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    Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bennet said Monday he wants to commit $1 trillion for underwriting research and projects to address climate change, set aside about one-third of U.S. lands and ocean territory for conservation and reach net-zero U.S. emissions by midcentury. His campaign's climate plan also would require utilities to offer consumers green-energy options as the Colorado senator joined two rivals for the 2020 nomination, former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, who already have released detailed proposals on the issue. Bennet's timetable of net-zero emissions no later than 2050 is longer than some activists have called for, but he said it was realistic and in line with what scientists say is needed. In a nod toward a possible tighter time frame, Bennet said the federal government would fund a 'climate challenge' and pay states that reduce emissions by 2030. Bennet said he tried to design the plan so any subsequent Republican administrations could not easily overturn his actions. 'You cannot put in a set of policies for two years and have them ripped out for another two years,' Bennet told reporters. 'The most important thing we have to do is build a broad constituency to take on climate change.' To do that and protect against the GOP reversing his policies, Bennet focuses on agriculture by creating an agency to finance innovative projects intended to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and by increasing incentives for farmers to use zero-emission energy.
  • An internal Education Department watchdog says Secretary Betsy DeVos has sometimes used personal email accounts for government business and did not always save the messages properly. The agency's Office of Inspector General released a report Monday finding 'limited' instances in which DeVos sent work emails from four personal accounts. Investigators say they found fewer than 100 emails to or from DeVos' personal accounts on the department's email system, and found no evidence of 'active or extensive' use of her personal accounts. But they found that the emails, which should have been forwarded to her government account, 'were not always being properly preserved.' The report says many of the emails were from people congratulating DeVos on her 2017 confirmation or offering staffing recommendations. House Democrats requested the review in October 2017.
  • A proposal that would grant Congress access to New York state tax returns filed by President Donald Trump has been revised to address concerns that it could jeopardize the privacy of anyone who files a return in the state. Assemblyman David Buchwald, D-Westchester County, submitted an amendment to his bill this weekend to make it apply only to federal, state and local elected officials and companies in which they have significant ownership. Under a bill approved by the state Senate, state tax officials could release any New York returns if requested by any of three congressional committees. Republicans objected on privacy grounds, but Democrats argued the bill would help Congress circumvent the administration's refusal to hand over Trump's federal returns. The Assembly could pass the amended proposal this week. The Senate must also approve the change.
  • From liberal firebrands Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren to moderates Joe Biden and John Hickenlooper, nearly the entire 2020 Democratic presidential field agrees that the federal minimum wage should be more than doubled, to $15 an hour. That near-unanimity reflects the success of an unorthodox campaign by the Service Employees International Union called the Fight for 15. It launched in 2012 to help nonunion McDonald's workers who walked off their jobs as cooks and servers agitate for a then-unthinkable $15 minimum wage. Now, according to the National Employment Law Project, one-third of the country will have a $15 minimum wage as gradual increases in bedrock Democratic states like California, Illinois and New York kick in over the coming years. Ernie Tedeschi, an analyst at Evercore ISI, calculated the de facto national minimum wage at a historic high of $12 an hour when accounting for a flurry of recent city and statewide increases . Officially, the federal minimum wage is still $7.25 an hour. Other than the sudden jump on wages and its hold in the Democratic primary, the Fight for 15 is also showcasing a different form of labor organizing as traditional union membership has dwindled. 'The labor movement is reinventing themselves as a new civil rights movement by helping workers in ways beyond collective bargaining,' said Gary Chaison, an industrial relations professor at Clark University in Massachusetts. 