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World News

    Forensic experts have begun studying two sets of bones at a Vatican City cemetery where a missing teenage girl's family was tipped to look for her. A Holy See spokesman, Alessandro Gisotti, said on Saturday that the analyses are being done at the Pontifical Teutonic College, where the bones were found under a stone slab last week. The missing girl, Emanuela Orlandi, vanished in 1983 at age 15 after she left her family's apartment in Vatican City for a music lesson in Rome. Her family' lawyer received an anonymous tip that Emanuela might be buried near the 19th century tombs of two German princesses in the Teutonic College cemetery. The tombs turned out to be empty, but the bones were found during a search of adjoining areas.
  • U.S. President Donald Trump said he spoke with Sweden's prime minister Saturday about jailed rapper A$AP Rocky and 'offered to personally vouch for his bail.' Trump tweeted that during a 'a very good call' with Prime Minister Stefan Lofven, he also 'assured him that A$AP was not a flight risk.' The platinum-selling, Grammy-nominated artist has been in custody since early this month over an alleged fight. Urged on by the first lady and celebrities including Kanye West and Kim Kardashian West, the president had said in a Friday tweet that he would intervene to try to free Rocky, whose real name is Rakim May. 'Our teams will be talking further, and we agreed to speak again in the next 48 hours!' Trump wrote Saturday after speaking with Lofven. The Swedish prime minister issued a statement earlier Saturday saying he would be glad to speak with Trump about A$AP Rocky's detention but that his government 'cannot and will not attempt to influence prosecutors or courts.' 'I understand that President Trump has a personal interest in the case....He has expressed the desire for a conversation with me, which is certainly positive,' Lofven said. 'I will explain that the Swedish judicial system is independent. In Sweden, everyone is equal before the law, and this includes visitors from other countries.' Rocky has been behind bars while Swedish police investigate the fight in Stockholm he allegedly was in before appearing at a music festival. Videos published on social media appear to show a person being violently thrown onto the ground by Rocky. A defense lawyer has said it was self-defense. Other recording artists have spoken on his behalf, including Sean 'Diddy' Combs, Justin Bieber, Shawn Mendes, Nicki Minaj and Post Malone.
  • Police in Hong Kong discovered a stash of a powerful homemade explosive as the semi-autonomous Chinese city readied for another major pro-democracy protest on Sunday. Police said they found about 2 kilograms (4.4 pounds) of TATP and arrested a man in a raid on a commercial building late Friday night. TATP, or tri-acetone tri-peroxide, has been used in terrorist attacks worldwide. Materials voicing opposition to an extradition bill that has sparked more than a month of demonstrations in Hong Kong were found at the site, local media said, but a police spokesman said no concrete link has been established and that the investigation is continuing. In a rally that aimed to counter the pro-democracy movement, thousands of people filled a park in central Hong Kong on Saturday to support the police, who have been accused of using rough tactics on protesters. Some waved Chinese flags, and a giant screen behind the stage for speakers read 'Safeguard Hong Kong.' Many wore white, heeding a call by organizers, and the demonstrators did not wear masks or helmets, public broadcaster RTHK said. The anti-extradition law activists wear black and don protective gear against police pepper spray and batons. Organizers said 316,000 people took part in the demonstration, while police put the turnout at 103,000. Alick McWhirter, a senior bomb disposal officer, said the seizure of the explosives Friday was the largest of its kind in Hong Kong and called it troubling that such a dangerous substance was being made in a homemade laboratory in the middle of the city. 'It puts at risk everybody within the building. It puts at risk bystanders outside,' he told reporters. Police spokesman Tse Chun-chung said more arrests may follow. Police have erected large barricades near government headquarters in preparation for the protest march through central Hong Kong on Sunday. Earlier marches have been largely peaceful, but in a recurring pattern, police have clashed with groups of mostly young protesters who try to take over streets or refuse to disperse after the main demonstration is over. The extradition bill, which would have allowed suspects to be sent to mainland China to face trial, fueled broader concerns that the freedoms and legal rights of Hong Kong residents are being eroded. Hong Kong's leader, Carrie Lam, has declared the bill dead, but protesters are demanding her resignation and an inquiry into the use of force by police to push back and disperse protesters.
