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National
Florida woman with suspended license tries to get stolen car from Sheriff's Office, deputies say
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Florida woman with suspended license tries to get stolen car from Sheriff's Office, deputies say

Florida woman with suspended license tries to get stolen car from Sheriff's Office, deputies say
Photo Credit: Marion County Sheriff's Office/WFTV
Tammi Gough, 43, failed to retrieve the stolen car., deputies say.

Florida woman with suspended license tries to get stolen car from Sheriff's Office, deputies say

A woman driving with a suspended license went to a Marion County Sheriff’s Office multi-district location Tuesday to try to retrieve a car she had stolen earlier in the year, a news release said.

>> Read more trending news 

Tammi Gough, 43, failed to retrieve the stolen car. She then drove to MCSO’s central office to complete her mandatory felon registration, deputies said.

A detective at the central office recognized Gough and knew her license had been suspended, the release said.

The Sheriff’s Office said Gough’s license had been suspended six times. 

Gough was arrested on charges of felony driving on a suspended or revoked license.

The Sheriff’s Office wrote on its Facebook page: “Tammi seems to have cheered up a tad bit in the time between her arrest and booking photo. Next time, we recommend an Uber.”

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News

  • An Indiana man is accused of beating his neighbor's dog with a log, shattering the animal's right eye socket. >> Read more trending news  Ronald Johnson, 55, of Valparaiso, was arrested Friday and charged with torturing or mutilating an animal, and cruelty to an animal, according to the Times of Northwest Indiana. Johnson was booked into the Porter County Jail and has been released after posting $1,500 bail, the newspaper reported. 'I don't think he should have been able to bond out that easily,' Courtney Gutowski, the dog's owner, said Monday in a statement to the Times. Johnson is accused of hitting Echo, Gutowski's 9-pound beagle/dachshund mix, with a log Aug. 28, police said. The impact shattered the dog's right eye socket, and the dog required emergency surgery, the Times reported. The dog's eye was surgically removed. Police did not give a motive for the alleged attack. The dog's eye had to be examined by a specialist in West Lafayette, the newspaper reported. While Echo seems to be responding well to treatment, Gutowski said the dog remains skittish. 'He is still very afraid when we take him out anywhere,' Gutowski told the Times. 'But he is finally running around in our backyard again under close supervision.' Johnson's initial hearing is scheduled for Sept. 25 at the Porter County Courthouse, the newspaper reported.
  • The bodies of four children found Monday in Georgia are believed to be those of four missing Marion County children whose 32-year-old mother's body was also found in Brantley County, Georgia, on Monday, the Marion County Sheriff's Office said. >> Read more trending news  Deputies said the family of Casei Jones reported her as missing Saturday after not having seen her in six weeks. Investigators said they identified Jones' husband, Michael Jones Jr., as a person of interest in her disappearance and that he was found Sunday in Brantley County, Georgia, after being involved in a crash. Deputies said Casei Jones' body was found in the vehicle Michael Jones Jr. was driving. Investigators said Michael Jones Jr. later led them to the remains of four children. Deputies said the remains have not been positively identified but that they are believed to be those of Casei Jones' four missing children -- Cameron Bowers, 10; Preston Bowers, 5; Mercalli Jones, 2; and Aiyana Jones, 1. Detectives said they believe Michael Wayne Jones Jr. killed the victims at their Southeast 86th Terrace home near Sunset Harbor Road and U.S. 441 in Marion County's Summerfield neighborhood. Investigators said they believe he stored the bodies at his home and in his van for several weeks before taking them to Georgia.  Deputies said a warrant has been issued for Michael Wayne Jones Jrs arrest on a charge of second-degree murder and that more charges are forthcoming.
  • Just days after being named to the cast of 'Saturday Night Live,' Shane Gillis was fired after receiving criticism for videos that revealed the comedian using slurs and offensive language, program officials announced Monday. >> Read more trending news  'After talking with Shane Gillis, we have decided that he will not be joining 'SNL,' a show spokesman representing executive producer Lorne Michaels said in a statement Monday. 'We want 'SNL' to have a variety of voices and points of view within the show, and we hired Shane on the strength of his talent as a comedian and his impressive audition for 'SNL.' We were not aware of his prior remarks that have surfaced over the past few days. The language he used is offensive, hurtful and unacceptable. We are sorry that we did not see these clips earlier, and that our vetting process was not up to our standard.' Gillis, 31, was criticized after a video of a podcast surfaced, where Gillis used a slur in referring to Chinese people and mocked a caricatured accent of a Chinese person speaking English, according to to The New York Times. The podcast, on a YouTube channel called 'Matt and Shane's Podcast,' was dated Sept. 26, 2018, according to The Hollywood Reporter. In a separate podcast from 2018, Gillis and co-host Matt McCusker rank how funny comedians are by race and use homophobic slurs, according to the Reporter. In another podcast recording, Gillis used the slurs to describe comedy filmmaker/producer Judd Apatow and comedian Chris Gethard, the Times reported. Gillis stated on his Twitter account last week, tweeting 'I'm a comedian who pushes boundaries. I sometimes miss. If you go through my 10 years of comedy, most of it bad, you're going to find a lot of bad misses. I'm happy to apologize to anyone who's actually offended by anything I've said. My intention is never to hurt anyone, but I am trying to be the best comedian I can be and sometimes that requires risks.' After 'SNL' announced his firing, Gillis issued an apology on Twitter, saying he respected the show's decision. 'I was funny enough to get SNL. That can't be taken away.
