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Multiple bomb threats made across metro Atlanta, entire country

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State & Regional Govt & Politics
Early voting for Georgia runoff elections underway
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Early voting for Georgia runoff elections underway

Early voting for Georgia runoff elections underway
Photo Credit: JOHN SPINK / AJC/JOHN SPINK / AJC
People lined up for early voting at the Cobb County West Park Government Center in Marietta on Oct. 18, 2018. JOHN SPINK / JSPINK@AJC.COM

Early voting for Georgia runoff elections underway

Early voting for Georgia’s runoff elections is available for one week, from Monday to Friday. Election Day for the runoffs is Dec. 4.

The runoffs will settle two statewide races in which neither Democratic nor Republican candidates won a majority of the vote in the Nov. 6 general election. 

The contests heading for runoffs are for secretary of state and Public Service Commission. During the general election, Libertarian Party candidates won more than 2 percent of the vote in each race, denying their opponents an outright win.

For secretary of state, Democrat John Barrow faces Republican Brad Raffensperger. The winner will succeed Secretary of State Robyn Crittenden, who was appointed by Gov. Nathan Deal to replace Gov.-elect Brian Kemp.

In the contest for Public Service Commission District 3, incumbent Republican Chuck Eaton is opposed by Democrat Lindy Miller.

To find early voting locations, voters can check with their county election offices, which often post early voting information online. Contact information for local election offices can be found through the secretary of state’s website at elections.sos.ga.gov/Elections/countyelectionoffices.do

RELATED: Early voting locations in Atlanta by county: Gwinnett CountyClaytonCobb CountyDeKalbFultonOther Counties

Unlike the general election, there’s no requirement for early voting on a Saturday before the runoff.

Absentee voting is also available for the runoffs. Voters can fill out an absentee ballot request form and return it to their county election offices. Mailed absentee ballots must be received by local election offices by 7 p.m. on Election Day.

All registered voters are eligible to participate in the runoff election, even if they didn’t cast ballots Nov. 6. The voter registration deadline for this year’s election was Oct. 9.

Read more

Find more Georgia election 2018 news on AJC’s Politically Georgia and on ajc.com.

