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News

    Seth Rollins and Becky Lynch have made their marks as professional wrestlers. Now, both believe they have formed a perfect match and are ready to grapple with married life. >> Read more trending news  The WWE stars announced their engagement Thursday, with Lynch, 32, announcing the news on Instagram.. “Happiest day of my life,” Lynch wrote in her post. Lynch and Rollins’ fellow WWE stars shared their congratulations in the comments section, along with Nikki Bella and her sister, Brie Bella, People reported. “Awww yay! Love this so much!” Nikki Bella wrote. “You deserve all the happiness in the world!!! Love you Becky!!!” “Yay!!!! Congrats!!! So happy for you both!!!” Brie Bella wrote. On Twitter, Rollins called himself the 'luckiest man alive' and posted a photo of Lynch showing off her engagement ring.
  • Lindsey Vonn and P.K. Subban are making the switch from Olympic rings to wedding rings. >> Read more trending news  Vonn, 34, a gold medalist in the 2010 Olympics and winner of 82 World Cup skiing events, made the announcement Friday on Instagram. She and Subban have been dating for at least a year, ESPN reported. 'He said YES!!' Vonn posted. 'Can’t wait to spend the rest of my life with this crazy/kind/handsome/hyper/giving man.' Subban, 30, won a gold medal as a member of Canada's men's hockey team at the 2014 Olympics, ESPN reported. He was traded from the Nashville Predators to the New Jersey Devils in June. The couple met two years ago at the Nickelodeon sports show that follows the ESPYs, Vogue reported. The pair made their relationship official in a red carpet at the CMT Music Awards in June 2018, People reported. “Right off the bat, I knew he was different,” Vonn told Vogue. “But I’d been married before, so I was pretty hesitant to let myself think that I could find someone that I would want to be married to again. After a few months of dating, I knew he was the one I wanted to be with, though. He makes me happy, and he’s so positive and energetic.” In addition to her marriage to skier Thomas Vonn, Lindsey Vonn dated golfer Tiger Woods for nearly three years until they split up in 2015, ESPN reported. 'Lindsey's the best thing that's ever happened to me,' Subban told Vogue. 'There are people in life that deserve to be with good people. They have that person who takes care of them and makes them smile, and she deserves to be with someone who loves her more than anything else in the world, and I do.' Vonn said the couple has not set a date for the wedding but will live in New Jersey, Vogue reported. We’re in such a busy time right now. We’re trying to move to New Jersey,” Vonn told the magazine. “I just want to enjoy the moment and the engagement. We’re not in a big hurry to get married. It kind of depends on his playing schedule, and when we have time to sit down and go through it. I don’t want to stress him out because he has a big season coming.”
  • A school resource officer is out of a job after she filmed a nude video of herself inside an elementary school bathroom during her shift. >> Read more trending news  Kissimmee Police told WFTV the woman removed her badge, uniform and gun when she went to the bathroom at Kissimmee Charter Academy to make the video for her husband in December. The video, which is heavily blurred, shows the woman asking the recipient what they thought of her video. The video was unearthed after the Osceola County Sheriff's Office investigated a personal incident with the school resource officer and her husband.  An investigation showed that while she was on lunch break, she was subject to recall at any point. Police said she was fired because if a shooting had occurred, she wouldn't have been able to respond.  The officer said that she locked the bathroom door and does not believe she should have been fired.  WFTV did not include the woman's name, as it was redacted in the report. 
  • A Nevada man overcame a weighty problem to become the first member of his family to enlist in the U.S. Army. >> Read more trending news  Seven months ago, Luis Enrique Pinto Jr., of Las Vegas, weighed 317, which meant he could not pass the Army's weight requirements, Army Times reported. The 18-year-old embarked on a program of exercise and diet and shed 113 pounds, allowing him to report to basic training, KNTV reported. Pinto now stands 6 feet, 1 inch and weighs 204 pounds, the television station reported. Pinto had been an offensive lineman in high school and had a steady diet of carbohydrates, but he changed his diet and dropped the pounds. 'I had struggled with weight my whole life. I’ve always been a big kid,' Pinto told KNTV. The biggest hurdle to losing weight was cardio training, Army officials said in a news release. Pinto began to combine jogging and sprinting to improve his times. 'Running wasn't my strong suit,' Pinto said in the news release. 'Carrying all that extra weight and trying to run definitely increased my time.' 'When no one was looking, I was doing push-ups in my room, eating right, knowing what to eat,' Pinto told KTNV. 'I feel like everyone has the power to know what they take into their body, so I just took that into consideration. I just did the right thing at the end of the day,' Pinto's work ethic impressed his friends, family and his Army recruiter, Staff Sgt. Philip Long. 'There were a couple times where he hit a plateau. He would lose a pound or two, maybe,' Long told KTNV. 'But to continue to push forward and put the effort and dedication in, it inspires me and it should inspire you.' Pinto will report to basic training in September, Army Times reported.
