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National News

    Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross made a trade betting that the stock in a shipping company with Russian-government ties would fall, a transaction coming just days after he learned of a possible negative news story about his investment in the company. Ross reported on a government form released Monday, as required by federal ethics rules, that he shorted stock in Navigator Holdings in October. The New York Times reported Tuesday that the transaction came three business days after a Times reporter submitted questions to Ross about Navigator. The transaction, listed as worth between $100,000 and $250,000, was first reported Monday by Forbes. Ross rebuffed any suggestions that he shorted the Navigator stock based on confidential information to make a profit. He said the transaction was part of his effort to divest from Navigator and that he did not stand to gain if the stock fell, or lose if it rose, at the time. In short selling, a person borrows shares of a stock and sells them. The aim is to then replace the borrowed shares with others bought later at a lower price, reaping a profit from the difference. Navigator counts a Russian gas producer with ties to the Kremlin among its major customers. President Donald Trump tapped Ross, a billionaire investor in distressed companies, to be his administration's point man on trade and manufacturing as Commerce chief. His spokesmen said in November that Ross planned to completely divest from Navigator, although he wasn't required to do so under his ethics agreement as an incoming Cabinet member, because he wanted to avoid any possible perception of a conflict of interest. Ross says now that he has completely divested his Navigator holdings. In a statement Tuesday, Ross said it would be 'completely false' to imply that the transactions involved insider trading using nonpublic information. The Times reporter 'contacted me to write about my personal financial holdings and not about Navigator Holdings or its prospects,' he said. 'I did not receive any nonpublic information due to my government position, nor did I receive any nonpublic information from a government employee. Securities laws presume that information known to or provided by a news organization is by definition public information,' Ross' statement said. Ross said he had been in the process of selling off his holdings in the company when he learned in late October that there were additional shares belonging to him in an account opened by the company. Because the shares were 'in electronic form' and he didn't have physical access to them to deliver them to the broker on time, he said he 'technically sold them short.' When he received the physical shares on Nov. 16, Ross said he delivered them to the broker to close the transaction. 'Therefore, it made no economic difference to me whether the shares went up or down between the sale date and the date I delivered them,' he said. The owners of Sibur, the Russian gas producer that is a major customer of Navigator, have included two Russian oligarchs close to President Vladimir Putin and a businessman believed to be Putin's son-in-law. Navigator ships products from Sibur. Navigator is one of a few companies in the world that can transport liquefied petroleum gas in cold and icy conditions. Russia is known for its brutal winters as well as its giant, state-controlled oil and gas producers.
  • President Donald Trump took a dig at Rep. Mark Sanford, a South Carolina Republican who has been critical of the president, during a meeting with House Republicans on Tuesday night. Trump told the lawmakers in a closed-door Capitol Hill meeting that he wanted to 'congratulate Mark on a great race,' according to two attendees. Another attendee said Trump's remarks elicited some boos from members of the House Freedom Caucus, a conservative group in the House. The three attendees spoke on condition of anonymity to describe the private meeting focused on immigration. Sanford, a Freedom Caucus member, said he was unable to attend because his flight was delayed at the Charleston, South Carolina, airport. 'The president has his own style. You gotta give him credit. He's an equal opportunity insulter. He gets just about everybody,' said Rep. Randy Weber, R-Texas. Sanford lost his primary bid last week to South Carolina state Rep. Katie Arrington and blamed his defeat on Trump, who urged Republicans to dump the former South Carolina governor. Trump tweeted on the day of the primary that the congressman had been unhelpful to him, adding, 'He is better off in Argentina.' That was a reference to Sanford's surprise disappearance from the state when he was governor, which he later revealed was to continue his affair with an Argentine woman. Sanford had called Trump untrustworthy and culturally intolerant, prompting Arrington's primary challenge. The congressman later said support for Trump had become a litmus test in GOP primaries. __ Associated Press writers Lisa Mascaro and Matthew Daly contributed.
  • Three months after a tornado rumbled through a South Fulton County neighborhood and destroyed people’s homes and lives, several neighbors told Channel 2 Action News they’re still recovering.  We’ve learned they’re on their own because the storm didn’t fit the criteria to be considered for state or federal disaster relief funds, on the Channel 2 Action News Nightbeat at 11.    TRENDING STORIES: Sole witness to deadly shooting says Tex McIver 'needs to be in hell' 2 dead, others injured in I-285 crash in South Fulton County Man arrested after beating, stabbing 15-year-old sister to death, police say  
  • Nearly eight decades ago, Ray Emory, then a young sailor, watched in disbelief as Japanese torpedoes tore into American ships in Pearl Harbor. Emory survived the devastating attack but didn't forget his fellow sailors and Marines who died and were buried in Hawaii without anyone knowing their names. His relentless efforts in the years that followed led to nearly 150 of those servicemen finally being identified so their families could find closure. Now frail with white-hair, the 97-year-old Emory arrived Tuesday in a golf cart at the pier where his ship, the USS Honolulu, was moored on Dec. 7, 1941. He came to say what could be his final goodbye to the storied naval base. More than 500 sailors were there to greet him. They lined the rails and formed an honor cordon, shouting cheers of 'Hip, Hip, Hooray!' Emory saluted them. 'I'm glad I came and I'll never forget it,' Emory told reporters after a ceremony in his honor. Emory wanted to visit the pier before leaving his Hawaii home for Boise, Idaho. His wife died about a month ago and he plans to live with his son and go fishing. During the attack on Pearl Harbor, Emory managed to fire a few rounds at the airplanes that dropped the torpedoes. He still has an empty bullet casing that fell to his ship deck. In 2012, the Navy and National Park Service recognized Emory for his work with the military and Department of Veterans Affairs to honor and remember Pearl Harbor's dead. Bureaucrats didn't welcome his efforts, at least not initially. Emory says they politely told him to ''go you-know-where.'' It didn't deter him. First, thanks to legislation sponsored by the late U.S. Rep. Patsy Mink of Hawaii, he managed to get gravestones for unknowns from the USS Arizona marked with name of their battleship. In 2003, the military agreed to dig up a casket that Emory was convinced, after meticulously studying records, included the remains of multiple USS Oklahoma servicemen. Emory was right, and five sailors were identified. It helped lay the foundation for the Pentagon's decision more than a decade later to exhume and attempt to identify all 388 sailors and Marines from the Oklahoma who had been buried as unknowns in a national cemetery in Honolulu. Since those 2015 exhumations, 138 sailors from the Oklahoma have been identified. About 77 have been reburied, many in their hometowns, bringing closure to families across the country. 'Ray, you're the man that did it. There's nobody else. If it wasn't for you, it would have never been done,' Jim Taylor, the Navy's liaison to Pearl Harbor survivors, told Emory during the brief ceremony Tuesday at the USS Honolulu's old pier. Taylor presented Emory with a black, folded POW/MIA flag printed with the words: 'You are not forgotten.' Some of the remains, especially those burned to ash, will never be identified. But the military aims to put names with 80 percent of the Oklahoma servicemen who were dug up in 2015. Altogether, the Pearl Harbor attack killed nearly 2,400 U.S. servicemen. The Oklahoma lost 429 men after being hit by at least nine torpedoes. It was the second-largest number of dead from one vessel. The USS Arizona lost 1,177 sailors and Marines. Most of those killed on the Arizona remain entombed in the sunken hull of the battleship. The Pentagon has also exhumed the remains of 35 servicemen from the USS West Virginia from Honolulu's National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. None have been identified so far.
  • California would lead the U.S. in significantly changing the standard for when police can fire their weapons under legislation that cleared its first hurdle Tuesday after an emotionally charged debate over deadly shootings that have roiled the country. It's time to change a 'reasonable force' standard that hasn't been updated in California since 1872, making it the nation's oldest unchanged use-of-force law, said Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, a San Diego Democrat who introduced the measure. 'It must be guided by the goals of safeguarding human life,' she said. A state Senate committee advanced the legislation that would allow police to use deadly force only in situations where it is necessary to prevent imminent and serious injury or death to the officer or another person. Now, California's standard makes it rare for officers to be charged after a shooting and rarer still for them to be convicted. Frequently it's because of the doctrine of 'reasonable fear': if prosecutors or jurors believe that officers have a reason to fear for their safety, police can use deadly force. Law enforcement lobbyists said the stricter standard could make officers hesitant to approach suspects out of fear their actions could be second-guessed. Democrats on the committee acknowledged that officers have difficult and dangerous jobs but argued the bill would make everyone safer by promoting de-escalation and fostering trust between police and people of color. 'It always blows me away when law enforcement only fear for their life only when they're facing black and brown people,' said Democratic Sen. Steven Bradford of Gardena, who is black. 'We don't have a problem with law enforcement, we've got a problem with racism.' Dozens of advocates lined up to list the names of young men killed by police across California, including Stephon Clark, who was shot this year when Sacramento officers say they mistook his cellphone for a handgun. The shooting sparked protests, and a prosecutor says it may be months before her office decides if police broke the law. It comes as police killings of black men have stirred upheaval nationwide. David Mastagni, a lobbyist for the California Peace Officers Association, said the proposed language creates 'a hindsight, second-guessing game that puts not only the officers at danger but puts the public at danger as well.' Randy Perry, representing several rank-and-file police unions that encompass 90,000 officers, called it 'a radical departure from criminal and constitutional law.' Critics could almost always argue that deadly force wasn't necessary because officers could have considered alternatives such as 'tactical repositioning,' which Perry called 'a euphemism for retreat.' Republican Sen. Jeff Stone of Temecula, the only senator on the committee who spoke in opposition, said the measure could stop people from becoming police officers and deter officers from responding to calls for help. Democratic Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson of Santa Barbara pointed to 'troubling' statistics about California's high incidence of police shootings and the disproportionate use of force against black men. She and fellow Democrat Scott Wiener of San Francisco said they believe the changes clarify when police can use lethal force and adequately address concerns raised by law enforcement opponents. 'We all agree that we don't want to put police officers in harm's way, but we also don't want to put the public in harm's way,' Jackson said. The measure now heads to another committee.
  • Top Republicans, including Georgia Senator Johnny Isakson, responded Tuesday to the Trump administration’s hard-line immigration policy of separating families at the U.S.-Mexico border, a “zero tolerance” policy implemented six weeks ago. Many Republicans responded publicly to the harsh criticism over the policy, saying they support keeping migrant children and parents together. Isakson said separating the families is no solution. Channel 2's Justin Gray caught up with Isakson in Washington where he said he does not support the Trump administration's actions. His office also said he has received a couple thousand calls so far from Georgians about this and the vast majority are opposed to separating families. TRENDING STORIES: Sole witness to deadly shooting says Tex McIver 'needs to be in hell' 2 dead, others injured in I-285 crash in South Fulton County Man arrested after beating, stabbing 15-year-old sister to death, police say On Tuesday afternoon, President Donald Trump once again blamed laws passed by Democrats for his administration’s policy of separating migrant children from parents suspected of coming into the country illegally while speaking Tuesday at a meeting of the National Federation of Independent Business. Trump said the policy is necessary because loopholes in the immigration laws mean families “cannot  be detained together or removed together, only released.” “These are crippling loopholes that cause family separations,” Trump said. “Child smugglers exploit the loopholes and they gain illegal entry into the United States, putting countless children in danger.” There is no law that mandates the separation of children and parents at the border. Georgia's other senator, David Perdue, abruptly  ended a news conference with other senators on Tuesday about the budget when reporters asked questions about separating families at the border. Perdue said he wanted to make sure they, 'didn't get hijacked about the current shiny object of the day.
