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World News

    Saying humanity is waging war with the planet, the head of the United Nations isn't planning to let just any world leader speak about climate change at Monday's special 'action summit.' Only those with new, specific and bold plans can command the podium and the ever-warming world's attention, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said. So sit down Brazil. Sit down Saudi Arabia. Sit down Poland 'People can only speak if they come with positive steps. That is kind of a ticket,' Guterres said. 'For bad news don't come.' As if to underscore the seriousness of the problem, the U.N.'s World Meteorological Organization released a quick science report Sunday showing that in the last several years, warming, sea level rise and carbon pollution have all accelerated. Brazil's, Poland's and Saudi Arabia's proposals for dealing with climate change fell short, so they're not on Monday's summit schedule. The United States didn't even bother, according to a U.N. official, who spoke on condition of anonymity. The bar isn't that high: Leaders from 64 nations, the European Union, more than a dozen companies and banks, a few cities and a state will present plans at the secretary-general's Climate Action Summit. Guterres wants nations to be carbon-neutral by 2050 — in other words, they will not add more heat-trapping greenhouse gases into the air than are removed by plants and perhaps technology each year. On Sunday, 87 countries around the world pledged to decarbonize in a way consistent with one of the international community's tightest temperature goals. There is a sense of urgency, Guterres said, because 'climate change is the defining issue of our time.' 'For the first time, there is a serious conflict between people and nature, between people and the planet,' Guterres said. He wants countries to commit to no new coal power plants after 2020 and reduce carbon pollution by 45% in the next century. The purpose of the summit is to come up with new green proposals a year earlier than the 2020 deadline that is in the 2015 Paris climate agreement. World leaders agreed in 2009 to try to keep warming to just 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) since pre-industrial times. Then in 2015 they added a secondary, tougher goal, at the urging of small islands, to keep warming to just 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). The new weather agency report showed that the world has warmed already by 1.1 degrees Celsius (2 degrees Fahrenheit). So that means the goals are to limit further warming to 0.9 degrees Celsius (1.6 degrees Fahrenheit) from now or even 0.4 degrees Celsius (0.72 degrees Fahrenheit) from now. Efforts to reduce carbon pollution need to be tripled to keep from hitting the 2-degree Celsius mark and must increase fivefold to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius since pre-industrial times, the World Meteorological Organization report said. As bad as that sounds, it's wrong and overly optimistic to use the mid-1880s as the benchmark, said Pennsylvania State University climate scientist Michael Mann. Mann said that many studies, including the WMO's, are overlooking that the world has warmed 0.2 degrees Celsius (0.36 degrees Fahrenheit) from human causes since the mid-1700s. The weather agency said the last five years were the warmest five on record and even 0.2 degrees Celsius (0.36 degrees Fahrenheit) hotter than the first half of the decade, a significant jump in just a few years. 'There is a growing recognition that climate impacts are hitting harder and sooner than climate assessments indicated even a decade ago,' the 28-page report said. A larger, more international report looking at climate change and oceans and ice will be released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on Wednesday. 'This new WMO report highlights the importance of making more progress on reducing emissions of carbon dioxide,' Cornell University climate scientist Natalie Mahowald said. 'Hopefully this latest U.N. Climate Summit will motivate more action.
  • Several thousand people have taken to the streets across northwest Russia to protest a controversial plan to build a major waste plant there. Police in the regional capital of Arkhangelsk said Sunday that about 1,000 people attended a rally there while local media reported that more than 2,000 protesters showed up. Protesters also rallied in more than a dozen towns in the area against the dump. Local media reported three activists have been detained at Arkhangelsk rally on charges related to their participation in unsanctioned gatherings earlier this year. The outcry against plans for the waste plant in a pristine Russian forest gained national prominence earlier this year. Russian President Vladimir Putin has asked local officials to heed public concerns but the construction project has not been shelved.
  • Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of Britain's main opposition Labour Party, insists he would serve a full term as prime minister if his party wins the next general election, which is widely expected to take place in the next few months. Countering speculation that the 70-year-old is considering standing down, Corbyn told the BBC on Sunday that he would lead Labour into the next election. Asked if he would serve a full term, Corbyn said: 'Of course.' Corbyn is at Labour's annual conference in the southern English city of Brighton. The gathering has been overshadowed by an attempt by a close ally of Corbyn's to oust his deputy Tom Watson, a move that was abandoned after Corbyn intervened. Watson has upset many of Corbyn's left-wing supporters by seeking to make Labour an anti-Brexit party.
