ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
80°
Rain
H 83° L 73°
  • cloudy-day
    80°
    Current Conditions
    Rain. H 83° L 73°
  • rain-day
    83°
    Today
    Rain. H 83° L 73°
  • clear-day
    85°
    Tomorrow
    Mostly Clear. H 85° L 66°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

National
‘Gun! Gun! Gun!’ Body cam, aerial video shows police kill unarmed black man 
Close

‘Gun! Gun! Gun!’ Body cam, aerial video shows police kill unarmed black man 

VIDEO: Graphic Footage Released In Killing of Unarmed Black Man In Sacramento

‘Gun! Gun! Gun!’ Body cam, aerial video shows police kill unarmed black man 

Sacramento police officials have released the harrowing audio and video, including footage from two officers’ body cameras, in the shooting death of an unarmed black man killed by police Sunday night

Stephon Alonzo Clark, 23, was shot multiple times in the backyard of his grandparents’ house, where he lived with several siblings. Sacramento Police Chief Daniel Hahn previously said the two unnamed officers involved in the shooting, who are on administrative leave while the case remains under investigation, fired on Clark 20 times. 

The footage was made public after it was shared with Clark’s family, per department policy. 

The body camera footage shows that the officers opened fire upon Clark seconds after encountering him on his patio. It also shows that, while the two officers involved ordered Clark to show them his hands, neither identified themselves as police officers. 

Clark’s aunt, Saquoia Durham, told The Sacramento Bee that her nephew did not stand a chance. 

“As soon as they did the command, they started shooting,” Durham told the newspaper. “They said, ‘Put your hands up, gun’ and then they just let loose on my nephew. They didn’t give him a chance to put his hands up or anything, and then when they shot him down, they knew they messed up.”

Family members and local activists also wondered why one of the videos shows, about six minutes after the shooting, an officer saying, “Hey, mute.” Officers are then seen muting the microphones on their body cameras for the rest of the recording released to the public. 

A police spokesman told the Bee there are a number of reasons officers may choose to mute their microphones, but did not go into detail. 

The officers who shot at Clark said they believed he was armed, but all that was found with his body was a cellphone. The killing has sparked protests and demands from Clark’s family and friends, as well as Sacramento officials, for answers about why an unarmed man was killed outside his own home. 

The Bee reported that the Rev. Al Sharpton has been in touch with Clark’s family and plans to travel to Sacramento to help ensure that Clark has a proper burial. The family has established a GoFundMe page to help fund his funeral arrangements, which include being buried next to a brother also cut down by gun violence, the Bee reported

>> Related: 20 bullets fired: Police kill unarmed black man holding cellphone in own backyard

Clark’s grandparents and other family members were inside the house as the shooting took place. His grandfather called 911 after hearing the gunshots, and his grandmother, Sequita Thompson, said she only learned the dead man was her grandson when she looked out the window after hours of police questioning on what she heard that night. 

“I opened that curtain and he was dead. I started screaming,” Thompson told the Bee

(Renee C. Byer/The Sacramento Bee via AP)
Sequita Thompson, of Sacramento, Calif., recounts the horror of looking out of her window to see her grandson, 23-year-old Stephon Clark, lying dead in her backyard after he was shot by police officers. Clark lived in the home with his grandparents and several siblings.
Close

20 bullets fired: Police kill unarmed black man holding cellphone in own backyard

Photo Credit: (Renee C. Byer/The Sacramento Bee via AP)
Sequita Thompson, of Sacramento, Calif., recounts the horror of looking out of her window to see her grandson, 23-year-old Stephon Clark, lying dead in her backyard after he was shot by police officers. Clark lived in the home with his grandparents and several siblings.

The shooting and the events surrounding it are laid out in the audio and video released Wednesday night, beginning with a 911 call from a resident in Clark’s neighborhood. The caller tells a dispatcher that there is a man going through the neighborhood and breaking vehicle windows, including those on the caller’s truck. 

