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National
2020 presidential race: Who is Amy Klobuchar?
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2020 presidential race: Who is Amy Klobuchar?

What You Need To Know: Amy Klobuchar

2020 presidential race: Who is Amy Klobuchar?

U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minnesota announced her candidacy for president in February 2019 in Minneapolis.

Here are some things to know about Klobuchar:

  • Klobuchar was born May 25, 1960, in Plymouth, Minnesota. Her father was a newspaperman and her mother was an elementary school teacher.
  • Klobuchar attended Wayzata High School in Plymouth, where she graduated as the valedictorian of her class. She graduated magna cum laude from Yale University and the University of Chicago Law School.
  • Klobuchar went on to practice commercial law in Minnesota. Her first foray into politics came after her daughter was born in the 1990s with a condition that kept her from swallowing, according to a 2010 profile in Elle magazine. Klobuchar told the magazine that 24 hours after her daughter was born, "They threw me out of the hospital, which is horrible even if your baby's not sick." After that experience, Klobuchar used the contacts she'd gained as an attorney to lobby Minnesota to guarantee a 48-hour hospital stay for new mothers and their babies, according to Elle. President Bill Clinton later made the law federal. "I had to go and testify about things like your water breaking, so I told them very detailed things to make them feel squeamish so they'd pass the bill the right way," Klobuchar told Elle.
  • Klobuchar worked at a pair of law firms before being elected to serve as attorney for Hennepin County in 1998, a role she held from 1999 to 2006.
  • Klobuchar had mulled a run for the state attorney general's office, but she decided to instead go for a seat in the U.S. Senate after then-Sen. Mark Dayton announced he wouldn't run again, according to the Star Tribune. She became the first woman elected to represent Minnesota in the U.S. Senate in 2006.
  • Klobuchar married her husband, University of Baltimore School of Law professor John Bessler, in 1993. The couple has a daughter named Abigail.
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News

  • Officials with the Florida Highway Patrol are continuing to investigate after they said a motorcyclist struck and killed two pedestrians Thursday evening. According to a witness, the motorcyclist was going an estimated 80 to 100 mph when it struck Anelsy Alba, 33, and her 6-year-old daughter, Sheyla Ruiz. The two were taken to a hospital where they later died. After the impact, the motorcycle continued moving down the road, hopped the center median into oncoming traffic and collided with a minivan. “It zoomed by me and then I saw it hit something and (it) exploded into several pieces,” the witness said. The mother and child did not use a crosswalk when they were crossing the street, according to Florida Highway Patrol. The driver of the motorcycle, Bryan Smith, was taken to the hospital in serious condition. It is unclear if he will face any charges. Officials said the driver of the minivan is in good condition.
  • An Oklahoma sheriff’s office is looking for who left a dog mutilated and bound in a field. The Humane Society of Tulsa shared a post on social media on Thursday showing Atlas -- a dog who had been dumped with his ears cut and covered in glue and his legs strapped together. “Today’s one of those days when you question humanity,” the post read. “Not only was he dumped in a field with his back legs strapped together, glue (yes glue) had been poured into his ears and then fast food wrappers had been shoved into the ears and stuck into the glue. One ear canal is so bad it looks like he will need surgery. Some type of chemical had been dumped on his face/ears and it appears his ears have been partially burned or cut off.” The Humane Society said fast-food wrappers were found shoved in the dog’s ears and a BB pellet was found inside him -- indicating he might have been shot by a BB gun. “From the moment we met him, he wasn’t mean, vicious or protectively aggressive. He just wanted help and warmed up to us as he realized we were there to help,' the Humane Society said. Atlas might need to see specialists and get surgery so they are asking people to donate to help with his care. Anyone who might know something about who left Atlas in this condition is asked to contact the Creek County Sheriff’s Office.
  • Police in Johnson City, Texas, are making sure the alleged meth users in their community are healthy. The department is kindly offering to test meth after it “found out” that it could be “contaminated” with coronavirus, KSAT reported. If users want to have the stash tested, they are more than welcome to take it to the police department, but if they don’t want to risk leaving their home, the police will come to them. You can read the entire post below:
  • As the fears of the coronavirus continue to spread, a beer with a now-unfortunate name is feeling the effects of the outbreaks. Corona beer sales are down because of fears over the name’s similarity to the deadly virus. A recent survey of American beer drinkers found that 38% of those asked will not buy Corona beer and 16% are confused if Corona beer is related to the coronavirus, USA Today reported. 5WPR, the company that conducted the survey, also found that 14% of those who would normally buy Corona, won’t do it in public, CNN reported. Constellation Brands, which own Corona Extra in the U.S. among other brands, has taken a 6% hit in the stock market as the entire financial system falls because of coronavirus fears, CNBC reported. But the company’s spokeswoman, Maggie Bowman, said the survey is misinformation and that sales are still strong, USA Today reported. The company said that its customers “understand there is no link between the virus and our business,” CNN reported. The company is doubling down on that belief and is going to go through with the launch of a new product, a Corona-branded hard seltzer that some say is “ill-timed,” USA Today reported. The ad campaign says “Coming ashore soon.” But Corona is not the only beer that is apparently not selling. Anheuser-Busch InBev has said it’s going to be down about 10% for the first-quarter profit because of coronavirus. Because people are not going out in countries hit hard by the virus, beer is not selling, CNBC reported. More Budweiser is sold in China than in the U.S., CNBC reported.
  • It was thought that dogs could not contract the COVID-19 or the coronavirus that is plaguing people across the world, but a pet dog in Hong Kong has apparently tested positive for the coronavirus. The result, however, was weak, the government of Hong Kong said, according to Fox News. The positive test was confirmed by the government of Hong Kong in a press release. The dog is the pet of a patient who has coronavirus. The test resulted from “environmental contamination” of the dog’s mouth and nose. The animal is in quarantine. It does not have any symptoms. Officials with the Hong Kong Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department are now saying that the pets of patients who test positive should also be in quarantine for 14 days, Fox News reported. The country’s agriculture department doesn’t believe the pets can become infected or infect humans, Bloomberg reported. Still, the American Kennel Club says to wash your hands with soap and water after coming in contact with any pet and you don’t need to get a muzzle mask to protect an animal from the virus. But if you do see a change of health, call your veterinarian.
  • Roswell officers are out in force Friday morning after four people ran from a police chase and only two were apprehended.  While police do not believe the public is in any danger, officers are positioned at Blessed Trinity Catholic High School and near school bus stops as a precaution, according to a spokesman for the department. The vehicle pursuit took place about 3 a.m., the spokesman said in a news release. An officer spotted a stolen vehicle during routine patrols and a pursuit ensued after he called in backup. One of the officers positioned a patrol car to stop the fleeing vehicle, commonly known as a PIT maneuver, and four people ran from the vehicle in the area of Woodstock and Crossville roads, according to police. Two were captured with the help of police dogs, drones and the Georgia State Patrol’s helicopter. The names of those apprehended and details on their charges were not disclosed. “After hours of searching, two suspects remain on the run,” the spokesman said in the release. “We believe that the two suspects escaped the area in a secondary getaway vehicle.” Police are asking anyone who lives in the area and witnessed anything suspicious to call 770-640-4100.  In other news: