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Coronavirus: Trump, Biden win Pennsylvania primary amid unrest, pandemic
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Coronavirus: Trump, Biden win Pennsylvania primary amid unrest, pandemic

Coronavirus outbreak: What you need to know

Coronavirus: Trump, Biden win Pennsylvania primary amid unrest, pandemic

Nearly 6.3 million people worldwide – including more than 1.8 million in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. While efforts to contain the COVID-19 outbreak continue, states have begun to shift their focus toward reopening their economies.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here.

Live updates for Tuesday, June 2, continue below

Trump, Biden win Pennsylvania primary amid unrest, pandemic

Update 11:30 p.m. EDT June 2: Pennsylvania held a primary election Tuesday amid civil unrest, a pandemic, the introduction of new voting machines in some counties and the debut of mail-in balloting that pushed county election bureaus to their limits.

The result of the highest-profile contest on the ballot was a foregone conclusion: President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden, uncontested for their party’s nominations, both won their primary Tuesday in Pennsylvania.

The lack of drama in the outcome of the presidential primary and the huge number of voters who opted to vote by mail meant turnout was light.

Still, voters in some places were dealing with late-arriving mail-in ballots and a dramatic consolidation of polling places in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and Montgomery County to cope with the difficulty of recruiting poll workers fearful of the coronavirus.

Ultimately, more than 1.8 million voters applied for a mail-in or absentee ballot, smashing expectations by state officials for the debut of the state’s new vote-by-mail law and drawing warnings that many contest results will be delayed well past election night.

Officials in Philadelphia and its suburbs, in particular, had been concerned that voters wouldn’t receive their ballots in time for the post office to return them by Tuesday’s 8 p.m. deadline

Thousands on New York City streets after curfew

Update 10:30 p.m. EDT June 2: Thousands of demonstrators protesting the death of George Floyd remained on New York City streets on Tuesday after an 8 p.m. curfew put in place by officials struggling to stanch destruction and growing complaints that the nation’s biggest city was reeling out of control night after night.

Mayor Bill de Blasio had doubled down on a citywide curfew, moving it up from 11 p.m. a night earlier, but rejected urging from President Donald Trump and an offer from Gov. Andrew Cuomo to bring in the National Guard.

Protests had resumed Tuesday during the day over the death of Floyd, a black man who died on May 25 after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed a knee on his neck even after he stopped moving and pleading for air.

People marched in groups of thousands in parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn, as merchants boarded up their businesses. As the the curfew time arrived, many were still in the streets and continued marching, with officers initially standing by and allowing them.

But officers started ordering people to move along, and began taking people into custody. Demonstrators who had been on the West Side Highway in lower Manhattan were herded off, with parts of the roadway blocked off behind them.

“Something has to break, and it’s not going to be us,” said Evan Kutcher, one of hundreds of demonstrators who stood outside the Barclays Center chanting Floyd’s name Tuesday evening. “We’re here because something needs to change.

Trump says GOP is pulling convention from North Carolina

Update 9:30 p.m. EDT June 2: President Donald Trump said Tuesday he is seeking a new state to host the Republican National Convention after host North Carolina refused to guarantee the event could be held in Charlotte without restrictions because of ongoing concerns over the coronavirus.

Trump tweeted the news Tuesday night, complaining that the state’s governor, Democrat Roy Cooper, other officials “refuse to guarantee that we can have use of the Spectrum Arena” and were not “allowing us to occupy the arena as originally anticipated and promised.”

Arkansas reports another 1-day record in new virus cases

Update 7:20 p.m. EDT June 2: Arkansas on Tuesday marked another one-day record for new coronavirus cases, and the governor said plans to further loosen restrictions on businesses remained on hold because of the spike.

The Health Department said at least 7,818 people tested positive for the virus, an increase of 375 over the 7,443 reported Monday. The department said it marked the biggest one-day increase in cases among non-incarcerated people, as only one of the new cases was somebody who was incarcerated.

The true number is likely higher because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick. The number of people in the state who were reported to have died from COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus, reached 136.

Officials said 132 people are hospitalized, a new high for the state.

The increases follow moves by the state to allow businesses that have closed because of the pandemic to reopen but with capacity limits and other restrictions. Arkansas did not have a stay-at-home order in place but had other restrictions Gov. Asa Hutchinson has been rolling back in recent weeks.

Senate confirms special watchdog for pandemic recovery

Update 6:20 p.m. EDT June 2The Senate has confirmed a new inspector general to oversee money distributed as part of the $2 trillion economic rescue law, putting at least one watchdog in place as oversight of the money has lagged.

The Senate confirmed Brian Miller, a lawyer in the White House counsel’s office, on a 51-40 vote Tuesday. Democrats voted against Miller after questioning his independence from President Donald Trump, who nominated him for the post.