“What did he use to break the windows?” the dispatcher asks.

“I have no idea,” the man responds. “I heard the noise and I came outside and he was standing right there on the side of my truck, and I grabbed my ball bat … (unintelligible) … I didn’t hit him, or nothing like that.”

The caller tells the dispatcher that the man is now in another yard, trying to get over a fence, but that he is trapped because of a neighbor’s dogs.  

The dispatcher asks for a description of the man, and the caller tells her he could not determine the man’s race because of the dark hoodie he was wearing. The suspect was wearing pants that appeared to have white stripes or dots on them, he says. 

During silent periods in the call, at least one dog can be heard barking in the background. The dispatcher continues to get the scant details of the vandal’s appearance: he’s tall, at more than 6 feet, and thin. 

The dispatcher tells the caller that the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office is sending a helicopter to search for the man and keep an eye on him until city police officers arrive. The weekend was a busy one because of St. Patrick’s Day, she says. 

The caller, a mechanic, tells the dispatcher that he keeps his tools in his truck, so the sound of his windows being broken alarmed him. 

“He’s lucky to be alive, if I would have gotten a hold of him,” the caller says, laughing. 

At that point in the 911 call, the officers who would shoot and kill Clark were about a block and a half away, according to the dispatcher. 

Audio from the dispatch office gives a glance into the same time frame from the viewpoint of law enforcement officers. The dispatcher relays a description of the accused vandal, and a male voice from the helicopter overhead mentions two large dogs as the only heat sources he can see on the infrared camera. 

A few minutes later, the deputy in the helicopter comes back on, telling the responding officers below he sees a man looking in the window of a home. 

“Two yards to the south of you, I’ve got a guy in a backyard looking into their window,” the deputy says. “He’s picking up a -- looks like a toolbar, or some sort of thing. He might be trying to break the window. Stand by.”

A moment later, the deputy says, “Okay, he’s breaking the window! Running south! Running to the south!”

The footage from the circling helicopter does not show Clark smashing the window, but picks up immediately afterward. The deputy is relaying his movements as Clark, seen only as a white figure in the camera’s infrared vision, jumps onto what appears to be a shed and vaults over the fence into his grandparents’ yard. 

At that point, he stops running and walks up to a vehicle between the fence and his grandparents’ home, briefly looking inside. 

As the helicopter continues to circle, the two police officers on the ground can be seen on the road in front of Clark’s grandparents’ home. One of the officers spots Clark and begins to run toward him, gun drawn. 

His partner follows and, as both officers run in his direction, Clark goes around the corner into the backyard of the house. Both officers follow, with one running into the open for a second before grabbing his partner and taking cover at the corner of the house. 

The officers huddle there and, as the helicopter’s camera gets a full view of the backyard, shots can be seen fired from the officers’ guns. 

Clark falls to the ground on his grandparents’ patio as the bullets ricochet off the pavement around him. He appears to try crawling away before becoming still. 

“Shots fired! Shots fired!” the deputy in the helicopter says. 

“Copy, shots fired,” the dispatcher responds. 

One of the officers on the ground, sounding out of breath, tells the dispatcher that the man is down, with no movement. He requests that backup officers arrive from a specific direction and asks that fire medics be en route. 

The officers have been criticized for waiting five minutes, until backup arrived, before rendering aid to Clark. Fire medics pronounced him dead at the scene. 

At one point, the dispatcher asks the officers if they also need medics. 

“Negative,” an officer responds. “Neither one of us are hit, we’re okay. Suspect’s down.”

The footage from the officers’ body cameras prior to the gunfire starts out quiet, as they make their way through the neighborhood, searching for the man suspected of vandalizing people’s vehicles. In the videos, the officers are seen asking a neighbor’s permission to search her backyard for the man. 

As they search, the dogs heard in the original 911 call are much closer. The officers clear a shed before heading back onto the street. 

