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World News

    Two German men have gone on trial, accused of killing a pregnant teenager on the Baltic sea island of Usedom because they wanted to see someone die. The 19-year-old defendant told a regional court in the northeastern city of Stralsund on Tuesday he and his 21-year-old co-defendant had talked about killing somebody and chose to the 18-year-old victim because she lived alone and it would be 'easier.' German news agency dpa reported that the younger defendant confessed in court to stabbing the young woman to death in the town of Zinnowitz in March before throwing her cellphone and the knife they'd used into the sea. The men, whose names weren't released for privacy reasons, were arrested a month later. They could face life imprisonment if convicted of murder.
  • A private helicopter carrying three people crashed Tuesday near a Greek island popular with vacationers and summer home owners after reportedly hitting electrical wires. Coast guard vessels and a helicopter were involved in a search-and-rescue effort following the crash in shallow water near the main port of Poros, some 60 kilometers (37 miles) south of Athens. Authorities said the helicopter had taken off from mainland area near Poros and had been due to land at Athens International Airport. 'According to the initial information we have on the helicopter, three people were on board, a Greek (pilot) and two foreign passengers,' Coast Guard spokesman Nikos Lagadianos said. 'Divers are already searching the site but they have not yet reached the cockpit.' The spokesman did not comment on local reports that the helicopter had hit electrical wires. The crash triggered a power outage on the island, local officials said. Authorities had initially reported that the helicopter had left Athens but later clarified that it had been heading toward the Greek capital.
  • Thousands of French police are setting up checkpoints and combing Atlantic beaches to secure the southwestern coast for the world leaders who are coming for the G-7 summit this weekend. Protesters, too, are setting up camp in towns near France's border with Spain to prepare for protests during the Aug. 24-26 gathering of major world democracies. More than 13,000 police are taking up their posts for the summit, and French and Spanish intelligence officials are coordinating against any threats, French Interior Minister Christophe Castaner said Tuesday. U.S. President Donald Trump will join host French President Emmanuel Macron and the leaders of Britain, Germany, Japan, Canada and Italy in the elegant resort town of Biarritz. Authorities are closing all air, train and road traffic to Biarritz to clear the way for the leaders. That's frustrating local businesses, since this is happening at the height of Europe's summer travel season. The city's biggest beach will also be closed. Blocked from Biarritz, activists are planning events down the coast in Hendaye and Urrugne, and in the Spanish town of Irun, to protest economic injustice, climate change and other concerns. Castaner said he expected the planned protests nearby to remain peaceful, but emphasized that security forces will be present in case demonstrations turn violent, as they have in previous international summits.
  • Health authorities in Spain are on high alert after a 90-year-old woman died amid a listeria outbreak in the southern region of Andalusia that has affected more than 110 people. José Miguel Cisneros, director of the infectious disease department at Seville's Virgen del Rocío Hospital, on Tuesday announced the first casualty since the outbreak was declared on Aug. 15. Authorities have closed the pork meat supplier's plant and recalled all of its products. Cisneros said roughly half of the 114 people affected by the bacteria remain hospitalized. Health Minister María Luisa Carcedo said an investigation is looking into how the meat evaded what she called 'strict food safety controls.' Listeria is a bacteria that usually causes mild illness in healthy people but can be dangerous to pregnant women and those with weakened immune systems.
  • The Latest on Italy's government crisis (all times local): 4:45 p.m. Matteo Salvini, the leader of Italy's right-wing League party, says he triggered a government crisis in the middle of the summer because he doesn't fear the prospect of an early vote. Salvini addressed senators on Tuesday after Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte announced he will tender his resignation, putting an end to the populist government forged only 14 months ago. Salvini said he would 'do again everything I did ... I'm a free man and I don't fear Italians' judgment.' Salvini has been maneuvering to become Italy's next leader as support for his party grows on his anti-migrant stance. Earlier, Conte had blasted Salvini for his 'irresponsible' move that has abruptly interrupted the work of the government. He added that Salvini has acted only to pursue his 'personal interests' and capitalize on his soaring popularity. Conte also stressed that a sudden government crisis puts Italy at risk of 'political and financial instability.' ___ 4 p.m. Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte has announced his resignation, blaming his decision to end his 14-month-old populist government on his rebellious right-wing coalition partner. He told senators on Tuesday he is handing in his resignation because his right-wing coalition partner, the League party led by Interior Minister Matteo Salvini, has decided to yank its support for the populist government. Conte said he will go later Tuesday to officially inform Italian President Sergio Mattarella of his decision. Mattarella, as head of state, could ask Conte to stay on and try to find an alternative majority in Parliament, or accept his resignation and see if some other leader can forge an alternative coalition. Failing that, Mattarella could dissolve Parliament, setting the stage for a new general election as early as October.