Responding to those concerns, Miller told the Senate Banking Committee during his confirmation hearing last month that “independence is vital” for the special inspector general for pandemic recovery. He pledged to conduct audits and investigations “with fairness and impartiality.” The post would place him in charge of overseeing a roughly $500 billion Treasury fund for businesses and localities created as part of the economic rescue law approved in March.

Republicans pointed to his previous experience as an independent watchdog. Miller has worked at the Justice Department and was inspector general for nearly a decade at the General Services Administration, which oversees thousands of federal contracts. Miller helped force out the GSA’s director during President George W. Bush’s administration, drawing criticism from the White House and Republican lawmakers.

But most Democrats weren’t convinced, with only one – Alabama Sen. Doug Jones – voting for him. Another Democratic moderate, West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin, said in a statement that he voted against Miller because “I believe his current role in the Office of White House Counsel and relationship with the president makes it impossible for him to remain independent as he investigates the administration’s response to the pandemic.”

As Miller assumes the post, he will be one of the sole checks on the massive pot of money as other oversight bodies set up in the law have foundered. The Pandemic Recovery Accountability Committee, a committee of inspectors general, still has no leader after Trump sidelined the original chairman, Glenn Fine, by demoting him. A bipartisan congressional commission is also rudderless as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., have not yet agreed upon and appointed a chair, as the law directs them to do.

Number of new COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts jumps under new reporting system

Update 3:05 p.m. EDT June 2: Officials with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health reported 3,840 new coronavirus cases statewide Tuesday, a sharp jump that officials said was explained by a change in how coronavirus case numbers are being reported, WFXT reported.

Following new guidance issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, state health officials said that they have begun to include the number of probable COVID-19 cases in their counts. According to WFXT, the cases are defined by the CDC as people who have had COVID-19 symptoms and were exposed to a positive case with or without positive results from an antibody test.

As of Tuesday, authorities said 7,035 people have died statewide from COVID-19. Officials said 100,805 people have been diagnosed with coronavirus infections in Massachusetts.

>> Read more on Boston25News.com

Ohio governor planning for schools to return in fall

Update 2:40 p.m. EDT June 2: Gov. Mike DeWine of Ohio announced Tuesday that officials aim to restart K-12 schooling in the fall, WHIO-TV reported.

The governor noted that the date to start school will ultimately be up to local school boards, according to WHIO-TV.

DeWine also announced that healthcare providers are able Tuesday to resume all surgeries and procedures that had previously been delayed.

>> Read more on WHIO.com

708 new cases of COVID-19 reported in New Jersey

Update 2:05 p.m. EDT June 2: Gov. Phil Murphy of New Jersey said Tuesday that 708 new coronavirus infections have been reported, raising the total number of COVID-19 cases in the state to 161,545.

On social media, the governor encouraged people to continue social distancing, noting that it "works."

“Wearing a face covering works,” he said. "Keep it up, and we’ll get through Stage 2 of our restart and recovery."

Officials also reported 51 more deaths associated with the coronavirus pandemic. As of Tuesday, 11,770 people have died statewide of COVID-19.

COVID-19 hospitalizations in North Carolina reach single-day high

Update 1:45 p.m. EDT June 2: Health officials in North Carolina reported the state’s highest single-day number of hospitalizations connected to the coronavirus pandemic on Tuesday, WSOC-TV reported.

Officials with the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services said 716 people were hospitalized due to severe complications associated with the novel coronavirus.

Officials have reported 29,889 cases of COVID-19 in North Carolina. More than 920 people statewide have died of coronavirus infections, WSOC-TV reported.

>> Read more on WSOCTV.com

More than 6.3M cases of COVID-19 reported worldwide

Update 1:10 p.m. EDT June 2: More than 6.3 million cases of COVID-19 have been reported worldwide as of Tuesday, according to data collected by Johns Hopkins University.

The United States continues to lead the world with the most number of coronavirus infections reported. As of Tuesday, more than 1.8 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with COVID-19. More than 105,000 people have died of the viral infection nationwide.

The second-most cases in the world have been reported in Brazil, where officials had confirmed more than 526,000 cases of COVID-19 by Tuesday.

1,653 new coronavirus infections reported in the UK

Update 12:25 p.m. EDT June 2: Officials in the United Kingdom reported 1,653 new coronavirus infections Tuesday, raising the country’s total number of infections to 277,985.

Officials said that as of 5 p.m. local time Tuesday, the most recent date for which data was available, 39,369 people had died nationwide of COVID-19.

COVID-19 cases ‘at an all-time low’ in New York, governor says

Update 12 p.m. EDT June 2: Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York said Tuesday that COVID-19 cases in the state were “at an all-time low."

