On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

rain-day
58°
Rain
H -° L 50°
  • rain-day
    58°
    Current Conditions
    Rain. H -° L 50°
  • rain-day
    Today
    Rain. H -° L 50°
  • heavy-rain-day
    55°
    Tomorrow
    Chance of Rain. H 55° L 41°
Listen
Pause
Error

News on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

World News

    New virus cases in China continued to fall Wednesday, with 1,749 new infections and 136 new deaths announced after China's leader said disease prevention and control was at a “a critical time.” Japan also confirmed more infections of the new coronavirus on the Diamond Princess cruise ship, bringing the total to 542 people among the 3,700 crew and passengers initially on board. The infections have led to heavy criticism of the decision to quarantine passengers on the vessel. The quarantine ends later Wednesday. The updated figures on the COVID-19 illness for mainland China bring the total for cases to 74,185 and deaths to 2,004. New cases have fallen to under 2,000 daily for the past two days. Chinese President Xi Jinping spoke about the efforts to control the outbreak in a phone call with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson described in state media. Separately, the U.N. secretary general told The Associated Press that the virus outbreak “is not out of control but it is a very dangerous situation.” Antonio Guterres said in an interview in Lahore, Pakistan, that “the risks are enormous and we need to be prepared worldwide for that.” The outbreak has caused massive disruptions and China may postpone its biggest political meeting of the year to avoid having people travel to Beijing while the virus is still spreading. One of the automotive industry's biggest events, China's biannual auto show, was postponed, and many sports and entertainment events have been delayed or canceled. The largest number of cases outside China is the 542 on the Diamond Princess at a port near Tokyo. The U.S. evacuated more than 300 American passengers, who are now under quarantine in the U.S. On Tuesday, the U.S. government said the more than 100 American passengers who stayed on the ship or were hospitalized in Japan would have to wait for another two weeks before they could return to the U.S.
  • Britain announced new post-Brexit immigration rules Tuesday that will make it tougher for European Union citizens, but easier for people from many other nations, to move to the U.K. starting next year. Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Conservative government said the new rules would “open up the U.K. to the brightest and the best from around the world” while ending “the reliance on cheap, low-skilled labor coming into the country.” But U.K. employers said the radical changes could bring about a labor crisis for sectors such as health and social care. Britain’s exit from the EU last month after 47 years of membership is triggering the biggest change to the country’s immigration rules for decades. During Britain’s EU membership — and until a post-Brexit transition period runs out on Dec. 31 — citizens of any of the EU's 27 nations can freely live and work in the U.K. More than 3 million EU citizens currently living in the U.K. are entitled to stay. But from January 1, 2021, new immigration rules will apply to EU and non-EU citizens alike. Home Secretary Priti Patel said Britain's new “points-based immigration system” would assess prospective immigrants on a range of skills, qualifications, salaries or professions. People hoping to work in Britain will need a job offer paying at least 25,600 pounds ($33,000) a year. That’s less than the current 30,000 pounds ($39,000) set for non-EU immigrants, a figure that is more than the country's average annual wage. Prospective immigrants who earn lessmay be able to come if they have other skills. Skilled immigrants are currently required to have a university degree but in future will only need the equivalent of Britain's pre-university “A levels.” The government says the new rules will cut net immigration from its current level of more than 200,000 people a year. But it has abandoned a pledge made by previous Conservative governments to cut Britain's annual net immigration figure to below 100,000 a year. The immigration plan still has to be passed by Parliament — which is highly likely since the Conservatives have a large majority. The government said it would come up with specific proposals for scientists, graduates, health care workers and those in the agricultural sector. But there is no specific immigration route for what the government calls “low-skilled workers” — a category it says includes 70% of the more than 1 million EU citizens who have moved to the U.K. since 2004. Hundreds of thousands of EU citizens currently hold jobs in sectors including farming, health care and restaurants that are relatively low-paid. Employers in those industries have warned there will be worker shortages under the tighter immigration rules. The U.K. Homecare Association described the lack of provisions for low-paid immigrant workers in the proposals as 'irresponsible.” 'Cutting off the supply of prospective care workers under a new migration system will pave the way for more people waiting unnecessarily in hospital or going without care,” it said. But the government was unsympathetic. “We need to shift the focus of our economy away from a reliance on cheap labor from Europe and instead concentrate on investment in technology and automation,” it said in a policy paper. “Employers will need to adjust.” Many people who voted in 2016 for Britain to leave the EU were believed that immigration had driven down wages and driven up joblessness among British-born workers. The evidence for this is partial at best. The Migration Advisory Committee, an independent body consulted by the government on immigration plans, said introducing a points-based system would only “very slightly increase GDP per capita, productivity, and improve the public finances” compared to continued free movement of EU citizens, and would also reduce Britain's economic growth. Diane Abbott, the immigration spokeswoman for the opposition Labour Party, called the proposed new system flawed. 'This isn't an 'Australian points-based system', which is a meaningless government soundbite,” she said. “It's a salary threshold system, which will need to have so many exemptions — for (the health service) — for social care and many parts of the private sector, that it will be meaningless.” ___ Follow AP’s full coverage of Brexit and British politics at https://www.apnews.com/Brexit.