  • A Darth Vader costume, playground equipment, pastries and boxes of food all are part of an exhibit at Ukraine's National History Museum displaying the colorful behavior and sometime-questionable practices that characterize the country's elections. The exhibition, called 'The Museum of Election Trash' was put together ahead of Sunday's snap parliamentary elections. Unlike elections in neighboring Russia, campaigns in Ukraine tend to be lively, and the seriousness of some candidates is open to question. One of those in this year's election is Darth Viktorovich Vader, who is running for a seat in Odessa. This is only the latest appearance of the Star Wars villain — another Darth Vader ran for president in 2014. The Star Wars theme continues this year with the election being widely called 'Battle of the Clones,' a reference to the fact that many candidates are mimicking the still-popular recently elected President Volodymyr Zelenskiy and his Servant of the People party. At least 86 candidates have listed in their bios that they are a 'Servant of the People' though they have nothing to do with the president's party. And eight Zelenskiys are running — admittedly it is a fairly common name. Though Zelenskiy, a former TV comic who won by a landslide in April to become president, is expected to win handsomely, he has recorded a video statement, urging voters to be careful not to vote for the copycats. Election officials just shrug their shoulders. 'The law unfortunately has no restrictions for those who are trying to confuse the voters,' says Volodymyr Vyrva, spokesman for the Central Election Commission. 'There's nothing we can do.' The 'electoral trash' exhibit also highlights candidates' efforts to influence voters through gifts. The items include colorful equipment for a town playground that one candidate provided before an election, along with pastries and boxes of foodstuffs handed out to voters. Museum employee Yulia Reshitko says such bribery will remain a feature of Ukrainian elections so long as millions of people struggle to make ends meet. The latest trend is providing free tickets to pop gigs or classical music concerts. 'People were happy with the food boxes before,' she said. Zelenskiy's successful transformation has encouraged others. Svyatoslav Vakarchuk, for example, is the leader of the new Golos party — and arguably the nation's most beloved rock star. 'Political extravaganza is part of the Ukrainian tradition where politicians have often resorted to various attention-grabbing antics,' says Kiev-based political analyst Volodymyr Fesenko. 'But the extravaganza does not always produce good results.' In 2010, a western Ukrainian man who changed his last name to 'Protyvsikh' which translates into English as 'Against Everyone' ran for president and won just 0.2 percent of the vote.
  • Taken on its own, Iran's seizure of a British-flagged oil tanker in the Strait of Hormuz may seem like a brazen act of aggression, a provocative poke in the nose to both Britain and its ally, the United States. But Iran seems to view the armed takeover of the Stena Impero as a carefully calibrated response to the July 4 taking of an Iranian supertanker off the coast of Gibraltar, an operation in which Britain's Royal Marines played a major role. Though the official reasons for the takeovers differ, it's fairly clear now that the seizure of the British vessel may give Tehran more leverage to get its own ship back. While Britain says it acted near Gibraltar because the Iranian tanker Grace 1 was busting sanctions by delivering oil to Syria, Iran says it intervened because the British-flagged tanker hit an Iranian fishing boat. The current tensions between Iran and the West have been escalating since President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. last year from the 2015 nuclear deal with Tehran with world powers and imposed sweeping economic sanctions on Iran, including its oil exports. The 2015 accord, of which Britain was a signatory, was designed to prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons in return for a lifting of sanctions. Tensions have risen further since May, when the U.S. announced it was dispatching an aircraft carrier and additional troops to the Middle East, citing unspecified threats posed by Iran. With the U.S. sanctions hitting the Iranian economy hard, Tehran is desperate for economic support and has been urging Britain, France and Germany to cobble together a package that will keep the nuclear deal on track. Veteran British diplomat Malcolm Rifkind, who served as British foreign secretary and defense secretary in the 1990s, says Iran sees its action against the Steno Impero as a direct result to the U.K.'s involvement in the takeover of the Grace 1. 