A few moments later, the officers begin running toward the area where the deputy in the helicopter spotted Clark looking into the vehicle window next to his grandparents’ house. 

“Show me your hands! Show me your hands! Stop!” one officer screams at Clark when he spots him. He runs after Clark, who is heading around the corner toward the patio.

As the officer rounds the corner, he again screams, “Show me your hands!” and, “Gun!” before pushing his partner back.

As both officers huddle at the corner, the same officer yells, “Show me your hands! Gun! Gun! Gun!” 

They then both open fire.

See the body camera footage from both officers, beginning when they first spot Clark, below. Warning: The images and language may be disturbing for some readers. 

Footage from the second officer’s body camera shows his hands holding his service weapon around the corner of the house as he and his partner unleash a barrage of bullets. It is not clear from the location of his body camera, which would be attached to his chest, if the second officer could see who he was shooting at. 

The second officer’s body camera captured the fiery blasts from his partner’s gun as the gunshots rang out. 

“Five seven, shots fired,” the first officer breathlessly tells the dispatcher. “Subject down.”

Over the next few minutes, the officers continue ordering Clark to show them his hands, with no response.

The second officer says that Clark was “still pointing” when he saw him prior to the shooting. They both spend a few moments quietly trying to catch their breath, during which time the officers determine that neither of them was shot.

The officers agree to do a “tactical reload,” a maneuver in which law enforcement officers reload recently-fired weapons with fresh, full magazines to ensure they don’t run out of ammunition. The second officer estimated that he fired his weapon about five times, though his body camera footage shows more.

Hahn has previously said that each officer fired 10 times. 

The second officer’s body camera footage shows that additional police officers began to show up about that time, with one officer asking if the suspect had a gun. 

“We haven’t secured it,” the second officer said. “We’re not moving in until we have more (backup).”

The first officer is also heard saying, “(Clark’s) still down, he’s not moving. We can’t see the gun.”

>> Read more trending news

The officers tell their colleagues that Clark walked toward them with his hands out in front of him and that he held something that looked like a gun. 

As the officers speak, their flashlights highlight Clark’s body, lying face-down on the patio. They continue to search from a distance for a gun.

They also continue to try to get a response from Clark. 

“Hey, can you hear us?” one officer yells. 

“We need to know if you’re okay,” a female officer says. “We need to get you medics, but we can’t go over there to get you help unless we know you don’t have your weapon.”

They continue trying to speak to the motionless Clark as sirens are heard in the background. 

“Sir, can you move?” the female officer asks. “Can you hear us?”

At least one officer keeps a gun trained on Clark the entire time and, for a few moments, the second of the first two officers on the scene suggests firing a non-lethal weapon at his body to ensure he isn’t faking unconsciousness, the footage shows. It does not appear that the officers did so.

A few minutes later, the footage shows the officers finally approaching Clark’s body. 

“Hey, if one of you guys want to go hands, cover him … oh, (expletive),” the second officer says as they get to Clark.

The body camera shows the edge of something flat and light-colored peeking out from underneath his body. As they handcuff his limp hands behind his back and turn him over to start CPR, their flashlights show what the item is.

It is the iPhone Clark was carrying.

