Weather Alert:

Flood Watches and Warnings for parts of Metro Atlanta

ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

heavy-rain-night
45°
Rain
H -° L 42°
  • heavy-rain-night
    45°
    Current Conditions
    Rain. H -° L 42°
  • rain-day
    Today
    Rain. H -° L 42°
  • rain-day
    52°
    Tomorrow
    Showers. H 52° L 42°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

National
Suspect accused in mentally disabled woman's assault was once police chief
Close

Suspect accused in mentally disabled woman's assault was once police chief

Suspect accused in mentally disabled woman's assault was once police chief
Robert Lanier New. (Photo: WSB-TV)

Suspect accused in mentally disabled woman's assault was once police chief

Roughly 20 years before Robert Lanier New became embroiled in assault allegations tied to a mentally disabled woman and her niece, he served as the police chief in Emerson. 

>> Read more trending news

City officials confirmed to WSB-TV that New had two stints with Emerson police. New first served with the department from September 1998 to February 1999, when he left to work for Acworth police, where he remained until November 2000, when he came back to Emerson police. 

He was promoted to police chief three weeks after his return. 

New resigned in 2004 to work as a government contractor, officials told WSB-TV. Shortly after, New joined the Cobb County Police Department in February 2005. 

But as quickly as New climbed up the ranks, his professional life started to fray. 

Cobb County Police Chief Mike Register hinted New’s future with the department could be decided early next week, according to WSB-TV. New has been on administrative leave without pay since allegations surfaced earlier this week that he assaulted a 44-year-old woman who has the mental capacity of a 10- to 14-year-old in his home. He was off duty at the time of the alleged abuse. 

According to an arrest warrant obtained Tuesday by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, New choked the woman and slapped both sides of her face during sex to the point that she cried. The woman told officers that with New’s hands around her throat, she wasn’t able to tell him to stop, the warrant alleges.

The incident happened sometime between March 1 and March 31 at his home in Kennesaw, according to police. New was off duty at the time. 

During her interview, the woman was reportedly “shaking due to fear,” police said.

The victim’s allegations were corroborated through text messages on her phone, according to the warrant.

“The accused made the statements through text messages, ‘I am in charge, I am in control,’” police said. The threatening messages allegedly continued even after the victim attempted to distance herself from New, as recently as March 31, police said.

No decision has been made on whether the department will fire New. 

“The recommendation is in the county attorney’s office for their review,” Register said. “That will be disclosed when we’re in agreement with the county attorney’s office.”

New charges were filed against the 46-year-old Thursday alleging he attempted to solicit the woman and her 12-year-old niece for sex. Police believe New was using the woman to try to get to her niece, Cobb police Officer Sarah O’Hara told The AJC. New met the woman online, but police are still investigating which website the two used. 

New remains in the Cobb County jail without bond on charges of aggravated assault-strangulation, simple battery, criminal solicitation and computer pornography. 

New is also being investigated for an administrative complaint filed with the department. Register said that complaint was not criminal, but involves another woman.

“We are investigating if he adhered to departmental policies,” Register said.

The complaint was filed weeks before the first allegations emerged against New.

Read More
VIEW COMMENTS

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.

