ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
84°
Partly Cloudy
H 92° L 73°
  • cloudy-day
    84°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 92° L 73°
  • cloudy-day
    92°
    Today
    Partly Cloudy. H 92° L 73°
  • cloudy-day
    92°
    Tomorrow
    Partly Cloudy. H 92° L 73°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

World News

    Thailand's prime minister said Tuesday his military government will hold elections only after a coronation ceremony for the new Thai king, casting fresh doubt on promises the polls will be held by next February. The junta seized power from an elected government in May 2014 and has repeatedly pushed back promised dates for holding new polls. Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha told reporters his government is preparing for the coronation of King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun, mentioning — apparently for the first time in public — that the election will take place only after the ceremony. No date has been set for the coronation, bringing the timing of the polls into question. Vajiralongkorn assumed the throne after the death of his father in 2016. 'The most important thing that the NCPO is now considering is making preparations for the royal coronation ceremony,' Prayuth said. 'Do not forget, all Thais, this is an important issue.' The NCPO is the National Council for Peace and Order, the ruling junta's formal name. Prayuth's mention of the election came in response to a reporter's question whether it would take place before the coronation or not. He replied 'After, of course' and 'After the royal coronation' as he walked away from reporters at a Government House news briefing. Chaturon Chaisaeng, education minister in the government ousted by the 2014 coup, said that because the prime minister did not say when the coronation would take place, the announcement is not yet a political issue. 'When the coronation will take place is up to his majesty's wishes and the government because nobody knows, as of now, when that is. If it takes place soon, for example much before the election, the election will take place as normal.' 'Right now everyone is waiting to hear when the coronation will take place,' Chaturon said.
  • A battery short circuit caused a small explosion at a London Underground station that injured five people Tuesday evening, authorities said. British Transport Police said the incident did not seem to be related to terrorism. 'The scene has been examined by specialist officers,' London Metropolitan Police said. 'It appears at this stage that the cause of the explosion was a battery short circuit. The Met Police and BTP are working together to establish the full facts.' Police said they were not aware of any serious injuries in what the force called a 'minor explosion' at Southgate tube station in northwest London. London Ambulance Service said three people were treated at the scene for minor injuries and two people were taken to the hospital. The service said it received an emergency call at 7:02 p.m. and responded with a number of ambulance crews and a hazardous area response team. Police cordons were put in place and the public was asked to keep away. Police responded after people ran from the station and said there had been an explosion.
  • Iran lashed out Tuesday against U.S. President Donald Trump's call on OPEC to increase oil production and limit global energy prices, saying the cartel 'is not an American organization.' The OPEC oil ministers began arriving in Vienna on Tuesday ahead of their official meeting Friday, when they will also confer with Russia, a non-OPEC country that since late 2016 has cooperated with the cartel to limit production. Analysts expect the group to consider an increase in production of about 1 million barrels a day, ending the output cut agreed on in 2016. The cut has since then pushed up the price of crude oil by about 50 percent. The U.S. benchmark in May hit its highest level in three and half years, at $72.35 a barrel. That prompted Trump to call on OPEC to cut production, tweeting in April and again this month that 'OPEC is at it again' by allowing oil prices to rise. Iran's oil minister, Bijan Namdar Zanganeh, said upon arriving in Vienna that 'OPEC is not an organization to receive the instruction from President Trump and follow it.' Underscoring how difficult the discussion about a production increase will be, Zanganeh said that Trump's comments have cast doubt on the prospect of a deal. 'Every decision in OPEC needs the unanimity and I don't believe in this meeting we can reach agreement,' he said, adding the issue 'has been politicized by President Trump.' Experts like Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC Markets U.K., note that the price of oil is high not only because of OPEC and Russia's agreement to limit output, but also because of Trump's policies, including a decision to reinstall sanctions on Iran. That crimped the country's ability to export crude, limiting supply and pushing up global prices. The U.S. sanctions on Iran also mean that if OPEC agrees on an increase in output as a group, Iran will be one of the countries to lose out, as it will not be able to export as much as it would like. By contrast, Saudi Arabia, the cartel's biggest producer and a fierce regional rival to Iran, could have the room to increase output more — and make more money — to make up for the shortfall in countries like Iran. So an OPEC deal to increase output could also influence the balance of power in the Middle East. Iraq's oil minister, Jabbar Ali Hussein Al-Luiebi, sounded more optimistic about a deal, saying 'we are after the stabilization of the market.' Ultimately, Hewson says, the 14 countries in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries are likely to agree on a production increase. 'There is an element of self-preservation in seeking to do this, as while most oil producers prefer higher prices they will also want to avoid a scenario where prices reach a level where demand drops off sharply, thus triggering a global slowdown, as well as accelerating the push for renewable (energy),' he said.