  • French President Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday announced measures intended to counter Islamic extremism in France by giving the government more authority over the schooling of children, the financing of mosques and the training of imams. Macron, during a visit to the city of Mulhouse in eastern France, said the government sought to combat “foreign interference” in how Islam is practiced and the way its religious institutions are organized in the secular country. 'The problem is when in the name of a religion, some want to separate themselves from the Republic and therefore not respect its laws,” he said. Macron said he plans to end a program created in 1977 that allowed nine countries to send teachers to France to provide foreign language and culture classes without any supervision from French authorities. Four majority-Muslim countries - Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco and Turkey - were involved in the program, which reaches about 80.000 students every year. Macron said France instead will have bilateral agreements with other nations to ensure the French state has control over the courses and their content starting in September. The French leader said a new law is being drafted to provide transparency in how mosques are financed. Macron said he asked the French Muslim Council, the CFCM, to improve the training of imams in France. He said the practice of allowing Algeria, Morocco and Turkey to send imams to France. would be phased out. “Mosques financed with transparency with imams trained in France and respectful of the Republican values and principles, that's how we will create the conditions so that Muslims in France can practice freely their religion,” Macron said. Macron said the only country with which France didn't reach an agreement on the new measures was Turkey. “Turkey today can make the choice to follow that path with us or not, but I won't let any foreign country feed a cultural, religious or identity-related separatism on our Republic's ground,” he said. “We can not have Turkey's laws on France's ground. No way,” Macron added. _____ Sylvie Corbet writes from Paris
  • In Arizona, a burgeoning Asian American community fields xenophobic calls about a planned night market featuring Asian street foods. In New York, a dim sum restaurant owner worries he won't make rent. In the San Francisco Bay Area, a local Asian American-owned restaurant chain is mulling temporarily shuttering one of its properties because of the downturn in trade. In major U.S. cities, Asian American businesses are seeing a remarkable decline in customers as fear about the viral outbreak from China spreads. City and health officials are trying to stanch the financial bleeding through information campaigns and personal visits to shops and restaurants, emphasizing that, with just 15 cases diagnosed in the entire country, there is no reason to avoid them. Business owners, some of whom have seen their customer traffic cut by more than half, are anxiously waiting for things to return to normal. Mesa, Arizona's freshly crowned Asian District was deep into organizing its night market when news broke that a case of the illness known as COVID-19 was confirmed at nearby Arizona State University. Xenophobic comments on social media and phone calls started almost immediately, according to Arizona Asian Chamber of Commerce CEO Vicente Reid. “I probably should stop picking up my phone altogether,' Reid said. 'One lady was like, ‘Well, aren’t people coming to your event that are the cause of it?'' The Feb. 29 food festival, modeled after popular outdoor Taiwanese markets, was designed to get the public acquainted with the district. Mesa Mayor John Giles called the xenophobia directed at the event “ridiculous.” “We certainly take any health crisis seriously but to make those kinds of connections is just offensive,' he said. Organizers will be handing out specially made masks with playful Asian-food theme slogans like “Bao to me” and “Insert lumpia here.” The virus has sickened tens of thousands of people, mostly in China. Fifteen people have been diagnosed with the virus in the U.S., all but two who recently traveled from China. U.S. citizens have also been diagnosed abroad, including 14 who were on a cruise ship quarantined off Japan and have been brought to hospitals in the U.S. Vegetarian Dim Sum House has been a fixture in Manhattan’s Chinatown for 23 years, but suddenly owner Frankie Chu said he will not be able to make his rent this month. Chu said sales have plunged 70% over the last two weeks at his no-frills restaurant. Three couples trickled in for lunch on a recent weekday. Normally, Chu said he gets up to 30 customers for lunch. At dinnertime, his narrow restaurant is usually packed with about 70 diners. These days, he gets about four. Chu has sent some of his staff on vacation to cut costs. Under the circumstances, he will ask his landlord to forgive a 5% late fee normally charged. “I don’t know how long I can stay here,” Chu said. “After 9/11, it wasn’t this bad.” The crisis has alarmed New York City officials and business leaders, who have launched a campaign to lure people back to hard-hit communities in Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn. “Chinatown is bleeding,” said Wellington Chen, executive chairman of the Chinatown Partnership, a local business and community group. “This thing is thousands of miles away. This fear is really out of proportion.” Small businesses in Manhattan’s Chinatown have reported sales drops of between 40% and 80% the past month as the viral outbreak in China spread, Chen said. In Flushing, business is down an estimated 40%, according to the Flushing Chinese Business Association. For some businesses, it’s much higher. Derek Law, senior vice chairman of the America China Hotel Association, said business has dropped about 70% at a spa he owns in Flushing. New York City is home to more than half a million Chinese Americans, the biggest population of any U.S. city. Some New Yorkers of Chinese descent are frustrated at being made to feel like foreigners because of a disease outbreak that feels as far away to them as any other resident. “I’m probably more American than a lot of the people asking me about coronavirus. It’s a little annoying to be honest,” said Christina Seid, owner of the Chinatown Ice Cream Factory, a neighborhood fixture that her father founded four decades ago with flavor offerings like mango and green tea. Seid, whose great-grandparents immigrated to New York from China, said business has been slower than usual but added that the winter months are never good for ice cream shops. She said she feels optimistic that things will soon return to normal, relying on New Yorkers' determination to get on with life. With no confirmed cases of the virus in New York City, officials and politicians are trying to drive home the point that there is no reason to avoid any neighborhood, with many eating at Chinese restaurants and tweeting out photos under the hashtags #supportchinatown. In Boston, Mayor Marty Walsh has launched a similar social media campaign, encouraging people to share photos of themselves supporting small businesses in the neighborhood with the hashtag #LoveBostonChinatown. Allison Arwady, the Chicago Department of Public Health commissioner, said she and her colleagues “continue to field rumors” about threats to public health. She said the health risk is low and urged people to not fear visiting and spending time at restaurants or stores in Chicago's Chinatown. 'Please do not allow stigma, xenophobia or fear to control your decisions,' Arwady said. In the San Francisco Bay Area, the situation is dire enough that Sunny Wong’s family is considering temporarily closing one of the four restaurants they own in Oakland Chinatown. Even some of his friends and patrons have told him about hearing of untrue rumors of people getting sick at one of his restaurants. 'People just are clueless. They hear stories and rumors and they just don't really look for the facts in a situation,' said Wong, adding that he has had to cut back hours for his workers. Carl Chan, president of the Oakland Chinatown Chamber of Commerce, said business owners have reported a drop of roughly 50% to 75% in business. The chamber is planning a Chinese New Year celebration, with Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf encouraging residents to patronize Chinatown restaurants. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio recently visited Nom Wah Tea Parlor, the oldest restaurant in Manhattan's Chinatown. The restaurant has seen a 40% drop in business over the past three weeks, said manager Vincent Tang, whose cousin Wilson Tang took over the restaurant from his father. Normally, the restaurant fills up at lunchtime. But during a recent weekday, nearly half the tables were empty, although it was at least busier than many of its lesser-known neighbors. “We're lucky to have loyal customers,” said Tang, sitting near an row of green stools that he used to swing around in as a child. “Usually at this time we are packed and there is a line outside.” Customers at Nom Wah said they were perplexed that others were staying away. “It didn't cross my mind at all,” said Kate Masterson, an artist digging into dumplings with her uncle at a booth beneath signed framed photographs of celebrities like Kirsten Dunst. “It's not happening here,' she said of the outbreak. ____ Tang reported from Mesa, Arizona. Associated Press writers Noreen Nasir in Chicago and Terry Chea in Oakland, California, contributed to this story.