'This may be the last national political contest for the unions. A loss means the loss of relevancy as a workplace voice, and a win means a new purpose for the unions, outside of collective bargaining.' Still, unions also need dues-paying members, and the movement is redoubling its efforts this week to pressure McDonald's into letting its workers unionize. Democratic presidential aspirants like New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee will join workers on picket lines this week, and Sanders will host a video town hall with employees of the fast-food giant who will protest outside the company's board meeting in Dallas on Thursday. 'That's the lynchpin of the thing that we're asking elected officials to respond to,' said Mary Kay Henry, SEIU's president, who has been demanding that presidential aspirants also detail how they'll make it easier for workers to join unions. 'We're trying to make a demand for a union about having a seat at the table that allows workers to be able to have a say in how decisions are made.' That may not be easy. McDonalds has argued that whether to allow unions is a decision for the franchisees who own the restaurants and employ the workers, not for the corporation. Labor groups worry that the new Republican-appointed majority on the National Labor Relations Board will prevent unions from forcing McDonald's to bargain for those employees. The tight job market has led some companies like Amazon and Target to offer a $15 minimum wage. But even though the $15 minimum wage has largely unified the Democratic presidential hopefuls — only technology entrepreneur Andrew Yang opposes it, arguing he'd rather have the government pay people directly — a bill to implement a national wage at that level is stalled in the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives. Democratic moderates worry it would be an economic shock to areas that don't already have high wages. A few booming cities like Seattle and San Francisco have already hit a $15 minimum wage, and evidence on the impact is mixed, with some studies showing that higher wages are boosting local economies but others following the traditional patterns that economists warn about with minimum wage hikes — that they can lead to fewer jobs by raising business payroll costs. 'If $15 is causing speed bumps in San Francisco, what does it mean in Sioux Falls?' asked Michael Saltsman of the Employment Policies Institute, a conservative think tank in Washington, D.C., that opposes the higher wage. 'We will get to the end of 2020, and $15 will be a largely blue state phenomenon.' Kansas City, Missouri, in 2015 passed a law to gradually raise its minimum wage to $13 an hour. But Missouri's GOP-led state legislature passed a law forbidding cities and counties from raising the minimum wage on their own, forcing the Kansas City measure's repeal. Terrence Wise, a 39-year-old McDonald's shift supervisor who earns $11 an hour, recounted the story at a recent Democratic presidential candidate forum in Las Vegas that was co-sponsored by SEIU. At the forum, California Sen. Kamala Harris said that, as president, she'd call the leadership of McDonald's to urge them to remove obstacles to unionization. Harris and other candidates including Castro, Hickenlooper, Warren and former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke spoke about the need to support unions and restock the NLRB with pro-labor members. Wise has three children and normally works a second job to help pay the bills. He said that he used an online tool from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to determine what an adequate wage in his neighborhood would be to raise a family and found it was $22 an hour. But there are few good options around. 'When I ride down my block to work, I see McDonald's, Pizza Hut, Taco Bell,' Wise said in an interview. 'We've got to make our bad jobs good jobs.
  • The Supreme Court is leaving in place a ruling for a California museum in a dispute over ownership of two German Renaissance masterpieces seized by the Nazis in World War II. The high court on Monday declined to get involved in the case, leaving in place lower court rulings. A federal appeals court ruled in 2018 for Pasadena's Norton Simon Museum of Art, blocking a lawsuit over ownership of 'Adam' and 'Eve.' The paintings are by Lucas Cranach the Elder. Marei von Saher sued over the works. They were taken by Nazis in a forced sale from her father-in-law, a Jewish art dealer in the Netherlands. After the war, the Dutch government sold the paintings. The museum acquired them in 1971. A Dutch court previously ruled against von Saher.
