March to speak with several lawmakers including Hatch, Corker, Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., and Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., according to several senior U.S. officials. All the officials agreed to discuss details of the negotiations only on condition of anonymity. However, after word of Lacava's visit was leaked by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., the administration refused to meet with Maduro's envoy. Rubio warned that Lacava, who embraces the nickname Dracula for his habits of tweeting and patrolling around his state late at night in a Batmobile-like vehicle, was reportedly involved in money laundering, making him too toxic for a White House bent on punishing such criminal activity. When The Associated Press reported on the politically fraught backchannel in March, few imagined it would succeed. Speculation swirled that the government was demanding an all-but-impossible prisoner exchange for Flores' two nephews, who in 2016 were convicted in New York of drug trafficking, after it was learned that a government-connected Venezuelan tycoon was paying Holt's legal fees as well as those of the men branded the 'narco-nephews.' At the same time, the Trump administration was intensifying a campaign to isolate Venezuela's government, sanctioning dozens of officials — including Maduro and Flores — for human rights abuses and drug trafficking while threatening a more crippling ban on oil shipments. An official with the National Security Council stressed that nothing had been offered to secure Holt's release and that there had been no change to U.S. policy to Venezuela. President Donald Trump found out Friday that Holt would be released, said the official, who was not authorized to speak publicly and requested anonymity. Rubio, who has Trump's ear on Latin America but only learned of Corker's visit when he landed in Caracas, said in a statement that the couple's release 'will in no way change U.S. policy towards the dictatorship in Venezuela.' Alfredo Romero, a lawyer who defends some of the opposition activists who were held alongside Holt, said that Maduro may be looking to win over some political sectors in the U.S. to temper Trump's hardline approach toward Venezuela. 'Holt's continued imprisonment was a thorn in the side,' he said. The talks were encouraged by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who met privately with Corker on Thursday morning and finalized details of the senator's trip ahead of testifying before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the State Department budget. 'We're doing all the right things. We have an American there that we desperately want to get back, Joshua Holt. And so know that we are engaged,' Pompeo told lawmakers at the hearing. The government of Cuba was also helpful in pressuring Maduro as well as former Spanish President José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, one official said. Zapatero has been leading a three-year push to bring the government and opposition together to help resolve Venezuela's economic and political crisis. Still, when Corker left for Caracas on Friday it was still unclear if Maduro would follow through on his pledge to release Holt, the officials said. On Saturday, a beaming Lacava could be seen in a video boarding the Venezuelan government plane that transported Holt to Washington wearing aviator glasses and a dark suit. He walked by the camera shouting 'Dracula on the attack!' and flashing a 'V for Victory' sign. In a photograph taken at the airport in Caracas, Holt can be seen standing alongside Lacava holding a Venezuela national soccer team jersey emblazoned with the governor's name. ___ Goodman reported from Bogota, Colombia.
  • The Latest on the release of a Utah man, Joshua Holt, who has been held in Venezuela (all times local): 8:10 p.m. The wife of the American man held for two years in jail in Venezuela says they worried until their plane was in the air that their release and flight to the U.S. would somehow fall apart. Joshua Holt and his wife arrived Saturday evening at Washington Dulles International Airport. Venezuelan officials released the Holts after high-level talks between President Nicolas Maduro and U.S. lawmakers. Holt's wife, Thamara Caleno, exchanged text messages with The Associated Press as she and Holt were traveling. She says that a fellow inmate at their Caracas jail relayed information Friday night that prison officials were discussing their release. At 10 that night, a warden asked to see them, then every two hours afterward they were awakened to have their pictures taken as part of a heightened security protocol. The next morning, they were told to pack their things and prepare to go. ___ 7:15 p.m. A Utah man who had been jailed in Venezuela for nearly two years has returned to the United States. A White House official says Joshua Holt arrived Saturday evening at Washington Dulles International Airport. The official isn't authorized to speak about the matter by name. Venezuelan officials released Holt after high-level talks between President Nicolas Maduro and U.S. lawmakers. Holt and his wife were jailed for nearly two years on weapons charges that U.S. officials consider bogus. The release of Holt and his wife and their departure for Washington came one day after Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee held a surprise meeting in Caracas with Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro. ___ 3:25 p.m. U.S. Sen. Bob Corker says he played a small role in bringing home a Utah man jailed in Venezuela for nearly two years. Corker on Saturday boarded a jet outside of Caracas with Joshua Holt