  • Six inmates were injured -- two seriously -- during a prison riot Friday night at a San Diego prison, officials said. >> Read more trending news  The disturbance began at the Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility shortly after 8 p.m., The San Diego Union-Tribune reported. Cal Fire San Diego spokesman Capt. Thomas Shoots said approximately 100 prisoners were in the prison yard when the riot broke out, the newspaper reported. It was not clear how many inmates were involved in the riot, the Union-Tribune reported. Officials with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said a fight involving several inmates on the recreation yard escalated into a riot, KNSD reported. According to KSWB, staff members ordered the inmates to stop fighting. When the fighting continued, 'officers used several rounds of less than lethal use of force to quell the disturbance.' Two of the inmates were seriously injured and airlifted to area hospitals, Shoots told the Union-Tribune. No prison staff members were injured, KNSD reported.
  • Identity theft may have entered the final frontier if accusations from a woman against an astronaut are true. >> Read more trending news  Summer Worden, a former Air Force intelligence officer living in Kansas, was married to astronaut Anne McClain. Now in the middle of a yearlong divorce and parenting dispute, Worden claims her former spouse accessed her bank account from space, KPRC reported. Worden filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, accusing McClain of identity theft and unauthorized access to the bank account, according to The New York Times.Worden claims McClain broke into her bank accounts while she was aboard the International Space Station, the newspaper reported. Through her lawyer, McClain admitted she had accessed the bank account from space on a computer system registered to NASA, the Times reported. However, McClain said she was merely keeping tabs on the couple's still intermingled finances, the newspaper reported. “I was shocked and appalled at the audacity by her to think that she could get away with that, and I was very disheartened that I couldn't keep anything private,” Worden told KPRC. McClain's attorney, Rusty Hardin, told the television station in a statement that 'family cases are extremely difficult and private matters for all parties involved.' 'Neither Anne nor we will be commenting on this personal matter,' Hardin said. 'We appreciate the media's understanding and respect, as maintaining privacy, is in the best interest of the child and family members involved.” In a statement to KPRC, NASA said it had no comment on the matter. 'NASA has no statement on this and does not comment on personal or personnel matters. Anne McClain is an active astronaut.' NASA officials told the Times they were unaware of any crimes committed on the space station. McClain, who returned to Earth in June after her six-month mission, took an under-oath interview with NASA's Office of Inspector General last week, the newspaper reported.  “She strenuously denies that she did anything improper,” Hardin told the Times. Hardin told the newspaper the bank access from space was an attempt to make sure there were sufficient funds in Worden’s account to pay bills and care for the child they were raising. Hardin said McClain continued using the same password and claimed she never heard an objection from Worden, the Times reported. The fight from space might be the first case, but Mark Sundahl, director of the Global Space Law Center at Cleveland State University, said it probably will not be the last one. “The more we go out there and spend time out there, all the things we do here are going to happen in space,” Sundahl told the Times.
  • One of two men featured in the John Grisham true crime book and Netflix series, 'The Innocent Man,' could soon be freed from an Oklahoma prison. >> Read more trending news  In a 190-page opinion, U.S. District Court Judge James Payne laid out his reasoning for why the state needs to have a new trial or release Karl Fontenot from prison, Fox23.com reported. Payne's opinion from the case at the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Oklahoma discusses alleged misconduct by police, investigators, and prosecutors in the case and 1984-1985 trial concerning the death of Donna 'Denice' Haraway. 'The Ada Police Department investigators turned a blind eye to many important pieces of evidence relying instead on witness statements that fit their theory of the case while disregarding much stronger evidence of alternate suspects,' Payne wrote. Fontenot and co-defendant Tommy Ward were convicted in Haraway's murder in October 1985, in part due to a recording of them talking about dreams they had about her murder. Payne said the 'dream confessions' that were used against the men in court held dubious value. When Haraway's body was found in 1986, she did not have the injuries Fontenot talked about in his dream. 'In fact, not one detail of Mr. Fontenot’s confession could ever be corroborated with any evidence in the case,' Payne wrote. He also called out the actions of Pontotoc County when it came to withholding and manipulating evidence, calling it a 'fraud on the court.' The decision that could free Fontenot in the next 120 days comes after he and Ward's convictions received international attention from the Netflix series based on Grisham's book. There is no indication on what this update means for Ward's case. A Facebook page that relays messages from Fontenot's family to people following the case simply asked for prayer that his release would come soon.