'From the point of view of the Iranians, there is a direct relationship,' he told The Associated Press Saturday. 'They were very, very angry at being caught out. But the Royal Navy was not acting against Iran; it was acting against Syria to enforce sanctions. But the Iranians don't see it that way.' Rifkind says Iran may carry its 'macho' actions too far and make it harder for Britain to continue with efforts to keep the nuclear accord alive. Iran made the link between the two separate seizures this month explicit on Saturday. 'The rule of reciprocal action is well-known in international law,' the semi-official Fars news agency quoted Abbas Ali Kadkhodaei, a spokesman for Iran's Guardian Council, as saying. He said Iran made the right decision in the face of an 'illegitimate economic war and seizure of oil tankers.' The precise timing may have been a coincidence, but it's a fact that Iran took action against the Stena Impero only hours after the government of Gibraltar — a British overseas territory — said it would continue to hold the Iranian tanker and its precious crude oil cargo, rejecting Iran's demands for its immediate return. The action against the Stena Impero, carried out by high speed patrol boats with a helicopter overhead, could hardly have been a surprise. Iran's leaders have publicly called Britain's seizure of the Grace 1 an act of 'piracy' and warned they were considering taking a British tanker in retaliation. Britain has offered to have the Iranian supertanker released if Iran pledges not to deliver the crude oil to Syria, an approach that has not borne fruit. A Gibraltar government hearing on the matter is set for August 15. The hope has to be that a diplomatic solution — the release of both seized vessels, with cargo and crew intact and unharmed, for example — can defuse this latest escalation in one of the most important sea passages on the planet.
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin says he believes Russians and Ukrainians constitute one nation and that the countries should find a way to integrate. Putin made the comments in an interview with the American film director Oliver Stone on June 19; material from the interview was used in a Stone film about Ukraine and the full transcript was published by the Kremlin on Friday. 'I believe that Russians and Ukrainians are one people ... one nation, in fact,' Putin said. 'When these lands that are now the core of Ukraine joined Russia ... nobody thought of themselves as anything but Russians.' In light of this bond, Putin said 'we can use this as our competitive advantage during some form of integration.
  • Francesco Saverio Borrelli, who as Milan chief prosecutor led the 1990s corruption probes which toppled Italy's long-ruling political class, has died. He was 89. Milan Chief Prosecutor Francesco Greco confirmed reports of Borrelli's death in a Milan hospital Saturday. He said a wake would be held at the city's courthouse. Borrelli's team of prosecutors in the 1990s unearthed systemic kickbacks dubbed 'Bribesville' between political parties and business figures. Scores of suspects were jailed in the 'Clean Hands' probes, and hundreds more were investigated. The investigations spelled the demise of decades of Christian Democrat post-war dominance of Italian politics. It also ended the political career of former Socialist Premier Bettino Craxi. The Neapolitan Borrelli became a magistrate in 1955 and in 1983 was appointed as a criminal prosecutor in Milan.
  • The No. 2 in Spain's Socialist Party says she is optimistic caretaker Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez will strike a last-minute deal with the far-left United We Can party to form a coalition government before next week's confidence vote. Adriana Lastra, the Socialist Party's vice general secretary, said Saturday that she was 'convinced' an agreement will be reached. The Socialists had said negotiations with United We Can were going nowhere until its leader, Pablo Iglesias, ceded on Friday to their demand to not seek a seat in the Cabinet. Sánchez would still need other parties' support for an absolute majority of the 350-member Parliament on Tuesday. If he fails, another vote would take place Thursday where the bar is lower and Sánchez would just need more 'Yes' than 'No' votes.