  • The Latest on Britain's plan to leave the European Union (all times local): 5:10 p.m. German Chancellor Angela Merkel says the main stumbling block with Britain's departure from the European Union can be removed if a 'practical solution' is found for the Irish border issue. Speaking Tuesday after a meeting with Nordic countries in the Icelandic capital of Reykjavik, Merkel says the remaining 27 EU countries are willing to find such a solution and avoid unraveling a carefully negotiated Brexit deal agreed upon with the British government last year. The deal was repeatedly rejected by U.K. lawmakers, leading to the resignation of British Prime Minister Theresa May. She was replaced by Brexit hardliner Boris Johnson, who wants a new divorce deal. Merkel, who is hosting Johnson for talks in Berlin late Wednesday, said whichever path Britain chooses the EU is willing to cooperate closely on economic and security issues. ___ 4:30 p.m. Britain has decided to stop going to many European Union meetings unless its attendance is crucial so its diplomatic staff can better prepare for its scheduled departure from the bloc on Oct. 31. UK Secretary of State Steve Barclay said Tuesday that the diplomatic corps 'will only go to the meetings that really matter, reducing attendance by over half and saving hundreds of hours.' He says this will free up staff 'to get on with preparing for our departure on October 31 and seizing the opportunities that lie ahead.' It was another sign that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is bent on leaving the EU 'come what may' at the end of October. Beyond preparing for Brexit, Johnson has said the diplomatic staff will also be working to prepare new relationships with the 27 remaining EU nations and looking for trade agreements with other nations. ___ 11:40 a.m. European Council chief Donald Tusk says that as long as British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is not proposing 'realistic alternatives' to the backstop agreement to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland, he is actually backing 're-establishing a border.' A key part of the divorce proposals between the EU and Britain centers on keeping the island free of physical borders between EU-member Ireland and the Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. Both sides committed to a 'backstop solution' to keep the border open in a deal with former prime minister Theresa May, but new prime minister Johnson vehemently opposes it. Tusk tweeted that 'those against the backstop and not proposing realistic alternatives in fact support reestablishing a border. Even if they do not admit it.' ___ 9:30 a.m. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has demanded that the European Union reopen Brexit negotiations, scrapping 'anti-democratic' provisions for the Irish border that he says would threaten the peace process in Northern Ireland. Johnson, who has made similar statements in the past, formally delivered his demands to the EU late Monday in a letter to Donald Tusk, president of the European Council. Johnson is calling for an end to the so-called backstop, which would keep Britain closely aligned with the European customs union if the two sides can't agree on other ways to prevent the reintroduction of border checks on people and goods moving between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, after a one-hour call with Johnson on Monday, said the Brexit deal wouldn't be renegotiated.
