BREAKING NEWS:

Atlanta to mandate face masks to contain coronavirus.

On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

cloudy-day
79°
Chance of T-storms
H 86° L 70°
  • cloudy-day
    79°
    Current Conditions
    Chance of T-storms. H 86° L 70°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    86°
    Today
    Chance of T-storms. H 86° L 70°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    88°
    Tomorrow
    Chance of T-storms. H 88° L 72°
Listen
Pause
Error

News on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Coronavirus updates: Japan expected to lift Tokyo’s state of emergency Monday

More than 5.3 million people worldwide -- including more than 1.6 million in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. While efforts to contain the COVID-19 outbreak continue, states have begun to shift their focus toward reopening their economies.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here.

Live updates for Sunday, May 24, continue below:

Japan expected to lift Tokyo’s state of emergency Monday

Update 11:46 p.m. EDT May 24: Japan is expected to end a state of emergency in Tokyo and four other prefectures Monday.

Economy Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura asked experts to lift the measure that was put in place about six weeks ago at a special task force meeting allowing businesses to gradually reopen.

“It appears the measure is no longer needed in all of the prefectures,” Nishimura said.

Japan’s state of emergency is soft and largely a request for people to stay at home and for non-essential businesses to close or operate shorter hours.

Experts are expected to give their approval. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe would then make an official announcement later Monday.

Japan has 16,580 confirmed cases and 830 deaths, according to the health ministry.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Millions of students return to schools in Australia Monday

Update 9:16 p.m. EDT May 24: Millions of students will return to classrooms Monday as school resumes in the Australian states of New South Wales and Queensland.

Schools in the less populous Western Australia, South Australia and Northern Territory had already reopened as cases throughout the country continue to drop.

Students in Victoria, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory are expected to return to classrooms in stages in June.

Safety precautions are still in place. Schools can not have assemblies or field trips.

New South Wales has recorded 50 of the country’s 102 deaths. Queensland has recorded six deaths. South Australia and the Northern Territory also have no active cases. The Australian Capital Territory has not had a case in three weeks.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

White House tightens travel restrictions with Brazil

Update 6:00 p.m. EDT May 24: Travelers who have been in Brazil for the 14 days preceding their arrival to the U.S. are barred entry to the country, the White House announced Sunday.

"I have determined that it is in the interests of the United States to take action to restrict and suspend the entry into the United States, as immigrants or nonimmigrants, of all aliens who were physically present within the Federative Republic of Brazil during the 14-day period preceding their entry or attempted entry into the United States," President Donald Trump said in the proclamation.

The restrictions are intended to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

There are 347,398 confirmed cases and 22,013 deaths from the coronavirus in Brazil, according to Johns Hopkins tracking information.

“Today’s action will help ensure foreign nationals who have been in Brazil do not become a source of additional infections in our country,” White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany said, CNN reported. “These new restrictions do not apply to the flow of commerce between the United States and Brazil.”

The White House had already banned travel from the United Kingdom, Europe and China, other countries hard hit by the virus.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Spain prepares to open some beaches Monday

Update 4:50 p.m. EDT May 24: Spain will open some beaches for sunbathing in Madrid and Barcelona Monday as part of the country’s easing of coronavirus-related restrictions.

Bars and restaurants will also open at 50% capacity with outdoor seating available for customers.

The two cities account for more than 15,000 of the country’s 28,752 deaths from the coronavirus. Health officials said 70 people died from the virus in the last 24 hours. In March at the height of the outbreak, more than 900 people a day died from the coronavirus in Spain.

Travel between regions is prohibited until late June. International travel will not be allowed until July.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

FDA commissioner warns pandemic ‘not yet contained’

Update 12:52 p.m. EDT May 24: Stephen Hahn, the commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, warned Americans observing Memorial Day weekend to follow federal guidelines aimed at curbing the spread of the coronavirus, saying it “is not yet contained.”

“With the country starting to open up this holiday weekend, I again remind everyone that the coronavirus is not yet contained. It is up to every individual to protect themselves and their community," Hahn tweeted. “Social distancing, hand washing and wearing masks protect us all."

Boris Johnson says UK schools to begin reopening June 1

Update 12:52 p.m. EDT May 24: Schools in the United Kingdom will start to reopen June 1, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said at his daily briefing.

“In line with the approach being taken in many other countries, we want to start taking our children back into the classroom, in a way that is as manageable and as safe as possible,” Johnson told reporters. “We said we would begin with early years’ settings and reception, year one, and year six in primary schools.”