The governor said 58 more people have died of COVID-19 statewide. The number of new fatal cases reported one day earlier was 54.

29 new cases of COVID-19 reported in DC

Update 11:15 a.m. EDT June 1: Health officials in Washington D.C. said Tuesday that 29 new coronavirus infections have been reported in the area, raising the total number of cases in the area to 8,886.

Officials also announced that two more people, both aged 79, had died of COVID-19 in Washington D.C., bringing the total number of deaths in the District to 470.

Americans charged, accused of violating social distancing rules in Singapore

Update 11 a.m. EDT June 2: Authorities in Singapore have charged two Americans with violating the country’s social distancing rules, according to NBC News.

The Americans, identified in court records obtained by NBC as Jeffrey Brown, 52, and Bao Nguyen Brown, 40, were accused of meeting with an Australian man at a restaurant on May 16 to socialize, the news network reported.

If convicted, the Browns could face up to 6 months in jail and a fine of up to $7,100, according to NBC News.

Stocks open higher as investors hope for economic recovery

Update 9:45 a.m. EDT June 2: Stocks opened modestly higher Tuesday on Wall Street, despite deepening unrest across the U.S., as investors hope that the gradual lifting of lockdown provisions will help economies recover from the damage caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% in the first few minutes of trading Tuesday. The gains were led by stocks that would stand to gain the most from a growing economy, including banks and industrial companies. The price of crude oil rose again, which helped energy companies.

Markets in Europe and Asia also rose. Bond yields rose slightly, another sign that pessimism was ebbing among investors.

Global cases near 6.3M, death toll tops 376K

Update 8 a.m. EDT June 2: The global death toll attributed to the novel coronavirus reached 376,077 early Tuesday, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally.

In the four months since the virus was first identified in Wuhan, China, it has infected at least 6,294,222 people worldwide. Meanwhile, 16 nations now have total infection counts higher than China’s 84,160.

The 10 nations with the highest number of infections recorded to date are as follows:

• The United States has reported 1,811,277 cases, resulting in 105,147 deaths.

• Brazil has recorded 526,447 cases, resulting in 29,937 deaths.

• Russia has confirmed 423,186 cases, resulting in 5,031 deaths.

• The United Kingdom has reported 277,738 cases, resulting in 39,127 deaths.

• Spain has confirmed 239,638 cases, resulting in 27,127 deaths.

• Italy has reported 233,197 cases, resulting in 33,475 deaths.

• India has reported 199,785 cases, resulting in 5,610 deaths.

• France has confirmed 189,348 cases, resulting in 28,836 deaths.

• Germany has reported 183,771 cases, resulting in 8,557 deaths.

• Peru has reported 170,039 cases, resulting in 4,634 deaths.

US air travel sees slight uptick as coronavirus restrictions ease

Update 7:04 a.m. EDT June 2: Air travel in the United States began crawling out of its coronavirus-imposed gridlock in May, but the road to recovery will be a long one.

According to the Transportation Security Administration, nearly 949,000 passengers were screened during the past weekend, compared with only 476,000 during the first weekend of May, CNN reported.

Trump administration’s coronavirus testing czar stepping down

Update 6:37 a.m. EDT June 2: Adm. Brett Giroir, the Trump administration’s coronavirus testing czar, announced Monday he will step down from the post June 30.

Giroir, who assumed the role in March, said during a Monday meeting of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS that he will return to his prior role as assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services, The Washington Post reported.

Meanwhile, an HHS spokesperson confirmed to NPR a testing czar successor will not be named for Giroir.

US coronavirus cases eclipse 1.8M, deaths top 105K

Update 12:41 a.m. EDT June 2: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States climbed past 1.8 million early Tuesday across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, there are at least 1,811,357 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 105,160 deaths. 

The hardest-hit states remain New York with 371,711 cases and 29,917 deaths and New Jersey with 160,918 cases and 11,723 deaths. Massachusetts, with 100,805 cases, has the third-highest number of deaths with 7,035, while Illinois has the third-highest number of cases with 121,234. Only 15 states and territories have confirmed fewer than 5,000 cases each.

Six other states have now confirmed at least 53,000 novel coronavirus cases each, including:

· California: 114,733 cases, resulting in 4,217 deaths

· Pennsylvania: 76,646 cases, resulting in 5,567 deaths

· Texas: 65,593 cases, resulting in 1,683 deaths

· Michigan: 57,532 cases, resulting in 5,516 deaths

· Florida: 56,830 cases, resulting in 2,460 deaths

· Maryland: 53,327 cases, resulting in 2,552 deaths

Meanwhile, Georgia, Virginia, Connecticut and Louisiana each has confirmed at least 40,000 cases; Ohio and Indiana each has confirmed at least 34,000 cases; North Carolina, Colorado, Minnesota, Tennessee, Washington and Arizona each has confirmed at least 20,000 cases, followed by Iowa with 19,699; Alabama and Wisconsin each has confirmed at least 18,000 cases, followed by Mississippi with 15,752; Rhode Island and Nebraska each has confirmed at least 14,000 cases, followed by Missouri with 13,724, South Carolina with 12,148 and Kentucky with 10,046; Utah, Kansas and Delaware each has confirmed at least 9,000 cases; the District of Columbia and Nevada each has confirmed at least 8,000 cases; New Mexico and Arkansas each has confirmed at least 7,000 cases, followed by Oklahoma with 6,913 and South Dakota with 5,034..