News

  • The Atlanta Falcons picked a bad time to play their second-worst game of the year. Losing by two touchdowns at Cleveland cost the Falcons (4-5) a chance to move one-half game back in the NFC wild-card race. They enter this week's home game against Dallas (4-5) two games behind Carolina for the final playoff spot. Atlanta looked out of sync most of the day. Only in Week 5 in a blowout loss at Pittsburgh did the Falcons play worse, but quarterback Matt Ryan isn't terribly concerned. 'There are seven games to go, and we are right in the mix,' Ryan said. 'Probably the most important part of being a professional is being able to move on. That includes being able to move on from both positive experiences and negative experiences. We can't begin to start feeling sorry for ourselves or anything like that.' Coach Dan Quinn told his team Monday that he was satisfied with its effort against the Browns but not much else. There was a palpable lack of speed as the Falcons fell short of reaching 'another spot that you go to, to play really exemplarily ball.' Trailing 14-10 and getting the ball to begin the third quarter, Atlanta's next four possessions ended with a fumble, two punts and a failure to score from the 1-yard line early in the fourth when Tevin Coleman was stopped for no gain and Ryan threw an incompletion. In between, the Browns scored two touchdowns with Nick Chubb's 92-yard run, the longest in Cleveland history, one of the most embarrassing plays of the season. Linebacker Duke Riley froze and got blocked by center JC Tretter while right guard Kevin Zeitler pinned Derrick Shelby back at the line of scrimmage. Chubb dashed through the hole and was too fast to catch after free safety Damontae Kazee dove at his feet and whiffed near the Cleveland 22. The Browns' 211 yards rushing were the most Atlanta has allowed since Sept. 28, 2014, at Minnesota. 'It wasn't the outcome we wanted and worked for but we can't dwell on it,' Riley said. 'We have to move forward like we did with the first couple of losses.' The offense suffered a letdown when center Alex Mack sent a shotgun snap over Ryan's head in the second quarter, causing the Falcons to settle for a field goal. Mohamed Sanu's lost fumble to begin the third was even worse because he held the ball out to get an extra yard and was still 14 yards shy of the first-down marker. Six plays later, the Browns were dancing in the end zone. 'We didn't do our jobs the way we were supposed to,' Sanu said, 'and you saw exactly what happened.' Quinn will challenge his players to create more energy in practice this week. 'I thought over the last couple weeks defensively we knew we had faced some good runners with the Giants and certainly at Washington, and it was going to take that second and third guy jumping over the pile to get there,' he said. 'I thought offensively we've been hitting it on that stride for a few weeks now. 'So for us not to find that speed, to create some of the explosive plays and same thing on the defensive side, not to create some of the speeds that create negative plays, those are things that I didn't think was up to our standard.' Notes: Quinn said MLB Deion Jones will practice for the second straight week in hopes that he can play against the Cowboys. Jones has been out since breaking his foot in the season-opening loss at Philadelphia. ... It will likely be Thursday before Quinn knows if kicker Matt Bryant will be ready to return from a hamstring injury. Giorgio Tavecchio is 5 for 5 on field goals and has hit all eight of his extra-point tries in playing the past three games in Bryant's spot. ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • Acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker will consult with Justice Department ethics officials about 'matters that may warrant recusal' amid pressure from Democrats to step aside from overseeing the special counsel's Russia investigation. Spokeswoman Kerri Kupec says Whitaker is fully committed to following appropriate procedures, including consulting with senior ethics officials about oversight responsibilities. Whitaker has been publicly critical of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation. In one interview as a commentator for CNN, Whitaker suggested the Mueller probe could be starved of resources. The Senate's top Democrat, Sen. Charles Schumer, has called for Whitaker to recuse himself from the Mueller probe. Schumer and House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi sent a letter Sunday asking the Justice Department to disclose whether Whitaker had been advised to recuse himself.
  • Democrat Kyrsten Sinema won Arizona's open U.S. Senate seat Monday in a race that was among the most closely watched in the nation, beating Republican Rep. Martha McSally in the battle to replace GOP Sen. Jeff Flake. The three-term congresswoman won after a slow vote count that dragged on for nearly a week after voters went to the polls on Nov. 6. She becomes Arizona's first Democratic U.S. senator since 1994. Her win cemented Arizona as a swing state after years of Republican dominance. Sinema portrayed herself as a moderate who works across the aisle to get things done. McSally, a former Air Force pilot who embraced President Donald Trump after opposing him during the 2016 elections, had claimed that Sinema's anti-war protests 15 years ago disqualified her and said one protest amounted to what she called 'treason.' But during her six years in Congress, Sinema built one of most centrist records in the Democratic caucus, and she voted for bills backed by Trump more than 60 percent of the time. She backed legislation increasing penalties against people in the country illegally who commit crimes. McSally's attacks on Sinema reached back more than 15 years, when Sinema was a Green Party spokeswoman and liberal