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National
Woman has more than 400 Christmas trees set up in her house
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Woman has more than 400 Christmas trees set up in her house

The History Of The Christmas Tree

Woman has more than 400 Christmas trees set up in her house

Shelly Botcher has never found a Christmas tree she didn’t like, and she has never thrown one away. 

>> Read more trending news 

This year, she has more than 400 trees set up throughout her house. 

"I never get rid of (any). I just add," she told WDAF. "I have burgundy, cream and white. I have my fruit motif, my reds and bronze, purple, black and silver, safari, pink, teal, seashells. So it’s sort of fun to see the new things that come out each year and add it to my collection."

Some trees are upside down in order to make space for others. One room has 72 trees in it. 

"To me, it can be just a stress reliever with the busy time of year," Botcher told WDAF. "Just looking at it … (it) takes you away from your everyday life for just a minute (or) two."

Not everyone at the house feels the same about the trees. 

"This is my husband’s room, and he hates this. But as long as he sees the TV, he's OK," Botcher told WDAF

Read More

News

  • Channel 2 Action News obtained dashcam video that shows someone a man fears is a police impersonator making an odd attempt to pull him over on Interstate 75. It happened Sunday as the man, who only wanted to be identified as Dan, was headed home. Channel 2's Matt Johnson showed the video to Atlanta police, and Atlanta Police Department officials said the partial license plate seen in the video does not match any of their vehicles. 'Three things didn't add up: the civilian plate, him pulling in front of me and the bogus lights,' Dan said. Hear the man's warning for the community, on the Channel 2 Action News Nightbeat at 11 p.m. TRENDING STORIES: Mom of 4 mysteriously disappears after leaving bar 'Some white people may have to die': UGA teaching assistant under fire for post Hundreds of people needed to participate in Super Bowl halftime show
  • A University of Georgia graduate student is getting criticism for comments he wrote on Facebook. >> Read more trending news The man at the center of the controversy is Irami Osei-Frampong, a philosophy graduate student employed by the university as a teacher's assistant. He speaks frequently about race and equality, but some critics believe he crossed the line when he made a post online that stated, 'Some white people may have to die for black communities to be made whole.' Another social media post said: 'Fighting white people is a skill.' The teaching assistant said he's confused by the backlash. 'I'm confused why that is so controversial,' Osei-Frampong said. Osei-Frampong appeared on Cox Media Group radio station WGAU on Tuesday morning, insisting he's not calling for violence, but believes it should remain an option.  'It's just a fact of history that racial justice often comes at the cost of white life,' Osei-Frampong said. 'I didn't advocate for violence. I was just honest of racial progress.' Thomas spoke with some students who had mixed reactions. 'I feel they should do something when it's, like, a racial thing,'' student Xavier Ford said. 'I would generally agree with it. I think black people in this country have been marginalized,' student Andrew Davis said. Thomas asked Osei-Frampong if he's worried about losing his position. 'If they fire me, they'd be firing me for doing my job,' Osei-Frampong said. Some UGA alumni said they're thinking about withholding donations to the school after learning of the comments. 'I feel like the things he is saying is inciting violence. They invite the idea into people's minds,' UGA alumnus Andrew Lawrence said. University leaders said they are consulting with the attorney general on what actions they can take, but Osei-Frampong said he's standing firm and not backing down. University administrators sent WSB-TV the following statement, which reads, in part:  “The University has been vigorously exploring all available legal options. Racism has no place on our campus.”