  • The call came at mealtime — an anonymous threat demanding $5,000 or her son's life. So Blanca Orantes-Lopez, her 8-year-old boy and his father packed up and left the Pacific surfing town of Puerto La Libertad in El Salvador and headed for the United States. Two months later, she sits in a federal prison south of Seattle. The boy, Abel Alexander, is in custody at a children's home across the country in upstate New York. She has no idea when she might see him again. 'I still haven't been able to talk to him,' Orantes told The Associated Press in Spanish as she wept through a telephone interview Monday from the prison. 'The most difficult is not seeing him.' Her story is emblematic of the 2,300 instances in which President Donald Trump's administration has separated minors from their migrant parents in an effort to deter illegal immigration. The practice has provoked a national uproar fueled by stories of children being torn from their mothers' arms and of parents being deported without their kids. The administration adopted a new 'zero tolerance' policy in April designed to curb a wave of Central American migrants who say they are fleeing violence at home. Homeland Security officials now refer all cases of illegal entry for prosecution. Authorities say they are required to remove the children before they can prosecute the parents, but many parents, including Orantes, have remained separated from their children long after being convicted. Trump has both applauded the practice and falsely blamed Democrats for it. 'We will not apologize for the job we do or for the job law enforcement does, for doing the job that the American people expect us to do,' Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen told the National Sheriffs' Association in New Orleans. 'Illegal actions have and must have consequences. No more free passes, no more get-out-of-jail-free cards.' The phone call that prompted Orantes' monthlong journey to the U.S. border was no idle threat, she said. About three years ago, Abel's uncle was kidnapped by extortionists and freed only after the family paid up, according to her attorney, Matt Adams, legal director of the Seattle-based Northwest Immigrant Rights Project. 'When they don't get their money, they kill people,' said Orantes, 26. This time, the demand was more than they could muster. And they had only a week to pay, she said. She and her son split from the boy's father in Guatemala. He remains in hiding, and Orantes said she does not know where he is. Upon reaching the border, she and Abel found it impossible to apply for asylum at a port of entry, Adams said. 'A lot of people are showing up at the border to apply for asylum and are being told, 'We don't have capacity for them,'' Adams said. 'It's not like they can just stand in a line for several days, because then the Mexican officials will grab them and deport them. So they're then forced to go through the ravine or the river.' That's what they did. The pair crossed illegally into Texas and immediately reported themselves to immigration authorities and requested asylum, Adams said. They were separated so Orantes could be prosecuted. The woman said she was moved to different detention facilities, including in Laredo, Texas, and placed among other desperate, crying mothers. At one point, officials brought Abel to her, she said. 'They told me, 'Say bye to him because he's being transferred.' I asked where,' she recounted. 'They just told me to say bye to him. ... He just started crying, saying, 'Don't leave me, Mom.' 'I just said, 'It'll be OK.' That's all I said.' Orantes was detained on May 22 with about 20 other people near Roma, Texas, Immigration and Customs Enforcement said. She was convicted of the misdemeanor of unlawfully entering the U.S. and was sentenced to time served, a development she thought would reunify her with Abel. Instead, with detention centers overflowing on the border, she became one of more than 1,600 detainees transferred by ICE to federal prisons. She was sent June 6 to the Federal Detention Center at SeaTac, where she remains with more than 200 other border detainees, waiting to hear whether her asylum request will proceed. The conditions there are better than they were at the immigration jails, she said. Before Trump's policy changes, she likely would not have been prosecuted, but instead allowed to remain with her son and granted an interview to determine whether she had a credible fear of persecution or torture in her home country. If officials found that she did, she and Abel would probably have been released while their immigration case continued. It was weeks before she learned her son's whereabouts, she said. She has not spoken with him. Her attorney said she has no money and is not allowed to make collect calls to the facility in Kingston, New York, where he is held. The boy has been able to call her sister, Maria Orantes, who lives in Maryland and has petitioned for custody, without success. 'He doesn't feel well there,' Maria Orantes said in a phone interview. 'When he calls, he's crying. He doesn't want to be there.' The Department of Health and Human Services, whose Office of Refugee Resettlement oversees the placement of migrant children separated from their families, did not immediately return an email seeking comment about why the boy had not been placed with his aunt. Blanca Orantes said she had hoped to live with her sister. 'I wanted to work,' she said. 'Raise my kid. Be a good person, get ahead, have some money and not hide. I thought it would be different.' ___ Follow Gene Johnson at https://twitter.com/GeneAPseattle and Manuel Valdes at https://twitter.com/ByManuelValdes . ___ See AP's complete coverage of the debate over the Trump administration's policy of family separation at the border: https://apnews.com/tag/Immigration .
  • A top manager of a state-controlled Russian energy company has been arrested on spying charges, a Moscow court said Tuesday. The Lefortovo District Court announced that Karina Tsurcan has been put in custody on charges of espionage, but wouldn't give further details. The court hearing was held Friday. Russian news agencies said that Tsurkan is a member of the management board of Inter RAO, an energy holding dealing with electric power supply and heat generation that has assets in Russia and other nations. Tsurcan headed Inter RAO's trading division. There was no immediate reaction from Inter RAO. Details of the charges weren't immediately known, but the state Tass news agency said that Tsurcan is accused of spying for Romania. She may face up to 20 years in prison if convicted. The Interfax news agency said that law enforcement agents on Monday conducted a search in the office of Deputy Energy Minister Vyacheslav Kravchenko in connection with Tsurcan's case. The ministry had no immediate comment.
  • The Latest on U.S.-China trade tensions (all times local): 1:30 p.m. President Donald Trump is taking on Mexico and Canada at a time when the United States is engaged in talks with them on the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Trump says in a speech before a small business group that Mexico hasn't done enough to address the flow of drugs through the southern border. And he's accusing Canada of imposing large tariffs on U.S dairy products to the detriment of American farmers. Trump is reiterating at the National Federation of Independent Business that he's trying to renegotiate NAFTA or he will seek separate trade deals with Canada and Mexico. The president says, 'We have to change our ways. We can no longer be the stupid country.' ___ 12:45 p.m. Economists are starting to warn that the tit-for-tat tariff threats between the United States and China, should they all be implemented, would meaningfully slow U.S. growth. Oxford Economics estimates that if President Donald Trump imposed the $200 billion in duties that he threatened to implement late Monday, and China responded in kind, U.S. growth could slow by 0.3 percentage point next year. 'It looks like the probability of a full-blown trade war between the world's two largest economies is rising,' said Louis Kuijs, an economist at Oxford Economics. 'Attitudes seem to be hardening.' Tariffs are already raising costs for some goods. A punitive duty the Trump administration applied to lumber imports from Canada has raised the price of a new home by $9,000, according to the National Association of Home Builders. ___ 11:14 a.m. The top White House trade adviser, Peter Navarro, says Beijing 'may have underestimated the resolve of President Donald J. Trump' by refusing to meet U.S. demands on trade and by threatening to retaliate against American trade sanctions. Navarro, known for his hard-line approach to China, still says the U.S. is open to talks to resolve the dispute before it imposes tariffs on up to $450 billion in Chinese products. 'Our phone lines are open; they have always been open,' he tells reporters. Navarro also disputes any notion that the trade standoff would damage the broader relationship with China. 'This is a trade dispute — nothing more, nothing less,' Navarro says. 'President Trump has a great relationship with President Xi' Jinping of China. ___ 10:30 a.m. Spooked by worsening tensions over trade between the world's two largest economies, investors are selling stocks and commodities and buying safer assets. The Dow Jones industrial average and the Nasdaq composite index have each dropped more than 1.4 percent in early trading. That follows brisk selling in international markets. Hong Kong's Hang Seng index dropped 2.8 percent and France's CAC 40 slipped 1.4 percent. The sell-off came after President Donald Trump threatened to impose tariffs on an additional $200 billion in imports from China, and the Chinese government said it would retaliate. Large U.S. companies with significant overseas business were hit especially hard. Boeing's stock shed 4.3 percent, Caterpillar 4 percent and GE 2.2 percent. Commodities such as oil, copper and soybeans fell. Bond prices climbed as investors turned more cautious. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.88 percent from 2.92 percent.
  • Officials in a Saudi-led coalition battling Shiite rebels for control of a crucial port in Yemen on Tuesday displayed weapons captured on the battlefield that they say show Iran is arming the insurgents. Iran long has denied arming the rebels, known as Houthis, despite reports by the United Nations, Western countries and outside groups linking it to the rebels' arsenal. Weapons shown to reporters in Abu Dhabi and later at an Emirati military base on a government-sponsored tour included drones, a sniper rifle, roadside bombs disguised as rocks and even a 'drone boat,' which had been filled with explosives that failed to detonate. The officials showed Iranian-labeled components inside of equipment they said was used to produce and load fuel for the rockets the rebels have fired across the border at Saudi Arabia. They also displayed images allegedly showing Iranian officials building components for the 'drone boat.' The officials said such weapons threaten both coalition forces and civilians. 'Unsurprisingly, there are advanced military components in the Houthi militia's hands,' Talal al-Teneiji, an Emirati Foreign Affairs Ministry official, told The Associated Press. 'We took time to inspect and disassemble these to figure out the source ... and we can say that these elements are military-grade materials imported from Iran to the Houthi militias.' Iran's mission to the United Nations later said it had no comment on the specifics of the Saudi-led coalition's allegations 'other than reiterating that Iran has not sent and does not send armaments to Yemen.' The rare show-and-tell by the Saudi-led coalition comes as the United Arab Emirates leads Yemeni forces in an offensive seeking to capture the Red Sea port city of Hodeida. Their campaign has been criticized by aid groups, which fear a protracted fight could force a shutdown of the port and potentially tip millions into starvation. Some 70 percent of Yemen's food enters via the port, as well as the bulk of humanitarian aid and fuel supplies. Around two-thirds of the country's population of 27 million relies on aid and 8.4 million are already at risk of starving. The Houthi-controlled port has remained open, as the main battle Tuesday was around the city's airport, to the south. Some of the weapons shown have previously been described by U.N. weapons experts and an independent group called Conflict Armament Research, which gained access to the materiel through the UAE's elite Presidential Guard. Among them were roadside bombs disguised as rocks that the research group has said bear similarities to others used by Hezbollah in southern Lebanon and by other Iran-backed fighters in Iraq and Bahrain, suggesting at the least an Iranian influence in their manufacture. Already, the Saudi-led coalition has disarmed between 20,000 to 30,000 land mines and bombs, most laid indiscriminately by the Houthis, al-Teneiji said. Other weapons on display Tuesday included a .50-caliber sniper rifle and mines. Officials also displayed a series of drones they said showed a growing sophistication by the insurgents, starting first with plastic foam models that could be built by hobby kit to one captured in April that closely resembled an Iranian-made drone. Those advanced drones have been flown into the radar arrays of Saudi Arabia's Patriot missile batteries, according to Conflict Armament Research, disabling them and allowing the Houthis to fire ballistic missiles into the kingdom unchallenged. Iran has been accused by the U.S. and the U.N. of supplying ballistic missile technology to the Houthis, something Tehran denies. At a military base, the officials showed what they described as 'dual-use' equipment that they believe was used to fuel Badr rockets, gear which they seized from smugglers in Yemen's central Marib governorate. Inside one piece of equipment a component bore the name of Shokouh Electric, an Iranian firm. Another piece of the equipment bore the Farsi name and address of Mashal Kaveh, another Iranian company. The Saudi-led coalition officials spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence matters. The AP could not immediately reach the Iranian companies for comment, but Iran has mocked previous show-and-tell events by Saudi and American officials. The officials also shared black-and-white images they said came from the 'drone boat' that failed to explode. They said the pictures and associated data from the boat's computer showed Iranians building components for the boat's guidance system in eastern Tehran, with a hat in the background of one picture bearing the symbol of Iran's hard-line paramilitary Revolutionary Guard. They said those involved in building the boat's components likely believed it would be destroyed in the blast, so they didn't wipe down the computer's hard drive. But perhaps more telling in Yemen's long, complicated war was the fact that the boat itself actually came from the UAE, which had originally given it to Yemeni government forces. ___ Associated Press writer Fay Abuelgasim contributed to this report. ___ Follow Jon Gambrell on Twitter at https://twitter.com/jongambrellAP . His work can be found at http://apne.ws/2galNpz .