  • Talks between Russia and Turkey meant to reduce tensions in northwestern Syria did not yield a “satisfactory result” for Ankara, but both sides agreed to continue negotiations, a spokesman for Turkey's president said Tuesday. Turkey and Russia support rival groups in the Syrian conflict and for the past few years have been closely coordinating their moves in Idlib province. A truce reached between the two countries collapsed in late 2019, leading to an offensive by Russian-backed Syrian troops who captured wide areas in the last rebel stronghold and triggered one of the civil war's worst humanitarian crises with about 900,000 people fleeing their homes. A Turkish delegation ended two days of talks with Russian officials in Moscow, and Ibrahim Kalin, the spokesman for Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, said both sides agreed to meet again. “We did not accept the document and map that was presented to us,” Kalin said, adding that Turkey’s position was for a return to the lines laid out under a cease-fire agreement for Idlib in 2018. Briefing journalists after a Cabinet meeting, Kalin also said it was out of the question for Turkey to move the positions of its observation posts. Turkey will continue sending in reinforcements “to protect the region and civilians,” Kalin said, adding that Ankara would respond to any attack against its troops “in the strongest way, like we did in the past weeks.” The Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement that “both sides noted their adherence to the existing agreements that envisage measures to reduce tensions, ease the humanitarian situation and continue the fight against terrorism.” The end of the talks came hours after the U.N. human rights chief urged Syrian government forces and their allies to allow safe corridors in conflict areas in northwestern Syria, where a military offensive has unleashed a massive wave of fleeing civilians in one of the worst humanitarian catastrophes in the long civil war. Michelle Bachelet told reporters in Geneva it was 'cruel beyond belief' that civilians live under plastic sheeting in freezing conditions while getting bombed. Her appeal came after a day after Syrian President Bashar Assad pledged to press ahead with a military campaign in the northwest that hasdisplaced many people from their homes since the start of December, according to U.N. officials. Many of the civilians are sleeping in open fields and under trees in freezing temperatures. “Children and families are caught between the violence, the biting cold, the lack of food and the desperate living conditions. Such abject disregard for the safety and well-being of children and families is beyond the pale and must not go on,” said Henrietta Ford, executive director of the U.N.'s children agency. About half the region’s population had already fled other parts of Syria, and displacement refugee camps are full. Aid organizations, including the U.N. World Food Program, have been forced to stop food distribution temporarily because the fighting has disrupted the movement of trucks bringing supplies to the region. Backed by Russian air power, Syrian government troops have made swift advances, seizing dozens of towns and villages in Idlib province and nearby rural areas around Aleppo. In the past week, Assad's forces have secured a strategic highway known as the M5 and consolidated control over Aleppo province for the first time since 2012, dealing a severe blow to the opposition now fighting to hold its last bastion in Idlib. Turkey has restarted joint patrols with the Russian military in northeastern Syria after a two-week hiatus due to the escalation in Idlib, the Russian military said. The government’s rapid advances have sparked rare clashes between Syria and Turkey, which backs Syria's rebels and has troops in the region to monitor a 2018 cease-fire deal. Turkey’s president has warned Assad to halt the advance and sent thousands of troops and equipment into the opposition enclave to try to stall the Syrian government offensive. Already home to more than 3.5 million Syrian refugees, Turkey fears a new influx of people may overwhelm its borders which it has kept sealed in recent years. The resumption of joint patrols in Hassakeh, in eastern Syria, was a possible sign of easing tensions. The U.N. Human Rights Office said it recorded 298 civilian deaths in Idlib and Aleppo, where the government offensive has been concentrated, since Jan. 1. It said 93 percent of those deaths were caused by the Syrian government and its allies. In addition, 10 medical facilities and 19 educational facilities were either directly hit or affected by nearby strikes, the U.N. office said. U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres decried suffering of Syrians as “horrible” in the 9-year-old civil war. In an interview with The Associated Press in Lahore, Pakistan, Guterres called for an immediate cease-fire, urging Turkey, Russia and Iran to find a political solution. Bachelet also urged all parties begin an immediate cease-fire and ensure the protection of all civilians. She called on the Syrian government and its allies to allow humanitarian corridors in conflict areas to permit the safe passage of civilians. 'No shelter is now safe,' Bachelet said. “And as the government offensive continues and people are forced into smaller and smaller pockets, I fear even more people will be killed.” Syrian opposition activists, meanwhile, reported airstrikes on several rebel-held areas Tuesday, including the outskirts of the town of Atareb and Daret Azzeh. ___ Keaten reported from Geneva. Associated Press writers Vladimir Isachenkov in Moscow, Kathy Gannon in Lahore, Pakistan, and Bassem Mroue in Beirut contributed.
  • The worst locust outbreak that parts of East Africa have seen in 70 years has reached South Sudan, a country where roughly half the population already faces hunger after years of civil war, officials announced Tuesday. Around 2,000 locusts were spotted inside the country, Agriculture Minister Onyoti Adigo told reporters. Authorities will try to control the outbreak, he added. The locusts have been seen in Eastern Equatoria state near the borders with Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda. All have been affected by the outbreak that has been influenced by the changing climate in the region. The situation in those three countries “remains extremely alarming,” the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization said in its latest Locust Watch update Monday. Locusts also have reached Sudan, Eritrea, Tanzania and more recently Uganda. The soil in South Sudan's Eastern Equatoria has a sandy nature that allows the locusts to lay eggs easily, said Meshack Malo, country representative with the FAO. At this stage “if we are not able to deal with them ... it will be a problem,” he said. South Sudan is even less prepared than other countries in the region for a locust outbreak, and its people are arguably more vulnerable. More than 5 million people are severely food insecure, the U.N. humanitarian office says in its latest assessment, and some 860,000 children are malnourished. Five years of civil war shattered South Sudan's economy, and lingering insecurity since a 2018 peace deal continues to endanger humanitarians trying to distribute aid. Another local aid worker was shot and killed last week, the U.N. said Tuesday. The locusts have traveled across the region in swarms the size of major cities. Experts say their only effective control is aerial spraying with pesticides, but U.N. and local authorities have said more aircraft and pesticides are required. A handful of planes have been active in Kenya and Ethiopia. The U.N. has said $76 million is needed immediately. On Tuesday, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo during a visit to Ethiopia said the U.S. would donate another $8 million to the effort. That follows an earlier $800,000. The number of overall locusts could grow up to 500 times by June, when drier weather begins, experts have said. Until then, the fear is that more rains in the coming weeks will bring fresh vegetation to feed a new generation of the voracious insects. South Sudanese ministers called for a collective regional response to the outbreak that threatens to devastate crops and pasturage.