  • This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from both above and below, calls it 'the end of the planet.' He is referring to geography more than the future. Yet in many ways this place is where the planet's warmer and watery future is being written. It is so warm here, just inside the Arctic Circle, that on an August day, coats are left on the ground and Holland and colleagues work on the watery melting ice without gloves. In one of the closest towns, Kulusuk, the morning temperature reached a shirtsleeve 52 degrees Fahrenheit (10.7 degrees Celsius). The ice Holland is standing on is thousands of years old. It will be gone within a year or two, adding yet more water to rising seas worldwide. Summer this year is hitting Greenland hard with record-shattering heat and extreme melt. By the end of the summer, about 440 billion tons (400 billion metric tons) of ice — maybe more — will have melted or calved off Greenland's giant ice sheet, scientists estimate. That's enough water to flood Pennsylvania or the country of Greece about a foot (35 centimeters) deep. In just the five days from July 31 to Aug. 3, more than 58 billion tons (53 billion metric tons) melted from the surface. That's over 40 billion tons more than the average for this time of year. And that 58 billion tons doesn't even count the huge calving events or the warm water eating away at the glaciers from below, which may be a huge factor. And one of the places hit hardest this hot Greenland summer is here on the southeastern edge of the giant frozen island: Helheim, one of Greenland's fastest-retreating glaciers, has shrunk about 6 miles (10 kilometers) since scientists came here in 2005. Several scientists, such as NASA oceanographer Josh Willis, who is also in Greenland, studying melting ice from above, said what's happening is a combination of man-made climate change and natural but weird weather patterns. Glaciers here do shrink in the summer and grow in the winter, but nothing like this year. Summit Station, a research camp nearly 2 miles high (3,200 meters) and far north, warmed to above freezing twice this year for a record total of 16.5 hours. Before this year, that station was above zero for only 6.5 hours in 2012, once in 1889 and also in the Middle Ages. This year is coming near but not quite passing the extreme summer of 2012 — Greenland's worst year in modern history for melting, scientists report. 'If you look at climate model projections, we can expect to see larger areas of the ice sheet experiencing melt for longer durations of the year and greater mass loss going forward,' said University of Georgia ice scientist Tom Mote. 'There's every reason to believe that years that look like this will become more common.' A NASA satellite found that Greenland's ice sheet lost about 255 billion metric tons of ice a year between 2003 and 2016, with the loss rate generally getting worse over that period. Nearly all of the 28 Greenland glaciers that Danish climate scientist Ruth Mottram measured are retreating, especially Helheim. At Helheim, the ice, snow and water seem to go on and on, sandwiched by bare dirt mountains that now show no signs of ice but get covered in the winter. The only thing that gives a sense of scale is the helicopter carrying Holland and his team. It's dwarfed by the landscape, an almost imperceptible red speck against the ice cliffs where Helheim stops and its remnants begin. Those ice cliffs are somewhere between 225 feet (70 meters) and 328 feet (100 meters) high. Just next to them are Helheim's remnants — sea ice, snow and icebergs — forming a mostly white expanse, with a mishmash of shapes and textures. Frequently water pools amid that white, glimmering a near-fluorescent blue that resembles windshield wiper fluid or Kool-Aid. As pilot Martin Norregaard tries to land his helicopter on the broken-up part of what used to be glacier — a mush called a melange — he looks for ice specked with dirt, a sign that it's firm enough for the chopper to set down on. Pure white ice could conceal a deep crevasse that leads to a cold and deadly plunge. Holland and team climb out to install radar and GPS to track the ice movement and help explain why salty, warm, once-tropical water attacking the glacier's 'underbelly' has been bubbling to the surface 'It takes a really long time to grow an ice sheet, thousands and thousands of years, but they can be broken up or destroyed quite rapidly,' Holland said. Holland, like NASA's Willis, suspects that warm, salty water that comes in part from the Gulf Stream in North America is playing a bigger role than previously thought in melting Greenland's ice. And if that's the case, that's probably bad news for the planet, because it means faster and more melting and higher sea level rise. Willis said that by the year 2100, Greenland alone could cause 3 or 4 feet (more than 1 meter) of sea level rise. So it's crucial to know how much of a role the air above and the water below play. 'What we want for this is an ice sheet forecast,' Holland said. In this remote landscape, sound travels easily for miles. Every several minutes there's a faint rumbling that sounds like thunder, but it's not. It's ice cracking. In tiny Kulusuk, about a 40-minute helicopter ride away, Mugu Utuaq says the winter that used to last as much as 10 months when he was a boy can now be as short as five months. That matters to him because as the fourth-ranked dogsledder in Greenland, he has 23 dogs and needs to race them. They can't race in the summer, but they still have to eat. So Utuaq and friends go whale hunting with rifles in small boats. If they succeed, which this day they didn't, the dogs can eat whale. 'People are getting rid of their dogs because there's no season,' said Yewlin, who goes by one name. He used to run a sled dog team for tourists at a hotel in neighboring Tasiilaq, but they no longer can do that. Yes, the melting glaciers, less ice and warmer weather are noticeable and much different from his childhood, said Kulusuk Mayor Justus Paulsen, 58. Sure, it means more fuel is needed for boats to get around, but that's OK, he said. 'We like it because we like to have a summer,' Paulsen said. But Holland looks out at Helheim glacier from his base camp and sees the bigger picture. And it's not good, he said. Not for here. Not for Earth as a whole. 'It's kind of nice to have a planet with glaciers around,' Holland said. ___ The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.