  • Even before he announces whether he's a 2020 presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders is working to avoid the drubbing that South Carolina's African-American voters handed him in 2016. A day after speaking at a Martin Luther King Jr. Day rally in the state capital on Monday, Sanders stayed through Tuesday for three more events in which African-American audiences were receptive to a message that hewed largely to his 2016 Democratic presidential platform. But the Vermont independent got personal even as he pitched free college tuition and a higher minimum wage, recounting repeatedly that he joined King's 1963 March on Washington and calling the late civil rights leader a 'major political influence on my thinking.' Asked Tuesday at historically black Benedict College about marching with King, Sanders joked with students that 'this kind of dates me a little bit' and added that it 'was one of the important days in my life.' For the famously cantankerous senator, who labored to connect with black voters during his first White House bid, the more intimate touches in this week's South Carolina swing showed that he knows he can't neglect the bellwether early-voting state if he runs again. With one leading black candidate already declared in California Sen. Kamala Harris, and a second potential contender in New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, Sanders would face even stiffer competition here in 2020 than he did in 2016, when Hillary Clinton brought strong ties to African-American communities. What Sanders offered this week, ahead of South Carolina visits by Harris and another fellow 2020 rival, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, was also an interest in going beyond the state's traditional Democratic strongholds, though it wasn't without a few stumbles along the way. He visited an African Methodist Episcopal church in the city of Florence on Monday night but left before the service was over. Amanda Loveday, a former executive director of the South Carolina Democratic Party, said Sanders' early exit in Florence was a 'wrong' step in a state where authenticity is critical. 'You have to be in South Carolina and actually be in South Carolina,' Loveday said, 'and I worry that he did not show that' fully in Florence. Sanders also faced logistical questions as he arrived in Charleston on Tuesday night. Brady Quirk-Garvan, chairman of the Charleston County Democrats, noted on Twitter that the senator was more than an hour late and 'didn't ask the local Dems to help promote.' 'I'm no expert in Democratic primaries,' Quirk-Garvan added, 'but this doesn't seem like a helpful re-boot...' Sanders senior adviser Josh Orton pushed back at Quirk-Garvan's interpretation, posting a picture of the crowded Charleston event and tweeting that 'the ENERGIZED crowd of Dems and others here chanted something. Let's just say it was...an encouragement.' To an extent, Sanders' tougher job in 2020's first-in-the-south primary stems from his stunning 2016 success. Many of the unabashedly liberal policies he championed in that presidential race are now part of the Democratic DNA, rendering his agenda somewhat less unique. The 77-year-old senator acknowledged that fact Tuesday during a meeting with the South Carolina state legislature's Black Caucus. Sanders told the lawmakers that he has no plans to officially join the Democratic Party even as he touted Democratic platform changes made in response to his campaign. 'Yeah, we lost. But our ideas won,' Sanders said. 'They are the ideas of America.' Xavier Duffy, a junior at Benedict College, where Sanders visited, said he supported Clinton three years ago but 'would vote for (Sanders) this time.' Praising Sanders for offering 'a template instead of just an inspirational speech,' Duffy said that trailblazing candidacies from Harris and potentially Booker were compelling but that young voters are 'keen enough to' go beyond identity and ask 2020 candidates, 'What do you have to offer?' Symone Sanders, former press secretary for Sen. Sanders' 2016 campaign, said in an interview that she's 'not surprised' to see him back in the state early, adding that both the senator and aides 'wish he spent more time in South Carolina' during his first run. She is not related to the senator. Even if other Democratic primary contenders share some of his central ideas, Sanders' higher name recognition and conspicuously different style may yet prove advantageous. Booker wove his trademark oratorical sweep into Monday remarks honoring King, while Sanders echoed the sentiment of other rally speakers by bluntly calling Trump a 'racist.' And when Sanders addressed South Carolina state lawmakers, he again aligned his goals with King's pursuit of both racial and economic fairness. 'Whether you're black or you're white or you're Latino, you need health care,' Sanders said. 'You want your kids to get a good education. You want clean drinking water. ... If Dr. King had remained alive, he would have had success in bringing people together around that kind of agenda.' ___ Associated Press writer Meg Kinnard in Columbia, S.C., contributed to this report.