  • Greg Laurie is among America’s most successful clergymen -- senior pastor at a California megachurch, prolific author, host of a global radio program. Yet after a youthful colleague’s suicide, his view of his vocation is unsparing. “Pastors are people, just like everyone else,” Laurie said by email. “We are broken people who live in a broken world. Sometimes, we need help too.” Laurie’s 15,000-member Harvest Christian Fellowship, based in Riverside, California, was jolted in September by the death of Jarrid Wilson, a 30-year-old associate pastor. Wilson and his wife, parents of two sons, had founded an outreach group to help people coping with depression and suicidal thoughts. 'People may think that as pastors or spiritual leaders we are somehow above the pain and struggles of everyday people,' Laurie wrote after Wilson’s death. 'We are the ones who are supposed to have all the answers. But we do not.' There is similar introspection among clergy of many faiths across the United States as the age-old challenges of their ministries are deepened by a host of newly evolving stresses. Rabbis worry about protecting their congregations from anti-Semitic violence. Islamic chaplains counsel college students unnerved by anti-Muslim sentiments. A shortage of Catholic priests creates burdens for those who remain, even as their church’s sex-abuse crisis lowers morale. Worries for Protestant pastors range from crime and drug addiction in their communities to financial insecurity for their own families to social media invective that targets them personally. Adam Hertzman, who works for the Jewish Federation of Pittsburgh, witnessed firsthand the emotional toll on his city’s rabbis after the October 2018 massacre that killed 11 Jews at the Tree of Life synagogue. “Somehow in the U.S. we expect our clergy to be superhuman when it comes to these things, and frankly that’s an unrealistic expectation,” he said. “They’re human beings who are going to feel the same kind of fear and numbness and depression that other people do.” ___ It’s difficult to quantify the extent of clergy stress, nationwide or denominationally. But a 2018 Gallup poll bears out a widely shared impression that clergy no longer enjoy the same public esteem as in the past. Only 37% of American rate members of the clergy highly for their honesty and ethics, the lowest rating in the 40 years Gallup has asked that question. “Not very long ago, they were seen as one of the pillars of the community,” said Carl Weisner, senior director of Duke Divinity School’s Clergy Health Initiative. “There has been some loss of status... and that does add to stress.” Yet Weisner says the challenges of ministry are often offset by the rewards. “There’s a gift of meaning in the work that not a whole lot of other professions have,” he said. Stress — and rewards — come in many forms for Rodney McNeal, 54, an Army veteran and hospital social worker who has pastored Second Bethlehem Baptist Church in Alexandria, Louisiana for nearly eight years. Officially, the African American church has 300 members but only about 130 attend a typical service, he said. “They don’t understand that I get tired like they get tired,' he said. “They want you to be at their constant beck and call.” He has attended five seminaries but never completed them. The courses, he said, didn’t cover the things he sees on the job. “The preaching part is the easy part,” he said. “Had I known the ugly side of ministry -- the hospital visits, burying the dead, being in the room when someone is dying and trying to comfort their family... Had I known all that, I don’t think I would have accepted being a pastor.” When he began, McNeal rarely took time off, straining his marriage. Although he has tried to create a work-life balance, he visits sick congregants on his lunch break and, if he gets off his job at 4:30 p.m., tries to make two or three home and hospital visits before he picks up his children at school. McNeal said pastors in small congregations get close to their parishioners; when a tragedy strikes, “you are feeling the same pains.” “You have to get them through the process, but nobody is there to help you,” he said. Over the years McNeal has opened up to two older pastors who counsel him. He also talks to his brother, who is a minister in North Carolina. “I know what depression is,” he said. “You have to sit in your car when you drive up in the driveway of the church and get your game face on to go in there. I have contemplated walking away so many times.” What keeps him going? “I love seeing people just turn their lives around,” he said. “I will be out in the community and somebody will say ‘Hey man, you changed my life. You helped me.’” ____ Episcopal Bishop Chilton Knudsen, from the vantage of a nearly 40-year career, cites several factors affecting the clergy’s morale -- including sex-abuse scandals that have rocked several Protestant denominations as well as the Roman Catholic church “Back in the day, you were automatically assumed to be trustworthy,” said Knudsen, 73. “As the scandals became public, the public trust of clergy has dropped a little notch with each revelation. Even if you never had a scandal, there’s still a taint by association.” “At the same time, the clergy has more complicated situations come across their doorstep,” she said. “There’s a wearing-down effect, a sense of frustration and malaise -- they’re thinking, ‘I’ve spent all these hours with people trying to do good things, and I’m just getting nowhere.’” Another challenge, she said, is the willingness of some churchgoers to engage in “clergy bashing.” “Sometimes your congregation is polarized -- a group who wants you gone and believes another priest will be so much better, and a group who are supportive,” she said. “People are acting out, circulating rumors about you in email chains -- it’s traumatic.” The Episcopal church offers subsidized psychological counseling to its clergy, but Knudsen says the service is underused. In Baltimore, the Rev. Alvin Gwynn -- at age 74 -- has been getting help from computer-savvy millennials as he serves for a 30th year as pastor of Friendship Baptist Church. His mostly African American congregation of 1,100 is flourishing, he says, and yet he’s weighed down sometimes by the multiple crises of his city -- high crime and drug abuse, underfunded schools, a lack of decent affordable housing. “The hardest thing is trying to keep people’s hope alive,” he said. “We’re no longer a