  • The United States announced Tuesday it was leaving the United Nations' Human Rights Council, with Ambassador Nikki Haley calling it 'an organization that is not worthy of its name.' It was the latest withdrawal by the Trump administration from an international institution. Haley, Trump's envoy to the U.N., said the U.S. had given the human rights body 'opportunity after opportunity' to make changes. She lambasted the council for 'its chronic bias against Israel' and lamented the fact that its membership includes accused human rights abusers such as China, Cuba, Venezuela and the Democratic Republic of Congo. 'We take this step because our commitment does not allow us to remain a part of a hypocritical and self-serving organization that makes a mockery of human rights,' Haley said. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, appearing alongside Haley at the State Department, said there was no doubt that the council once had a 'noble vision.' But today we need to be honest,' Pompeo said. 'The Human Rights Council is a poor defender of human rights.' The announcement came just a day after the U.N. human rights chief, Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein, denounced the Trump administration for separating migrant children from their parents. But Haley cited longstanding U.S. complaints that the 47-member council is biased against Israel. She had been threatening the pull-out since last year unless the council made changes advocated by the U.S. 'Regrettably, it is now clear that our call for reform was not heeded,' Haley said. Still, she suggested the decision need not be permanent, adding that if the council did adopt reforms, 'we would be happy to rejoin it.' She said the withdrawal notwithstanding, the U.S. would continue to defend human rights at the United Nations. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's office called the U.S. decision 'courageous,' calling it 'an unequivocal statement that enough is enough.' The move extends a broader Trump administration pattern of stepping back from international agreements and forums under the president's 'America First' policy. Although numerous officials have said repeatedly that 'America First does not mean America Alone,' the administration has retreated from multiple multilateral accords and consensuses since it took office. Since January 2017, it has announced its withdrawal from the Paris climate accord, left the U.N. educational and cultural organization and pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal. Other contentious moves have included slapping tariffs on steel and aluminum against key trading partners, recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital and moving the U.S. Embassy there from Tel Aviv. Opposition to the decision from human rights advocates was swift. A group of 12 organizations including Save the Children, Freedom House and the United Nations Association-USA said there were 'legitimate concerns' about the council's shortcomings but that none of them warranted a U.S. exit. 'This decision is counterproductive to American national security and foreign policy interests and will make it more difficult to advance human rights priorities and aid victims of abuse around the world,' the organizations said in a joint statement. Added Kenneth Roth, the executive director of Human Rights Watch: 'All Trump seems to care about is defending Israel.' On Twitter, al-Hussein, the U.N. human rights chief, said it was 'Disappointing, if not really surprising, news. Given the state of #HumanRights in today's world, the US should be stepping up, not stepping back.' And the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank close to the Trump administration, defended the move, calling the council 'notably incurious about the human rights situations in some of the world's most oppressive countries.' Brett Schaefer, a senior fellow, pointed out that Trump could have withdrawn immediately after taking office but instead gave the council 18 months to make changes. Haley has been the driving force behind withdrawing from the human rights body, unprecedented in the 12-year history of the council. No country has ever dropped out voluntarily. Libya was kicked out seven years ago. The move could reinforce the perception that the Trump administration is seeking to advance Israel's agenda on the world stage, just as it prepares to unveil its long-awaited Israeli-Palestinian peace plan despite Palestinian outrage over the embassy relocation. Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner, is visiting the Middle East this week as the White House works to lay the groundwork for unveiling the plan. Israel is the only country in the world whose rights record comes up for discussion at every council session, under 'Item 7' on the agenda. Item 7 on 'Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories' has been part of the council's regular business almost as long as it has existed. The United States' current term on the council ends next year. Although the U.S. could have remained a non-voting observer on the council, a U.S. official said it was a 'complete withdrawal' and that the United States was resigning its seat 'effective immediately.' The official wasn't authorized to comment publicly and insisted on anonymity. That means the council will be left without one of its traditional defenders of human rights. In recent months, the United States has participated in attempts to pinpoint rights violations in places like South Sudan, Congo and Cambodia. The U.S. pullout was bound to have ripple effects for at least two countries at the council: China and Israel. The U.S., as at other U.N. organizations, is Israel's biggest defender. At the rights council, the United States has recently been the most unabashed critic of rights abuses in China — whose growing economic and diplomatic clout has chastened some other would-be critics, rights advocates say. There are 47 countries in the Human Rights Council, elected by the U.N.'s General Assembly with a specific number of seats allocated for each region of the globe. Members serve for three-year terms and can serve only two terms in a row. The United States has opted to stay out of the Human Rights Council before: The George W. Bush administration opted against seeking membership when the council was created in 2006. The U.S. joined the body only in 2009 under President Barack Obama. ___ Associated Press writers Jamey Keaten in Geneva and Edith M. Lederer at the United Nations contributed.
  • Russian police say that $800,000 worth of valuables have been stolen from Colombian singer Maluma's hotel room in Moscow while he's visiting Russia to support the Colombia team at the World Cup. Russian news reports quoted local police as saying that the stolen items included a variety of luxury watches, numerous pieces of jewelry and other belongings. They said a thief apparently got into Maluma's room posing as his guest while the singer was absent. It wasn't immediately clear when the theft took place. The value of the items was estimated at more than 50 million rubles (about $800,000). An official investigation is underway. Maluma traveled to Saransk Tuesday where Japan beat Colombia 2-1.
  • A human rights group on Tuesday criticized a phone tapping agreement between Romania's intelligence agency and the high court, saying it exposes ordinary citizens to potential abuse. The High Court of Cassation and Justice, prosecutors and the Romanian Intelligence Service signed a secret protocol in 2009 in which the agency promised to provide technical infrastructure for prosecutors and protect classified data obtained from legal phone and electronic tapping. The agreement was published on Monday. The Human Rights in Romania-Helsinki Committee Association criticized the deal, saying close links between the courts and intelligence agents could lead to civil rights' abuses. It noted that the court had rejected just one of 26,500 phone tapping requests made on national security grounds. Senior members of the ruling Social Democratic Party claim 6 million people have been tapped in recent years and say Romania is controlled by forces in the justice system and intelligence agency which are outside party control — something they call a 'parallel state.' The Social Democrats and their allies are currently pushing through laws which critics say would curb prosecutorial powers and make it harder to punish high-level corruption. Almost three decades after communism ended, some ordinary Romanians believe the state intelligence agency taps their phones and bugs their homes. The Securitate communist secret police kept close tabs on Romanian citizens, with an army of informers and agents who listened to phones and reported on dissent.