and his wife destined for Washington. Venezuelan police arrested the couple on weapons charges and held them without trial. U.S. officials all along considered the charged bogus. The Republican senator from Tennessee says much of the credit for Holt's release goes to his staffer Caleb McCarry for his dogged determination. He says fellow Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah worked tirelessly for Holt's family. Corker on Friday met personally with President Nicola Maduro. State TV showed the two men at the presidential palace warmly shaking hands. It follows a meeting that Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois had in April with Maduro to urge Holt's release. ___ 2:45 p.m. A Utah man newly freed from a Venezuelan jail has been seen boarding a private jet that's expected to take him to Washington. Joshua Holt was wearing a bright orange backpack and was surrounded by supporters. Venezuelan officials released Holt on Saturday after high-level talks between President Nicolas Maduro and U.S. lawmakers. Holt and his wife were jailed nearly two years on weapons charges that U.S. officials considered bogus. Photos show Sen. Bob Corker at Holt's side, helping carry a large black duffel bag. Corker negotiated the release with Maduro. ___ 1:40 p.m. Venezuela's chief spokesman says a Utah man and his wife jailed in Caracas for two years have been freed and are on their way to the United States. Communications Minister Jorge Rodrigues said Saturday that the release of Joshua Holt follows months of dialogue between President Nicolas Maduro and representatives of the United States. Holt was arrested on weapons charged during a trip to Venezuela to marry a woman he'd met on a website to practice Spanish. U.S. officials say the charges were trumped up. ___ 10 a.m. The family of a Utah man jailed in a Venezuelan jail for two years calls his release a miracle. A statement that relatives provided Saturday confirms that Joshua Holt and his wife will be freed from detention in the capital of Caracas. The couple was arrested on weapons charges that U.S. officials dismiss as trumped up. President Donald Trump says in a tweet that he expects to greet Holt at the White House later Saturday. Holt's family expresses its gratitude for all who worked for his release. They also ask to be allowed to meet Holt and his wife before making any public statements.
  • President Donald Trump accused The New York Times on Saturday of inventing a source for a story who, in fact, was a White House official conducting a briefing for reporters under the condition that the official not be named. Trump tweeted that the Times quoted an official 'who doesn't exist' and referenced a line in the story about a possible summit with North Korea, which read: 'a senior White House official told reporters that even if the meeting were reinstated, holding it on June 12 would be impossible, given the lack of time and the amount of planning needed.' Said Trump: 'WRONG AGAIN! Use real people, not phony sources.' The Times reported in a story about the tweet that it had cited 'a senior White House official speaking to a large group of reporters in the White House briefing room.' The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Trump has repeatedly criticized the use of unnamed sources and labeled information related by unnamed officials 'fake news.' Still, his White House regularly arranges briefings with officials who demand anonymity before relaying information, a practice also used by previous administrations. While Trump asserted the official did not exist, he also took issue with how the Times paraphrased the remarks. When asked at the briefing, which was attended by The Associated Press, if it was possible for the summit to go forward by June 12, the official cast doubt, but did not give a definitive answer. 'I think that the main point, I suppose, is that the ball is in North Korea's court right now. There's really not a lot of time,' the official said. 'There's a certain amount of actual dialogue that needs to take place at the working level with your counterparts to ensure that the agenda is clear in the minds of those two leaders when they sit down to actually meet and talk and negotiate and hopefully make a deal. And June 12 is in ten minutes.' The White House press office invited reporters to the background briefing, both to attend in person or to call-in and insisted that the official not be named. The AP reporter in attendance questioned why the briefing was not on the record — meaning that the official's name could be used. The official said the president had been talking publicly during the day, as well as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and that the briefing was intended to provide 'background context.
  • Subtropical Storm Alberto continues to strengthen as a tropical storm watch has been issued for parts of Florida, Alabama and Mississippi drenching Memorial Day weekend plans for much of the Gulf Coast.  >> Read more trending news A tropical storm warning has been issued for parts of the Florida Gulf Coast including from Bonita Beach to the Anclote River as well as north near the Aucilla River to the Mississippi/Alabama border, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  A tropical storm warning means tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area. Heavy rainfall is expected as the storm, with sustained winds of 40 mph, continues to move at 13 mph through the Dry Tortugas.  A storm surge watch has also been issued for parts of Florida and the Mississippi/Alabama border, officials said.  The latest forecast ends the tropical storm and storm surge watch for parts of Louisiana. 