  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel has urged Europeans to confront populism, nationalism, racism and anti-Semitism as she paid tribute to the Nazi resistance in her own country. Speaking Saturday at a solemn ceremony marking the anniversary of the failed attempt to kill Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, Merkel said the courage and sacrifice of the conspirator should serve as an example to people today. 'They put humanity over their own human lives,' she told the crowd at the site where plot leader Col. Claus von Stauffenberg and others were executed. Von Stauffenberg tried to kill Hitler with a briefcase bomb on July 20, 1944, during a meeting at his headquarters in what was then East Prussia. Hitler escaped the full force of the blast when someone moved the briefcase next to a table leg, deflecting much of the explosive force. The plot crumbled when news spread that Hitler had survived. Von Stauffenberg and his fellow plotters were executed within hours. Merkel took the occasion to pay tribute to all who stood up against the Nazis in different ways, including people who hid Jews to save them from the death camps, the Jews who rose up in the Warsaw Ghetto to attack their Nazi captors in 1943, the Polish fighters of the 1944 Warsaw Uprising and other partisans who fought against the German occupiers and others. 'Von Stauffenberg is a symbol of the resistance, but his story is not the only story of the resistance,' she said. Amid evidence of rising anti-Semitism and racism in Germany, Merkel said people need to draw inspiration from the civil courage shown by those who resisted the Nazis and make their voices heard. 'Instead of looking away or being silent, we need to be engaged,' she said. On a wider scale, she said Europeans need to speak out and act against nationalism and populism. 'We need to think multilaterally, not unilaterally; global, not national; open not isolationist; together, not alone,' she said to applause. 'Those are the tasks of today.
  • The Latest on developments related to tensions between the U.S. and Iran (all times local): 7 p.m. Iran's semi-official Tasnim news agency is reporting that the country's powerful Revolutionary Guard has recently issued two warnings to aggressive U.S. drones. The Saturday report quotes Deputy Chief of Staff of the Iranian Armed Forces Gen. Mehdi Rabbani as saying an American MQ-9 drone had twice entered Iranian air space — once on May 26 and again on June 13 — and was confronted with hard warnings. Gen. Rabbani said the advanced drone took off from a U.S. base in Kuwait on May 26 and flew about 20 hours near Iran's airspace. When it approached the Iranian coast, it turned around after determining 'our air defense system targeted and locked in on it.' On June 13, the drone took off from another country and when it crossed into Iran, 'Our air defense systems locked in on it and it made a few warning shots.' Tasnim said the U.S. claimed that Iran launched missiles against the drone. __ 6:40 p.m. Britain's defense secretary says the British-flagged oil tanker that has been seized by Iranian forces was in Omani waters at the time. Penny Mordaunt told Sky News on Saturday that the takeover was a 'hostile act' by Iran. Britain has promised a 'robust' response but there are no indications the use of military force is a likely option. Mordaunt says that a British Royal Navy frigate deployed to help protect shipping in the Strait of Hormuz was roughly 60 minutes from the scene when the Iranians took control of the tanker. ___ 6:40 p.m. U.K. Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt says Britain's response to Iran's seizure of a British-flagged ship in the Strait of Hormuz 'will be considered but robust.'  In comments on Twitter on Saturday, he wrote that he spoke with Iran's foreign minister and expressed extreme disappointment that the Iranian diplomat had assured him Iran wanted to de-escalate the situation but 'they have behaved in the opposite way.' He wrote: 'This has (to) be about actions not words if we are to find a way through. British shipping must & will be protected.' ___ 6:30 p.m. Britain's Foreign Office has summoned a senior Iranian diplomat to Whitehall to discuss the crisis brought about by Iran's seizure of a British-flagged tanker in the Strait of Hormuz. The summons to Iran's charge d'affaires came Saturday, one day after Iranian patrol boats backed by helicopter support took control of the Stena Impero tanker and brought it to Iran. Britain has said it is seeking a diplomatic and not a military solution to the situation. It is calling for the immediate return of the vessel and its crew. Britain's government has been holding emergency security Cabinet sessions to try and find a way out of the impasse. The crisis came as Britain's government is in a state of transition, with Prime Minister Theresa May expected to be replaced by a new Conservative Party leader in just four days. ___ 4 p.m. Germany says Iran's seizure of a British oil tanker and the brief detention of another is an 