  • A humanitarian ship with 182 rescued migrants is sailing back and forth Sunday in international waters between Italy and Malta as it awaits permission from some European government to dock. The Ocean Viking, a Norwegian-flagged ship operated by SOS Mediterranee and Doctors Without Borders, rescued four groups of migrants fleeing Libya on human traffickers' unseaworthy boats last week. On Friday it disembarked 35 people it had rescued under Maltese orders because their migrant boat was in a Mediterranean Sea region under Malta's search-and-rescue responsibility. But the remaining 182 people, including 13 children under age 15 and a newborn, have so far been rejected by Malta and Italy, which contend that charity boats help Libyan-based human traffickers. Italy is demanding that other European nations take many of those rescued.
  • The World Health Organization has issued an unusual statement raising questions about whether Tanzania is covering up possible cases of the deadly Ebola virus, a significant cause for concern during a regional outbreak that has been declared a rare global health emergency. The statement Saturday says Tanzania's government 'despite several requests' is refusing to share the results of its investigations into a number of patients with Ebola-like symptoms and is refusing to ship patient samples to an outside WHO partner lab. Tanzania's government, which has said it has no Ebola cases, could not immediately be reached for comment Sunday. The cases would be the first-ever Ebola infections confirmed in the East African country. The United Nations health agency says it was made aware on Sept. 10 of the death in Tanzania's commercial capital, Dar es Salaam, of a patient suspected to have Ebola. A day later, it received unofficial reports that an Ebola test had come back positive. On Thursday, it received unofficial reports that a contact of the patient, who had traveled widely in the country, was sick and hospitalized. A rapid response is crucial in containing Ebola, which can be fatal in up to 90% of cases and is most often spread by close contact with bodily fluids of people exhibiting symptoms or with contaminated objects. The WHO statement said the lack of information from Tanzania made it difficult to assess potential risks. The Ebola outbreak based in neighboring Congo has infected over 3,000 people and killed nearly 2,000 of them. A few cases have been confirmed in neighboring Uganda as well, and other neighboring countries have been preparing for the outbreak's possible spread. This is not the first time health officials have raised serious questions about the suspected Tanzania cases. On Monday, the U.S. health and human services secretary, Alex Azar, told reporters in Uganda that he and others were 'very concerned about the lack of transparency' in Tanzania. Critics have shown increasing alarm as Tanzanian President John Magufuli's government has restricted access to key information and cracked down on perceived dissent. Lawmakers recently approved an amendment to a statistics law to make it a crime to distribute information not sanctioned by the government or which contradicts the government. The World Bank was among those expressing concern at that amendment. ___ Associated Press writer Rodney Muhumuza in Kampala, Uganda contributed. ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa
  • The European Union will insist that border controls be put up along the Irish border if Britain leaves the bloc without a deal and the British government will be responsible for that, a top EU official said. Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission president, told Sky News in an interview broadcast Sunday that the blame for that would rest squarely on Britain. Border controls could in theory go up soon after Oct. 31, Britain's scheduled departure date. Brussels was 'in no way responsible' for the consequences of a no-deal Brexit, Juncker told Sky News. 'We have to make sure that the interests of the European Union and of the internal market will be preserved,' he said. How to maintain a frictionless border between EU member Ireland and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom, is the thorniest issue in the Brexit discussions. An invisible border is a key component of 1998's Good Friday peace accord that brought peace in Northern Ireland after decades of sectarian violence. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is insisting that the Irish border provision in the Brexit deal negotiated by his predecessor, Theresa May, be scrapped. The so-called Irish backstop is effectively a guarantee that no border will go up on the island of Ireland by requiring that Britain stick to EU trade rules — even though it won't have any say in the formulation of those rules after Brexit — until the two sides have negotiated a comprehensive trade deal. That would leave Britain locked into the EU's orbit for years. British lawmakers rejected May's deal three times this year, with many doing so because of their opposition to the backstop. Johnson is trying to get the EU to agree to replace the backstop with 'alternative arrangements' — a mix of technology to replace border checks and a common area for agricultural products and animals covering the whole island of Ireland. Juncker said he is open to alternative arrangements, but noted that in a no-deal Brexit, an animal entering Northern Ireland could then enter the EU via Ireland if there are no border controls. 