  • German police say together with officers in Lithuania and Croatia they have shut down a website hosting bomb-making manuals. Police in Goettingen said Tuesday that about 1,000 officers were involved in raids against 22 suspects linked to the website xplosives.net. Goettingen police chief Uwe Luehring said authorities seized the site's server and numerous storage devices. He said the site also hosted information on how to build military weapons and explosives. Authorities also seized an unspecified amount of explosives and drugs in the raids in the three countries.
  • Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte announced his resignation Tuesday, blaming his decision to end his 14-month-old populist government on his rebellious and politically ambitious deputy prime minister, Matteo Salvini. Conte told the Senate that the surprise move earlier this month by Salvini's right-wing League party to seek a no-confidence vote against the coalition was forcing him to 'interrupt' what he contended was a productive government. He said that government reflected the results of Italy's 2018 election and aimed to 'interpret the desires of citizens who in their vote expressed a desire for change.' The coalition included two rivals, the anti-establishment 5-Star Movement and Salvini's euroskeptic, anti-migrant right-wing League party. Conte said he will go later Tuesday to tender his resignation to President Sergio Mattarella. As head of state, Mattarella could ask Conte to stay on and find an alternative majority in Parliament. That is considered an unlikely scenario, however, given the long-festering acrimony among the coalition's partners and the deep divisions in the opposition Democrats, who would be a potential partner. Or, after sounding out party chiefs in consultations expected to start as soon as Wednesday, Mattarella could come to the conclusion that another political leader or a non-partisan figure could cobble together a viable government. That government's pressing task would be to lead the country at least for the next few months, when Italy must make painful budget cuts to keep in line with European Union financial regulations. Failing that, Mattarella could immediately dissolve Parliament, 3½ years ahead of schedule, as Salvini has been clamoring for. Pulling the plug on Parliament sets the stage for a general election as early as late October, right smack in the middle of delicate budget maneuvers that will be closely monitored in Brussels. Conte, a lawyer with no political experience, is nominally non-partisan, although he was the clear choice of the 5-Stars when the government was formed. The premier scathingly quoted Salvini's own recent demands for an early election so he could gain 'full powers' by grabbing the premiership. Conte blasted Salvini for showing 'grave contempt for Parliament' and putting Italy at risk for a 'dizzying spiral of political and financial instability' in the months ahead by creating an unnecessary crisis that collapses a working government. Salvini, who sat next to Conte, smirking at times as the premier spoke, began the Senate debate by saying, defiantly, 'I'd do it all again.' Pressing for a new election as soon as possible, Salvini, who as interior minister has led a crackdown on migrants, said: 'I don't fear Italians' judgment.' In the European Parliament election three months ago in Italy, as well as in current opinion polls, Salvini's League party has soared in popularity to be the No. 1 political force among Italians.