  • The Supreme Court on Monday sided with a member of the Crow tribe who was fined for hunting elk in Wyoming's Bighorn National Forest, giving him a good chance to get a more than $8,000 fine against him overturned. The case the justices decided 5-4 is a win for Clayvin Herrera and his tribe, which had argued they continued to have hunting rights in the forest. Herrera's case began in 2014 when he went hunting with family. The group began on the Crow tribe's reservation in southern Montana but crossed into the neighboring Bighorn National Forest in Wyoming, where they killed several elk. Soon after, a game warden saw photos Herrera posted on a bragging website for hunters, including one of him crouched in the snow behind an elk he shot and another with its antlers balanced on his shoulders. The game warden ultimately identified the area where the photos were taken in the Bighorn National Forrest, and Herrera was cited for killing an elk there during the winter, when it is prohibited. But Herrera, backed by the federal government, argued that when his tribe gave up land in present-day Montana and Wyoming under an 1868 treaty, the tribe retained the right to hunt on the land, including land that became Wyoming's Bighorn National Forest. The state of Wyoming had argued that the Crow tribe's hunting rights ceased to exist after Wyoming became a state in 1890 or after Bighorn National Forest was established in 1897. But the Supreme Court disagreed, with Justice Neil Gorsuch joining his four liberal colleagues — justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan — in ruling for Herrera. The court's four other justices said they would have ruled that a prior case settled that Crow tribe members like Herrera don't have an unrestricted right to hunt and fish in the Bighorn National Forest and are subject to the game laws of Wyoming. The ruling does not immediately resolve the issue of Herrera's fine. The Supreme Court said in sending the case back to lower courts that the state can argue that it can regulate hunting by Crow tribe members if it is necessary for wildlife conservation. The state can also try to argue that the tribe's treaty rights didn't extend to the specific area of Bighorn National Forest where he was hunting. But Herrera's lawyers have argued that the location where he was hunting was covered by the treaty and have said data shows that elk are overpopulated in the state. The state can pursue the case or drop it. Wyoming's attorney general did not immediately respond to a request for comment. George Hicks, an attorney for Herrera, said in a statement that his lawyers were gratified by the court's ruling. The case is Herrera v. Wyoming, 17-532.
  • The Supreme Court said Monday that a judge must decide whether a dispute between drugmaker Merck and patients who alleged they were injured by its bone-strengthening drug Fosamax can go forward. All nine justices agreed that the case should go back to a lower court for further proceedings. The case is at an early stage, and the justices said the question of whether it can move forward should be decided by a judge, not a jury. Users of Fosamax, which is prescribed to treat osteoporosis in women who have gone through menopause, had sued arguing that Merck had failed to provide adequate warnings on the drug's label. A trial court initially threw out claims against the New Jersey-based company but an appeals court revived them. The Supreme Court did not answer whether the case should move forward. Instead, it explained that if a judge finds clear evidence Merck told federal regulators about the reasons for a warning and that warning was rejected by regulators, the case should be dismissed. Only three justices — Justice Samuel Alito, Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Brett Kavanaugh — suggested that was the case. Fosamax was first approved in 1995, but after the drug went on the market, evidence began to emerge that it increases the risk of an unusual type of thigh-bone fracture. In 2008, the FDA said it was concerned about reports of those fractures in Fosamax users and users of similar drugs. In response, Merck proposed changing Fosamax's label. The FDA agreed Merck should alert users by changing the 'adverse reaction' section of Fosamax's label. But the FDA rejected Merck's proposed changes to the label's more serious 'warnings' section. At the same time, the FDA began studying the issue, and in 2010 the FDA decided to require Merck to add a warning about the fractures to Fosamax's label. Hundreds of people ultimately sued Merck, alleging they'd sustained Fosamax-related thigh-bone fractures and arguing that Merck had failed to provide adequate warnings on the drug's label. The Trump administration had sided with Merck, arguing that the company couldn't have added a warning before 2010 because the FDA determined the available evidence didn't support a change before then. The case is Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. v. Albrecht, 17-290.
  • President Donald Trump is insisting he didn't borrow from many banks because he 'didn't need the money,' not because they wouldn't do business with him. Trump's tweets Monday appear to be in response to New York Times reporting that Deutsche Bank anti-money laundering specialists recommended that multiple transactions associated with Trump and his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, be flagged to federal authorities. Bank executives rejected that advice. The Times and others have reported that the bank was the 'only mainstream financial institution consistently willing to do business' with Trump due to his repeated defaults. Two House committees have subpoenaed Deutsche Bank and other financial institutions as part of their investigations into Trump's finances. Trump, his family and the Trump Organization have filed a lawsuit to try to stop them from complying.
  • Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan, the first Republican in Congress to accuse President Donald Trump of impeachable conduct, is facing a primary challenge. Second-term state Rep. Jim Lower (LOW'-ur) announced Monday he's running for the western Michigan seat. The announcement came two days after Amash sent a series of tweets , concluding that special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election reveals Trump 'engaged in specific actions and a pattern of behavior that meet the threshold for impeachment.' The 30-year-old Lower, of Greenville, says he made the announcement earlier than planned after Amash attacked Trump. Lower calls himself a 'pro-Trump, pro-life, pro-jobs, pro-Second Amendment, pro-family values Republican.' Another Republican, Army National Guard veteran Tom Norton, announced last month he is running. Amash was first elected in 2010 and overcame a 2014 primary challenge.
  • Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris is unveiling a pay inequity proposal that aims to close the gender pay gap by holding corporations accountable when men are paid more than women. Harris' plan would require companies to disclose pay policies while applying for a mandatory 'Equal Pay Certification' from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Companies that fail to achieve certification would be fined 1% of their profits for every 1% wage gap they allow to persist for work of equal value. The U.S. senator from California says $180 billion would be generated over 10 years, with fines decreasing over time as companies strengthen their equal pay practices. 'Kamala Harris has a simple message for corporations: Pay women fairly or pay the price,' her campaign said in announcing the plan Monday, noting that the burden has been on workers to hold corporations accountable for pay discrimination. 'We've let corporations hide their wage gaps, but forced women to stand up in court just to get the pay they've earned. It's time to flip the script and finally hold corporations accountable for pay inequality in America,' the campaign said. The equal pay plan is the latest proposal from Harris, who has been seeking a break-out moment in a crowded field of Democrats seeking the party's nomination. Earlier, she outlined a plan that would raise pay for teachers nationwide, and she has also focused on housing affordability. However, she has lagged behind Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren , who has been the policy pace-setter among the Democratic field. In Harris's equal-pay plan, the campaign says, companies would be prohibited from asking about prior salary history as part of their hiring process, banned from using forced arbitration agreements in employment contracts for pay discrimination matters, and would be required to allow employees to freely discuss their pay. They would also be required to report the share of women who are among the company's top earners, the total pay and total compensation gap that exists between men and women, regardless of job titles, experience and performance. All federal contractors will be required to achieve Equal Pay Certification within two years of Harris taking office, her campaign says. If they do not, they will be barred from competing for contracts valued at more than $500,000.

News

  • An truck driver based in Euclid, Ohio, is accused of causing the deaths of four people lastThursday afternoon in a fiery interstate crash in McDonough, Georgia. On Monday, authorities announced charges against the driver, 39-year-old Mohabe McCoy, since all four victims had been identified. He is facing charges of second-degree homicide by vehicle, a misdemeanor, improper turn and driving too fast for conditions. >> Read more trending news  The victim’s bodies were badly burned when McCoy’s tractor-trailer slammed into the back of their Chevrolet pickup truck on I-75, according to officials with the Henry County Police Department. The pickup truck, which was hauling pine straw, was pushed into the back of another tractor-trailer and went up in flames.  The victims were identified as Jose Ibarra Yanez, 42, Jaime Sanchez, 26, Fermin Sanchez, 20, and Juana Adaliris Ortiz-Martinez, 31. The three men and woman were from Dublin, Georgia.  The crash happened around 12:15 p.m. Thursday. At the time, northbound traffic was lagging after another crash on I-75 shut down the interstate before the I-675 interchange. Video from a nearby car dealership obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution shows the first tractor-trailer slowed before an exit, and the pickup truck followed suit. McCoy’s tractor-trailer, which was hauling potatoes, did not appear to slow down before plowing into the back of the truck in the video. McCoy was arrested Thursday evening after he was checked out at Atlanta Medical Center. He is being held Monday in the Henry County Jail in lieu of a $10,000 bond. 