'This will not happen,' he said. 'We have to preserve the health and the safety of our citizens.' Under the rules of the EU's single market, goods and people can move across the 28 countries seamlessly. Johnson got elected by Conservative Party members in July on the promise that the country will leave the EU on Oct. 31 come what may. British lawmakers, however, have passed a law that says the prime minister has to request an extension to the Brexit date if Parliament does not back a deal or a no-deal departure by Oct. 19. That law has raised questions on exactly when the country will leave. Parliament is now suspended until Oct. 14, just over two weeks before the U.K. is due to leave the EU. However, it may be forced to return if the Supreme Court decides this week that Johnson's request broke the law when he suspended Parliament. The Supreme Court is deciding whether Johnson unlawfully shut Parliament to prevent lawmakers from scrutinizing his plan to leave the EU with or without a divorce deal. Opponents also accuse him of misleading Queen Elizabeth II, whose formal approval was needed to suspend the legislature. The government says that Johnson acted lawfully and the issue of suspending parliament is one for politicians, not the courts. Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said the government will respect the Supreme Court's ruling on Johnson's move to suspend Parliament. 'Of course, we will respect whatever the legal ruling is from the Supreme Court,' he told the BBC on Sunday. Pressed on whether Northern Ireland could have different EU customs arrangements than the rest of the UK, Raab said: 'No, of course, that would be wrong.' ___ Follow AP's full coverage of Brexit and British politics at: https://www.apnews.com/Brexit
  • More than 600,000 travelers with Thomas Cook were on edge Sunday wondering if they will be able to get home as one of the world's oldest and largest travel companies teetered on the edge of collapse. The company, which confirmed Friday it was seeking 200 million pounds ($250 million) in extra funding to avoid going bust, was in last-ditch talks with shareholders and creditors to stave off a collapse. Sky News reported that discussions were taking place Sunday at the London-based headquarters of law firm Slaughter & May. Thomas Cook would not comment on that report but said it has sought to reassure customers that their flights are continuing to operate as normal. It said most package holidays for British travelers are protected by the ATOL insurance scheme. The financial difficulties were also raising questions about the jobs of the 22,000 staff employed by Thomas Cook around the world, including 9,000 in Britain. The tour operator recently raised 900 million pounds ($1.12 billion) in new capital, including from its leading Chinese shareholder Fosun. Unions and the main opposition Labour Party have urged the British government to intervene financially to save jobs if the company cannot raise the necessary funds. A collapse could leave around 150,000 travelers from Britain stranded, along with hundreds of thousands of travelers from other countries. In that scenario, Britain's Civil Aviation Authority would likely be ordered by the government to launch a major repatriation operation to fly stranded vacationers home, much like it did when Monarch Airlines went bust nearly two years ago. British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said British holidaymakers will not be left stranded and that contingency planning was underway. 'I don't want to give all the details of it because it depends on the nature of how people are out there,' he told the BBC. 'But I can reassure people that, in the worst-case scenario, the contingency planning is there to avoid people being stranded.' Thomas Cook, which first started operating in 1841 with a one-day train excursion in England, has been struggling over the past few years for a variety of reasons. In May, the company reported in half-year results that it had a net debt burden of 1.25 billion pounds and cautioned that political uncertainty related to Britain's departure from the European Union had led to softer demand for summer holiday travel. Heatwaves over the past couple of summers in Europe have prompted many potential vacationers to stay at home, while higher fuel and hotel costs have weighed on the travel business. The company's troubles appear to be already afflicting those travelling under the Thomas Cook banner. One British vacationer told BBC radio that the Les Orangers beach resort in the Tunisian town of Hammamet, near Tunis, was demanding that visitors pay extra money for fear it won't be paid what it is owed by Thomas Cook. Ryan Farmer from Leicestershire told the BBC early Sunday that the hotel had summoned guests who were due to leave to go to its reception and 'pay additional fees, obviously because of the situation with Thomas Cook.' He said many tourists refused the demand since they had already paid Thomas Cook, so the hotel's security guards shut the hotel's gates and 'were not allowing anyone to leave.' It was like 'being held hostage,' said Farmer, who is due to leave Tuesday. He said he would also refuse to pay if the hotel asked him. The Associated Press called the hotel, as well as the British embassy in Tunis, but no officials or managers were available for comment.