  • An Indiana woman is accused of child neglect after police said her 2-year-old grandson drank enough peach schnapps to send him to a hospital. >> Read more trending news  Chantell Meriwether, 42, of Evansville, was booked Thursday into the Vanderburgh County Detention Center, the Evansville Courier & Press reported. According to an affidavit from the Evansville Police Department, the toddler's mother dropped the boy off with Meriwether, who is her mother. When the woman picked up the boy later in the day, she noticed he was incoherent, WFIE reported. She called for an ambulance after arriving at her home, according to the Courier & Press. Paramedics determined the child had been drinking alcohol, the newspaper reported. When police officers went to Meriwether's home, she said she had been doing laundry while the child was asleep. According to police, Meriwether admitted there was a bottle of alcohol 'tucked in between her bed and bed frame,' the Courier & Press reported. She told officers the boy 'must have found the bottle and drank some of the alcohol,' according to the police affidavit. Police said the boy drank about 2 to 4 ounces of peach schnapps, WFIE reported.
  • A jury found a white Florida man guilty of manslaughter Friday night in the 2018 fatal shooting of an unarmed black man outside a convenience store. >> Read more trending news  A Pinellas County jury deliberated for 6 1/2 hours before finding Michael Drejka guilty in the July 19, 2018, shooting death of Markeis McGlockton, the Tampa Bay Times reported. Drejka, 49, stared straight ahead as the verdict was read at 10:41 p.m. Friday, the newspaper reported. He will be sentenced Oct. 10 and could receive up to 30 years in prison, WTVT reported. Drejka is being held without bond until the sentencing, the television station reported. McGlockton's death came after an argument over a handicapped parking spot at a Clearwater convenience store, WFLA reported. According to Pinellas County deputies, Britany Jacobs, 26, parked her 2016 Chrysler 2000 in a handicapped spot at a Circle A Food Store and waited while McGlockton, her boyfriend, took the couple's 5-year-old son into the store, the television station reported. Drejka pulled into the parking lot and confronted Jacobs, asking why she had parked in the handicapped space, the Times reported. “I was scared,” Jacobs told jurors. “I didn’t know who this strange, suspicious man was.” McGlockton left the store and confronted Drejka, WFLA reported. Surveillance video showed McGlockton push Drejka to the ground, the television station reported. Drejka then took out a .40 caliber Glock handgun and shot McGlockton in the chest, according to the surveillance video. McGlockton was taken to an area hospital, where he later died, WFLA reported. While jurors deliberated, they sent a note to the judge seeking clarification for Florida's 'stand your ground' statute. The law maintains a shooting is justified if a reasonable person in those circumstances believes they are in danger of death or great bodily harm, The Associated Press reported. Prosecutors said the video showed McGlockton moving back once Drejka pulled his gun, the Times reported. “This conviction doesn’t bring our son back, but it does give us some sense of justice because far too often the criminal justice system fails us by allowing people who take the lives of unarmed Black people to walk free as though their lives meant nothing,” McGlockton’s mother, Monica Robinson, said in a statement. “We are hopeful that this conviction will be a brick in the road to changing the culture of racism here in Florida.”