  • A federal court has ruled that the Education Department violated privacy laws with regard to students defrauded by the Corinthian for-profit college chain. In a break with Obama administration policy, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced in December that some students cheated by the now-defunct schools would only get a part of their federal student loan forgiven. In order to determine how much to forgive, the agency analyzes average earnings of graduates from similar programs. But a California district court ruled late Friday that the department's use of Social Security Administration data in order to calculate loan forgiveness violates the Privacy Act. The court ordered that the Education Department stop the practice and stop debt collection from these students. The court also said that it needs to hear more from the agency and plaintiffs in the class-action suit in order to decide whether or not to compel the agency to return to full loan forgiveness. A hearing is scheduled for June 4. The decision marks an important victory for students challenging the partial loan forgiveness rule. Toby Merill, director of the Project on Predatory Student Lending at Harvard University, which is representing the students, hailed the decision. 'The notion that students got anything other than negative value from Corinthian has been roundly disproved by student experience and the judgment of employers and the legitimate higher education sector,' Merill said in a statement. ' An Education Department spokesperson did not respond to a request for comment Saturday. DeVos said the approach of the Obama administration left room for potential abuse and unfairly burdened taxpayers who ended up paying for those loans with their taxes. DeVos said her new procedure will take into account the value a student received from their education and compensate them for what they didn't get. But critics slammed the new rule as unfair since tens of thousands of Corinthian students have already received full loan discharge under the Obama administration. They said some students will not be able to get a full refund just by virtue of working a minimum-wage job in an unrelated field and making some income. One of the plaintiffs in the suit, Jennifer Craig, borrowed $9,000 to attend a Corinthian medical insurance and billing program in 2014, but she never received her diploma because the school shut down in 2015. She was unable to get a job in her area of study because the school did not provide her with the necessary practical training. The Education Department only forgave 20 percent of her loan. Craig says that she and her husband live in poverty and are unable to pay off the remaining 80 percent. The Obama administration cracked down hard on for-profit colleges accused of fraud and shut down Corinthian and other major chains and tightened regulations for the schools. The administration spent $550 million to fully forgive the loans of tens of thousands of students. There are currently nearly 100,000 claims from students still pending at the department.
  • All those long rehab days finally paid off Boston second baseman Dustin Pedroia. The 2008 AL MVP made his season debut Saturday after October knee surgery, helping the Red Sox rally for an 8-6 victory over the Atlanta Braves. 'There's been a lot of tough days,' Pedroia said. 'Today was great to be out there and play.' Pedroia went 0 for 4, but he walked and scored in the third inning of Boston's sixth win in seven games. Andrew Benintendi homered and drove in three runs, and Mitch Moreland had a key two-run double. Pedroia, who part of Boston's 2007 and '13 World Series-winning teams, got a standing ovation when he came up with the bases loaded and two outs in the first. He popped out to right. 'Every moment's special when you get an opportunity to play baseball here. I never take it for granted,' he said. 'Today was up there with any of the moments that I've been here. I was proud to be able to comeback from the surgery I had and help us win.' Pedroia hustled home on Christian Vazquez's single, beating a throw to the plate with a headfirst slide. 'Great baserunning. He looked fast,' Red Sox manager Alex Cora said. 'The way he moved, that was good to see. It's good to have him back with the energy he brings.' Knuckleballer Steven Wright (1-0) pitched three scoreless innings for the victory. Craig Kimbrel worked the ninth for his 16th save, retiring three in a row after Ronald Acuna Jr.'s leadoff homer. Dansby Swanson hit a two-run drive for the Braves, who have dropped 10 of their last 13 at Fenway Park. Atlanta left-hander Sean Newcomb, a Massachusetts native, struggled with his control in his first career game in Fenway, giving up three runs and six hits over three innings with four walks and four strikeouts. 