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  • Channel 2 Action News is investigating a string of bomb threats that have been made across metro Atlanta and across the country.  Several metro counties and cities have reported threats. They coincide with threats that have been made across the country towards schools, city/county offices, newspapers and television stations.  Earlier in the day, five DeKalb County schools were placed on lockdown after police said someone called in threats to them. Here is a minute-by-minute look at what is going on: 3:05 p.m. Calhoun EMA says the city has received multiple threats:  'We have received multiple bomb threats all over town. No dangers have been found at this time. Be aware of your surroundings but please stay calm. We have found nothing to validate any of these threats.'  3:02 p.m. The FBI has released a statement saying: “We are aware of the recent bomb threats made in cities around the country, and we remain in touch with our law enforcement partners to provide assistance. As always, we encourage the public to remain vigilant and to promptly report suspicious activities which could represent a threat to public safety.”  3:01 p.m. In Cobb County, authorities tell Channel 2 that threats have caused them to evacuate the courthouse. Threats were also made at Cobb County police headquarters, which also houses their 911 center, and police precincts 1 and 4.  @wsbtv @cobbcountygovt nobody is allowed in the building there are police at every corner and I was told by another another attorney that the judges were taken to a secure chamber— J. Feathers (@Evlfthrs) December 13, 2018 2:50 p.m. There have been at least four locations across downtown Atlanta where bomb threats have been reported.  Cartersville police said they are looking into a threat on South Erwin Street. Across the country: Bomb threats have also been made to universities, newspapers and television stations across the country.  We're working a number of bomb threat calls in OKC. There have been similar threats called into several locations around the country. No credible threat found at this point. We encourage the public to continue to be vigilant and call with anything suspicious.— Oklahoma City Police (@OKCPD) December 13, 2018 MSP Fusion Center tracking multiple bomb threats emailed to numerous businesses in the state. MSP Bomb Squad notified and local departments are responding in their communities. Similar threats have been received in other states. We will share more info when available.— Mass State Police (@MassStatePolice) December 13, 2018 CapAlert: There has been a bomb threat at Yochum Hall. Please evacuate Yochum Hall until further notice.— Capital University (@Capital_U) December 13, 2018 #BREAKING UPDATE: Second bomb threat made against library in Georgetown. Follow developments: https://t.co/WGlll81vWf — WPDE ABC15 (@wpdeabc15) December 13, 2018 #BREAKING UPDATE: Second bomb threat made against library in Georgetown. Follow developments: https://t.co/WGlll81vWf — WPDE ABC15 (@wpdeabc15) December 13, 2018 CMPD is actively investigating multiple unsubstantiated bomb threats in the Charlotte area. At this time, there are similar reports happening in other cities across the country. We’ll continue to release information as it becomes available. pic.twitter.com/eC9nMbxcGa — CMPD News (@CMPD) December 13, 2018 SCAM ALERT: There is a rampant hoax email being distributed across the country of a bomb threat making demands for money. Emails began locally around 1 pm. We do NOT believe these emails have any validity and direct you to delete email. Do NOT send money. More info coming soon— Grand Rapids Police (@GrandRapidsPD) December 13, 2018 (1/2) At approximately 10AM this morning #SFPD responded to reports of bomb threats at numerous locations throughout the city. SFPD is responding to each location. We have received information that several other cities across the United States have received similar threats. pic.twitter.com/AEyFanZRvr — San Francisco Police (@SFPD) December 13, 2018 Bomb threat messages via email have been sent to several businesses demanding ransom. No credibility to any individual threat generic email sent en masse— EL PASO POLICE DEPT (@EPPOLICE) December 13, 2018
  • A 27-year-old man has died after falling while working as a window washer at the Trump International Hotel in Las Vegas. >> Read more trending news  Jonathan Garcia, of Las Vegas, fell to his death around 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, according to the Clark County coroner. Garcia's cause of death is pending. Witnesses said winds had pushed the rigging against the building several times before the man fell, reported KTNV-TV. Officials with the Trump organization released the following statement Wednesday: 'We are deeply saddened to learn of the incident today. We are working diligently with the owner of the third party company to investigate the details. Our thoughts and prayers are with the victim and his family.' The Nevada Occupational Safety and Health Administration is investigating the incident.
  • Lawmakers clashed over science, ethics and politics on Thursday at a House hearing on using fetal tissue in critically important medical research, as the Trump administration reviews the government's ongoing support for such studies. Research fields in which fetal tissue is used include HIV, childhood cancers, treatments that enlist the body's immune system to battle cancer, and the hunt for a vaccine against the Zika virus, a cause of birth defects. Republicans said alternatives to fetal tissue are available and should be used instead. Democrats said that view is at odds with science. Each side called on expert witnesses. 'Most of my constituents don't understand when you harvest baby parts, why that is OK,' said Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., who chaired the hearing by the Oversight and Government Reform Committee. Meadows, leader of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, is one of President Donald Trump's biggest allies in Congress. But Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., responded: 'The consensus in the scientific community is that there is currently no adequate substitute for fetal tissue in all of the cutting-edge research for which it is used today.' The government has funded research using fetal tissue for decades, under administrations of both political parties. Trump has gone out of his way to court social and religious conservatives among his staunchest supporters. The administration's new review of whether taxpayer dollars are being properly spent on fetal tissue research has raised alarms among medical investigators, who fear their work will be stopped to satisfy anti-abortion activists. Under Sec. Alex Azar, the Health and Human Services Department says it is trying to balance 'pro-life' and 'pro-science' imperatives in its ongoing audit of fetal tissue research. Azar's office said in a statement that the National Institutes of Health put a pause on procurement of new human fetal tissue in the fall, after the audit was announced. The department says research with fetal tissue already on hand was allowed to proceed, and that it never intended to stop research. The HHS statement left open the possibility of procuring new fetal tissue to prevent research projects from being interrupted. HHS has not announced a timeline for completing its audit. Fetal tissue is used to produce research mice that model how the human immune system works. The tissue, from elective abortions, would otherwise be discarded. Biochemist Tara Sander Lee told the committee that alternatives to fetal tissue are available and can be used. 'We do not need fetal body parts from aborted babies to achieve future scientific and medical advancements,' said Sander Lee, with the Charlotte Lozier Institute, which is opposed to abortion. Tissues from infants who have to undergo heart surgery are among the alternatives, she said. But neuroscientist Sally Temple, testifying on behalf of the International Society for Stem Cell Research, told lawmakers that alternatives to fetal tissue are simply not suitable for every disease and condition being studied. 'The consensus opinion is that those alternatives are not sufficient,' she said. Temple explained that tissue samples from different stages of the life cycle are not interchangeable. 'It is not the same material,' she said. 'It is a different developmental stage. It has unique properties.' Temple said researchers would readily use alternatives to fetal tissue if that was suitable.
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