  • Jailed Tunisian media magnate Nabil Karoui said he's 'reasonably optimistic' about winning Tunisia's presidential runoff, where he is facing independent law professor Kais Saied. They beat out two dozen other candidates in the first-round of voting on Sept. 15. No date has been set yet for the presidential runoff in the North African nation but Tunisia's electoral body says it will take place by Oct. 13. The 56-year-old Karoui, co-owner of private TV station Nessma TV, was jailed Aug. 23 pending an investigation into alleged money laundering and tax evasion charges. He has said he's the victim of a smear campaign. He was allowed to remain in the race because he has not been convicted but he said he felt being in jail cost him many votes. The Associated Press sent questions to his lawyer, Kamel Ben Messaoud, who responded Saturday night with Karoui's comments. In those written answers, Karoui said 'of course we have a chance, because it's a second round and both candidates will restart from scratch.' Karoui said he celebrated his qualification for the runoff last week with his cellmates. Karoui, who has positioned himself as an advocate for the poor, said he wants to be released to be able to campaign on an equal footing with his adversary. He denounced a 'serious denial of justice and democracy' and said it is 'against the will' of the people who voted for him. Considered very conservative, the 61-year-old Saied, who is not affiliated with any political party, emerged as the outsider of the vote. 'I'm not in competition or in a race with anyone,' Saied told The Associated Press earlier this week. '(Tunisians) are free to choose who they want.' The election was called early after the death in office in July of President Beji Caid Essebsi. It is Tunisia's second democratic presidential election since the 2011 revolution that toppled autocratic leader Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, unleashing the Arab Spring uprisings across the region. Ben Ali died Thursday at age 83 in Saudi Arabia.
  • Many residents in Albania's capital of Tirana and the port city of Durres have not gone back to their homes after a 5.8 magnitude earthquake injured 105 people and damaged hundreds of buildings. Authorities say the Saturday afternoon quake was followed by more than 100 aftershocks. It also damaged about 600 homes and temporarily knocked out power and water facilities in Tirana, Durres and some other western and central districts. Many people fled their homes when the quake hit at 4:04 p.m., with at least 500 spending the night in temporary shelters. Experts on Sunday inspected damaged homes and buildings and raised more emergency tents. Defense Minister Olta Xhacka, speaking at a Cabinet meeting, said 'luckily oil wells were not damaged.' Prime Minister Edi Rama said he had phone calls from his Italian, French, German and other European counterparts offering assistance. Johannes Hahn, European Union's budget and administration commissioner and former enlargement one, tweeted that '#EU immediately offered assistance.' Located along the Adriatic and Ionian Seas, Albania is earthquake-prone and registers seismic activity every few days.
  • After two years on the run with the Islamic State group, Um Mahmoud just wanted to return home. When she finally made it to Raqqa with her daughters and grandchildren, she found her home partially burned but livable. She also found a hostile city reluctant to take her back. The 53-year-old seamstress had returned from al-Hol camp, where 73,000 people, most of them families of IS militants, have been kept since the territorial defeat of the group in March. But there is little trust in the returnees in Raqqa, which IS ruled with a brutal hand for years and which suffered massive devastation in the fight to drive it out. Um Mahmoud's neighbors and relatives in Raqqa have shunned her. 'No one asks about us,' said the mother of six. 'Relatives are ... afraid of us.' Her return, in June, is part of an experiment by the U.S.-backed Kurdish-led administration that runs northeastern Syria — an attempt to bring reconciliation to Raqqa after the upheaval that tore apart its social fabric. City administrators have allowed the return of nearly 700 families from al-Hol. The camp includes some 30,000 Syrians, mostly women and children, along with tens of thousands of Iraqis and hundreds of foreigners. Most of those foreigners' home countries have refused to take them back. The administration here argues it's better to bring the families back into the fold rather than leave them stewing in radicalism. The return is coordinated with Arab tribal sheikhs, who vouch for the returnees, acting as guarantors they will not cause trouble. Thousands more Syrians in the camp have applied to return. The results of the experiment are still uncertain, Um Mahmoud's case makes clear. She and her family spoke on condition they not be identified by their full names because of the stigma they face. Um Mahmoud means mother of Mahmoud in Arabic, a common way of addressing women in the Arab and Muslim world that uses the name of their firstborn son. She and her family fled Raqqa in the summer of 2017 when IS ordered their neighborhood evacuated in the face of advances by the U.S.