'Wasn't clicking,' Braves manager Brian Snitker said. 'I don't know, it just wasn't. He's bound to have one of those. ... He just didn't have it.' The Braves had a 5-4 lead before Moreland's double down the right-field line off Sam Freeman (1-2) in the sixth. Benintendi added a two-run triple in the seventh. The Red Sox had to rally after Drew Pomeranz was pulled with one out in the fourth. He was charged with five runs and six hits. Swanson connected in the second, hitting a drive to the Green Monster seats for his third homer. Kurt Suzuki added an RBI single in the third, and Freddie Freeman and Nick Markakis each drove in a run in the fourth. Benintendi went deep in the bottom of the fourth, trimming Atlanta's lead to 5-4 with a solo shot. TRAINER'S ROOM Braves: Snitker said RHP Anibal Sanchez (right hamstring) likely will start Tuesday. He went three innings in a rehab start for Triple-A Gwinnett on Friday. Red Sox: Cora said the plan for RHP Austin Maddux (10-day disabled list, strained right shoulder) is to be extended more than one inning. HOMECOMING Newcomb was born in Brockton, about 30 miles south of Fenway. He attended Middleborough High School and lives in Massachusetts in the offseason. A fan held up a sign that read: 'We love Sean Newcomb.' He estimated there were about 200 people at the game to see him. 'There were a couple of my buddies near the dugout, so I could hear some of the stuff they were saying, but that was it,' he said. 'It was cool to get a chance to have the family and friends come watch.' MORE CHANGES NEEDED Some advertisements outside of Fenway — with a picture of Hanley Ramirez — will need to be changed. The club designated the 34-year-old slugger for assignment on Friday. He hit only .163 with three homers and 12 RBIs in May after starting strong with a .330 average, three homers and 17 RBIs. UP NEXT Braves: RHP Mike Foltynewicz (3-3, 2.72 ERA) is set to start the series finale Sunday. He has a 0.56 ERA in his last three starts. Red Sox: LHP Chris Sale (5-1, 2.17 ERA) looks to continue his strong start this season, having allowed three or fewer runs in all 11 starts. ___ More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball
  • While the Trump Administration has hailed economic and job gains over the past year and a half, the price of gasoline has jumped sharply in recent months for consumers and businesses, adding to the cost of everything from a daily commute, to a summer vacation, and the amount of money companies pay to ship their products around the country. And it’s starting to used by Democrats on Capitol Hill to take aim at the White House. “Gas prices have risen more than 25% since Trump took office,” said Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR). “Overall world crude oil prices have increased over 75 percent in the past year,” said Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA), as Democrats wrote President Donald Trump a letter earlier this week, asking him to do something about the rising cost of gasoline . Americans are paying the price at the pump for Trump’s chaotic approach to foreign policy. He hasn’t pressured Gulf leaders to lift their cap on oil output, or pursued diplomatic solutions in Yemen and Syria. The result? $3.89 a gallon #GasPrices pic.twitter.com/CTaW97cez9 — Senator Bob Menendez (@SenatorMenendez) May 23, 2018 Those numbers at the pump aren’t unusual for the Washington, D.C. area as just the ohter day, this reporter filled up on the way to work, and ha the pump shut off before the tank was full, when the total hit the $50 credit card limit at that station for a single transaction. Figures released in recent weeks by the Trump Administration clearly show the increase, with gas prices up on average by over 52 cents a gallon from the same time a year ago, at an average of $2.92 per gallon. The $2.92 per gallon is the highest average price at the pump on Memorial Day in four years – in 2014, gas was at an average of $3.67 per gallon, as Republicans blamed the energy policies of the Obama Administration, arguing for more oil exploration in the United States. Gas prices generally trended down the last few years, leading President Trump to proclaim where they stood on July Fourth of last year. Gas prices are the lowest in the U.S. in over ten years! I would like to see them go even lower. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 4, 2017 But since that tweet on July Fourth of last year, the price of gasoline has only gone up, and federal energy experts expect even more in the months ahead. “Relatively higher crude oil spot prices, higher gasoline demand, and falling gasoline inventories are all factors contributing to higher gasoline prices,” the Energy Information Administration reported last week. The EIA predicted an average of $2.90 per gallon for gasoline this summer.