  • A North Georgia man who made off to Florida after allegedly placing his 6-month-old son in an Alabama hotel room freezer now faces a charge of murder in the baby’s death. Carlton James Mathis, 28, of Gainesville, is currently being held in a Florida jail on charges stemming from his June 4 arrest, when authorities said he attempted to run and was shot four times by SWAT officers. When he is released, he’ll be arrested in Dothan, Ala., in connection with his son’s murder, police said Tuesday. Both Mathis and the child’s mother, Amanda Gail Oakes, 36, of Murrayville, were previously charged with abuse of a corpse after investigators found the body of Carlton James Oakes in a freezer at the Dothan InTown Suites. The body had been there five or six days, according to police.  They were arrested outside a Bronson, Fla., apartment after a standoff with SWAT, marking the end of a multistate manhunt that began three days earlier in Hall County. Hall sheriff’s deputies were tipped off that the couple was staying in the Dothan area and it was possible their son was dead.  TRENDING STORIES: Sole witness to deadly shooting says Tex McIver 'needs to be in hell' 2 dead, others injured in I-285 crash in South Fulton County Man arrested after beating, stabbing 15-year-old sister to death, police say Once in police custody, Mathis and Oakes provided investigators with information that led them back to the Dothan hotel, and the baby’s body was discovered.  Police have not released the 6-month-old’s cause of death. Oakes also faces a charge of manslaughter and is being held in the Houston County, Ala., jail. Her bond is set at $400,000. Dothan police Lt. Lynn Watkins said it will be up to a judge to decide if Mathis will be extradited to Alabama or if his Florida charges will be disposed first, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution previously reported.  A Florida judge set Mathis’ bond at $1 million on charges of assault, drug possession, weapon possession by a convicted felon and child neglect.  Dothan police have placed a hold on Mathis, and he will not be granted bond on the murder charge, according to authorities. In addition to his charges in Alabama and Florida, Mathis is also a person of interest in a gas station robbery, Hall County sheriff’s deputies told Channel 2 Action News. He is wanted there for allegedly violating his probation, officials said.  
  • Natalia Anggraeni of Kennesaw, Georgia, knows her two youngest children were killed in a crash. But her own injuries make it difficult to comprehend friends say. >> Read more trending news “She’s in and out of consciousness,” Emily Thoreson, a family friend, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “She keeps asking for her babies, but she knows they aren’t here.” Thoreson knows the Cobb County family because both she and Anggraeni have children with special needs. On Saturday afternoon, Thoreson got a phone call from Anggraeni with devastating news. The family had been in a crash on I-85 in Anderson County, S.C., while heading to a Wofford College summer camp.  “We dropped everything and we just drove there,” Thoreson said. “All she could tell us was that Nate and Kiki had passed away.” Investigators say 17-year-old Jessica Wolwark was driving a Chevrolet northbound on I-85 when for unknown reasons she ran off the highway and her SUV overturned at 5:45 a.m. Saturday morning.  Wolwark’s younger sister and brother died from their injuries after being ejected, police said. Kirana “Kiki” Wolwark, 15, and Nate Wolwark, 12, were both killed. Wolwark and her mother, Anggraeni, were wearing seat belts but were seriously injured in the crash. Numerous drivers stopped at the scene of the crash to help the family, including Sarah Eagle, an East Carolina University nursing student. Eagle said she waited with Kiki until paramedics arrived. The teenager later died at the hospital.  Jessica and her mother were both taken by helicopter to a Greenville hospital, where both remained Tuesday. Anggraeni has a broken neck and several broken ribs and her daughter has torn ligaments in her arm, but is expected to be released from the hospital this week.  Anggraeni’s oldest child, Nick, 20, was not with the family at the time of the crash. He stayed at the family’s Kennesaw home to help care for his siblings’ pets, including six chicks that Kiki had recently persuaded her mom to buy, Thoreson said.  “Kiki was a super-friendly animal lover,” Thoreson said. “She was the artist. She would draw anime and they were so in-depth.”  And Nate, despite his young age, was mature beyond his years and very polite, Thoreson said. His gentle nature helped him communicate with his older brother, who has autism, and others with special needs, Thoreson said.  “Nate was wonderful. He’s one of the boys from back in the day. ‘Yes ma’am. No ma’am,’” she said. “He was so friendly. He was such a good, giving child.” Kirana attended Harrison High School, where she recently completed ninth grade, and Nate attended Palmer Middle School, according to the Cobb County School System. He recently finished sixth grade. Thoreson’s daughter has created a Go Fund Me page to assist the family, who she says does not have medical insurance. Anggraeni, who works as a special needs paraprofessional for the Cobb County School System, will also need a new vehicle for the family.  “I’m asking everybody they know if anybody can donate a car, so she doesn’t have to worry about it, so she’ll be able to return to work,” Thoreson said.  The Sweet Hut Bakery and Cafe near Kennesaw, where the Wolwark sisters worked, is planning to donate all of its proceeds this Saturday to the family. The bakery is located at 2795 Chastain Meadow Parkway.  The crash remains under investigation by the South Carolina Highway Patrol, a spokesman said Tuesday.  Funeral arrangements for the siblings have not yet been finalized, but a funeral home in Greenville is assisting with the cost, Thoreson said. The family is hopeful Anggraeni will be released from the hospital in time to attend. 