  • Russia has resumed sharing data from its radiation monitoring stations in Siberia after some were taken offline following a deadly explosion at a missile range, a nuclear weapons watchdog said Tuesday. The mysterious accident at a naval weapons testing range on the White Sea in northwestern Russia earlier this month has been accompanied by changing or contradictory information from Russian authorities. That has led to speculation about what really happened in the town of and what type of weapon was involved. It has even raised comparisons to the Soviet Union's 1986 disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine, the world's worst nuclear disaster, when Soviet officials tried to cover up the news for days. The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization said earlier this week that several Russian radiation monitoring stations went silent shortly after the reported explosion. Lassina Zebro, the organization's executive secretary, said Tuesday on Twitter that the two Russian stations that were reported to be offline are back in operation and they are now backfilling the data. He also lauded Moscow for 'excellent cooperation.' Russian officials earlier Tuesday brushed off suggestions that they were concealing details of the explosion from foreign nations. Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov told the Interfax news agency Tuesday that it is Russia's choice, not an obligation, to share data under the treaty. He did not directly address the reports that information on radiation levels was not shared.

News

  • A Nebraska teenager paid tribute to her late father through her high school senior pictures. >> Read more trending news  Julia Yllescas, a senior at Aurora High School, wanted her father to be a part of her senior pictures. Her father, Capt. Robert Yllescas, died Dec. 1, 2008, in Bethesda, Maryland, from injuries he received from an improvised explosive device while serving in Afghanistan. Yllescas had her senior pictures taken Saturday and sent them to photographer Susanne Beckmann to see if she could create an 'angel picture,' KOLN reported. Julie Yllescas loved the first two photographs that Beckmann worked on, They show her sitting and standing next to a faint shadow of her father in uniform, the radio station reported. 'Why it has hit my heart so hard is that I almost felt when I saw those pictures that he truly was there,” Yllescas told KOLN. 'And to have a piece of him with me throughout my senior year. Because sometimes it feels like where are you, why did you have to go.' Beckmann, whose husband has served in the Nebraska National Guard for 16 years, was only too happy to create the images. 'I was teary-eyed when I was editing them,' Beckmann told KOLN. 'All I could think in my head is I don't ever want to have to do this for my own kids.' Beckmann, who has run Snapshots by Suz for eight years, said she has known the Yllescas family since Julia was 9.  'I thought it would be a great idea to do these angel pictures for her as a special gift for her big milestone and to her family,' Beckmann told Cox Media Group by telephone Tuesday morning. 'I am an active duty National Guard wife, which is what inspired the idea and the vision. 'I take a lot of pictures of military families and it is always an honor for me to capture their special memories.' The photographs that include her father are a comfort for Yllescas 'Just to have that on my wall and be like, 'No, he is with me,' even though I can't physically see him,” she told KOLN.
  • A Texas elementary school teacher has a gift for her students.  Richelle Terry is promising no homework for her second- and third-grade math students for the entire school year, KBMT reported.  Terry is a teacher at Evadale Elementary. She had taught pre-K, but this is the first time she's taught the higher grade. >> Read more trending news  Instead of pouring over their math problems for hours at the dining room table, she wants her students to spend time with family and to enjoy their childhood.  'You see them, and they're like, 'I hate school. I don't like school. I don't like learning. That class is boring.' It's because they take the fun out of it. Everything is serious ... and it doesn't have to be that way,' Terry told KBMT. Terry said there should be enough time in class to finish assignments and the school has added a tutorial period for kids need extra help, according to KBMT. Terry said she will take a look at how her students are handling the no-homework rule throughout the semester. The school district allows its teachers to be flexible as long as students meet requirements, KBMT reported.
  • It will forever be called the 'great mattress migration of 2019' when the wind picked up and relocated dozens of air mattresses that were blown up for a movie-in-bed under the stars event in Colorado. >> Read more trending news  People in Stapleton, a neighborhood in Denver, couldn't believe their eyes when they saw the mattresses flying through the air and being followed by people who were trying to catch them, The Denver Post reported. Some of the mattresses that weren't caught became impromptu pool floats after they flew over a fence and landed in a pool area, KDVR reported. One man was able to record some of the craziness, uploading it to social media. Robb Manes said when he glanced over to the event's organizer she told him, 'This is a disaster,' he told the Denver Post. Manes and others spent about 30 minutes trying to catch the beds, he told the newspaper. 