-backed forces and coalition airstrikes. They moved with the retreating militants from town to town over the following months, until the group's final showdown in the eastern village of Baghouz. Two of her sons and a son-in-law were killed while fighting or working for IS. She emerged from Baghouz and was sent to al-Hol along with her three daughters and three grandchildren. Her husband, father, her surviving 14-year-old son and a son-in-law are in detention with the Kurdish-led forces. The son-in-law was sentenced to a year in prison for membership in IS, though it was determined he didn't fight. Without her male relatives, Um Mahmoud returned to a Raqqa that is trying to move on. Streets that were once unidentifiable under piles of debris have been cleared, and municipality workers are keeping them clean. Many tall buildings in the skyline are still bombed-out skeletons, but residents have moved in, rebuilding apartments or opening shops. New restaurants have sprung up, some along the banks of the river running across the city. Billboards rise over busy streets. One advertised a new wedding planning business that commissions singers, banned under IS. Vegetables from nearby farms color street stands. Public parks brim with children and their families. Officials say more than 800,000 people have returned to the city and its suburbs, nearly eight times the number who were still left in the city when IS was finally expelled in October 2017. Local officials said they restored 18 of 24 water pumping stations damaged by fighting. More than 300 schools, out of 800, now operate with tens of thousands of students. The U.S-led coalition has trained more than 7,500 men and women for Raqqa's internal security forces and refurbished 20 bridges destroyed in the fighting. A U.S. State Department official, speaking on condition of anonymity to brief reporters, said 'very targeted' spending has been going into newly liberated areas to ensure that IS doesn't return. Washington, which last year froze its own planned funding for stabilization in northeast Syria, has raised more than $325 million from other nations for recovery operations. The official, however, acknowledged that the 'mission is not complete.' IS retreated to desert areas and melted in among the population. It's now waging a counterinsurgency, targeting local officials and security checkpoints. At least six attacks were recorded in Raqqa alone in August, compared to none the month before, according to the Rojava Information Center. The violence only stokes Raqqa residents' suspicions. Osama, who runs a shop selling phone credit in Raqqa, said Kurdish-led authorities are too lenient on IS supporters in court and shouldn't allow them back. 'Who can guarantee they don't return to their old ways?' he said. He refused to share his last name out of fear for his security. During their rule, IS militants threatened to cut his tongue for his vocal criticism. His shop is on al-Naim Square, which became notorious for beheadings, shootings and other public punishments the group carried out there. Now it has been renamed Freedom Square. 'If France and Germany refuse to take their own nationals, it must be for a good reason. Why should we take ours?' he said. Um Mahmoud's sponsor, Sheikh Hweidi al-Shalsh, said that view is short-sighted. Women and children in al-Hol camp are steeped in radical ideology, he said, feeding more radicalism unless they are removed. 'If there is no security, the return of the people of Raqqa will ensure it is restored,' al-Shalsh said. He extolled the benefits of tribal restorative justice. If someone is killed, tribal sheikhs get together to find a resolution. 'We are a tribal Muslim society first and foremost. Our nature is to forgive ... We are a family.' Um Mahmoud scrapes out a living selling second-hand clothes in the market. She sold her gold bracelets to start up the business. Unlike most in the city, she and her daughters still follow the women's dress imposed by IS, covering not only their faces with a veil but also their eyes and hands. 'The State is gone, but we are still implementing God's laws,' she said, defending the choice. She is stunned by how her neighbors have ostracized her. 'Look at this! They have electricity and we don't. This one and that one,' she said pointing at her neighbors' houses. 'They don't feel for us. We are women sitting in the dark alone and they have 24 hours a day electricity. Is this what you call freedom?' Since electricity has not been fully restored, residents rely on generators for power and traditionally share among themselves. Um Mahmoud's neighbors refused to share with her. Um Mahmoud admitted her sons and sons-in-law fought for or were members of IS, but she said her family never hurt the neighbors. She accused them of trying to curry favor with the new authorities. Her family also said they encountered problems with city officials, despite promises of reintegration. When her daughter, Somaiya, asked to visit her imprisoned husband, authorities requested proof of marriage. But the local official refused to issue her the document, declaring her an IS supporter. Somaiya went three times, once removing her face veil to avoid the IS label, to no avail. This means she also can't enroll her son in school. A senior Kurdish official, not familiar with this specific case, denied new returnees are refused documents and said the reason must be procedural. The whole point is reintegration, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity. The American official said the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces and local authorities are leading the reintegration effort, while the U.S.-backed coalition gives indirect support. Once her husband is released from prison, Somaiya wants to move to a new neighborhood where no one recognizes them. For Um Mahmoud, life would change if her husband, father and son return. She said they never carried weapons and should be allowed back. To prove she wants to fit in, she said her son will join the new Kurdish-led forces once he returns. For now, she doesn't know where they are. 'Not a night passes without thinking about them. If we can only learn their news, whether they are well or if they are dead,' she said. 'We are patiently waiting until God resolves it and we return to our normal life.