News

  • Two brothers accused of at least seven robberies across metro Atlanta in May are no ordinary criminals: they’re identical twins. Marquavious and Juntavious Burton, 20, were arrested in early June. According to Fulton County jail records, the twins have been arrested multiple times since 2015 on charges such as aggravated assault and theft by receiving stolen property. The latest charges include seven counts of armed robbery and a charge of participating in criminal street gang activity. Police believe they may be responsible for even more recent robberies. The Burton twins have also been accused of shooting at some of the robbery victims, Channel 2 Action News reported.  In other news:
  • Two Cobb County siblings were killed after their 17-year-old sister allegedly lost control of the family’s SUV on a South Carolina interstate, police said Monday.  Jessica Wolwark was driving a Chevrolet northbound on I-85 in Anderson County when she ran off the highway and the SUV overturned Saturday morning, according to police.  Wolwark and her mother, Natalia Anggraeni, were both wearing seat belts and were seriously injured in the crash. Two other family members died from their injuries after being ejected, police said.  Kirana “Kiki” Wolwark, 15, and 12-year-old Nate Wolwark were both killed, a family friend posted on a Go Fund Me page. The family was traveling from their Kennesaw home to Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C., where the girls were to attend a religious retreat, according to Chrissy Concepcion, who set up the fundraising page for the family. The family does not have medical insurance, she said. The South Carolina medical examiner was unable to confirm the identities of those killed, but family friends confirmed the names and ages of the Wolwark siblings.  “Kiki was a joy to be around, and spread her love for animals to everyone she knew,” Concepcion posted. “Nate was the perfect boy; always helpful, caring, and accepting of everyone around him.” The driver and her mother were both taken by helicopter to a Greenville hospital, where both remained Monday. Anggraeni has a broken neck and several broken ribs, Concepcion said. Jessica Wolwark has torn ligaments in her arm, but is expected to be released from the hospital this week.  The South Carolina Highway Patrol is investigating the crash.  In other news: 
  • President Donald Trump tried on Tuesday evening to push Republicans in the House to pass an immigration reform bill later this week, basically telling GOP lawmakers he would support whatever they could pass, as Republicans struggled to find the votes to do that, and pressed the White House to back off a new policy that separates some illegal immigrant kids from their parents after being picked up at the border. “The system’s been broken for many years,” the President told reporters at the Capitol before the unusual Tuesday evening gathering. “The immigration system, it’s been a really bad, bad. system, probably the worst anywhere in the world. And we’re gonna try and see if we can fix it.” Earlier in the day, the President had told a gathering of business leaders that he would not back off his calls for major changes in U.S. immigration laws. “When people come up, they have to know they’re never going to get in, or else it’s never going to stop,” Mr. Trump said of the flow of illegal immigration across the southern border with Mexico. President Trump: 'I'm asking Congress to do is to give us a third option, which we have been requesting since last year, the legal authority to detain and promptly remove families together as a unit. We have to be able to do this. This is the only solution to the border crisis.' pic.twitter.com/UllzH6rL4y — CSPAN (@cspan) June 19, 2018 But complicating matters for the President was the recent move to force the separation of children and parents, if the parents were being charged for illegally entering the United States, as that continued to draw stern opposition from GOP lawmakers of all stripes. “All of us are horrified at the images that we are seeing,” said Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX). “We ought to stop separating families,” said Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-KS). “The Administration disagrees,” as GOP lawmakers said the conflict wasn’t really discussed during the Tuesday night meeting with Mr. Trump. “We can have strong border security without separating families,” said Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH). 13 GOP Senators signed a letter to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, asking the Trump Administration to “halt current policies leading to the forced separation of minor children from their parents,” but that missive fell on deaf ears at the White House, as GOP lawmakers scrambled for kind of legislative answer. If every Senator is willing to support it by unanimous consent, the Senate could pass a bill, before the end of the week, that would allow families charged with illegal entry to be kept together while awaiting an expedited hearing. I truly hope that is what we do. — Marco Rubio (@marcorubio) June 19, 2018 House GOP leaders on Tuesday night posted two different immigration bills for possible House votes – one was a more conservative plan backed by Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), which was unlikely to get close to a majority; a second was a more moderate bill that lacked the support of conservatives. It left many unsure what would happen if votes occurred this week on the House floor. “I’m still working through whether I can vote for the compromise bill,” said Rep. Warren Davidson (R-OH), as more conservative lawmakers withheld their support from the only all-GOP plan that has a chance for approval. Meanwhile, even as Mr. Trump tried to push Republicans to stick together on immigration, he managed to cause some internal GOP pain, as lawmakers said the President – during the closed door meeting with House lawmakers – took a verbal shot at Rep. Mark Sanford (R-SC), who lost his primary a week ago to a candidate backed by the President. “Is Mark Sanford here? I just want to congratulate him on running a great race,” the President reportedly said, drawing quiet groans and hisses from some GOP members. One Republican, Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI) said later on Twitter, that the jab was uncalled for. “This was a classless cheap shot,” Amash wrote.
  • U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson accused the Trump administration of a 'cover-up' after officials denied him entry Tuesday to a detention center for migrant children in South Florida where he had hoped to survey living conditions. Nelson and U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, both Florida Democrats, went to the contractor-run Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children following reports it was receiving detained children who had arrived in the country illegally. Wasserman Schultz said the facility was being used for an estimated 1,000 children, aged 13 to 17 — most of whom arrived as unaccompanied minors and about 10 percent of whom are children separated from their families at the border. She said two other South Florida facilities were being used for younger children. 'It is an affront as the senior senator of this state that an agency head would tell me that I do not have entrance into a federally funded facility where the lives and health of children are at stake,' Nelson said. President Donald Trump's immigration policies have drawn intense scrutiny following reports of the forced separation of migrant children from their parents. Democrats and some Republicans are urging an end to the practice at the U.S.-Mexico border. Thousands of children split from their families at that border are being held in government-run facilities. Wasserman Schultz said her staff had spoken Tuesday with the Florida-based company, Comprehensive Health Services, contracted to run the facility. She said her staff was told the lawmakers would be 'welcomed warmly and allowed into the facility.' But Nelson said Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services Eric Hargan told him it would take two weeks for them to gain access. 'I think what they're doing is a cover-up for the president,' Nelson said. Trump doesn't like the negative response he's received, even from fellow Republicans, Nelson said. 