'unjustifiable intrusion' on shipping through a key Persian Gulf route that is increasing tensions in the region. The Foreign Ministry said Saturday that it 'strongly condemns' Iran's actions on Friday against the vessels in the Strait of Hormuz. The ministry is urging Iran to immediately release the ship and crew it seized, and said Britain has Germany's support. It calls the seizure 'an unjustifiable intrusion into the civilian shipping industry which further exacerbates an already strained situation.' It added that, 'Another regional escalation would be very dangerous; it would also undermine all ongoing efforts to find a way out of the current crisis.' ___ 3:35 p.m. France's foreign ministry has called on Iran to quickly free a British-flagged oil tanker and its crew, as well as respect freedom of navigation in the Persian Gulf. The ministry said in a statement on Saturday that the seizing of the ship 'harms the needed de-escalation of tensions' in the region. It firmly condemned the action while expressing solidarity with Britain. Iran said it seized the tanker on Friday in the Strait of Hormuz, at the mouth of the Persian Gulf, in what marked a new escalation of tensions in a crisis over the slow unraveling of the 2015 nuclear accord. French President Emmanuel Macron has been leading a bid to de-escalate tensions and resume dialogue. ___ 3:25 p.m. Iran's state TV is showing the first footage of a British-flagged oil tanker after it was seized a day earlier by the country's Revolutionary Guard. The Saturday report published a video showing the Stena Impero docked near the port of Bandar Abbas in southern Iran near the Strait of Hormuz. Earlier Saturday, the director general of Ports and Maritime Affairs of Hormuzgan province, Allahmorad Afifipour, said all 23 crew members would remain on board the ship in order to follow safety regulations. ___ 2:55 p.m. Iran's Guardian Council, a powerful constitutional watchdog, says the seizure of a British-flagged oil tanker was in response to Britain's role in seizing an Iranian tanker earlier this month. The semi-official Fars news agency quoted Abbas Ali Kadkhodaei, a council spokesman, as saying Saturday that 'The rule of reciprocal action is well-known in international law.' Kadkhodaei says Iran made the right decision in the face of an 'illegitimate economic war and seizure of oil tankers.' The Council rarely comments on such matters, but when it does, it's seen as a reflection of the supreme leader's views. That's because the council works closely with Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who has final say on all state matters. ___ 2:15 p.m. The Indian and Philippine governments say they're working to get Iran to release nationals from the two countries who were on board a British-flagged oil tanker seized by Iran in the Persian Gulf. India's foreign ministry spokesman, Raveesh Kumar, said Saturday its diplomats were 'in touch with the Government of Iran to secure the early release and repatriation' of the 18 Indian crew members on the Stena Impero. Manila's Department of Foreign Affairs also says its ambassador to Tehran is in contact with Iranian authorities to ensure the one Filipino crew member's safety and immediate release. Philippine Foreign Affairs Undersecretary Sarah Lou Arriola says there have been no reports of injuries among the crew. Iran's state-run IRNA news agency has said the other crew members consisted of three Russians and a Latvian. ___ 12:55 p.m. The chairman of Britain's House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee says military action to free the oil tanker seized by Iran would not be a good choice. Tom Tugendhat said Saturday it would be 'extremely unwise' to seek a military solution to the escalating crisis, especially because the vessel has apparently been taken to a well-protected port. 'If it has been taken to Bandar Abbas then that's an important Iranian military port and I think any military options will therefore be extremely unwise,' he told BBC. He also said it would not be useful to expel Iran's ambassador to the United Kingdom because it is important to keep talking. Other senior British figures have said military options should not be used. ___ 11:05 a.m. Iran's state-run IRNA news agency is reporting that the country's seizure of British-flagged oil tanker a day earlier was due to a collision with an Iranian fishing boat. Saturday's report says the British tanker caused damage to the fishing boat, then didn't respond to calls from the smaller craft. The fishing boat informed Iran's Ports and Maritime Organization, which notified the Revolutionary Guard. The report says Revolutionary Guard vessels directed the Stena Impero to the Iranian port of Bandar Abbas for an investigation Friday. Iran's attempt to offer a 'technical' explanation for seizing the tanker could signal a possible de-escalation of tensions in the strategic Strait of Hormuz, which has become a flashpoint between Tehran and the West. Another British ship was briefly detained by Iran on Friday before being allowed to go.