  • Calling the shots as his West Wing clears out, President Donald Trump sees his hard-line immigration stance as a winning issue heading into a midterm election he views as a referendum on his protectionist policies. 'You have to stand for something,' Trump declared Tuesday, as he defended his administration's immigration policy amid mounting criticism over the forced separation of children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. The chorus of condemnation includes Democrats, as well as Republicans, who are increasingly worried that reports about bereft children taken from their parents could damage the GOP's chances in November. Still, Trump believes that his immigration pledges helped win him the presidency and that his most loyal supporters want him to follow through. He made a rare trip to Capitol Hill late Tuesday to meet with GOP legislators and endorse a pair of bills that would keep detained families together, among other changes, but he remains confident that projecting toughness on immigration is the right call, said five White House officials and outside advisers who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly. 'It's amazing how people are surprised that he's keeping the promises he made on the campaign trail now,' said Trump political adviser Bill Stepien. While the White House signaled Trump may be open to a narrow fix to deal with the problem, the president spent the day stressing immigration policies that he has championed throughout his surprise political career. He has resisted calls to reverse the separation policy, saying any change must come through Congress. In a speech to a business group earlier Tuesday, Trump said he wanted to see legislation deal with family separation, which, he said, 'We don't want.' He also emphasized border security and again made the false argument that Democrats are to blame for the family separation problem. Said Trump: 'Politically correct or not, we have a country that needs security, that needs safety, that has to be protected.' Several White House aides, led by adviser Stephen Miller, have encouraged the president to make immigration a defining issue for the midterms. And Trump has told advisers he believes he looks strong on the matter, suggesting that it could be a winning culture war issue much like his attacks on NFL players who take a knee for the national anthem. Former Trump senior adviser Steve Bannon said the president is emphasizing the policies that brought him to the White House. 'I think this is one of his best moments. I think this is a profile in courage. This is why America elected him,' Bannon said. 'This is not doubling down, it is tripling down.' Still, Trump, a voracious watcher of cable news who is especially attuned to the power of images, appeared to acknowledge later Tuesday that the optics could be doing damage. During his closed-door meeting with lawmakers on the Hill, Trump said his daughter Ivanka had encouraged him to find a way to end the practice, and he said separating families at the border 'looked bad,' according to several attendees. 'He said, 'Politically, this is bad,'' said Rep. Randy Weber, R-Texas. 'It's not about the politics. This is the right thing to do.' Trump's immigration standoff comes as he escalates his nationalist trade moves, imposing new tariffs on imports and threating more. With few powerful opposing voices remaining in the West Wing, Trump is increasingly making these decisions solo. Some key advisers have left, and chief of staff John Kelly appears sidelined. Republicans, particularly those in more moderate districts, are worried they will be damaged by the searing images of children held in cages at border facilities, as well as by audio recordings of young children crying for their parents. The House Republicans' national campaign chairman, Ohio Rep. Steve Stivers, said Monday that he's asking 'the administration to stop needlessly separating children from their parents.' Other conservatives also raised concerns, but many called for Congress to make changes instead of asking Trump to directly intervene. Ralph Reed, chairman of the Faith & Freedom coalition of evangelical voters, added to the drumbeat to end the child separation policy Tuesday, calling on Congress to pass legislation that would end the process as part of a broader immigration overhaul. But asked if the border policy was bad for Trump politically, Reed suggested core supporters remain on the president's side. He said the group's members are 'more than willing to give the president and his administration the benefit of the doubt that this is being driven by a spike in people crossing the border, a combination of existing law and court decisions require this separation, and the fact that the Democrats refused to work with the administration to increase judges so that this can be dealt with more expeditiously.' Trump on Tuesday mocked the idea of hiring thousands of new judges, asking, 'Can you imagine the graft that must take place?' Worried that the lack of progress on his signature border wall will make him look 'soft,' according to one adviser, Trump has unleashed a series of tweets playing up the dangers posed by members of the MS-13 gang — which