News

  • Police took a middle school student into custody Friday morning on suspicion of firing shots at Indiana’s Noblesville West Middle School, leaving at least two people injured. >> Read more trending news Update May 26, 1:04 p.m. EDT: The student who was shot on Friday has been identified as 13-year-old Ella Whistler, according to WTTV. Her family released her photo and a statement, that she is “doing well” and remains in stable but critical condition. In a statement to RTV6, the family thanked law enforcement but asked for privacy at this time. “We’d like to thank everyone across the country who has prayed for our family today,” the statement read. “We’ve felt those prayers and appreciate all of them.” Update 7:44 p.m. EDT: Jason Seaman, the teacher injured in the shooting, released a statement Friday evening: “First of all, thank you to the first responders from Noblesville and Fishers for their immediate action and care. I want to let everyone know that I was injured (but) am doing great. To all the students, you are all wonderful and I thank you for your support. You are the reason I teach.” Update 2:50 p.m. EDT: The Indianapolis Star identified the teacher injured in Friday’s shooting at Noblesville West Middle School as Jason Seaman. The newspaper reported he was shot three times while knocking the gun out of the hands of a middle school student who fired shots at the school. Jason Seaman’s brother, Jeremy Seaman, told the newspaper that he was not surprised by reports of his brother’s actions. Students have told several news stations that his quick thinking saved an untold number of lives. “He’s not really ever been the person to run away,” Jeremy Seaman told the Star. “When the safety of the kids is at hand, it’s not surprising to me that he was going to do what he had to do.” Jeremy Seaman told the Star that his brother was undergoing surgery Friday. Update 2:39 p.m. EDT: Noblesville police Chief Kevin Jowitt said at a news conference Friday afternoon that the student who opened fire at Noblesville West Middle School earlier in the day asked to be excused from class before returning with a pair of handguns.  Jowitt said the student was quickly taken into custody. Update 2 p.m. EDT: A Noblesville West Middle School student told WXIN that a science teacher sprang into action Friday after a student opened fire at the school, knocking the gun from the shooter’s hand and likely saving lives. The seventh-grade girl, who was not identified, told the news station that “this science teacher bravely swatted that gun away from the gunman’s hands, saving everyone else in that room.” Another seventh-grader, Ethan Stonebraker, told The Associated Press that the shooter walked into his science class while students were taking a test. 'Our science teacher immediately ran at him, swatted a gun out of his hand and tackled him to the ground,' Stonebraker said. 'If it weren't for him, more of us would have been injured for sure.' It was not immediately clear if the teacher was the same one injured in Friday morning’s shooting.  Police said a juvenile and an adult teacher were injured when an unidentified male student opened fire at the school around 9 a.m. Another student also suffered an ankle fracture, according to officials with Riverview Health. Update 11:43 a.m. EDT: Vice President Mike Pence thanked law enforcement officers and shared condolences after a shooting at a middle school in his home state, Indiana. “Karen and I are praying for the victims of the terrible shooting in Indiana,” Pence wrote on Twitter Friday, referring to his wife, Karen Pence. “To everyone in the Noblesville community -- you are in our hearts and in our prayers.” Update 11:28 a.m. EDT: Noblesville police Chief Kevin Jowitt confirmed that a teacher and a juvenile were injured Friday morning in a shooting at Noblesville West Middle School. Police did not identify either of the victims. They were taken to IU Health Methodist Hospital and Riley Hospital, respectively, Jowitt said. Officials with Riverview Health said earlier Friday that a second student was treated for an ankle fracture after the shooting. Authorities had a suspect, identified as a male student, in custody Friday morning. Jowitt said Noblesville West Middle School had been cleared by 11:30 a.m. However, he added that authorities also received reports of a threat made at Noblesville High School. Police are investigating the report. Update 11:18 a.m. EDT: Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb said he and other officials are monitoring the situation in Noblesville after at least two people were injured in a shooting at Noblesville West Middle School on Friday. Authorities are expected to provide additional details about Friday’s shooting in a news conference later in the day. Update 10:55 a.m. EDT: Chad Lancaster, whose eighth-grade daughter and sixth-grade son attend Noblesville West Middle School, told the Indianapolis Star that his daughter called her mother, his ex-wife, while hiding under a desk amid reports of an active shooter on campus. He told the newspaper he has been unable to get in touch with his son. “This is surreal,' Lancaster told the Star. 'This happens in high school, not here.' Officials with Riverview Health said one of the two people injured in Friday morning's shooting was taken to the hospital and transfered to Riley Hospital in stable condition. A second person, a student, was being treated for an ankle fracture. Officials told the Star earlier Friday that an adult was also injured in the shooting. A suspect, who has not been identified, was in custody after the shooting. Update 10:40 a.m. EDT: Indiana University Health officials told the Indianapolis Star that an adult and a teenager were injured in Friday’s shooting at Noblesville West Middle School. The two have not been identified. Indiana State Police said earlier Friday that they were taken to IU Health Methodist Hospital for treatment of their injuries and that their families had been notified. Update 10:20 a.m. EDT: Indiana State Police confirmed two people were taken to a hospital after authorities responded Friday morning to reports of an active shooter at Noblesville West Middle School. Officials said a suspect was in custody after the shooting. Authorities were expected to provide additional details at a news conference later Friday. Original report: Authorities confirmed around 9:40 a.m. that police had a suspect in custody after responding to a report of an active shooter situation at the middle school. Check back for updates to this developing story.