  • A single blood test may be able to detect your risk of dying within five to 10 years. That’s according to new research published this week in the journal Nature Communications, for which scientists in the Netherlands examined blood sample data on 44,168 Europeans ages 18 to 109 from 12 cohorts. More than 5,500 participants died during follow-up studies. When looking through the data, lead researcher Eline Slagboom and her team identified 14 biomarkers in the blood independently associated with “all-cause mortality.” These biomarkers, which are “involved in various processes, such as lipoprotein and fatty acid metabolism, glycolysis, fluid balance, and inflammation,” ultimately help determine one’s score (or risk) of dying within five to 10 years. “Such a score,” study authors wrote, “could potentially be used in clinical practice to guide treatment strategies, for example when deciding whether an elderly person is too fragile for an invasive operation.” But how well can those 14 biomarkers actually predict risk of death? To find out, the scientists also compared their data with a 1997 cohort in Finland. According to data on more than 7,600 Finnish individuals (1,213 of whom had died during follow-up), the 14 biomarkers initially examined predicted patient deaths within five to 10 years with approximately 83% accuracy, according to the study. This suggests the biomarkers “clearly improve risk prediction of five and 10-year mortality as compared to conventional risk factors across all ages,” study authors wrote. Conventional risk factors, such as systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol, typically have a mortality prediction accuracy of 78% to 79%. Still, further research is certainly needed before a blood test based on the 14 biomarkers is used in clinical settings. Because the data used in the study comes from a variety of cohorts, future efforts should focus on creating a biomarker score based on individual-level data. Read the full study at nature.com.

News

  • Seth Rollins and Becky Lynch have made their marks as professional wrestlers. Now, both believe they have formed a perfect match and are ready to grapple with married life. >> Read more trending news  The WWE stars announced their engagement Thursday, with Lynch, 32, announcing the news on Instagram.. “Happiest day of my life,” Lynch wrote in her post. Lynch and Rollins’ fellow WWE stars shared their congratulations in the comments section, along with Nikki Bella and her sister, Brie Bella, People reported. “Awww yay! Love this so much!” Nikki Bella wrote. “You deserve all the happiness in the world!!! Love you Becky!!!” “Yay!!!! Congrats!!! So happy for you both!!!” Brie Bella wrote. On Twitter, Rollins called himself the 'luckiest man alive' and posted a photo of Lynch showing off her engagement ring.
  • Lindsey Vonn and P.K. Subban are making the switch from Olympic rings to wedding rings. >> Read more trending news  Vonn, 34, a gold medalist in the 2010 Olympics and winner of 82 World Cup skiing events, made the announcement Friday on Instagram. She and Subban have been dating for at least a year, ESPN reported. 'He said YES!!' Vonn posted. 'Can’t wait to spend the rest of my life with this crazy/kind/handsome/hyper/giving man.' Subban, 30, won a gold medal as a member of Canada's men's hockey team at the 2014 Olympics, ESPN reported. He was traded from the Nashville Predators to the New Jersey Devils in June. The couple met two years ago at the Nickelodeon sports show that follows the ESPYs, Vogue reported. The pair made their relationship official in a red carpet at the CMT Music Awards in June 2018, People reported. “Right off the bat, I knew he was different,” Vonn told Vogue. “But I’d been married before, so I was pretty hesitant to let myself think that I could find someone that I would want to be married to again. After a few months of dating, I knew he was the one I wanted to be with, though. He makes me happy, and he’s so positive and energetic.” In addition to her marriage to skier Thomas Vonn, Lindsey Vonn dated golfer Tiger Woods for nearly three years until they split up in 2015, ESPN reported. 'Lindsey's the best thing that's ever happened to me,' Subban told Vogue. 'There are people in life that deserve to be with good people. They have that person who takes care of them and makes them smile, and she deserves to be with someone who loves her more than anything else in the world, and I do.' Vonn said the couple has not set a date for the wedding but will live in New Jersey, Vogue reported. We’re in such a busy time right now. We’re trying to move to New Jersey,” Vonn told the magazine. “I just want to enjoy the moment and the engagement. We’re not in a big hurry to get married. It kind of depends on his playing schedule, and when we have time to sit down and go through it. I don’t want to stress him out because he has a big season coming.”
  • A school resource officer is out of a job after she filmed a nude video of herself inside an elementary school bathroom during her shift. >> Read more trending news  Kissimmee Police told WFTV the woman removed her badge, uniform and gun when she went to the bathroom at Kissimmee Charter Academy to make the video for her husband in December. The video, which is heavily blurred, shows the woman asking the recipient what they thought of her video. The video was unearthed after the Osceola County Sheriff's Office investigated a personal incident with the school resource officer and her husband.  An investigation showed that while she was on lunch break, she was subject to recall at any point. Police said she was fired because if a shooting had occurred, she wouldn't have been able to respond.  The officer said that she locked the bathroom door and does not believe she should have been fired.  WFTV did not include the woman's name, as it was redacted in the report. 