activist. McSally backed Trump's tax cut, border security and the Affordable Care Act repeal agenda as she survived a three-way GOP primary in August, defeating two conservative challengers who claimed her support for Trump was fake. McSally also campaigned on her military record and support for the Armed Forces. Sinema attacked McSally's leadership of last year's failed Affordable Care Act repeal effort as a sign that she would not protect Arizona residents with preexisting medical conditions. McSally argued that she would protect patients, despite her vote on the bill that would have removed many of those protections. The contest drew more than $90 million in spending, including more than $58 million by outside groups, according to Federal Election Commission reports. Attack ads by both sides clogged the airwaves for months. Sinema, 42, has a law degree, worked as a social worker and was a political activist in her 20s, running as an independent Green Party candidate for the Arizona House. She then became a Democrat and served several terms in the state Legislature. Sinema started as an overt liberal but developed a reputation for compromise among her Republican peers, laying the groundwork to tack to the center. When the 9th Congressional District was created after the 2010 Census, Sinema ran for the Phoenix-area seat as a centrist and won the 2012 election. McSally, 52, was the first female Air Force pilot to fly in combat, flying A-10 attack jets. She also was the first woman to command a fighter squadron, again in A-10s. McSally lost her first race in Arizona's 2nd congressional district in 2012, when she was narrowly defeated by Democratic Rep. Ron Barber, who replaced Rep. Gabby Giffords after she was wounded in a 2011 assassination attempt. But McSally came back to win the 2014 election, beating Barber by a narrow margin. She was re-elected in 2016. Flake was an outspoken critic of Trump and announced in 2017 that he would not seek re-election, acknowledging he could not win a GOP primary in the current political climate. His support of the president's initiatives, however, was mixed. He strongly backed last year's tax cut bill but criticized Trump's positions on free trade.
  • A lawyer who also served as a part-time judge and assistant attorney general faces a dozen charges of sexual exploitation of children. An official said in one of his jobs as a lawyer, George Randolph Jeffery, helped send a lot of people to jail for child support. Channel 2's Mark Winne counted 12 sexual exploitation of children in warrants for Jeffery.  The Georgia Bureau of Investigation said a joint GBI-FBI investigation is ongoing. Attorney Robbie Ballard said his firm represents Jeffery and Jeffery intends to plead not guilty and beyond that it is much too soon to comment. Our research suggests Jeffery held positions of trust. Walton County probate judge Bruce Wright said he inherited Jeffrey as an associate probate judge from the previous administration and Jeffrey handled an average of about one estate case for him a year for the past six years but the charges stunned him. TRENDING STORIES: Abrams sues for more time; Kemp's campaign says math is clear Rain will stick around today, rest of the week Missing woman who left home to run errand found dead Wright said he will assign Jeffery no cases while the charges are pending. He said he will refer Jeffery to the judicial qualifications commission for removal as a judge, if he's found guilty or pleads guilty. A spokesperson for Attorney General Chris Carr indicated Jeffrey had been appointed, 'to serve as a Special Assistant Attorney General representing the Georgia Department of Human Services, Division of Child Support Services - in Walton and Newton Counties. 'Attorney General Carr opposes any and all forms of child exploitation and abuse,' the statement said, 'We hold our Special Assistant Attorneys General to very high standards. Given the circumstances, we terminated Mr. Jeffery’s appointment as a Special Assistant Attorney General immediately upon getting word of the arrest.'  Documents indicate most of the charges involve photos or video but one charge involves an allegation Jeffery used an email account to entice a child for indecent purposes. We're told because of his connections to the system in Walton County, Jeffery has been transferred to the Barrow County jail, where he has been held without bond.  
  • Walmart announced Monday it will start giving military spouses a hiring preference. >> Read more trending news  There are more than 500,000 active duty military spouses nationwide, according to a company statement. While the U.S. unemployment rate is around 4 percent, the same rate among military spouses is 26 percent, with a 25 percent wage gap compared to their civilian counterparts. “Military spouses are unsung heroes,” said Walmart president and CEO Doug McMillon. “They serve in partnership with their uniformed spouses, and we want to honor them and help them find a job or build an amazing career.” The new Military Spouse Career Connection builds on the plans to hire 250,000 military veterans by 2020. So far, Walmart stores nationwide have hired 212,000, according to a company statement. “Walmart has offered me amazing career opportunities after I completed my military service. I honestly did not know what career direction I was going to take once I came home,” said Ed Gregorek, store manager at a Cleveland Walmart who served 13 years in the Army. >> Trending: Double homicide haunts family, police 33 years later Candidates must meet hiring criteria. Jobs can be found at at walmartspouseswithamission.com.
  • The wedding band has been in his family for more than a hundred years. So, when he noticed it was no longer on his finger at Saturday's Georgia football game, Stuart Howell said his heart dropped.