  • Police are searching for a missing woman with a mental illness.   Police in South Fulton County sent Channel 2 Action News a picture of Lauree Chapman, 62.    She suffers from paranoid schizophrenia.  Police said she was last seen walking around 4 p.m. Thursday on Rock Lake Drive. She was wearing a light blue shirt, tan vest, tan pants, and black sneakers.   Call 911 if you have seen her.  #MISSING: South Fulton Police need help locating Lauree Chapman. She was last seen on the 5000 block of Rock Lake Drive on 05/24/2018. She was wearing a light blue shirt, tan vest, tan pants, and black sneakers. If you know her whereabouts, call 911. Please RT! pic.twitter.com/QL8Vlwo058 — WSB-TV (@wsbtv) May 25, 2018  
  • A video game that gives the player the choice to be an elite SWAT team member or take the role of an active shooter during a mass casualty event is drawing national and international backlash.  >> Read more trending news “Active Shooter,” developed by Revived Games and offered through the Steam video game platform, is a point-of-view simulation game that allows the player to lead a team to extract civilians and neutralize the shooter, or play as the mass shooter, according to its description.  “I have been stormed with accusations and heavy (criticism) from people across the globe,” the video game publisher, Acid, wrote. “First of all, this game does not promote any sort of violence, especially any sort of a mass shooting. Originally when this game started its course of the development, I (had) planned on having SWAT only based game-play. Then I thought about adding more gameplay to it by adding additional roles: of the shooter and the civilian. While I can see people's anger and why this might be a bad idea for the game, I still feel like this topic should be left alone. After receiving such high amount of critics and hate, I will more likely remove the shooters role in this game by the release, unless if it can be kept as it is right now.” In addition to commenters on the video game storefront on Steam disgusted with it, a petition on change.org trying to stop its release has garnered more than 5,350 signatures.  Infer Trust, a United Kingdom charity, asked Valve, the company behind the Steam game store, to drop the title ahead of its June 6 release.  'It's in very bad taste,” an Infer Trust spokeswoman told the BBC. “There have been 22 school shootings in the U.S. since the beginning of this year. It is horrendous. Why would anybody think it's a good idea to market something violent like that, and be completely insensitive to the deaths of so many children? We're appalled that the game is being marketed.' The video game developer also has made other titles including “Tyde Pod Challenge” and “White Power: Pure Voltage.” Neither game has anything to do with laundry detergent fads or racism.
  • A secret backchannel led by a veteran Republican Senate staffer and a flamboyant Venezuelan official nicknamed 'Dracula' broke through hostile relations between the two governments to secure the release of American prisoner Joshua Holt, who traveled to the South American country for love and ended up in jail, without a trial, for two years. A week ago the chances of Holt's long ordeal ending any time soon looked slim. On the eve of Venezuela's May 20 presidential election, the Utah native appeared in a clandestinely shot video from jail railing against Nicolas Maduro's government, saying his life had been threatened in a prison riot. In retaliation, he was branded the CIA's spy boss in Latin America by the head of the ruling socialist party. Hours earlier Maduro expelled the top American diplomat over the refusal of the U.S. to recognize his re-election. But the arrival in Caracas on Friday of Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, led to a surprise breakthrough. Maduro handed over Holt and his wife, Thamara Caleno, to Corker in what his government said was a goodwill gesture to promote dialogue and mutual respect between the two antagonistic governments. Holt, 26, traveled to Caracas in June 2016 to marry a fellow Mormon he had met online while looking to improve his Spanish. The couple was waiting for Caleno's U.S. visa when they were arrested at her family's apartment in a government housing complex for what the U.S. considered trumped-up charges of stockpiling an assault rifle and grenades. Although Corker sealed the deal in a few tense hours in Venezuela's collapsing, crime-filled capital, the push to secure Holt's release began months earlier by Corker's top Latin American policy aide, Caleb McCarry, who both Corker and Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, credited with leading the painstaking, behind-the-scenes negotiations. McCarry leveraged a 15-year-old relationship with Maduro from their time together on the Boston Group, an informal gathering from across the political spectrum — Democrats, Republicans, socialists and capitalists — from both countries that worked discreetly to repair relations between the two countries following a coup in 2002 against then-President Hugo Chavez. Relationships formed in the now-defunct group were also instrumental in securing the release of another American accused of spying, documentary filmmaker Tim Tracy, who spent a month in a Venezuelan jail in 2013. McCarry secretly traveled to Venezuela in February to discuss Holt's imprisonment with Maduro and first lady Cilia Flores. The U.S. Embassy was kept at an arm's length, for fear of derailing the talks, although the initiative was backed by Undersecretary of State Thomas Shannon, who also knew Maduro from his days as political officer in Caracas at the outset of Hugo Chavez's revolution in the 1990s, several senior U.S. officials said. Holding McCarry's hand throughout the delicate talks was 'Dracula' — Rafael Lacava, the governor of central Carabobo state and a trusted ally of Maduro who also was close to the Boston Group members. Shortly after McCarry's visit, Lacava traveled to Washington in March to speak with several lawmakers including Hatch, Corker, Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., and Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., according to several senior U.S. officials. All the officials agreed to discuss details of the negotiations only on condition of anonymity. However, after word of Lacava's visit was leaked by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., the administration refused to meet with Maduro's envoy. Rubio warned that Lacava, who embraces the nickname Dracula for his habits of tweeting and patrolling around his state late at night in a Batmobile-like vehicle, was reportedly involved in money laundering, making him too toxic for a White House bent on punishing such criminal activity. When The Associated Press reported on the politically fraught backchannel in March, few imagined it would succeed. Speculation swirled that the government was demanding an all-but-impossible prisoner exchange for Flores' two nephews, who in 2016 were convicted in New York of drug trafficking, after it was learned that a government-connected Venezuelan tycoon was paying Holt's legal fees as well as those of the men branded the 'narco-nephews.' At the same time, the Trump administration was intensifying a campaign to isolate Venezuela's government, sanctioning dozens of officials — including Maduro and Flores — for human rights abuses and drug trafficking while threatening a more crippling ban on oil shipments. An official with the National Security Council stressed that nothing had been offered to secure Holt's release and that there had been no change to U.S. policy to Venezuela. President Donald Trump found out Friday that Holt would be released, said the official, who was not authorized to speak publicly and requested anonymity. Rubio, who has Trump's ear on Latin America but only learned of Corker's visit when he landed in Caracas, said in a statement that the couple's release 'will in no way change U.S. policy towards the dictatorship in Venezuela.' Alfredo Romero, a lawyer who defends some of the opposition activists who were held alongside Holt, said that Maduro may be looking to win over some political sectors in the U.S. to temper Trump's hardline approach toward Venezuela. 'Holt's continued imprisonment was a thorn in the side,' he said. The talks were encouraged by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who met privately with Corker on Thursday morning and finalized details of the senator's trip ahead of testifying before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the State Department budget. 'We're doing all the right things. We have an American there that we desperately want to get back, Joshua Holt. And so know that we are engaged,' Pompeo told lawmakers at the hearing. The government of Cuba was also helpful in pressuring Maduro as well as former Spanish President José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, one official said. Zapatero has been leading a three-year push to bring the government and opposition together to help resolve Venezuela's economic and political crisis. Still, when Corker left for Caracas on Friday it was still unclear if Maduro would follow through on his pledge to release Holt, the officials said. On Saturday, a beaming Lacava could be seen in a video boarding the Venezuelan government plane that transported Holt to Washington wearing aviator glasses and a dark suit. He walked by the camera shouting 'Dracula on the attack!' and flashing a 'V for Victory' sign. In a photograph taken at the airport in Caracas, Holt can be seen standing alongside Lacava holding a Venezuela national soccer team jersey emblazoned with the governor's name. ___ Goodman reported from Bogota, Colombia.