friendly city -- our families have been torn apart, and people don’t have the interaction with the church that they once had.” The National Association of Evangelicals, which represents more than 45,000 churches in the U.S., published research in 2016 detailing pervasive financial stress among its pastors. Of more than 4,200 pastors surveyed, half earned less than $50,000 a year and more than 90% worried about insufficient retirement savings. Only 20% said their congregations had more than 200 people. Yet pastors in booming megachurches can suffer as well. Jarrid Wilson’s death in September was preceded in August 2018 by the suicide of Andrew Stoecklein, the 30-year-old pastor of Inland Hills Church in Chino, California. A few days before killing himself, Stoecklein had preached about his own struggles with panic attacks and depression. Wilson’s suicide was among the reasons that megachurch pastor Howard John Wesley recently told his 10,000-member congregation at Alfred Street Baptist Church in Alexandria, Virginia, that he was taking a 15-week sabbatical. 'There's not been a day in these past 11 years that I have not woken up and knew that there's something I had to do for the church, that I have to be available for a call,” Wesley said. “I’m tired.” ___ For Muslim clergy in America, the stresses of being a faith leader are often magnified by awareness that their communities face prejudice and suspicion. “We’re framed in this idea that somehow we’re a fifth column trying to take the country down,” said James Jones, vice chair of the board of the Islamic Seminary of America. “We’re asked to prove ourselves -- that we are patriotic -- in ways that other people aren’t.” Jones, a religion professor at Manhattanville College, says engagement in interfaith activities can be valuable for Muslim clergy. “We in our community have to share that more inclusive approach,” he said. “Not insular, harsh rhetoric.” Adeel Zeb encountered anti-Muslim sentiment head-on while serving as Islamic chaplain at Duke University in 2015. The school invited Muslim students to give their call to prayer from the bell tower of the campus chapel, only to withdraw the invitation -- citing safety concerns -- amid a backlash that included death threats and outraged criticism from prominent Christian figures such as evangelist Franklin Graham. Zeb, now chaplain at the five-college Claremont Colleges network in California, described Duke’s backtracking as “a hard call.” “Students’ and staff’s lives were being threatened,” he said. “You don’t want to live with that on your conscience -- one of your students getting shot and killed.” At Claremont, Zeb ministers to about 300 Muslim students on multiple campuses, striving to keep up with their political and cultural interests. “We chaplains are having to be far more socially conscious than before -- you have to be very cautious, and hyperaware,” he said. His students grew up in the post-9/11 era that kindled anti-Muslim sentiment among some Americans. “Many of the students here haven’t seen much of the blessing or sweetness of being a Muslim in the U.S.,” he said. “They usually see the curse of it.” “If they see oppression happening, they will all start feeling the pain, and start causing a ruckus, and that causes stress for me,” said Zeb, who meditates and works out to cut the tension. “I have to make sure there’s a very strong dose of self-care, so I can be resilient.” ___ In September 2017, on the first day of Rosh Hoshana -- the Jewish new year -- a security guard found a hateful, obscene anti-Semitic message scrawled on an outdoor wall of Temple Sinai -- home to the oldest Jewish congregation in Oakland, California. Rabbi Jacqueline Mates-Muchin rushed to the synagogue after getting a predawn call and devised a plan before worshippers gathered for morning services. As they arrived, she encouraged them to write positive messages on sheets of butcher paper, which were then used to cover the graffiti until a work crew could paint over it. “Love Not Hate,” “Shalom” and “Stronger Together” were among the scores of multi-colored messages. Looking back now, Mates-Muchin says the incident had some upsides: Her congregation was heartened by an outpouring of support from civic and religious leaders. Among those expressing solidarity was a women’s mosque in neighboring Berkeley. However, the graffiti incident -- and the subsequent deadly attacks on synagogues in Pittsburgh and in Poway, California -- took a toll. Since the Pittsburgh massacre, Mates-Muchin said. “I don’t begin a service without having a rough plan of where I’d direct people if someone came in with a gun.” During that span, her synagogue has beefed up security measures -- more lighting, security cameras and guards. For the most recent high holy days, synagogue leaders requested the deployment of armed off-duty police officers. The Central Conference of American Rabbis -- the main rabbinical organization for Reform Judaism in North America -- seeks various ways to provide personal and professional support to its members. There’s a rapid-response line to field calls from troubled rabbis, and a social worker who offers free short-term counseling. The flare-up of anti-Semitism compounds the day-to-day challenges, says Rabbi Betsy Torop, director of rabbinic engagement for the organization. “We’re living in a country we’ve felt safe in, and now we see anti-Semitism everywhere,” she said. “Rabbis deal with their own feelings about this -- plus the need for increased security for their congregation. It plays out in creating stress and anxiety in a lot of ways.” Security worries have affected other faiths as well. Pardeep Singh Kaleka, executive director of the Interfaith Conference of Greater Milwaukee, said his own Sikh temple has armed guards and an evacuation plan, the result of a 2012 attack in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, that killed six worshippers, including his father, the temple president and one of its founders. He said some Sikh leaders are tempted to avoid outreach to non-Sikh faiths and communities, but he urges them to take the chance. “All of us are facing uncertainty and divisiveness,” he said. “It’s a responsibility of faith leaders to bring people together.' ___ Associated Press religion editor Gary Fields contributed. __ Associated Press religion coverage receives support from the Lilly Endowment through the Religion News Foundation. The AP is solely responsible for this content.