“We then intend from June 15 for secondary schools to provide some contact for year 10 and year 12 students to help them to prepare for exams next year, with up to a quarter of these students in at any point."

Johnson said schools would need to reduce the size of classes, have staggered breaks and lunch, and staggered 

pickup and drop-off of students.

Cuomo: Pro sports in New York can begin training camps

Update 12:43 p.m. EDT May 24: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said professional sports teams in New York can open their training camps.

“Starting today, all the New York professional sports leagues will be able to begin training camps," Cuomo said during his daily news conference. “I believe that sports that can come back without having people in the stadium, without having people in the arena, do it. Do it. Work out the economics, if you can. We want you up. We people to be able to watch sports to the extent people are still staying home. It gives people something to do. It’s a return to normalcy.”

Crowds at Missouri tourist spot ignore social distancing

Update 11:37 a.m. EDT May 24: Large crowds of vacationers were caught on video ignoring social distancing guidelines as they reveled in bars, pools and yacht clubs, The Washington Post reported.

The lack of social distancing occurred at the Lake of the Ozarks over the weekend, the newspaper reported. One photograph shared by KSDK showed dozens of people crowded at an outdoor patio beneath a sign reading, “Please practice social distancing.”

Police: Crowds larger than normal in Daytona Beach, Florida

Update 10:30 a.m. EDT May 24: Crowds gathering in Florida’s Daytona Beach were “larger than normal” on Saturday, the Daytona Beach Police Department, tweeted Saturday.

“You may have seen larger than normal crowds this evening, both on the beach side, and on Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune Blvd,” the department said in its tweet.

The night was not incident-free however. Daytona Beach police said two people were injured Saturday evening in a shooting that happened at a convenience store near the boardwalk. WFTV reported.

The night was not incident-free however. Daytona Beach police said two people were injured Saturday evening in a shooting that happened at a convenience store near the boardwalk. WFTV reported.

The two people shot had non-life-threatening injuries, police said.

White House adviser: Unemployment will top 20% in May

Update 10:08 a.m. EDT May 24: White House economic adviser Kevin Hassett said he believes the nation’s unemployment rate will top 20% for the month of May.

Hassett told CNN said he expects the rate will be even higher in June, but “should start to trend down,” after taht.

Hassett thinks it is possible that the unemployment rate could still be in double digits in November.

“I think that, yes, unemployment will be something that moves back slower," Hassett said on CNN’s “State of the Union” program. “I think it could be better than that. But you’re going to be starting at a number in the 20s and working your way down. And so of course you could still not be back to full employment by September or October. Again if there were a vaccine in July, then I would be way more optimistic about it.”

NSA chief says travel restrictions to Brazil likely

Update 9:20 a.m. EDT May 24: National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien said the Trump administration is likely to announce new travel restrictions to and from Brazil.

O’Brien, during an interview on CBS’ “Face the Nation,” said the administration is likely to make a decision about restricting travel to Brazil on Sunday and said White House officials “hope that will be temporary.”

He said the White House would “take a look at the other countries on a country by country basis” in that region.

Jerusalem’s Church of the Holy Sepulchre reopens

Update 6:55 a.m. EDT May 24: Jerusalem’s Church of the Holy Sepulchre, one of Christianity’s holiest sites, reopened Sunday, The Washington Post reported.

The church, which closed several months ago for the first time since the 14th century, allowed 50 people at a time to visit the church, the newspaper reported. Visitors were required to wear masks and maintain a 6-foot distance from one another.

“From this Holy Place, in this Easter time, we continue our prayers, asking for the end of this pandemic,” the leaders of the Greek Orthodox, Catholic and Armenian Orthodox churches in Jerusalem said in a statement Saturday. The churches share custody of the site, the Post

UK lawmaker calls for Boris Johnson’s aide to resign

Update 6:47 a.m. EDT May 24: A growing number of Conservative Party lawmakers are calling for Dominic Cummings, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s top aide, to resign.

“Enough is enough,” Steve Baker wrote in an editorial for The Critic website. “Dominic Cummings must go before he does any more harm to the UK, the Government, the Prime Minister, our institutions or the Conservative Party.”

Several newspapers in the United Kingdom reported that Cummings made a second trip from London to Durham during the coronavirus lockdown. But Johnson’s office on Downing Street refuted the allegations, saying in s statement that “We will not waste our time answering a stream of false allegations about Mr. Cummings from campaigning newspapers.”

Other Conservatives agreed with Baiker, taking to Twitter to voice their displeasure.

Roger Gale tweeted that Cummings’ position “is no longer tenable”

Caroline Nokes tweeted “there cannot be one rule for most of us and wriggle room for others”

Craig Whittaker tweeted that “you cannot advise the nation one thing then do the opposite”

US coronavirus cases top 1.6M, deaths inch closer to 100K

Update 12:05 a.m. EDT May 23: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States surged past 1.6 million early Saturday across all 50 states, the District of ColumbiaPuerto RicoGuam and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, there are at least 1,622,612 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 97,087 deaths.

The hardest-hit states remain New York with 359,926 cases and 28,926 deaths and New Jersey with 153,140 cases and 11,082 deaths. Massachusetts, with 90,889 cases, has the third-highest number of deaths with 6,228, while Illinois has the third-highest number of cases with 105,444. Only 16 states and territories have confirmed fewer than 5,000 cases each.

Seven other states have now confirmed at least 41,000 novel coronavirus cases each, including:

• California: 90,778 cases, resulting in 3,672 deaths

• Pennsylvania: 70,784 cases, resulting in 5,100 deaths

• Michigan: 54,395 cases, resulting in 5,224 deaths

• Texas: 53,584 cases, resulting in 1,470 deaths

• Florida: 50,127 cases, resulting in 2,233 deaths

• Maryland: 45,495 cases, resulting in 2,243 deaths

• Georgia: 42,139 cases, resulting in 1,817 deaths

Meanwhile, ConnecticutLouisianaVirginiaOhio and Indiana each has confirmed at least 30,000 cases; Colorado and North Carolina each has confirmed more than 22,000 cases; TennesseeWashington and Minnesota each has confirmed at least 19,000 cases; Iowa and Arizona both have confirmed more than 16,000 cases; Wisconsin has 14,877 cases; Rhode IslandAlabama and Mississippi each has confirmed at least 13,000 cases; Missouri and Nebraska each has confirmed at least 11,000 cases, followed by South Carolina with 9,638; KansasDelawareKentucky and Utah each has confirmed at least 8,000 cases; the District of Columbia and Nevada each has confirmed at least 7,000 cases, followed by New Mexico with 6,625; Oklahoma and Arkansas each has confirmed at least 5,000 cases.

Click here to see CNN’s state-by-state breakdown.