  • A Nevada man overcame a weighty problem to become the first member of his family to enlist in the U.S. Army. >> Read more trending news  Seven months ago, Luis Enrique Pinto Jr., of Las Vegas, weighed 317, which meant he could not pass the Army's weight requirements, Army Times reported. The 18-year-old embarked on a program of exercise and diet and shed 113 pounds, allowing him to report to basic training, KNTV reported. Pinto now stands 6 feet, 1 inch and weighs 204 pounds, the television station reported. Pinto had been an offensive lineman in high school and had a steady diet of carbohydrates, but he changed his diet and dropped the pounds. 'I had struggled with weight my whole life. I’ve always been a big kid,' Pinto told KNTV. The biggest hurdle to losing weight was cardio training, Army officials said in a news release. Pinto began to combine jogging and sprinting to improve his times. 'Running wasn't my strong suit,' Pinto said in the news release. 'Carrying all that extra weight and trying to run definitely increased my time.' 'When no one was looking, I was doing push-ups in my room, eating right, knowing what to eat,' Pinto told KTNV. 'I feel like everyone has the power to know what they take into their body, so I just took that into consideration. I just did the right thing at the end of the day,' Pinto's work ethic impressed his friends, family and his Army recruiter, Staff Sgt. Philip Long. 'There were a couple times where he hit a plateau. He would lose a pound or two, maybe,' Long told KTNV. 'But to continue to push forward and put the effort and dedication in, it inspires me and it should inspire you.' Pinto will report to basic training in September, Army Times reported.
  • Six inmates were injured -- two seriously -- during a prison riot Friday night at a San Diego prison, officials said. >> Read more trending news  The disturbance began at the Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility shortly after 8 p.m., The San Diego Union-Tribune reported. Cal Fire San Diego spokesman Capt. Thomas Shoots said approximately 100 prisoners were in the prison yard when the riot broke out, the newspaper reported. It was not clear how many inmates were involved in the riot, the Union-Tribune reported. Officials with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said a fight involving several inmates on the recreation yard escalated into a riot, KNSD reported. According to KSWB, staff members ordered the inmates to stop fighting. When the fighting continued, 'officers used several rounds of less than lethal use of force to quell the disturbance.' Two of the inmates were seriously injured and airlifted to area hospitals, Shoots told the Union-Tribune. No prison staff members were injured, KNSD reported.
  • Identity theft may have entered the final frontier if accusations from a woman against an astronaut are true. >> Read more trending news  Summer Worden, a former Air Force intelligence officer living in Kansas, was married to astronaut Anne McClain. Now in the middle of a yearlong divorce and parenting dispute, Worden claims her former spouse accessed her bank account from space, KPRC reported. Worden filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, accusing McClain of identity theft and unauthorized access to the bank account, according to The New York Times.Worden claims McClain broke into her bank accounts while she was aboard the International Space Station, the newspaper reported. Through her lawyer, McClain admitted she had accessed the bank account from space on a computer system registered to NASA, the Times reported. However, McClain said she was merely keeping tabs on the couple's still intermingled finances, the newspaper reported. “I was shocked and appalled at the audacity by her to think that she could get away with that, and I was very disheartened that I couldn't keep anything private,” Worden told KPRC. McClain's attorney, Rusty Hardin, told the television station in a statement that 'family cases are extremely difficult and private matters for all parties involved.' 'Neither Anne nor we will be commenting on this personal matter,' Hardin said. 'We appreciate the media's understanding and respect, as maintaining privacy, is in the best interest of the child and family members involved.” In a statement to KPRC, NASA said it had no comment on the matter. 'NASA has no statement on this and does not comment on personal or personnel matters. Anne McClain is an active astronaut.' NASA officials told the Times they were unaware of any crimes committed on the space station. McClain, who returned to Earth in June after her six-month mission, took an under-oath interview with NASA's Office of Inspector General last week, the newspaper reported.  “She strenuously denies that she did anything improper,” Hardin told the Times. Hardin told the newspaper the bank access from space was an attempt to make sure there were sufficient funds in Worden’s account to pay bills and care for the child they were raising. Hardin said McClain continued using the same password and claimed she never heard an objection from Worden, the Times reported. The fight from space might be the first case, but Mark Sundahl, director of the Global Space Law Center at Cleveland State University, said it probably will not be the last one. “The more we go out there and spend time out there, all the things we do here are going to happen in space,” Sundahl told the Times.