  • Miners in southern Poland worried that massive coal imports will eliminate their jobs on Tuesday blocked railway tracks on the import route. A few hundred miners with trade union flags in the southern coal mining region town of Slawkow also planted devices on the tracks that looked like explosives. They said that imports of millions of tons of cheaper Russian coal are undercutting their jobs and pointed to millions of tons of unsold Polish coal piling up at their mines. Miners also announced a massive protest in Warsaw on Feb. 28 in demand of job protection, higher pay and an end to coal imports. The protest will take place early during campaign season ahead of the presidential election on May 10. Coal mining is Poland's single largest employer, accounting for some 83,000 jobs. The government says that Poland's coal will remain the nation's chief energy source for years to come and is supporting the opening of a new coal mine while also facing international pressure to cut the use of the fossil fuel that is harmful to the environment. Last year, Poland produced over 61 million tons of coal but sold only 58.4 million tons. At the same time some 16.7 million tons of coal were imported, mostly from Russia. ___ Read all the AP stories about the impact of climate change at https://apnews.com/Climate
  • The criminal trial for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will begin March 17, court officials announced Tuesday, shaking up the final stretch of a contentious election campaign and hurting the longtime Israeli leader’s hopes of forming a new government after the vote. The announcement means that Netanyahu will appear in the Jerusalem court as a defendant just two weeks after the March 2 election. After a campaign in which Netanyahu has worked feverishly to divert attention from his legal woes, the final days of the race are almost certain to play into the hands of his opponents by focusing on the looming trial. Netanyahu was indicted in November on charges of fraud, breach of trust and accepting bribes in connection to a series of scandals. He is accused of accepting lavish gifts from billionaire friends and offering regulatory favors to local media moguls in exchange for positive news coverage. Netanyahu, Israel's longest-serving prime minister, has denied any wrongdoing. In a brief statement, the court said Netanyahu is expected to attend the initial hearing. The March 2 election is Israel’s third in under a year. Like the previous elections in April and September, the upcoming vote is seen largely as a personal referendum on Netanyahu. The previous elections ended in deadlock, with both Netanyahu’s Likud Party and the rival Blue and White, led by former military chief Benny Gantz, unable to secure parliamentary majorities. Opinion polls have predicted a similar outcome in the third. Gantz said it was a “sad' development that would prevent Netanyahu from focusing on his duties as prime minister. “Netanyahu will be preoccupied with himself alone. He will not be in a position to look out for the interests of Israel’s citizens,” he said. Netanyahu responded to Gantz's remarks by criticizing him without directly addressing the trial. Netanyahu is desperate to remain as prime minister, a position he can use as a bully pulpit to rally public support. He has repeatedly sought to portray himself as the victim of a witch hunt by overzealous police, hostile prosecutors and the media. With the exception of the prime minister, Israeli law requires public officials to resign if charged with a crime. That means that if Netanyahu is forced to give up his position, he would go on trial as a private citizen. Netanyahu last month gave up an attempt to seek immunity from prosecution after concluding he did not have enough support in parliament. Throughout the current campaign, Netanyahu has gone to great lengths to make voters forget about his trial. Instead, he has sought to painted himself as a global statesman uniquely qualified to lead the country through tumultuous times. He boasts of Israel’s emergence as a natural gas exporter, his strategy of confronting archenemy Iran and warming behind-the-scenes alliances with former Arab foes in the Persian Gulf. But more than anything, he points to his close friendship with President Donald Trump, bragging that it gives Israel a unique opportunity to push its international agenda. Just three weeks ago, Netanyahu was welcomed at the White House for a festive event unveiling Trump’s long-awaited Mideast plan. The plan greatly favored Israel at the expense of the Palestinians. Netanyahu then jetted off to Moscow, where he leveraged his good relations with President Vladimir Putin to win the release of a young Israeli woman who had been jailed on minor drug charges. In recent days, he has turned inward, promising young Israelis that he will lower the high cost of living and assuring voters the country is prepared for the coronavirus scare. Gantz, meanwhile, has focused his campaign almost entirely on Netanyahu’s legal troubles and questioning his fitness to serve. Yohanan Plesner, president of the Israel Democracy Institute, a Jerusalem think tank, said it is difficult to predict how thescheduling of the trialwill impact the election. Although the country has long known Netanyahu would go on trial, the setting of the date draws new attention to his legal troubles and makes it the central issue of the final stretch. “The more the discussion is about Netanyahu as a defendant rather than Netanyahu as a statesman obviously it does not work in Netanyahu’s favor,” he said. The bigger impact of Tuesday’s announcement could come after the election. Under Israel’s parliamentary system, the prime minister must form a majority coalition with smaller allied parties in order to rule. Opinion polls are once again predicting that both Gantz’s Blue and White and Netanyahu’s Likud will emerge as the largest parties, but still short of securing the necessary parliamentary majority with their partners. Together, the two parties could control a majority of seats and form a unity government. Gantz has repeatedly said he is open to a power-sharing agreement with Likud, but not under Netanyahu’s leadership when he is facing serious criminal charges. The odds of Gantz compromising are even lower now that the trial is imminent. Other parties, and perhaps even members of the Likud, may also be reluctant to line up behind a prime minister on trial. That could turn attention to President Reuven Rivlin, who is responsible for choosing a prime minister-designate after the election. The president typically holds several days of consultations after the election before choosing the head of the party who he believes has the best chances of forming a coalition. The designated prime minister is then given up to six weeks to negotiate a coalition deal with his partners, meaning Netanyahu’s trial will begin in the middle of this sensitive period. After the last two elections, Rivlin gave Netanyahu the first crack at forming a government, and in September, he floated a power-sharing proposal in which Netanyahu and Gantz would rotate as prime ministers, with Netanyahu serving first. Unless Likud defies the polls and scores an overwhelming victory, it will be difficult to tap Netanyahu as the prime minister-designate days before he goes on trial, Plesner said. “The president’s roadmap for how to form a coalition no doubt will now dictate that Gantz would be first, rather than Netanyahu,” he said.
  • Russia will temporarily ban Chinese nationals from entering the country due to the virus outbreak centered in China that has infected more than 73,000 people worldwide, Russian authorities said Tuesday. The entry ban goes into effect Thursday at midnight Moscow time (2100 GMT) for an indefinite period, according to a decree signed by Russian Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin. The government said it took the move due to the “worsening epidemiological situation” in China. Russia already had cut off most Chinese visitors by closing the long land border with China and Mongolia and imposing other travel restrictions. The new entry ban won't affect travelers who need to transfer flights at Russian airports, authorities said. So far, Russia has had only three confirmed cases of the COVID-19 disease caused by the virus — two Chinese citizens who were treated and released, and a Russian national infected on the Diamond Princess cruise ship now quarantined in Japan. However, Russian authorities have taken significant steps to try to keep the virus from spreading, including hospitalizing hundreds of people as a precaution after they returned from China. Russia halted most air traffic to China, suspended all trains to China and North Korea, and temporarily stopped issuing work visas to Chinese citizens. Chinese students studying in Russia were told not to return until March 1. Earlier this month, the prime minister said Russia might start deporting the foreigners infected with the virus. In the meantime, Germany is sending a second shipment of medical aid supplies to China to help the Asian giant fight the coronavirus epidemic. German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said the government would send 8.7 tons of aid supplies worth 150,000 euros ($162,000), including protection gear and disinfectants. 'Germany stands firmly on the side of China in the battle against coronavirus and works closely and trustfully with the Chinese officials,' Maas said. 'We have the utmost respect for the efforts China has already undertaken.' The virus, which emerged in central China in December, has killed 1,868 patients in mainland China and five others elsewhere. The World Health Organization has named the illness COVID-19. C hina has instituted a strict lockdown on over 60 million people in central Hubei province and other nations are taking their own measures — including mandatory 14-day quarantines — to stop the virus from getting established on their territory. Europe has had one virus death among its 47 confirmed cases, an 80-year-old Chinese tourist in Paris who was initially turned away by two French hospitals. Italy says 14 of 25 Italian crew members aboard the troubled Diamond Princess cruise ship, which has been struck under quarantine in Japan, will take an Italian evacuation military flight home. The other 11, including the captain of the ship, will stay, the Italian Foreign Ministry said. No date for the Italian air force plane's departure for Japan has been decided yet. The Russian Embassy in Japan announced Tuesday that one Russian was among the 542 people on the Diamond Princess confirmed with the virus. The statement clarified earlier reports about two Russians getting infected. On Monday, a Russian court sent a woman who broke out of a locked hospital during a 14-day isolation period back into quarantine. Russian health authorities are suing others who have defied quarantine requirements.