  • The Latest on the release of a Utah man, Joshua Holt, who has been held in Venezuela (all times local): 8:10 p.m. The wife of the American man held for two years in jail in Venezuela says they worried until their plane was in the air that their release and flight to the U.S. would somehow fall apart. Joshua Holt and his wife arrived Saturday evening at Washington Dulles International Airport. Venezuelan officials released the Holts after high-level talks between President Nicolas Maduro and U.S. lawmakers. Holt's wife, Thamara Caleno, exchanged text messages with The Associated Press as she and Holt were traveling. She says that a fellow inmate at their Caracas jail relayed information Friday night that prison officials were discussing their release. At 10 that night, a warden asked to see them, then every two hours afterward they were awakened to have their pictures taken as part of a heightened security protocol. The next morning, they were told to pack their things and prepare to go. ___ 7:15 p.m. A Utah man who had been jailed in Venezuela for nearly two years has returned to the United States. A White House official says Joshua Holt arrived Saturday evening at Washington Dulles International Airport. The official isn't authorized to speak about the matter by name. Venezuelan officials released Holt after high-level talks between President Nicolas Maduro and U.S. lawmakers. Holt and his wife were jailed for nearly two years on weapons charges that U.S. officials consider bogus. The release of Holt and his wife and their departure for Washington came one day after Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee held a surprise meeting in Caracas with Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro. ___ 3:25 p.m. U.S. Sen. Bob Corker says he played a small role in bringing home a Utah man jailed in Venezuela for nearly two years. Corker on Saturday boarded a jet outside of Caracas with Joshua Holt and his wife destined for Washington. Venezuelan police arrested the couple on weapons charges and held them without trial. U.S. officials all along considered the charged bogus. The Republican senator from Tennessee says much of the credit for Holt's release goes to his staffer Caleb McCarry for his dogged determination. He says fellow Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah worked tirelessly for Holt's family. Corker on Friday met personally with President Nicola Maduro. State TV showed the two men at the presidential palace warmly shaking hands. It follows a meeting that Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois had in April with Maduro to urge Holt's release. ___ 2:45 p.m. A Utah man newly freed from a Venezuelan jail has been seen boarding a private jet that's expected to take him to Washington. Joshua Holt was wearing a bright orange backpack and was surrounded by supporters. Venezuelan officials released Holt on Saturday after high-level talks between President Nicolas Maduro and U.S. lawmakers. Holt and his wife were jailed nearly two years on weapons charges that U.S. officials considered bogus. Photos show Sen. Bob Corker at Holt's side, helping carry a large black duffel bag. Corker negotiated the release with Maduro. ___ 1:40 p.m. Venezuela's chief spokesman says a Utah man and his wife jailed in Caracas for two years have been freed and are on their way to the United States. Communications Minister Jorge Rodrigues said Saturday that the release of Joshua Holt follows months of dialogue between President Nicolas Maduro and representatives of the United States. Holt was arrested on weapons charged during a trip to Venezuela to marry a woman he'd met on a website to practice Spanish. U.S. officials say the charges were trumped up. ___ 10 a.m. The family of a Utah man jailed in a Venezuelan jail for two years calls his release a miracle. A statement that relatives provided Saturday confirms that Joshua Holt and his wife will be freed from detention in the capital of Caracas. The couple was arrested on weapons charges that U.S. officials dismiss as trumped up. President Donald Trump says in a tweet that he expects to greet Holt at the White House later Saturday. Holt's family expresses its gratitude for all who worked for his release. They also ask to be allowed to meet Holt and his wife before making any public statements.
  • President Donald Trump accused The New York Times on Saturday of inventing a source for a story who, in fact, was a White House official conducting a briefing for reporters under the condition that the official not be named. Trump tweeted that the Times quoted an official 'who doesn't exist' and referenced a line in the story about a possible summit with North Korea, which read: 'a senior White House official told reporters that even if the meeting were reinstated, holding it on June 12 would be impossible, given the lack of time and the amount of planning needed.' Said Trump: 'WRONG AGAIN! Use real people, not phony sources.' The Times reported in a story about the tweet that it had cited 'a senior White House official speaking to a large group of reporters in the White House briefing room.' The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Trump has repeatedly criticized the use of unnamed sources and labeled information related by unnamed officials 'fake news.' Still, his White House regularly arranges briefings with officials who demand anonymity before relaying information, a practice also used by previous administrations. While Trump asserted the official did not exist, he also took issue with how the Times paraphrased the remarks. When asked at the briefing, which was attended by The Associated Press, if it was possible for the summit to go forward by June 12, the official cast doubt, but did not give a definitive answer. 'I think that the main point, I suppose, is that the ball is in North Korea's court right now. There's really not a lot of time,' the official said. 'There's a certain amount of actual dialogue that needs to take place at the working level with your counterparts to ensure that the agenda is clear in the minds of those two leaders when they sit down to actually meet and talk and negotiate and hopefully make a deal. And June 12 is in ten minutes.' The White House press office invited reporters to the background briefing, both to attend in person or to call-in and insisted that the official not be named. The AP reporter in attendance questioned why the briefing was not on the record — meaning that the official's name could be used. The official said the president had been talking publicly during the day, as well as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and that the briefing was intended to provide 'background context.