  • Deputies in Oklahoma arrested a teen Sunday in connection to threats made against McAlester High School. >> Read more trending news  Pittsburg County deputies said Alexis Wilson, 18, made the threats while talking to a friend, which got reported to the Sheriff's Office through her coworkers. According to reports, deputies were called Monday by Wilson's co-workers at a local Pizza Inn, where they say she had been showing someone videos of her shooting a newly purchased rifle. Deputies said Wilson told that person she was going to 'shoot 400 people for fun and that there were so many people at her old school that she would like to do it.' At her home, Wilson told deputies the comment wasn't 'meant to be taken the way that the comment was taken in the situation (Sunday).' Deputies found the recently bought AK-47, along with multiple magazines and a 12-gauge shotgun in Wilson's room inside the home. According to the Sheriff's Office report, Wilson's mother was aware her daughter had been saving for the rifle but was not concerned since 'Alexis has always shot firearms and had hunted.' Wilson was arrested and faces charges of making terroristic threats toward the school.
  • A Texas man is accused of being naked and assaulting a 58-year-old woman with her wheelchair outside her apartment Friday. >> Read more trending news  According to court documents, Williard Lee Houston, 39, assaulted the woman, KXAN reported. He was arrested and booked into the Travis County Jail on a count of injury to a disabled individual, KEYE reported. He was being held in lieu of a $75,000 bond, according to arrest records. Police said they found the woman lying in a stairwell, bleeding from her mouth, KXAN reported. Police said the woman told them 'the naked man beat her,' according to court documents. The woman was taken to an area hospital, where she was treated for a fractured wrist and possible fractures to her nose and ribs, KEYE reported. According to court documents, Houston told police he hit the woman with her wheelchair about 10 times, KXAN reported. Police said Houston started screaming expletives and said, ”That was my first time hitting an old lady… I show mad respect for a woman.” The woman told police she did not recall what led to the assault, the television station reported.
  • Following an article posted by The New York Times this weekend, several Democratic presidential candidates are calling for the impeachment of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh on allegations of sexual misconduct from his time as a student at Yale University. On Sunday, the Times reported that Kavanaugh faced a separate allegation of sexual assault from his undergraduate days and that the FBI did not investigate the claim. However, the story has come under some scrutiny. The Times tweeted a promotion for the story, which they later deleted and apologized for, then added an editor's note to the online story explaining that the female student mentioned in the new claim declined to be interviewed about the allegations and that friends say she does not recall the incident. The Times' article was an excerpt from a book about Kavanaugh that is to come out in a couple of weeks. Kavanaugh fought sexual assault allegations prior to his confirmation by the Senate last October, facing many in Congress who said he was unfit for the position. Amid the renewed call from Democratic candidates and others in Congress, many are asking if and how a Supreme Court justice, who is appointed to the position for life, can be removed from the bench. Here's a look at the impeachment process for sitting federal judges and others. >> Read more trending news  Can a Supreme Court justice be impeached? Yes, a Supreme Court justice can be impeached. Article II Section 4 of the U.S. Constitution gives the House of Representatives the power to impeach federal judges and gives to the U.S. Senate the right to vote to remove judges who have been impeached. The section reads: 'The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.' Judges are considered part of the 'all civil Officers of the United States' portion of the section. What can a Supreme Court justice be impeached for? The Constitution lays out two specific actions and one vague description of something that could lead to impeachment and removal of a justice from the bench. The Constitution says a person may be removed from office for convictions of 'Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.' While treason and bribery are spelled out, high crimes and misdemeanors are a little vaguer. High crimes and misdemeanors are generally seen as a violation of the public's trust. Sexual assault would fall under that category. How does impeachment work? Impeachment for justices works the same way as impeachment for a president or vice president would work. Here are the steps in the process for impeaching a federal justice: In the House First, an impeachment resolution must be introduced by a member of the House of Representatives. The speaker of the House must then direct the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary (or a special committee) to hold a hearing on the resolution to decide whether to put the measure to a vote by the full chamber and when to hold such a vote. A simple majority of the Judiciary Committee must approve the resolution. If the Judiciary Committee approves the resolution, it moves to a full vote on the House floor. If a simple majority of the those present and voting in the House approve an article of impeachment, then the justice is impeached. In the Senate The procedure then moves to the Senate where a 'trial' is held to determine if the justice committed a crime. There is no set procedure for the trial. Details outlining how the trial is conducted would be set by the Senate leadership. Members of the House serve as 'managers' in the Senate trial. Managers serve a similar role as prosecutors do in a criminal trial, they present evidence during the procedure. The justice can have counsel to represent him during the Senate process. Unlike in the trials of an impeached president or vice president, the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court would not preside over the trial of a justice. In an impeachment trial of a Supreme Court justice, the vice president would oversee the proceedings. Senators listen to the evidence presented, including closing arguments from each side and retire to deliberate. Senators then reconvene and vote on whether the justice is guilty or not guilty of the actions he is accused of. It takes a two-thirds vote of the Senate to convict. If the justice is found guilty, he is removed from office immediately. The result of the hearing in the Senate, along with a charge in the House that a justice has committed a crime is not a legal one. No penalty, other than removal from office, is brought against a justice in an impeachment hearing. Has any Supreme Court justice been impeached? Samuel Chase, who was appointed by President George Washington, was impeached in 1804 for 'arbitrary, oppressive, and unjust' decisions on the court. The Senate declined to remove Chase from office on the House's recommendation of impeachment, saying a justice should not be removed from the court because his or her decisions are not popular.