News

  • Singer Harry Styles was unharmed after being robbed at knifepoint Friday night in London, authorities said. Styles, 26, the former One Direction band member, released “Fine Line,” his second solo album in December. He was approached by a man with a knife who “demanded cash,” E! News reported. London police officials confirmed they were investigating a knifepoint robbery in the Hampstead area of London, the BBC reported. Police said no arrests had been made and that an investigation was ongoing, the network reported. Earlier Friday, Styles stopped by “The Zoe Ball Breakfast Show” to cover Joni Mitchell’s “Big Yellow Taxi,” New Musical Express reported.
  • Ricky Leo Davis, who was convicted nearly 15 years ago of the murder of a newspaper columnist, has become the first California inmate to be exonerated by genetic genealogy, the same technology that identified the alleged Golden State Killer in April 2018. Davis, 54, was released Thursday from the El Dorado County Jail in Placerville after the same DNA evidence that proved he did not kill his housemate, Jane Anker Hylton, in July 1985, pointed to another man as the killer. Hylton, a 54-year-old mother and columnist for the Foothills Times, was stabbed 29 times and suffered a bite mark on her left shoulder, according to authorities. Saliva from that bite mark would ultimately solve the case. Davis, who was convicted in the 20-year-old case in August 2005, is the second inmate in U.S. history to be freed using genetic genealogy, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. “Simply put, Ricky Leo Davis did not kill Jane Hylton,” El Dorado County District Attorney Vern Pierson said. Pierson announced the latest development in Davis’ case during a news conference Thursday. He also announced the arrest of the new suspect, who the Sacramento Bee identified as 51-year-old Michael Eric Green. CBS Sacramento reported Green was arrested outside his Roseville home, where neighbors said he’d spent much of his life living with and caring for his parents. Green was one of three young men Hylton’s then-13-year-old daughter told investigators she’d met in a park the night her mother was slain. She identified the boys by first names only: Calvin, Michael and a third boy named either Steve or Brian. Green, who was a juvenile when Hylton was killed, was arrested Tuesday in Placer County. He was booked Friday into the El Dorado County Jail on a murder charge, according to jail records. Pierson said the other two boys Hylton’s daughter named the morning her mother’s body was discovered have also been tracked down. One has since died and the other is cooperating with the investigation. The prosecutor said the new developments in the murder case were “two of the most dramatic extremes” he’d experienced in his 28 years on the job. “On one hand, a person, Ricky Davis, was falsely accused, brought to trial, convicted and has spent the last 15-some years in custody for a crime that I can tell you, in all confidence, he did not commit,” the prosecutor said. “It’s not a matter of we don’t have sufficient evidence to move forward on it or to proceed to a new trial. “In all confidence, he did not commit this crime. He is not responsible.” A brutal crime Davis, who was 20 when Hylton, 54, was killed, called police shortly after midnight July 7, 1985, after he and his girlfriend at the time, Connie Dahl, found Hylton’s body in the home they had just begun sharing, according to the Northern California Innocence Project. The home, located in El Dorado Hills, belonged to Davis’ grandmother, who the day before had allowed Hylton, who was her employee, and Hylton’s daughter to move in because the columnist was having marital trouble. “Davis and Dahl told detectives they had gone to a party the night before and returned home at 3:30 a.m., where they found Hylton’s daughter waiting outside,” the organization’s synopsis of Davis’ case reads. “She told them that she had gone out with a group of boys that night and was afraid her mother would be upset with her for being out too late. The three entered the house together. “Davis saw blood in the hallway outside the master bedroom and found Hylton’s body on the bed. Davis and Dahl immediately called 911 to report the crime.” Hylton’s estranged husband was cleared of the crime and the case eventually went cold. Fourteen years later, in November 1999, cold case detectives with the El Dorado Sheriff’s Office reopened the investigation and brought in Dahl for questioning. “The detectives interrogated Dahl four times over the next 18 months using techniques known to increase the chances of false confessions,” the case synopsis says. “Dahl ultimately changed her story for police and implicated Davis as the killer. She also implicated herself in the crime, telling the police that she bit the victim during the attack.” In addition, Dahl claimed Hylton’s daughter helped the couple move her mother’s body. Based nearly entirely on Dahl’s new claims, Davis was convicted in 2005 and sentenced to 16 years to life in prison, the synopsis states. Dahl, meanwhile, received a sentence of a year in county jail for her purported role in the crime. The Northern California Innocence Project became involved in Davis’ case in 2006, opening its own investigation into Hylton’s murder. With the cooperation of Pierson’s office, Davis’ attorneys sought DNA testing on evidence from the crime scene, including the victim’s nightgown and scrapings taken from under her fingernails. The testing found a man’s DNA on the nightgown in the area of the bite mark, the synopsis says. DNA found under the victim’s fingernails matched the sample from nightgown. “The test results excluded Davis, Dahl and Hylton’s daughter as the sources of the DNA,” according to the case synopsis. “The unknown male DNA profile found on the nightgown indicated that Dahl did not bite the victim, contrary to her testimony at trial.” Innocence Project attorneys went to court with the new evidence, successfully arguing in 2018 that the evidence would have likely resulted in a different outcome at Davis’ trial. Davis’ conviction was overturned on April 15, 2019, but prosecutors initially intended to retry him for Hylton’s slaying. Instead, Pierson’s office teamed up with the Sacramento County Crime Lab to use genetic genealogy to trace the unknown DNA to potential family members who had submitted their own genetic profiles to public websites. The process led detectives and prosecutors to Green. ‘Aggressive confession-driven interrogation tactics’ Pierson on Thursday highlighted the interrogation tactics he said led to Davis’ arrest and conviction more than two decades after Hylton was killed. In a court hearing at which Davis was officially set free, the prosecutor described Dahl’s questioning by two now-retired investigators as “aggressive, confession-driven interrogation.” In a snippet of Dahl’s interrogation transcript shared by Pierson’s office via video, a detective urged her to be the first to talk in the case. “So the train is coming through right now and, in my experience in law enforcement, the first one to jump on the bandwagon always gets