  • A North Carolina man is accused of strangling his 15-year-old daughter before slitting her throat during a weekend visit at his home, sheriff’s deputies said. Joshua Lee Burgess, 32, of Monroe, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Zaria Joshalyn Burgess. Zaria was visiting her father when she was slain. Union County Sheriff’s Office officials said in a news release that Burgess walked into the agency’s lobby just before 9:30 a.m. Sunday and told a dispatcher he was there to turn himself in. The dispatcher began searching for warrants in Burgess’ name. “He stopped her. He said, ‘You’re not going to find my name. I just killed someone,’” Tony Underwood, chief communications officer for the Union County Sheriff’s Office, told WSOC in Charlotte. “At that point, the red flags started to go off.” After Burgess gave details of the killing and told them where to find Zaria’s body, deputies went to Burgess’ home at 5102 Hampton Meadows Road, near Wesley Chapel. Inside, they found the slain teen, authorities said. A reporter with WSOC was in the courtroom Monday for Burgess’ first court appearance, where authorities offered gruesome details of the girl’s death, including how her father reportedly killed her. Reporter Tina Terry said there was a “collective gasp” when the details were revealed, according to the news station. “It’s just pure evil,” Underwood said. No motive for the slaying was given. Burgess' Facebook page is filled with photos of his daughter, who he called his “mini-me.” “I love this little angel more than anything. Nothing beats quality time with my daughter,” he wrote on a post from 2015. >> Read more trending news  Zaria’s cousin, Dytaysha Wadsworth, told WSOC the victim was a sweet girl who loved her family. She was about to start her freshman year at Monroe High School. “She was just the type of kid that would come in a room or come in a house and say, ‘Hey everybody’ -- just wanting to make everybody smile,” Wadsworth said. “She was so young, and nobody deserves to leave this world like that, especially by someone they thought was gonna protect them and be there for them.” Burgess is being held without bond in the Union County Jail.
  • The Coast Guard is searching for two boaters who didn't return from a fishing trip Friday evening off the coast of Port Canaveral, Florida. >> Read more trending news  Brian McCluney and Justin Walker were last seen leaving the 300 Christopher Columbus boat ramp Friday in a 24-foot center console boat heading toward 8A Reef. McCluney is a firefighter with the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department and Wilcox is a master technician with the Fairfax County, Virginia, Fire and Rescue Department. Update 10:50 a.m. EDT Aug. 20: The wife of one of the boaters missing since Friday morning took her search efforts into the air Tuesday, WFTV reported. Natasha Walker caught a private flight from the Titusville airport to help comb the Florida coastline as the search continues for her husband, Justin Walker, and his friend, Brian McCluney. 'They know that we want them to keep fighting,' Natasha Walker told WFTV before boarding the plane. The U.S. Coast Guard said Monday afternoon that⁩ a volunteer found a tackle bag belonging to Brian McCluney about 50 miles off the coast of St. Augustine. 'This is still absolutely a rescue mission,' Jacksonville fire Chief Keith Powers said Monday at a news conference. 'We're talking about a decorated combat vet here. We're talking about a firefighter paramedic. These guys have the skills ... to survive for a long time.' Kevin McCluney, the brother of Brian McCluney, told WFTV that if any people were resourceful enough to survive, it would be these two men. 'Between the two of them, I know they've got it locked down,' Kevin McCluney said. 'It's just a matter of time.' Brian McCluney's wife, Stephanie McCluney, told WFTV he underwent survival training during his time in the U.S. Navy and that Justin Walker is one of the most resourceful men she knows. 'If I were ever stranded anywhere, those were the two men I'd want to be stuck with,' she said. Coast Guard officials continued to search for the McCluney and Walker on Tuesday. Update 6:44 a.m. EDT Aug. 20: The search for two missing firefighters will continue Tuesday morning, authorities said. The Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department is calling on anyone who would like to help with the search and has the following items: A boat that can work in the range of 30-60 miles Binoculars A SAT phone (which is short for a satellite telephone. It’s a type of phone that connects to other phones by radio, orbiting through satellites.) Update 3:10 p.m. EDT Aug. 19: McCluney's wife said in a post on Facebook that her husband's tackle bag was found 50 miles off the shore of St. Augustine, WJAX-TV reported. The search for McCluney and his friend, Wilcox, continued Monday. Update 1:25 p.m. EDT Aug. 19: Officials with the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department said over 135 people assisted Monday with the search for McCluney and Walker. There were 36 boats searching from Brunswick, Georgia, to St. Augustine, Florida, on Monday, officials said. Searching for the missing boaters will continue until dark, JFRD officials said. Agency officials stressed Monday that the search was still a rescue mission. The missing men were raised on the water, according to JFRD. 