Read More

News

  • Hours after saying he wouldn't leave his own daughter with accused pedophile R. Kelly, the musician's crisis manager stepped down. USA Today reported that Darrell Johnson resigned after walking back comments he made Monday on 'CBS This Morning.' >> Read more trending news  On the morning show, when asked by Gayle King if he would allow his 20-year-old daughter to be alone with Kelly, Johnson said, 'I wouldn’t leave my daughter with anybody that’s accused of pedophilia. Period.' Johnson later told USA Today he spoke poorly. 'I should have worded it better,' Johnson said, adding he also meant to say, 'I would leave my daughter with Kelly because I do not believe he is a pedophile.' In a statement to the publication, Johnson confirmed he was no longer working for Kelly. 'This has nothing to do with Mr. Kelly it's for my (own) person(al) reasons,' he said. It's not clear what exactly Johnson's role with Kelly's team was. He was initially referred to as a publicist or spokesman for the singer, but several of Kelly's attorneys have told USA Today Johnson was not a part of Kelly's defense team. Steve Greenberg, one of Kelly's attorneys, told the publication Johnson was 'acting as a PR person.' But in a since-deleted tweet posted Monday, Greenberg said, 'Darryl Johnson is a crisis manager who has been assisting us and will continue to assist us. He is not a PR person, he is not a spiritual advisor. He has the full confidence of the defense team.' Greenburg later issued a formal statement on Johnson's exit, saying he 'decided to take some time off.' 'As has been reported, Darrel Johnson has decided to take some time off, for personal reasons, from his efforts on behalf of R. Kelly,' Greenberg said in a statement. 'The defense wants to thank Mr. Johnson for his tireless assistance and looks forward to his return. He shares our confidence that this is an unprecedented assault against R. Kelly by others, for their own personal gain, and the innocence of R. Kelly. 'There will be no further comment.
  • Drivers on I-35 in Dallas were surprised Monday morning to see a man driving a Lime scooter with the rest of traffic, cutting through five lanes in a seemingly nonchalant manner. >> Read more trending news  Driver Josh Weatherl captured the scooter rider on video with his dashboard camera just before 9 a.m. The unidentified man, wearing a backpack and headphones -- but no helmet -- checks over his shoulder before he crosses five lanes of traffic in about 15 seconds. Weatherl can be heard in the recording laughing and expressing his disbelief. 'Bro, what are you doing?' Weatherl exclaimed in the recording. 'Oh, my gosh. That is the most wild thing I've ever seen.' The man was probably going about 15 mph in a 60 mph zone, WFAA-TV reported. Weatherl told WFAA-TV he thought the man looked like he knew what he was doing. 'I think he’s done it before based on how calm he was, I don’t think this was his first rodeo,' Weatherl said. A Lime spokesman called the man's actions unsafe and said riders should not take the scooters onto highways, The Dallas Morning News reported.
  • A Denver man accused of murdering his wife can legally use the money from her life insurance policy to pay his defense attorney, KDVR reported. >> Read more trending news  Robert Feldman, 55, officially fired his public defender Monday and rehired a private attorney after the Colorado Supreme Court ruled last month he could use the funds he collected from Stacy Feldman's policy, according to The Denver Post. The court ruled the law firm was an independent third party that was given the money legally, even though the guardian of his two children argued they should receive the funds, the newspaper reported. Robert Feldman was charged with first-degree murder in February 2018 in connection with the strangulation death of Stacy Feldman in 2015, the Post reported. Stacy Feldman was found dead in the couple's shower, but prosecutors said Robert Feldman staged his wife's death to appear she had slipped and fallen, KDVR reported. After he was charged, Robert Feldman paid David Kaplan's law firm $550,000 to defend him, using money from his wife's $751,000 life insurance policy, the television station reported. The family of Stacy Feldman sued in Colorado Probate Court and won. According to court documents, the attorneys for the Feldmans' children argued that allowing Robert Feldman to use the policy money was a violation of Colorado's 'slayer statute,' the Post reported. The law prevents someone from feloniously killed another person from benefiting from their estate, the newspaper reported. The Probate Court ruled in favor of Robert Feldman's children and ordered the law firm to put the money into a court registry until the criminal trial ended, the Post reported. Robert Feldman appealed the decision and the Colorado Supreme Court reversed it, ruling Stacy Feldman's family acted too late to prevent her husband from using the money, KDVR reported. 'The Probate Court, according to the Supreme Court, can’t freeze the money already given to a third party. If Robert Feldman had the money in his account,' criminal defense attorney Dan Recht told the television station. 'Probate Court did have jurisdiction to freeze that money but it was already with the law firm. Kaplan was rehired as Robert Feldman's attorney Monday. Feldman will be arraigned in October, and a judge scheduled a trial to begin next April, KDVR reported.