the, always gets the easiest ride,” the unnamed detective said. “Right,” Dahl responded. Watch a video about the Jane Hylton case below. Editor’s note: The video contains crime scene footage that may be too graphic for some viewers. The detective then brought up the bite mark on the victim’s left shoulder. “…whether Ricky brings it on you or you bring it on somebody else, have you ever been the type of person that, during a fight, you know, whether you scratch, hit, punch, have you ever bitten someone? Do you ever bite?” the detective asked. “I’ve bitten some,” Dahl responded. “I’ve bitten a couple of times. Yeah.” The next snippet shows Dahl saying she didn’t know if she’d bitten Hylton. “I don’t know if … I don’t believe that I have it in me to help do this,” she said. Eventually, Dahl confessed to biting Hylton and said Davis killed her. Dahl died in 2014, the Bee reported. Watch Thursday’s news conference announcing Ricky Davis’ exoneration below. According to the newspaper, which covered Davis’ hearing Thursday, Pierson told El Dorado Superior Court Judge Kenneth J. Melekian that the DNA evidence exonerating Davis led his office to go over the murder case again as though it had never been solved instead of trying to prove Davis was the killer. When Melekian turned toward Davis a short time later, he declared him “factually innocent.” Davis and his attorneys were emotional following the hearing, the Bee reported. One Innocence Project lawyer, Melissa O’Connell, thanked Davis for his “tremendous strength and resilience, and never giving up hope,” the newspaper said. Davis, who emerged from the jail shortly after 3 p.m., walked into a crowd of about two dozen family members and Innocence Project staff. They hugged him and welcomed him back into the outside world. “God bless the Innocence Project,” Davis said as he held up a T-shirt from the organization. Both his own lawyers and Pierson said Davis will likely be financially compensated for the time he wrongfully spent in prison. According to The Associated Press, that compensation, under California law, would equal $750,000, or $140 for each day he spent behind bars. Pierson talked after the fact about meeting face-to-face with Davis a few nights before his release. “It’s an interesting conversation, to meet with someone as a prosecutor and realize that this person has, in fact, been falsely accused, convicted and incarcerated,” Pierson said. “He said a number of things. He knew that we had made a commitment that we would follow up on it.” He said Davis referenced the amount of time it had taken to free him since the DNA evidence first indicated his innocence in 2014. “I had to tell him, in all candor, if this investigation had moved forward years ago, the technology did not exist, the techniques did not exist that were employed in this case to unwind it the way that we were able to do it now,” Pierson said. “I wish it had occurred sooner, that we could have gotten him out of custody sooner. The practical reality is it’s only been the past year and a half, two years that genetic genealogy to identify someone in these circumstances has been in existence.” O’Connell said she and her colleagues believed in Davis’ innocence since they took on the case, both because of his own claims and what they believe were coercive interrogation methods. She said it was amazing how composed Davis remained in court Thursday. “I asked him, ‘Did you ever think this day would come?’ and he said, ‘Yes.’” O’Connell said. “He never gave up hope, and he trusted that the system would undo this wrongful conviction.” Watch Pierson and O’Connell discuss Thursday’s developments below, courtesy of the Bee. © 2020 © 2020 Cox Media Group
  • A California man is accused of entering a home, where the residents said he was making scrambled eggs and eating flan while not wearing pants, authorities said. Carl Cimino, 61, of Desert Hot Springs, was booked into the Riverside County Jail on a charge of residential burglary Tuesday morning, according to arrest records. According to police, three people woke up at their home around 7:30 a.m. and heard banging and yelling in the kitchen. They found Cimino making scrambled eggs with bologna and ranch dressing and eating flan, The Desert Sun reported. According to deputies, Cimino was not wearing pants and refused to leave the residence, the newspaper reported. Deputies finally were able to remove Cimino after using a police service dog, according to the arrest report. Cimino was placed on a gurney and removed from the home by paramedics, according to The Desert Sun. According to jail records, Cimino was free on bail after being arrested Jan. 23 on a drug-related accusation, the newspaper reported. The home’s residents said they were not hurt and there was no damage. They believe Cimino entered the home through an unlocked door, according to The Desert Sun.
  • Nearly all the employees at Orlando’s religious theme park, Holy Land Experience, will lose their jobs this spring. A document sent to the city of Orlando on Monday shows that the theme park will lay off all its staff involved in its stage shows. The move comes after the park announced it will be “shifting the focus of the park away from entertainment and theatrical productions to focus on the Biblical Museum.” Park officials said the layoffs will take effect April 18. In total, according to the Federal Worker Adjustment & Retraining Notification document sent to the city of Orlando, 118 jobs will be eliminated. The restructuring comes as a result of a “corporate wide ministry reorganization,” according to documents filed with the city.
  • A man with a metal detector made an explosive discovery when he found a live mortar from World War II Monday. Police said the munition was a remnant from when the area was used as a training ground during the war. The bomb squad determined the mortar was too unstable to be moved so it was detonated near where it was found. “The blast was heard from a distance, which caused alarm for many residents,” Lebanon police said on social media. “We appreciate everyone’s concerns and phone calls.” Authorities searched the area for more mortars before deeming it safe.
  • Ja’net DuBois, who played feisty neighbor Willona Woods on the 1970s television series “Good Times,” was found dead in her home Tuesday morning, according to a report. She was 74. The actress’ family told TMZ that DuBois died in her sleep at her Glendale, California, home. DuBois played the Evans family’s neighbor on “Good Times,” and also sang the theme song to 1970s sitcom “The Jeffersons,” according to The Hollywood Reporter. DuBois composed and sang “Movin’ On Up” for the show. DuBois won two Emmys Awards for her voice-over work on “The PJs.” She also appeared in movies including “I’m Gonna Git You Sucka,” “Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle” and “Tropic Thunder,” according to The Hollywood Reporter. DuBois also worked on Broadway, performing in productions including “Golden Boy” and “A Raisin in the Sun.” TV Land, which has aired reruns of “Good Times,” tweeted a tribute to the actress, writing that DuBois “would be missed.”