Click here to see CNN’s state-by-state breakdown.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Read More

News

  • The Chicago Blackhawks are bucking the trend of considering a name change. The NFL’s Redskins and the MLB’s Indians have both announced that they will consider changing the teams’ names and logos to something more culturally appropriate. But the Blackhawks will not. The name and image of a Native American warrior will be staying but the team’s officials said they will be “raising the bar even higher” to raise awareness of Native American culture. “The Chicago Blackhawks name and logo symbolizes an important and historic person, Black Hawk of Illinois’ Sac & Fox Nation, whose leadership and life has inspired generations of Native Americans, veterans and the public,” the team said in a statement according to the Chicago Sun-Times. Team officials said they have worked with Native American groups “by offering ongoing reverent examples of Native American culture, traditions and contributions, providing a platform for genuine dialogue.” While the team won’t be changing its name, it does not discount the decisions of other professional sports teams to reevaluate their names and logos, The Associated Press reported. “We recognize there is a fine line between respect and disrespect, and we commend other teams for their willingness to engage in that conversation,” the team said. The hockey team honors Native Americans with pregame and intermission events, the Sun-Times reported. But there have been some Native American groups that have said the name and logo continue racist stereotypes. The Blackhawks, known as the Black Hawks, joined the NHL in March 1926 and was named by the owner Frederic McLaughlin after the unit he served with in World War I – the Blackhawk Division of the 86th Infantry, WMAQ reported. The NHL season has been suspended due to coronavirus, but training camps are set to start July 13 with games resuming Aug. 1, the NHL announced Monday.
  • A Texas boy is recovering after he was struck by gunfire twice in two separate drive-by shootings that happened just days apart. According to WOAI-TV, the shootings occurred late Saturday and early Tuesday at the same home on West Viola Avenue in Yakima, authorities said. In the first shooting, an 11-year-old boy suffered a gunshot wound to the leg, Yakima police said in a news release. In the second, the same boy was shot in the leg once, while his 9-year-old sister was shot in the leg twice, according to the release. The children were taken to a nearby hospital and released after receiving treatment, authorities said. In a statement, Yakima police Chief Matt Murray called the incidents 'heart-wrenching and alarming.' “The Police Department’s top priority is the reduction of violent crime – and these incidents are a glaring example of why,” Murray said. “But this is a community issue, and we need the community’s help to solve it and prevent further violence.” Authorities have not announced any arrests in the case. If you have information about the shootings, you can submit a tip anonymously by calling Crime Stoppers at 1-800-248-9980. Read more here or here.
  • Gov. Brian Kemp has asked the federal government to send more resources to expand COVID-19 testing in Gwinnett County and to renew funds needed to keep the National Guard staffing testing sites around the state. Kemp on Tuesday asked for help getting personal protective equipment like masks and gloves for the state’s first responders and essential workers and an extension in funding for the Georgia National Guard, which has been performing COVID-19 testing and sanitizing long-term care homes during the pandemic. In addition to sustaining the ongoing federal coronavirus assistance, Kemp is seeking additional funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to increase Gwinnett’s testing infrastructure, a spokesman said. Gwinnett has seen a surge in positive COVID-19 tests since mid-May, with 9,666 total as of July 6, according to the Gwinnett, Newton and Rockdale County Health Departments. Members of a federal COVID-19 response team visited Gwinnett County last week and are expected to compile a report detailing how spread could be further prevented. That report will be given to local health officials. >>Read MORE on AJC.com.
  • A driver died Wednesday morning after a fiery crash on a major interstate in Gwinnett County.  The wreck, which involved a truck and an SUV, happened about 1:30 a.m. on I-85 at Jimmy Carter Boulevard, according to Gwinnett police spokeswoman Cpl. Michele Pihera.  The truck caught fire after the crash, and the driver had to be freed from the vehicle, she said.  A Gwinnett police officer was injured during the rescue effort, according to Pihera. The officer was checked out at a hospital and released.  One driver died on the way to a hospital, Pihera said. It is not clear which vehicle that person was driving.  No details were released about the second driver’s condition. — Return HERE for updates from The Atlanta Journal Constitution.
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