News

  • It's been a major distraction for drivers on Florida’s Turnpike in Osceola County. They don't know if she has a home, but a dog, whom some are now calling Ozzy, certainly has a lot of people watching out for her. >> Read more trending news  Dispatchers at the turnpike’s Traffic Management Center have spent months doing everything they can to catch the dog before she or a driver gets hurt. On Friday, Florida Turnpike officials said she was captured. She is very calm and quiet. There's a whole team of people watching hundreds of cameras along the turnpike and keeping an eye out for anything that may be dangerous for drivers. But consistently since May, in one particular part of the road, they kept seeing the same dog over and over. Road Ranger Jonathon Hester patrols a stretch of the turnpike near the Yeehaw Junction. “Our No. 1 job is safety,' Hester said. He's usually routing drivers around wrecks or helping with a flat tire. But lately, he's been determined to find the furry fugitive. 'This one has just evaded us for a long time and we keep trying to find him,” Hester said. For about two months, dispatchers were seeing the yellow Labrador between mile markers 196 and 205 on the turnpike, headed southbound. 'And just kind of runs up and down the roadway. It's a big distraction for the motorists driving by,” Hester said. “People see it and slam on their brakes.' Officials said they have no idea where she came from. 'It's possible it could've come from a vehicle crash,” Hester said. “A motorist could've been traveling with this dog, and crashed and the dog got scared and ran away.' Because she's been living on the road in Osceola County, they have affectionately named her Ozzy. Osceola County Animal Control let Hester borrow a trap in an effort to catch Ozzy. Now that the dog is caught, they plan to scan Ozzy for a chip to see if she has a home. If not, Ozzy may be up for adoption.
  • The Jacksonville Game Center has been burglarized twice in less than a month with thieves making off with nearly $10,000 worth of Magic the Gathering cards.  >> Read more trending news  Store owners told Action News Jax that both times, the thieves busted through a wall to get in. Hector Ortiz is a regular at the game center. Action News Jax caught up with him as customers and staff were preparing for their Friday night Magic the Gathering tournament. “The place is pretty packed, we have anywhere from 20-plus players,” Ortiz said. “It’s like a second home. A lot of people come to get away from issues.” So, when these crimes occur, Ortiz said the customers take it as a personal attack. “The first time it happened was really heartbreaking,” Ortiz said. Action News Jax first reported three weeks ago when thieves busted a hole in the wall to take more than $5,000 rare Magic the Gathering cards. The owner said they came back again overnight Friday. Surveillance video showed the glow of their flashlights. The owner said this time, they left another hole in the wall and stole more than $3,000 in those same, valuable cards.  He said they busted through the wall at the restaurant next door. Friday, Hunan Wok had a board up in the window where the thieves broke their glass to get in.Ortiz had a message for the thieves. “Just grow up,” Ortiz said. “It’s not necessary. You’re attacking us for a quick buck. Just go out there and get a job, man.
  • A woman is in jail facing felony charges after Clayton County authorities said she allegedly sneaked a firecracker into a courtroom and threatened to blow up the place.  >> Read more trending news  Whitney Jefferies, 32, was arrested Monday night after a judge saw the threat the woman allegedly posted on social media, Channel 2 Action News reported.  Judge Michael Garrett said Jefferies was in the front row in his courtroom. He told Channel 2 she seemed agitated that it was taking so long for her case to be called.  Later, he saw a video she posted on her social media page in which she held up a firecracker and said she was going to blow the courtroom apart, the news station reported.  It is not clear how Jefferies got the firecracker into the courtroom, and Clayton County Sheriff Victor Hill has not commented on the situation. Deputies went to Jefferies’ condo in Morrow to arrest her, Channel 2 reported. Nobody answered when agents first knocked on her door, according to the news station.However, deputies realized someone was inside the home when a pizza was delivered to the house later that evening, Channel 2 reported.  Deputies went back to Jefferies’ door and brought her out in handcuffs, the news station reported.  Jefferies was booked into the Clayton jail, where she remains held on a $35,000 bond. She face three charges, including making terroristic threats and possession of a destructive device.