News

  • Multiple people are in the hospital or dead following some sort of party or event in Pittsburgh, according to police.  Police said seven people are involved in what they are calling a medical situation at SouthSideWorks City Apartments. Police said five people were found in an apartment and one was in an elevator. Another person was found on the street. >> Read more trending news  Around 2 a.m., one victim called 911 for help, police said. 'Director Wendell Hissrich confirms three dead and four in hospital with conditions ranging from serious to critical,' Pittsburgh public information officer Chris Togner said in an update. Police said there were no initial signs of any drug paraphernalia or needles found during their investigation so far. Officers said all the victims were wearing orange wristbands. Investigators said they have identified two venues that had events using orange wristbands Saturday night. Investigators are asking anyone who attended or knows about this party or event involving orange wristbands to call police at 412-323-7141.
  • Actor Aron Eisenberg, who played Nog on 'Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,' has died, reports say. He was 50 years old. >> Read more trending news  According to the official 'Star Trek' website and Fox News, Eisenberg's wife, Malissa Longo, first shared the news in an emotional Facebook post Saturday night. 'It is with extreme regret and sadness to announce that my love and best friend, Aron Eisenberg, passed away earlier today,' Longo wrote. 'He was an intelligent, humble, funny, emphatic soul. He sought to live his life with integrity and truth.' She added: 'He made me (and still makes me) want to be the best human I can possibly be, because he always strove to be the best human he could be. His resilience and willingness to learn was and is an inspiration.
  • Parents in one Georgia community say their kids' football games were canceled Saturday after two coaches got into a fight on the field. >> Read more trending news  WSB-TV's Alyssa Hyman was in South Fulton County, where an upset mom contacted WSB-TV after her son was sent home Saturday. LaPorschia Brown said her son plays with the Old National Knights Team, which is run by the city of South Fulton Parks and Recreation Department. Brown said Xavier's coach called her Saturday after she dropped him off to say he needed to be picked back up after the heated physical fight broke at Old National Park – between the adults. 'I get a call from one of his other coaches saying that I need to pick him up,' Brown said. 'It shut down an entire game. A couple of moms were really mad, like myself.' Brown said when she got to the park, police were at the scene, along with furious parents. Video appears to show a group of adults shouting and shoving each other as the kids look on.  The league ended up canceling all the games for the day, and police shut down the park due to safety concerns.  Hyman spoke to police, who said the park ranger unit responded to reports of a dispute between parents and coaches. A spokesperson said no one was arrested since police couldn't determine who started the fight.  Brown said she is frustrated and disappointed and expected more from her son's coaches. 'I know my son looks up to them. He doesn't have a father in his life,' Brown said. 'I thought I was putting people in his life that were good for him, but apparently, I was wrong.' Brown said angry parents are one thing, but disappointed kids are another. She said kids travel in from other states for some of the games and practice for them at least three times a week. 'I just feel like that's sad because the boys look forward to this, you know?' Brown said. 'Apologize to him. Don't apologize to me. He's the one that was hurt.' Hyman contacted the league commissioner, who sent the following statement:  'We are aware of the incident. Our city of South Fulton park rangers responded. We are working through the details of what transpired this afternoon. As we gather additional details, we will consider what additional steps may be taken. It is always our first priority ensure the safety of all of our patrons, citizens, youth and families.