Read More

News

  • We know staying home has been the main way to stay safe during the coronavirus pandemic, but which activities are safe and which are the riskiest? Can you still run to the store, have a barbecue or attend a celebration? Doctors with the Texas Medical Association have developed a chart that ranks the risks involved in various outings. The lowest risk according to the medical professionals is opening the mail. The highest risk -- going to a bar. The group said the rankings were compiled by experts from the Texas Medical Association’s COVID-19 Task Force and the group’s Committee on Infectious Diseases, with the assumption that people who are participating are wearing a mask. Fourteen doctors were on the committee that made the list, KTVT reported. It was developed to help put the information that was available into one easy-to-understand presentation, KEYE reported. “People will have to decide what risk they think is reasonable for themselves and their families to take in order to live life,” Dr. Erica Swegler, a member of the taskforce, told KEYE. While the chart may be handy to gauge risk, the medical association said the best thing to do is, “stay home if possible, wear a mask and maintain at least 6 feet of distance when they have to go out, and practice safe hand hygiene,” KXAN reported.
  • The Chicago Blackhawks are bucking the trend of considering a name change. The NFL’s Redskins and the MLB’s Indians have both announced that they will consider changing the teams’ names and logos to something more culturally appropriate. But the Blackhawks will not. The name and image of a Native American warrior will be staying but the team’s officials said they will be “raising the bar even higher” to raise awareness of Native American culture. “The Chicago Blackhawks name and logo symbolizes an important and historic person, Black Hawk of Illinois’ Sac & Fox Nation, whose leadership and life has inspired generations of Native Americans, veterans and the public,” the team said in a statement according to the Chicago Sun-Times. Team officials said they have worked with Native American groups “by offering ongoing reverent examples of Native American culture, traditions and contributions, providing a platform for genuine dialogue.” While the team won’t be changing its name, it does not discount the decisions of other professional sports teams to reevaluate their names and logos, The Associated Press reported. “We recognize there is a fine line between respect and disrespect, and we commend other teams for their willingness to engage in that conversation,” the team said. The hockey team honors Native Americans with pregame and intermission events, the Sun-Times reported. But there have been some Native American groups that have said the name and logo continue racist stereotypes. The Blackhawks, known as the Black Hawks, joined the NHL in March 1926 and was named by the owner Frederic McLaughlin after the unit he served with in World War I – the Blackhawk Division of the 86th Infantry, WMAQ reported. The NHL season has been suspended due to coronavirus, but training camps are set to start July 13 with games resuming Aug. 1, the NHL announced Monday.
  • A Texas boy is recovering after he was struck by gunfire twice in two separate drive-by shootings that happened just days apart. According to WOAI-TV, the shootings occurred late Saturday and early Tuesday at the same home on West Viola Avenue in Yakima, authorities said. In the first shooting, an 11-year-old boy suffered a gunshot wound to the leg, Yakima police said in a news release. In the second, the same boy was shot in the leg once, while his 9-year-old sister was shot in the leg twice, according to the release. The children were taken to a nearby hospital and released after receiving treatment, authorities said. In a statement, Yakima police Chief Matt Murray called the incidents 'heart-wrenching and alarming.' “The Police Department’s top priority is the reduction of violent crime – and these incidents are a glaring example of why,” Murray said. “But this is a community issue, and we need the community’s help to solve it and prevent further violence.” Authorities have not announced any arrests in the case. If you have information about the shootings, you can submit a tip anonymously by calling Crime Stoppers at 1-800-248-9980. Read more here or here.
  • Gov. Brian Kemp has asked the federal government to send more resources to expand COVID-19 testing in Gwinnett County and to renew funds needed to keep the National Guard staffing testing sites around the state. Kemp on Tuesday asked for help getting personal protective equipment like masks and gloves for the state’s first responders and essential workers and an extension in funding for the Georgia National Guard, which has been performing COVID-19 testing and sanitizing long-term care homes during the pandemic. In addition to sustaining the ongoing federal coronavirus assistance, Kemp is seeking additional funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to increase Gwinnett’s testing infrastructure, a spokesman said. Gwinnett has seen a surge in positive COVID-19 tests since mid-May, with 9,666 total as of July 6, according to the Gwinnett, Newton and Rockdale County Health Departments. Members of a federal COVID-19 response team visited Gwinnett County last week and are expected to compile a report detailing how spread could be further prevented. That report will be given to local health officials. >>Read MORE on AJC.com.
  • A driver died Wednesday morning after a fiery crash on a major interstate in Gwinnett County.  The wreck, which involved a truck and an SUV, happened about 1:30 a.m. on I-85 at Jimmy Carter Boulevard, according to Gwinnett police spokeswoman Cpl. Michele Pihera.  The truck caught fire after the crash, and the driver had to be freed from the vehicle, she said.  A Gwinnett police officer was injured during the rescue effort, according to Pihera. The officer was checked out at a hospital and released.  One driver died on the way to a hospital, Pihera said. It is not clear which vehicle that person was driving.  No details were released about the second driver’s condition. — Return HERE for updates from The Atlanta Journal Constitution.
  • About a dozen American flags lined up along Highland Avenue in Needham, Massachusetts, were burned Sunday night, according to police. A dozen more flags set on the lawn near the Exchange Club were found destroyed, as well. According to Boston's WFXT, the flags have been replaced, but the ashes are still scattered along the grass. Longtime Needham resident Kate Robey takes it upon herself to display the flags on Highland Avenue during patriotic holidays. “I think everyone appreciates it. I get honks and the waves and the thank-yous,” Robey said. But this Fourth of July, the flags were vandalized. “Dedicated people put those out and to just burn them, nonchalantly, it’s hurtful,” said Robey. Robey has been working with the Needham VFW for years and has displayed these flags in the same parts of town for almost a decade now. She’s left confused and wondering why someone would vandalize her tribute to the men and women serving the country. “As I do the flags, I think of the veterans, fallen brave and the military out there fighting for our freedom now,” Robey said. Robey said about a dozen were burned by Memorial Park and a dozen more burned outside the Needham Exchange Club, where 500 flags were displayed in lieu of a scaled-back Fourth of July celebration. “I don’t mind what you do at your home with your flags, but these flags are my flags, and it’s vandalism,” Robey said. Police said they are investigating the matter.