  • A Charlotte, North Carolina woman and her Australian boyfriend were murdered while they were traveling the world, officials said. >> Read more trending news  Chynna Deese, 24, and her boyfriend, Lucas Fowler, 23, were found shot and killed on a remote western Canadian highway Monday near their broken down van, WSOC-TV reported. Officials said they were exploring Canadian national parks and heading to Alaska. Police said this does not appear connected to any other crimes. Friday night, WSOC-TV interviewed Chynna's mother Sheila Deese, who said despite not knowing how her daughter died, she's comforted in knowing her daughter and Fowler were together until the end. 'It is a love story, a southern girl goes out of the country, meets this Australian and they were just the same personality,' Sheila Deese said. Canadian Police said they don't know if Deese and Fowler were targeted or if this was random. They said they are working with the FBI to find the couple's killer. 
  • A 77-year-old convicted murderer who was released from prison after being deemed 'too old' to kill again was convicted this week of fatally stabbing a Maine woman. >> Read more trending news  Albert Flick was found guilty Wednesday of killing 48-year-old Kimberly Dobbie in July 2018 outside a Lewiston laundromat. The attack happened in front of Dobbie's 11-year-old twin boys. 'I'm glad the verdict is done and over and I'm glad he'll never be able to walk the streets again,' said Dobbie's friend James Lipps, NBC News reported. This is Flick's second murder conviction. Flick was convicted in the 1979 death of his wife, Sandra. Similar to Dobbie's death, Flick stabbed his wife as her daughter watched, CNN reported. Flick was sentenced to 25 years in prison for the 1979 murder. He was released and was released in 2000 after 21 years for good behavior, The Washington Post reported.  By 2010, when he was in his late 60s, Flick had been convicted of assaulting two other women. Despite his record, the judge in the 2010 case sentenced him to four years. “At some point Mr. Flick is going to age out of his capacity to engage in this conduct,” Maine Superior Court Justice Robert E. Crowley said, according to the Portland Press Herald. “And incarcerating him beyond the time that he ages out doesn’t seem to me to make good sense.” Judge Crowley retired in 2010. He hasn't responded to media requests for comment. Flick is scheduled for sentencing August 9. He faces 25 years to life behind bars. “I firmly believe this could have been prevented,” Elsie Clement, whose mother was stabbed to death by Flick in 1979, told the Press Herald last year of Dobbie's death. “There is no reason this man should have been on the streets in the first place, no reason.”
  • Public school students in New Hampshire will be provided with free menstrual products thanks to the passage of a new law. SB 142, signed into law Wednesday by Gov. Chris Sununu, will require public schools to provide feminine hygiene products in women’s and gender-neutral bathrooms in high schools and middle schools starting January 1, The Concord Monitor reported.  >> Read more trending news  “This legislation is about equality and dignity,” Sununu said. “SB 142 will help ensure young women in New Hampshire public schools will have the freedom to learn without disruption – and free of shame, or fear of stigma.” The idea for the law came from 17-year-old Caroline Dillon, a high school student in Rochester, N.H. The high schooler was inspired to act after learning in U.S. History class about 'period poverty,' where those who can't afford feminine hygiene products miss work or school during menstruation. “It was sad to think about,” Dillon told The Monitor. “Girls in middle and high school would never dream of telling somebody that they have to miss school or use socks because they can’t pay for pads.” Dillon approached state Sen. Martha Hennessey with her idea, and Hennesey became a main sponsor of the bill. Educating some lawmakers was initially awkward, Dillon said. Most lawmakers are men, and wanted to avoid words like 'menstruation,' 'tampon' and 'feminine hygiene products,' The Monitor reported. “They would say ‘the thing’ or just try to avoid saying it all together,” Dillon said. “I would say to them, ‘If this makes you uncomfortable, think about how uncomfortable it is to be in this situation yourself. If you can't really picture it yourself, think about any woman in your life: your mom, your daughter, your aunt – think about how uncomfortable she feels – you are in the position to make it so these women don’t have to feel that way.’ ”  Dillon's efforts were ultimately successful. Funding for the new measure will come from school districts' budgets, according to CNN. Districts can partner with nonprofit organizations to provide the feminine hygiene products. Opponents of the bill said its amounts to an unconstitutional unfunded mandate,  USA Today reported. Similar laws currently exist in New York, Illinois and California.