  • A married Georgia police officer appeared in court with black eyes last week for his first court appearance in the homicide of his girlfriend, a paramedic who was found shot to death May 11 in her home.  William Leonard Talley, 51, is charged with murder, possession of a firearm during the commission of a crime and a violation of his oath as a public officer, according to Muscogee County Jail records. A judge on Saturday ordered Talley, a sergeant with the Columbus Police Department, be held without bond on the murder charge.  Talley, a married father of two teenage daughters, is accused of shooting Kelly Susanne Levinsohn, 44, inside her home. He was arrested in neighboring Harris County after crashing Levinsohn’s truck on Interstate 185, The Columbus Ledger-Enquirer reported.  The longtime police officer, who was left in critical condition in the crash, was hospitalized at Piedmont Columbus Regional Hospital for five days before being released Thursday and booked into the jail.  His attorney, Jennifer Curry, told the Ledger-Enquirer that Talley is being housed away from the general population while he continues to recover from his injuries. Curry said Talley, a police officer since 2002, would be at risk among fellow inmates he helped put behind bars.  Curry on Saturday waived her client’s preliminary hearing and entered a not guilty verdict on his behalf.  “Our goal today really was to protect families on both sides, especially Mr. Talley’s children,” Curry told the newspaper. “They didn’t ask for this, so I’m trying to respect their privacy.” Talley’s wife was among the scant number of people in the courtroom Saturday. Despite his marital status, Columbus police officials have characterized Levinsohn’s death as the result of a domestic situation. They have not confirmed a romantic relationship between her and her alleged killer, though some of Levinsohn’s neighbors told WTVM in Columbus that the pair had been dating for more than a year.  Curry declined to comment Saturday on the nature of her client’s relationship with Levinsohn, the Ledger-Enquirer reported.  “Again, my goal today was to protect his two daughters,” Curry said. “I’m hoping that both families have time to understand what happened and come to terms with where we’re at now.” Columbus police officials said officers were called to Levinsohn’s home around 8 p.m. Saturday by an unidentified caller who told 911 dispatchers someone had been injured or killed in the home. The caller identified the suspect in the slaying as an officer with the department.  The caller met officers at Levinsohn’s home and told them the suspect had been in a car crash in Harris County, the Ledger-Enquirer reported. Officers went inside the home, where they found Levinsohn dead of a single gunshot wound.  They also found the paramedic’s vehicle to be missing, the newspaper said.  Columbus police Chief Ricky Boren told the Ledger-Enquirer that investigators recovered a gun believed to be the murder weapon. It was not a department-issued weapon, Boren said.  Talley, a patrol sergeant and SWAT team member, is on leave without pay pending a resolution of the case, the newspaper said.  Clark Rowell, who lives across the street from the crime scene, told WTVM his neighbor’s relationship with Talley was not always a peaceful one.  “One time, they had a bad argument out there on the front porch,” Rowell told the news station. “He went to the door, she opened it up and she wouldn’t let him in.” Rowell said after Levinsohn slammed the door on him, Talley “stomped” to his patrol car and left.  Talley’s own personnel record shows that he was also handcuffed by colleagues called to Levinsohn’s home more than a year before her slaying. Records obtained by the Ledger-Enquirer show officers were called to the scene around 7:41 p.m. March 11, 2018. Talley had been drinking, according to the report obtained by the newspaper.  “Talley had to be placed in handcuffs due to a brief struggle while officers attempted to calm him down and speak with him about his personal issues,” the report stated.  Two on-duty supervisors had to be called to Levinsohn’s home to deal with the situation. According to the Ledger-Enquirer, Talley served a single day’s suspension in September related to the incident.  He was not arrested, the newspaper said. It was his first disciplinary action in nearly a decade and his previous disciplinary issues were minor ones.  A sergeant since November 2009, Talley briefly became a detective in 2015, but transferred back to the patrol division less than a year later. Aside from the handful of disciplinary actions against him, he was given “glowing” performance evaluations, the Ledger-Enquirer reported.  Supervisors in 2017 complimented his “initiative” and recommended he try for a promotion to lieutenant.  