'We're talking about a decorated combat vet here. We're talking about a firefighter paramedic. These guys have the skills,' a JFRD official said Monday at a news conference. 'These guys have the skills to survive for a long time.' Update 9:25 a.m. EDT Aug. 19: Authorities and volunteers continued to search Monday for McCluney and Walker. Coast Guard officials said Monday that crews have searched an estimated 24,000 miles since Friday. Authorities said they continued to search Monday from Port Canaveral up to Jacksonville. Officials with the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department urged people in the area to contact authorities 'if you see something ... any debris, anything.' McCluney is a Jacksonville firefighter and Wilcox is a master technician with the Fairfax County, Virginia, Fire and Rescue Department. Update 3:10 p.m. EDT Aug. 18: Multiple agencies have joined the search, On Sunday afternoon, the Coast Guard said crews are investigating reports of a debris field 50 miles east of St. Augustine, Florida, WJAX reported. However, they have confirmed it's not related to the missing boaters. Earlier Sunday, Stephanie Young McCluney, the wife of one of the missing men, thanked the efforts of the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department in a Facebook post. According to a tweet from the agency, 50 firefighters were assisting the Coast Guard with the search. The Jacksonville Association of Fire Fighters has also set up a link for those wanting to help with search efforts.  'The donations will support the search efforts and ultimately the families of the firefighters,' according to the Jacksonville Firefighter Charities donation page. 'Thank you so much for your support and prayers!' Original report: In a Facebook post Saturday, McCluney's wife said the Coast Guard has suspended the air search until Sunday morning but will continue to search by boat and radar overnight. According to Stephanie McCluney's post, the search area will move north as the Coast Guard continues to survey the coast off Volusia County throughout the night. According to the Jacksonville Association of Firefighters, McCluney is a Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department firefighter from Station 31 near Oak Hill Park. The Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department said in a Facebook post that Walker is a master technician at the Virginia fire department near Washington, D.C. The Coast Guard had deployed a search plane and several boats to look for the overdue boaters. The Navy and Brevard County Sheriff's Office are assisting with the search. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville Command Center at 904-714-7558. The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.
  • Golden State Warriors player Stephen Curry is establishing Howard University's first NCAA Division 1 golf program. According to a Monday news release from the university, Curry pledged to support the program for the next six years. Curry was led to establish the program after meeting Otis Ferguson IV, a golfer and senior at Howard, in January. Forbes reported that Curry was on campus hosting a viewing 'Emmanuel,' a documentary he produced on the 2015 Charleston church shooting in which nine African Americans were murdered. >> Read more trending news  'Utilizing his unique position, Curry will introduce and increase access to elite golf at a historically black college, furthermore calling on sport and community giants like Under Armour, Callaway, (he and wife Ayesha Curry's foundation) Eat. Learn. Play., among others, for help with equipment, uniforms, and more,' the news release said. Howard plans to debut the first women's and men's golf teams in the 2020-2021 academic year. 'Golf is a sport that has changed my life in ways that are less tangible, but just as impactful,' Curry said in a statement. 'It's a discipline that challenges your mental wherewithal from patience to focus, and is impossible to truly master, so when you hear about these passionate student athletes who have the talent but don’t have a fair shot at the game, it’s tough. I feel really honored to play a small role in the rich history of Howard University, and look forward to building their first men’s and women’s golf teams with them.' ESPN reported that Howard previously competed in Division II golf. University officials think the teams were disbanded in the 1970s. Curry was joined by Howard University President Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick, Ferguson, the university's athletic director, Kery Davis, and Calloway CEO Oliver 'Chip' Brewer for a tee-off Monday in Washington, D.C. School officials will start searching for coaches, playe