'Are they abusing these kids? Are they sleeping on the floor? Are they in cages, like we've seen in some videos?' Wasserman Schultz asked after being barred from the building. The Florida facility is overseen by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Department spokesman Kenneth Wolfe said in an email Monday that it had reopened as 'a temporary unaccompanied alien children program facility.' He did not provide further details. Gov. Rick Scott's office, however, released documents Tuesday that showed that federal authorities in February notified state officials and members of Congress that the Homestead facility would be reopened. Federal authorities didn't give an exact date, but said the Homestead location would reopen after damage from Hurricane Irma was repaired. The release from HHS also stated that the facility would only be used for 'unaccompanied alien children' detained by immigration officials. Later Tuesday, Scott called on Trump's administration to stop separating the families. The Republican governor sent his request in a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar. Scott's letter also requested that federal authorities notify state officials when they bring into Florida migrant children who have been separated from their families. Scott also wants to know what services are being provided to the children and whether they have had any health screenings. He said the information is needed to make sure that the children are being protected. An Associated Press reporter was denied access to Azar while he visited a Miami hospital Tuesday to talk with patients about drug costs. Spokesman Gavin Smith barred the AP reporter from asking Azar about the immigration facility because an interview with the secretary had not been pre-arranged. Several dozen children could be seen Tuesday playing soccer outside the building behind a chain link fence, mostly talking and shouting to each other in Spanish. Security officials would not let reporters near the facility or provide details on conditions inside. Mark Greenberg, a former head of the HHS Administration for Children and Families, said agency policy says requests to visit facilities for migrant children be submitted two weeks in advance. However, Greenberg said in the current state of heightened concern it behooves HHS to act rapidly on requests from lawmakers. Greenberg said much of the reason for lead time is logistical: the facilities are operated by federal contractors and government officials should be present for a congressional inspection. 'The current urgency of concerns about what is happening to children who have been separated from their parents makes it important to provide access as quickly as possible,' he said. Greenberg is currently a senior fellow at the Migration Policy Institute, a Washington think tank focused on immigration. ___ Reporter Gary Fineout contributed to this story from Tallahassee. See AP's complete coverage of the debate over the Trump administration's policy of family separation at the border: https://apnews.com/tag/Immigration
  • Top Republicans responded Tuesday to the Trump administration’s hard-line immigration policy of separating families at the U.S.-Mexico border, a “zero tolerance” policy implemented six weeks ago. Many Republicans responded publicly to the harsh criticism over the policy, saying they support keeping migrant children and parents together. >> Read more trending news Update 10:00 p.m. EDT June 19: The growing backlash against the Trump administration’s immigration policy is expanding as tech workers take a stand in Silicon Valley. Microsoft workers are demanding the tech giant end its relationship with Immigration and Customs Enforcement in the wake of the forced separation of families at the U.S. southern border. Some 100 Microsoft employees signed an open letter that calls for the company to sever its ties with ICE, according to The New York Times. “We believe that Microsoft must take an ethical stand, and put children and families above profits,” employees said in the letter. The letter was addressed to Microsoft chief executive, Satya Nadella. Microsoft has a contract with ICE worth more than $19 million “for processing data and artificial intelligence,” the Times reported.  Axios reported the letter demanded three things: Cancel its contract with ICE, create a public policy stating that 'neither Microsoft nor its contractors will work with clients who violate international human rights law,” and commit to 'transparency and review regarding contracts between Microsoft and government agencies, in the US and beyond.' Update 8:30 p.m. EDT June 19: Protests unfolded in several U.S. cities Tuesday against the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, which has resulted in the separation of at least 2,000 children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border over the past six weeks. In New York, opponents of the policy marched from Union Square to Lower Manhattan, demanding an end to the separation policy. In San Francisco, protesters marched to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement building, demanding that the agency stop separating children from their parents at the border. Protesters also gathered in Philadelphia’s Rittenhouse Square to protest the administration’s immigration policy during an appearance by Vice President Mike Pence at a GOP fundraiser. Update 6:30 p.m. EDT June 19: As President Donald Trump meets with Congressional Republicans this hour over immigration, it’s unclear whether lawmakers can agree on immigration legislation and whether the meeting will address the controversial policy of separating undocumented families at the U.S. border. Trump is reportedly urging House Republicans to pass “the compromise bill and the Goodlatte bill,” according to The Hill, which is citing GOP sources. Senior Trump administration officials are doubling down on the administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, calling out opponents of the plan, according to a new statement, the Huff Post reported on Twitter. “The administration’s zero tolerance policy is a response to a humanitarian crisis brought about by loopholes in federal immigration law that encourage human trafficking and smuggling. As a result of these loopholes, the only two options for the U.S. government are to either release into the country illegally all illegal Central American migrants who show up at our border with a minor, or to prosecute them for illegal entry. There is no policy of family separation,” the statement said. “The Trump administration has repeatedly asked Congress to give us the authority to detain families together and promptly return families together. Members of Congress who are pushing to give immunity for child smuggling will only increase the crisis ten-fold.” The statement urges Congress to close the loopholes so the government can return “illegal alien families in a fair, expeditious and humane fashion.” Update 4:42 p.m. EDT June 19: An undocumented child with Down syndrome was separated from her parents while illegally trying to cross the U.S.-Mexico border, according to The Wall Street Journal. The 10-year-old girl was separated from her parents, even though her father is a legal U.S. resident, and sent to an immigration facility in McAllen, Texas, the Journal reported, while her mother was sent to a facility in Brownsville. The separation occurred while the mother was trying to get the girl and her brother across the border.    The newspaper learned of the situation after an interview with Mexico’s Foreign Prime Minister Luis Videgaray. During a speech at a small business event Tuesday, Trump blamed Mexico for contributing to the crisis at the U.S. southern border, saying the Mexican government could help end the stream of people traveling to the U.S. if it wanted to.  Update 3:09 p.m. EDT June 19: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, said Tuesday that Republicans support creating a plan to keep migrant children and parents together amid criticism of a Trump administration policy that separates families suspected of coming into the country illegally at the border. “I … and all of the other senators of the Republican conference support a plan that keeps families together,” McConnell told reporters Tuesday. Sen. Orin Hatch, R-Utah, has passed a letter around to colleagues calling on U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions to stop separating families, The Hill reported. “I’m asking for a pause,” Hatch said. “I think we ought to pause and look at this very carefully.” Update 2:07 p.m. EDT June 19: A pair of Florida Democrats was barred Tuesday from going inside a Miami-area facility housing immigrant children as the national debate raged around the Trump administration’s policy of separating migrant children from parents at the border. U.S. Rep. Debbie Wassermn Schultz and U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson attempted to enter the Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children Tuesday, but Wasserman Schultz said they were told that they needed to put in a request to visit the facility two weeks ahead of time. The lawmakers said that they were told by the company that runs the facility that they would be able to visit Tuesday, but they were stopped by the a representative of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. “This is not a good day for our country, where a U.S. senator and a U.S. congressman have been turned away from