  • Attorneys for Jeffrey Epstein have appealed a judge's decision last week to hold the wealthy financier and accused child predator in jail pending his trial on allegations of sex trafficking. >> Read more trending news  Epstein's attorneys filed a notice of appeal Monday after U.S. District Court Judge Richard Berman denied their client bail last week. In his decision, Berman cited the potential danger Epstein poses to others and the community. The appeal was made public Tuesday, according to Reuters. Prosecutors last week asked Berman to hold Epstein, 66, without bail, arguing that he is a flight risk and danger to the community. Attorneys for Epstein denied that their client posed a flight risk and asked Berman to allow Epstein to be held under house arrest at his Manhattan mansion. Epstein is accused of sexually exploiting and abusing dozens of girls between 2002 and 2005 at his homes in New York and Florida, allegedly heading a sex trafficking scheme that saw his victims recruiting other girls to be abused.  He has pleaded not guilty to sex trafficking and sex trafficking conspiracy charges. Epstein avoided significant jail time and prosecution in 2008 after he was accused of molesting girls in Palm Beach County, Florida. As part of a plea deal reached with federal prosecutors in Florida, Epstein pleaded guilty to two lesser counts of soliciting a minor for prostitution and agreed to register as a sex offender. He served 13 months in jail as part of the deal.
  • A Florida woman suffered a minor injury Monday after she was hit by a train in Tampa, WFLA reported. >> Read more trending news  Police said Anna C. Jenkins, 34, was walking along the railroad tracks shortly after 9 p.m. and was wearing headphones, which prevented her from hearing the approaching train, the television station reported. The train conductor told police he blew the train's horn when he saw a woman on the tracks and tried to the stop, the Tampa Bay Times reported. The conductor said the train was traveling about 17 mph, the newspaper reported. Jenkins suffered a laceration on her forehead and was taken to an area hospital, WFLA reported. She was listed in stable condition.
  • A Louisiana police officer who suggested in a Facebook post that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-New York, should be shot, and another officer who “liked” the post were both fired Monday. Gretna, Louisiana, police officer Charlie Rispoli posted an entry Friday on Facebook suggesting that Ocasio-Cortez “needs a round.” “This vile idiot needs a round........and I don’t mean the kind she used to serve.”Ocasio-Cortez was once a bartender in New York City. The story, first reported by Nola.com, included an image of the Facebook post that has since been deleted. Gretna Police Chief Arthur Lawson said at a press conference that Rispoli had been fired along with officer Angelo Varisco who “liked” Rispoli’s Facebook post. The post, Lawson said, reflected poorly on his department.  >> Read more trending news  “This incident, we feel, has been an embarrassment to our department,” Lawson said. “These officers have certainly acted in a manner which was unprofessional, alluding to a violent act be conducted against a sitting U.S. [congresswoman], a member of our government [and] we are not going to tolerate that.” The two officers were fired for violating the department’s social media policy, Lawson said. Rispoli had served in the department for 14 years while Varisco had been with the Gretna police for less than three years. It is unclear if Rispoli knew he was sharing and commenting on a post from a website that publishes satire on current events. Ocasio-Cortez responded to Rispoli’s firing on Twitter saying, “This is Trump’s goal when he uses targeted language & threatens elected officials who don’t agree w/ his political agenda. It’s authoritarian behavior. The President is sowing violence. He’s creating an environment where people can get hurt & he claims plausible deniability.” President Donald Trump has been feuding via Twitter with Ocasio-Cortez and three other Democratic U.S. congresswomen, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan. The four women have been dubbed “The Squad.” On Monday, Trump tweeted, 'The 'Squad' is a very Racist group of troublemakers who are young, inexperienced, and not very smart. They are pulling the once great Democrat Party far left, and were against humanitarian aid at the Border...And are now against ICE and Homeland Security. So bad for our Country!