make up a minuscule percentage of those who cross the border. He used the loaded term 'infest' to reference the influx of immigrants entering the country illegally. As the immigration story becomes a national flashpoint, Trump has been watching the TV coverage with increasing anger, telling confidants he believes media outlets are deliberately highlighting the worst images — the cages and screaming toddlers — to make him look bad. The president has long complained about his treatment by the media, but his frustrations reached a boiling point after he returned from his Singapore summit with North Korea's Kim Jong Un to face news reports questioning his negotiating skills. He complained to one adviser that the media had not given him enough credit after the summit and was continuing to undermine him on immigration, according to a person familiar with the conversation but not authorized to speak publicly. On Tuesday, Trump argued that sticking by his policies was a winning political strategy as he took a fresh shot at Democrats. 'They can't win on their policies, which are horrible,' he said. 'They found that out in the last presidential election.' ___ Associated Press writers Zeke Miller and Matthew Daly contributed to this report.

News

  • Two brothers accused of at least seven robberies across metro Atlanta in May are no ordinary criminals: they’re identical twins. Marquavious and Juntavious Burton, 20, were arrested in early June. According to Fulton County jail records, the twins have been arrested multiple times since 2015 on charges such as aggravated assault and theft by receiving stolen property. The latest charges include seven counts of armed robbery and a charge of participating in criminal street gang activity. Police believe they may be responsible for even more recent robberies. The Burton twins have also been accused of shooting at some of the robbery victims, Channel 2 Action News reported.  In other news:
  • Two Cobb County siblings were killed after their 17-year-old sister allegedly lost control of the family’s SUV on a South Carolina interstate, police said Monday.  Jessica Wolwark was driving a Chevrolet northbound on I-85 in Anderson County when she ran off the highway and the SUV overturned Saturday morning, according to police.  Wolwark and her mother, Natalia Anggraeni, were both wearing seat belts and were seriously injured in the crash. Two other family members died from their injuries after being ejected, police said.  Kirana “Kiki” Wolwark, 15, and 12-year-old Nate Wolwark were both killed, a family friend posted on a Go Fund Me page. The family was traveling from their Kennesaw home to Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C., where the girls were to attend a religious retreat, according to Chrissy Concepcion, who set up the fundraising page for the family. The family does not have medical insurance, she said. The South Carolina medical examiner was unable to confirm the identities of those killed, but family friends confirmed the names and ages of the Wolwark siblings.  “Kiki was a joy to be around, and spread her love for animals to everyone she knew,” Concepcion posted. “Nate was the perfect boy; always helpful, caring, and accepting of everyone around him.” The driver and her mother were both taken by helicopter to a Greenville hospital, where both remained Monday. Anggraeni has a broken neck and several broken ribs, Concepcion said. Jessica Wolwark has torn ligaments in her arm, but is expected to be released from the hospital this week.  The South Carolina Highway Patrol is investigating the crash.  In other news: 
  • President Donald Trump took a dig at Rep. Mark Sanford, a South Carolina Republican who has been critical of the president, during a meeting with House Republicans on Tuesday night. Trump told the lawmakers in a closed-door Capitol Hill meeting that he wanted to 'congratulate Mark on a great race,' according to two attendees. Another attendee said Trump's remarks elicited some boos from members of the House Freedom Caucus, a conservative group in the House. The three attendees spoke on condition of anonymity to describe the private meeting focused on immigration. Sanford, a Freedom Caucus member, said he was unable to attend because his flight was delayed at the Charleston, South Carolina, airport. 'The president has his own style. You gotta give him credit. He's an equal opportunity insulter. He gets just about everybody,' said Rep. Randy Weber, R-Texas. Sanford lost his primary bid last week to South Carolina state Rep. Katie Arrington and blamed his defeat on Trump, who urged Republicans to dump the former South Carolina governor. Trump tweeted on the day of the primary that the congressman had been unhelpful to him, adding, 'He is better off in Argentina.' That was a reference to Sanford's surprise disappearance from the state when he was governor, which he later revealed was to continue his affair with an Argentine woman. Sanford had called Trump untrustworthy and culturally intolerant, prompting Arrington's primary challenge. The congressman later said support for Trump had become a litmus test in GOP primaries. __ Associated Press writers Lisa Mascaro and Matthew Daly contributed.