a federal facility because the Trump administration does not want us to check on the welfare and the care of the children inside -- children who have been taken from their moms and dads,” Nelson said. Update 1:30 p.m. EDT June 19: President Donald Trump once again blamed laws passed by Democrats for his administration’s policy of separating migrant children from parents suspected of coming into the country illegally while speaking Tuesday at a meeting of the National Federation of Independent Business. Trump said the policy is necessary because loopholes in the immigration laws mean families “cannot  be detained together or removed together, only released.” “These are crippling loopholes that cause family separations,” Trump said. “Child smugglers exploit the loopholes and they gain illegal entry into the United States, putting countless children in danger.” There is no law that mandates the separation of children and parents at the border. “We've got to stop the separation of the families, but politically correct or not we have a country that needs safety, that needs security, that has to be protected,” Trump said. “We don’t want people pouring into our country, we want them to come in through the process, through the legal system and we want ultimately a merit-based system where people come in based on merit.” Update 11:40 a.m. EDT June 19: More than 20 state attorneys general are calling for an end to the Trump administration’s immigration policy, which has led to children being separated from their parents at the border and has sparked national outrage. The 21 Democratic state attorneys general, from states including Massachusetts, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Washington, sent a letter Tuesday to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen. “Put simply, the deliberate separation of children and their parents who seek lawful asylum in America is wrong,” the attorneys general said in the letter. “This practice is contrary to American values and must be stopped. We demand that you immediately reverse these harmful policies in the best interests of the children and families affected.” The group is led by New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas, who on Tuesday called the immigration policy “inhumane” and “draconian.” “The Justice Department is ignoring its legal and moral obligations for the sake of a political agenda at the expense of children and the efforts of state law enforcement officials,” Balderas said. “The latest move to unnecessarily separate families is cruel and another example of this administration putting politics ahead of people.” Update 10:15 a.m. EDT June 19: President Donald Trump insisted on Twitter that “Democrats are the problem” in the immigration debate as criticism of his administration’s policy of separating children from parents at the border continues. Trump wrote Tuesday morning that Democrats “don’t care about crime and want illegal immigrants, no matter how bad they may be, to pour into and infest our Country, like MS-13.” The president has blamed Democrats for the recent surge in family separations, saying that laws need to be changed in order to change the separation policy. >> Recording of crying immigrant children separated from parents at border sparks outrage “Now is the best opportunity ever for Congress to change the ridiculous and obsolete laws on immigration,” Trump said Tuesday in a tweet with the hashtag #CHANGETHELAWS.   There are no laws mandating the separation of children and parents at the border. The president also wrote Tuesday morning that “if you don’t have Borders, you don’t have a Country,” and reiterated a claim that crime has risen in Germany since the country started accepting migrants, despite government numbers that show crime at its lowest rate since 1992. Update 9:44 a.m. EDT June 19: The executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund called stories of children being separated from their parents as a result of the Trump administration’s immigration policy “heartbreaking,” saying in a statement Monday that “such practices are in no one’s best interests, least of all the children who suffer their effects.” “Detention and family separation are traumatic experiences that can leave children more vulnerable to exploitation and abuse and can create toxic stress which, as multiple studies have shown, can impact children’s long-term development,” said Henrietta Fore, an American who has headed UNICEF since earlier this year. She noted that the U.S. government has long supported UNICEF’s efforts to help uprooted children in Syria, South Sudan, Somalia and Haiti. >> Clergy group brings church charges of child abuse, immorality against Jeff Sessions over zero-tolerance policy “Children -- no matter where they come from or what their migration status -- are children first and foremost,” she said. “I hope that the best interests of refugee and migrant children will be paramount in the application of U.S. asylum procedures and laws.” Update 8:40 a.m. EDT June 19: Sen. John McCain called the Trump administration’s family separation policy “an affront to the decency of the American people” in a tweet Monday night. The Arizona Republican said the policy is “contrary to principles and values upon which our nation was founded.” “The administration has the power to rescind this policy,” he wrote. “It should do so now.” >> Is the immigration separation policy new, where did it come from, where are the detention centers? McCain is among a growing number of Republican lawmakers voicing concern over the administration's 'zero tolerance' approach to illegal border crossings. Under the policy, all unlawful crossings are referred for prosecution. With adults detained and facing prosecution, any minors accompanying them are taken away. Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May. Update 7:15 p.m. EDT June 18: The nonprofit news organization ProPublica released an eight minute audio recording of wailing children, who were separated from their parents last week. >> All 5 living first ladies speak out on separation of immigrant children, parents at border A U.S. border patrol agent can be heard laughing in the background as the 10 children from Central America are separated from their families. Update 6:00 p.m. EDT June 18: Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, during a briefing Monday afternoon, said there’s nothing new about the current policy of separating undocumented children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Trump's 'zero tolerance' immigration policy: 4 things to know 'This entire crisis is not new, Nielsen said, pointing to 'loopholes' in federal immigration laws from the past, but that could change this week with the introduction of several immigration measures in the U.S. House and Senate, including one from Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. Cruz is expected to introduce the “Protect Kids and Parents Act,” according to news reports. The measure would double the number of federal immigration judges from 375 to 750. It would authorize new temporary shelters to better accommodate families.  The bill would mandate that immigrant families remain together, unless there’s criminal conduct or a threat to the children, and it would require that asylum cases are heard within 14 days of application.   Update 5:35 p.m. EDT June 18:  The head of the Department of Homeland Security, Kirstjen Nielsen, addressed the growing backlash over the Trump administration’s zero-tolerance immigration policy at the southern U.S. border, which is separating undocumented children from their parents. Nielsen defended the policy and urged  Congress to fix the system and close the loopholes. >> Before Trump policy, immigrant families arrested at the border were detained together Update 5:30 p.m. EDT June 18: Two more first ladies have weighed in on the widening controversy over the Trump administration’s policy of separating children from their parents at the southern U.S. border. Michelle Obama retweeted comments Laura Bush made that Trump’s “zero-tolerance policy is cruel. It is immoral. And it breaks my heart.” >> Trump border policy: How to help immigrant children separated from families Former first lady Rosalynn Carter also released a statement Monday, according to The New York Times. 