  • A 23-year-old woman last seen Saturday night has been found alive in Charlestown, Massachusetts, nearly a mile from where she was out with friends three days prior.  >> RELATED: Mom of 4, including newborn twins, vanishes after leaving bar Boston Police arrested 38-year-old Victor Pena after an extensive investigation, leading them to find Olivia Ambrose in the suspect's apartment in Charlestown. According to police, Olivia was standing inside the apartment near the suspect when they entered. Pena has been charged with kidnapping. Additional charges may follow, but at this time the investigation is ongoing and further information has not been released. Boston Police Commissioner William Gross credited the public for providing tips to law enforcement during their investigation, to ultimately find Olivia.  'Great teamwork today. This is what we mean in community policing. The entire village showed up for this one,' Gross said during a press conference on Tuesday night. Olivia was last seen outside Hennessey's Bar in downtown Boston around 11 p.m. Saturday night, January 19. She had been out with her twin sister, Francesca, and some friends after moving to the city recently. She works for Toast, a Boston software company, and had just relocated to Jamaica Plain. But Olivia, or Liviy, wasn't heard from the next morning and hadn't been seen since. Boston Police said earlier in the day they were searching for a man caught on surveillance footage with Ambrose. WFXT Security Analyst Dan Linskey said police had located the man seen in surveillance at the same place Olivia was found after he was recognized by law enforcement when his photo was released.  It was just an hour and a half after the photo was released that he was found.  The following timeline was released to accompany surveillance pictures.   11:04 PM: Ms. Ambrose is seen leaving a bar located at 25 Union Street (Hennessy’s) with a white male who has since been determined to not be involved in her disappearance.  11:42 PM: Approximately 40 minutes later, two unknown males are observed inviting Ms. Ambrose to walk with them in the area of Congress Street and State Street. One of the males appears to walk ahead while the second male places his arm around Ms. Ambrose and directs her towards the State Street MBTA Station.  12:01 AM: Approximately 20 minutes later, additional video shows Ms. Ambrose being accompanied by that same male, still with his arm around her, exiting the Bunker Hill Community MBTA Station in Charlestown. The other male party is no longer observed in any surveillance video moving forward. 12:13 AM: Approximately 10 minutes later, Ms. Ambrose and the unknown male are observed again in the area of Green Street walking together towards Bartlett Street. A short time later, phone records indicate Ms. Ambrose’s phone was in the general area of the Bunker Hill Housing Development.  Police found her in the area where she has been reportedly last captured on surveillance video with the man seen in the pictures.  'It is obvious from the surveillance video that she did not go along willingly,' Gross said. Investigators searched fields, school hallways and grounds, and even dumpsters to find Olivia, Gross said.  Boston Police say Olivia was taken to a hospital to be evaluated.  The Ambrose family released a statement Tuesday evening, thanking the efforts of the Boston Police department and all others involved in finding Olivia.  'The Ambrose family is so grateful for the monumental efforts of the Boston Police Department and the MBTA and Transit police who have worked tirelessly over the last three days to bring Olivia home. They also want to thank all of the staff at Hennessey's Bar who have been so helpful since Olivia went missing. The Ambrose family is also so appreciative of all the efforts, prayers and good wishes of their friends, family and complete strangers who have helped in the efforts to find Olivia. And finally, they want to thank Olivia's co-workers at Toast who sprang into action and were instrumental in getting the word out. The family is overjoyed.
  • A federal judge appeared inclined Tuesday to toss out a lawsuit against President Donald Trump by porn actress Stormy Daniels that sought to tear up a hush-money settlement about their alleged affair. Trump and his former personal lawyer asked a judge to dismiss the lawsuit after agreeing to rescind a nondisclosure agreement that included a $130,000 payment to Daniels. Judge S. James Otero did not rule in U.S. District Court, but he seemed to agree with lawyers for the president and Michael Cohen that there were no longer grounds for a lawsuit. 'It seems you've achieved ... what you sought to achieve,' Otero said to Daniels' attorney. If Otero does throw out the case, it would give both sides a chance to claim victory. The case would allow Daniels to speak without threat of legal consequences, but it would also prevent further litigation she has sought to force the president and Cohen to give sworn testimony. Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, brought the lawsuit to free herself from the agreement that silenced her as the 2016 presidential campaign reached its conclusion. Cohen had arranged the payment and later pleaded guilty to campaign violations after admitting the deal was struck to help Trump prevail in the presidential contest. Trump has denied the alleged 2006 affair. Daniels had claimed the agreement was not valid because Trump's signature was not on it and the president's lawyer has said he was never party to the settlement. Despite appearing to get what Daniels originally sought — dismissal of the agreement she disregarded long ago in speaking to news media and writing a book — her lawyer fought hard to keep the case alive. Attorney Michael Avenatti, who once toyed with making a presidential run to take on Trump, wanted the case to continue so he could force Trump and Cohen to give depositions. But the judge wasn't buying Avenatti's legal reasoning for keeping litigation going when there was no longer an issue in dispute. Otero repeatedly asked Avenatti to cite case law to support his arguments. But after he named several cases, Otero told him he was 'mixing apples and oranges.' 'I think we see the issues very differently,' the judge said. During those exchanges, Trump's attorney, Charles Harder, had a smirk that appeared to keep growing. Still, Avenatti declared his client the winner after Tuesday's hearing. 'They admitted what we said all along,' Avenatti said. 'So any attempt by anyone to claim that this is not a victory for Stormy Daniels is completely bogus and nonsense and dishonest.' Essential Consultants, the company Cohen set up to handle the deal, had once sought to fight Daniels in arbitration for violating the nondisclosure agreement by speaking in public about the affair. Cohen had even threatened a $20 million lawsuit against her. Cohen didn't follow through with those legal actions after seeking to dismiss the lawsuit, but he had said he would seek repayment of the $130,000. Cohen's lawyer, Brent Blakely, said Tuesday he wouldn't seek repayment of that money. Avenatti said he would seek legal fees regardless of how Otero rules on dismissal of the case. Last month, Otero ordered Daniels to pay Trump $293,000 in attorney's fees after dismissing a defamation lawsuit she brought against him.
  • Sen. Jeff Merkley, one of the most vocal critics of President Donald Trump's immigration policies, seemed content to meet with constituents in Oregon and did not say if he'll run for president in 2020. Merkley has been postponing a decision on a White House bid for some time. Last year, he said he'd decide soon after the November midterm election. Now, he says he'll decide before the end of this first quarter. Nine Democrats have declared their intentions to run -- the most recent was Sen. Kamala Harris from California. 'One every day,' Merkley said with a grin during an interview Monday before he hosted a town hall in a community college in Salem, Oregon's capital city. Deciding whether to run is a gamble as Merkley faces an ever-expanding field of Democrats and would have to abandon the option of being elected to the Senate for a third term — unless the Oregon Legislature changes the law. Merkley gained some name recognition nationally last June, when he tried to enter a federal facility in Texas where immigrant children were being held. An aide videotaped the scene as he was refused entry and police were called. The video quickly gained over 1 million views in a day, and was repeated in newscasts across the country. At a town hall Monday, Merkley — wearing jeans, cowboy boots and a work shirt — described his efforts to stop the internment of immigrant children, including through his introduction of the 'No Internment Camps Act.' The Oregon Democrat said it was 'spooky' that in this era, legislation in America would have internment camps in its title. Merkley, the son of a millwright, was first elected to the Senate in 2008 and handily won re-election six years later. Asked if he might prefer to be in the Senate if Democrats gain control in 2020, Merkley said: 'Well I tell you, I've been in the majority, and I've been in the minority, and the majorities are better.' He said senators have a huge ability to influence the direction of policy, even if they're not the chair of a committee or subcommittee. Merkley is a member of the appropriations committee; the environment and public works committee; the foreign relations committee and the budget committee. Merkley, to support Democratic candidates for other offices in key states, has hired field staff in states such as Iowa and New Hampshire. They could also assist in laying the groundwork for a presidential run. He has already visited Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada, states that have early primaries and caucuses in the presidential sweepstakes. ___ Follow Andrew Selsky on Twitter at https://twitter.com/andrewselsky