  • An Atlanta mother is accused of chasing two teens with a bat at her son's bus stop and attacking one of them, police say. >> Read more trending news  She's now in jail, and police are looking for her son.  Police told WSB-TV's Tyisha Fernandes that Tiara Jones got involved in a fight between her son and two other Grady High School teens after the boys exchanged threatening messages on Instagram on Monday morning. Police said someone sent a 'spoof' message, pitting certain students at Grady High School against each other. Jones' son, Dashun McDonald, confronted the other two about the message at their bus stop, police said. Fernandes spoke to parent Alycia Aldridge, who said her son didn't even know McDonald. 'My son told him, 'First of all, I don't know you,' and he kind of backed down,' Aldridge said.  When the boys got to school, officials had heard about what happened and called them into the office.  'It was supposed to be squashed,' Aldridge said. 'They apparently bumped hands or shook hands, whatever it was, and went their separate ways.'  Later that afternoon, when the friends were walking home, they said McDonald approached them again, this time with his mom.  Aldridge said Jones accused the boys of trying to fight her son. Jones then went to her car, popped the trunk and pulled out a bat, Aldridge said. 'She's twirling the bat, telling them she's going to bust him in his head,' Aldridge said. 'You don't get to chase people's children and approach them with bats.' The boys got away and called 911, authorities said. Police took a report, but didn't arrest Jones right away.  The next morning, police said Jones showed up at the bus stop again and encouraged her son to fight. A student recorded the fight on a cellphone.  The video shows Jones trying to jump into the fight, and when a student wouldn't let her, she grabbed him by the hair and pushed him to the ground, WSB-TV reported. Students broke up the fight and got on the bus to go to school, but police said Jones followed the bus and told her son to fight the boy again.  Another video shows a school police officer thrown to the ground while trying to break up the fight, WSB-TV reported. Parent Shearee Pittman said the entire incident never should have happened.  'Had Atlanta police went to her Monday when I asked them to, just to arrest her for the stalking, none of this would have taken place Tuesday,' Pittman said. 'She wouldn't have been able to jump on that young man, those children wouldn't have been subjected to what they had to see, and she probably wouldn't be in jail.' 
  • A Canadian woman's video of two grizzlies duking it out on a British Columbia highway is going viral. >> Read more trending news  According to CTV News, Cari McGillivray shared the clip of the battling bears, which she spotted near Stewart on the Stewart Cassiar Highway, in a Facebook post Friday. 'Don’t normally post on here but thought I’d share this incredibly rare and amazing moment with all you guys of these grizzlies fighting!' McGillivray captioned the footage, which had racked up 550,217 views and 17,000 shares by Sunday morning. 'Keep a sharp eye out for the little wolf that is observing them in the distance!' 'Don’t normally post on here but thought I’d share this incredibly rare and amazing moment with all you guys of these grizzlies fighting!' McGillivray captioned the footage, which had racked up 550,217 views and 17,000 shares by Sunday morning. 'Keep a sharp eye out for the little wolf that is observing them in the distance!' She added on Instagram: 'Came to see bears fishing. Left with this amazing memorable moment! Still feeling the high from seeing these two majestic animals fighting!' Commenters called the video 'awesome' and 'incredible.' 'It's one of the most amazing scenes of nature I've seen,' Facebook user Leeanne Willoughby wrote. 'National Geographic stuff here.' 'Interesting to watch the argument!' added Jackie Wolski. 'Gotta finish it! See it my way!' Read more here.
  • Authorities are searching for a missing 2-year-old boy who may be with his 'armed and dangerous' father, the California Highway Patrol and Merced County Sheriff's Office said in an Amber Alert released Saturday. >> Read more trending news  AMBER ALERT – CHILD ABDUCTION – MERCED COUNTY – ARMED & DANGEROUSATWATER, CA – On September 21, 2019 the Merced County... Posted by Merced County Sheriff's Office on Saturday, September 21, 2019 According to KTLA, police believe Steven Weir, 32, abducted John Weir from Merced County, where they were last spotted Friday evening. The pair 'could possibly be heading to the Tuolumne or Calaveras County areas,' the Sheriff's Office said in a Facebook post. Authorities described John Weir as a blond-haired, blue-eyed boy who was last seen wearing a blue T-shirt with tan shorts. Steven Weir, who is 5-foot-10 and weighs 300 pounds, has brown hair and eyes, the Amber Alert said. He was wearing a blue T-shirt with cargo shorts and may be traveling in a red 2005 Hyundai Elantra with California tag 5SKT544, police said. Authorities are urging anyone who sees the Weirs or their vehicle to call 911. Read more here or here.