'The practice and policy today of removing children from their parents' care at our border with Mexico is disgraceful and a shame to our country,' Carter said. Update 4:30 p.m. EDT June 18: The Department of Health and Human Services has released photos of the “tent city” in the Texas border outpost of Tornillo, just outside of El Paso, where the U.S. government is sending children separated from their parents at the border. There are already dozens of children at the facility, according to news reports. Update 3:10 p.m. EDT June 18: Sen. Kamala Harris, D-California, called Monday for the resignation of Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen amid the ongoing debate over the Trump administration’s immigration policy. The demand came one day after Nielsen said in a tweet that, “We do not have a policy of separating families at the border. Period.” Nielsen echoed President Donald Trump’s claims that a law is behind the recent spike in separations of migrant children and their parents at the border. “We will not apologize for enforcing the laws passed by Congress,” Nielsen said. “We are a nation of laws. We are asking Congress to change the laws.” However, as Harris and numerous fact checkers have noted, there is no law that mandates the separation of children and parents at the border. Harris said in a statement Monday that Nielsen’s “misleading statements ... are disqualifying.” “We must speak the truth,” Harris said. “There is no law that says the Administration has to rip children from their families. This Administration can and must reverse course now and it can and must find new leadership for the Department of Homeland Security.” Update 2:30 p.m. June 18: Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Monday that President Donald Trump is telling an “outright lie” when he claims that Democrats are behind the recent surge in separations of children from their parents on the border. “This is not happening because of the 'Democrats' law,' as the White House has claimed,” Clinton said. “Separating families is not mandated by law at all.” Clinton, who ran as a Democrat against Trump during the 2016 presidential election, also appeared to chastise U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who cited a Bible verse last week while justifying the Trump administration’s immigration policy. “Those who selectively use the Bible to justify this cruelty are ignoring a central tenant of Christianity,” Clinton said. “Jesus said, ‘Suffer the little children unto me.’ He did not say, ‘Let the children suffer.’” Update 2 p.m. EDT June 18: Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush urged President Donald Trump to end the policy that’s allowed authorities to separate migrant children from their parents on the border, writing Monday on Twitter that 'children shouldn't be used as a negotiating tool.” “(Trump) should end this heartless policy and Congress should get an immigration deal done that provides for asylum reform, border security and a path to citizenship for Dreamers,” he wrote. The president has repeatedly called for Democrats to negotiate with Republicans to address illegal immigration after falsely claiming that the party is behind laws that mandate the separation of child from parent at the border. No such law exists.  Jeb Bush, brother of former President George W. Bush and son of former President George H.W. Bush, ran against Trump in 2016 for the Republican presidential nomination. In an op-ed published Sunday by the Washington Post, former first lady Laura Bush called the Trump administration policy “cruel.” 'I live in a border state,' Bush wrote. 'I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel. It is immoral. And it breaks my heart.' First lady Melania Trump has also criticized the policy, telling CNN in a statement through her spokeswoman that “She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws, but also a country that governs with heart.” Update 12:46 p.m. EDT June 18: President Donald Trump again accused Democrats of obstructing efforts to deal with illegal immigration and the separation of children and parents at the border, telling reporters Monday that “we’re stuck with these horrible laws” because Democrats refuse to sit down with Republicans. There are no laws mandating the separation of children and parents at the border. “We have the worst immigration laws in the entire world,” Trump said. “Nobody has such sad, such bad – and in many cases, such horrible and tough – you see about child separation. You see what’s going on there.” “The United States will not be a migrant camp and it will not be a refugee holding facility,” Trump said. Update 12 p.m. EDT June 18: U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Monday said authorities don’t want to separate children from their families but that officials have a duty to prosecute people who illegally cross the border. “When we ignore our laws at the border we obviously encourage hundreds of thousands of people a year to likewise ignore our laws and illegally enter our country, creating an enormous burden on our law enforcement, our schools, our hospitals and (our) social programs,” Sessions said Monday during the National Sheriffs’ Association Annual Conference in New Orleans. He framed the issue as a debate over “whether we want to be a country of laws or whether we want to be a country without borders.” “President Trump has said this cannot continue,” Sessions said. “We do not want to separate parents from their children. If we build the wall, if we pass legislation to end the lawlessness, we won’t face these terrible choices. We will have a system where those who need to apply for asylum can do so and those who want to come to this country will apply legally.” Sessions’ arguments echoed those of President Donald Trump, who has blamed Democrats for passing laws that he said led to the separations. There are no laws mandating the separation of children and parents at the border. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said earlier Monday that officials will not apologize for enforcing immigration laws. 'We have to do our job,' she said. Original report: President Donald Trump defended his administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy on Monday, writing in a series of tweets that children are being used “by the worst criminals on earth” to get into America as critics slammed the policy for separating children from their parents. “Children are being used by some of the worst criminals on earth as a means to enter our country,” Trump wrote. “Has anyone been looking at the Crime taking place south of the border. It is historic, with some countries the most dangerous places in the world. Not going to happen in the U.S.” The president pointed to a rise in crime in Germany as an example of the chaos caused by illegal immigration, writing in a tweet that it was a “big mistake made all over Europe in allowing millions of people in who have so strongly and violently changed their culture.” However, Germany’s internal ministry reported last month that criminal offenses in the country were at their lowest since 1992, according to Reuters. This spring, the Trump administration ordered prosecutors to charge every person illegally crossing the border. Children traveling with the adults have been separated and placed in detention centers, prompting protests nationwide. The president has blamed Democrats for not fixing the law that allows for the separations. “Tell them to start thinking about the people devastated by Crime coming from illegal immigration,” the president wrote. “Change the laws!” Despite his claim that Democrats are at fault for the situation, The Associated Press reported that the Trump administration “put the policy in place and could easily end it.” The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Earthlings in the Northern Hemisphere: Are you hot enough yet? Well, Thursday we're welcoming the longest day of the year. Right, summer solstice! So besides it being opposite of the winter solstice, how do we explain this annual event? To understand the summer solstice, you've got to understand the Earth's tilt. It might not feel like it, but the Earth is skewed at a 23.5-degree angle. It's also spinning while spinning — but that's for another day. 'The overhead sun is over the Tropic of Cancer. It receives the largest amount of solar radiation. … On this day, the length of daytime in the Northern Hemisphere is the longest of the year,' according to an explanation in a video from the Kurdistan Planetarium. As the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration points out, the name itself speaks to the length of day: 'The word solstice comes from Latin solstitium or sol (the sun) + -stit-, -stes (standing).' Basically, it'll feel like the sun is standing still. Since most places up north can expect somewhere around 16 hours of daylight on the summer solstice, it’s a good time to soak up some rays. But the annual event also coincides with many formal traditions. In Scandinavia, for example, many people celebrate Midsummer, a historically pagan celebration in which people feast and dance around a maypole. They also drink and sing — at the same time. 'We recommend two beers per nube. This will improve both your singing and your Swedish,' a participant said. In some Christian traditions, people celebrate the nativity of St. John the Baptist through feasts and bonfires. If you’re confused on what to do for summer solstice, just enjoy a meal or take a picture of the sun. You'll have plenty of time for both.