  • Three months after a tornado rumbled through a South Fulton County neighborhood and destroyed people’s homes and lives, several neighbors told Channel 2 Action News they’re still recovering.  We’ve learned they’re on their own because the storm didn’t fit the criteria to be considered for state or federal disaster relief funds, on the Channel 2 Action News Nightbeat at 11.    TRENDING STORIES: Sole witness to deadly shooting says Tex McIver 'needs to be in hell' 2 dead, others injured in I-285 crash in South Fulton County Man arrested after beating, stabbing 15-year-old sister to death, police say  
  • Nearly eight decades ago, Ray Emory, then a young sailor, watched in disbelief as Japanese torpedoes tore into American ships in Pearl Harbor. Emory survived the devastating attack but didn't forget his fellow sailors and Marines who died and were buried in Hawaii without anyone knowing their names. His relentless efforts in the years that followed led to nearly 150 of those servicemen finally being identified so their families could find closure. Now frail with white-hair, the 97-year-old Emory arrived Tuesday in a golf cart at the pier where his ship, the USS Honolulu, was moored on Dec. 7, 1941. He came to say what could be his final goodbye to the storied naval base. More than 500 sailors were there to greet him. They lined the rails and formed an honor cordon, shouting cheers of 'Hip, Hip, Hooray!' Emory saluted them. 'I'm glad I came and I'll never forget it,' Emory told reporters after a ceremony in his honor. Emory wanted to visit the pier before leaving his Hawaii home for Boise, Idaho. His wife died about a month ago and he plans to live with his son and go fishing. During the attack on Pearl Harbor, Emory managed to fire a few rounds at the airplanes that dropped the torpedoes. He still has an empty bullet casing that fell to his ship deck. In 2012, the Navy and National Park Service recognized Emory for his work with the military and Department of Veterans Affairs to honor and remember Pearl Harbor's dead. Bureaucrats didn't welcome his efforts, at least not initially. Emory says they politely told him to ''go you-know-where.'' It didn't deter him. First, thanks to legislation sponsored by the late U.S. Rep. Patsy Mink of Hawaii, he managed to get gravestones for unknowns from the USS Arizona marked with name of their battleship. In 2003, the military agreed to dig up a casket that Emory was convinced, after meticulously studying records, included the remains of multiple USS Oklahoma servicemen. Emory was right, and five sailors were identified. It helped lay the foundation for the Pentagon's decision more than a decade later to exhume and attempt to identify all 388 sailors and Marines from the Oklahoma who had been buried as unknowns in a national cemetery in Honolulu. Since those 2015 exhumations, 138 sailors from the Oklahoma have been identified. About 77 have been reburied, many in their hometowns, bringing closure to families across the country. 'Ray, you're the man that did it. There's nobody else. If it wasn't for you, it would have never been done,' Jim Taylor, the Navy's liaison to Pearl Harbor survivors, told Emory during the brief ceremony Tuesday at the USS Honolulu's old pier. Taylor presented Emory with a black, folded POW/MIA flag printed with the words: 'You are not forgotten.' Some of the remains, especially those burned to ash, will never be identified. But the military aims to put names with 80 percent of the Oklahoma servicemen who were dug up in 2015. Altogether, the Pearl Harbor attack killed nearly 2,400 U.S. servicemen. The Oklahoma lost 429 men after being hit by at least nine torpedoes. It was the second-largest number of dead from one vessel. The USS Arizona lost 1,177 sailors and Marines. Most of those killed on the Arizona remain entombed in the sunken hull of the battleship. The Pentagon has also exhumed the remains of 35 servicemen from the USS West Virginia from Honolulu's National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. None have been identified so far.