From all accounts, Levinsohn also excelled at her job as an advanced emergency medical technician with Care Ambulance, the Ledger-Enquirer reported. Muscogee County Coroner Buddy Bryan told the newspaper Levinsohn had been with the service for 12 years.  Bryan said her slaying came as a shock to those she worked with. “She was very dedicated to her job. It’s a hard job, both physically and mentally hard. She took it in stride, never showed any kind of negative mood towards one of the patients that she was transporting,” Bryan said. “She was always there to ease the patient’s pain and suffering, and she was just the kind of person you would want to see come to the scene to be with you.” He said Levinsohn was also a friendly face for first responders, who were often exposed to horrific situations.  “In our line of business, me as a coroner and her as an EMT, we see a lot, car accident victims, gunshot victims, stabbing victims, sick people,” Bryan said. “(Levinsohn) was a very emotionally stable person. She kept a level head the whole time, and I praised her for that quite often.” The coroner said he was taking extra care that Levinsohn’s body was treated with respect as her mother, Wylma Levinsohn, traveled home from Israel to see about burying her daughter, who friends described as her best friend.  According to Kelly Levinsohn’s obituary, her funeral was Sunday in Columbus.  Longtime friend Staci Warman described Kelly Levinsohn as a loyal friend with a smile that was “the most contagious part about her.” “She was the best friend anybody really could ever have,” said Warman, who last spoke to Levinsohn in April, the day after Levinsohn’s birthday.  At the time, Levinsohn was on a trip to Aruba with her mother, Warman said.  Kay Witt, who had known Levinsohn since her childhood, also spoke about the tropical vacation, saying that Wylma Levinsohn will be left with a treasured memory.  “They spent a week in Aruba and had an absolute ball, snorkeling, driving around, laying on the beach, eating,” Witt told the Ledger-Enquirer. “All the things that you would do on your fantasy vacation, they did.” Witt said Kelly Levinsohn was also her mother’s “rock” as her father, Bill Levinsohn, battled cancer before his 2017 death.  Besides her mother, Levinsohn is also survived by an older brother, Gary Levinsohn, who “loved her from the minute she was born and was so proud of what she became,” her obituary said. 
  • A police officer died and two others were injured after they responded to a domestic violence call late Sunday at an Alabama mobile home park, according to multiple reports. >> Read more trending news  After an hours-long manhunt, authorities arrested Grady Wayne Wilkes, 29, on charges connected to the shooting. The slain officer was identified as William Buechner, WSFA reported. The news station reported the injured officers were identified as Webb Sistrunk and Evan Elliott. Here are the latest updates: Update 1:30 p.m. EDT May 20: Auburn police Chief Paul Register said early Monday that the two officers injured in Sunday’s shooting were expected to recover. 'This is probably the worst day of my time here,' Register said. 'Words cannot express the loss for this family, our family and this community.' One of the injured officers, identified as K-9 Officer Webb Sistrunk, was being treated Monday at a hospital in Columbus, Georgia, WMBA reported. The other officer, identified as Officer Evan Elliott, was treated for his injuries and released, according to the news network. Authorities on Monday arrested Grady Wayne Wilkes on charges including capital murder, WMBA reported. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey decried the violence. 'This is so tragic and so useless. I'm just heartbroken,' she said Monday during an appearance in Montgomery. Update 12:40 p.m. EDT May 20: Police on Monday identified the slain officer as William Buechner, a 13-year veteran of the Auburn Police Department, WBMA reported. Police Chief Paul Register identified the injured officers as Webb Sistrunk and Evan Elliott, AL.com reported. Authorities earlier Monday arrested Grady Wayne Wilkes, 29, the man suspected of shooting the officers. Officials continue to investigate. Update 8:32 a.m. EDT May 20: Police have apprehended the man accused of fatally shooting one police officer and injuring two others late Sunday at an Auburn mobile home park. According to WVTM reporter Sarah Killian, Grady Wayne Wilkes, 29, was captured Monday. >> See the tweet here Original report: According to the Opelika-Auburn News, a white man opened fire just after 10 p.m. Sunday as Auburn police officers responded to a domestic disturbance call at a mobile home park. “Responding officers were injured by gunfire and were transported to local hospitals,” Auburn police said in a news release. Although authorities have not release the officers’ names or conditions, the Opelika-Auburn News reported that one died and two more were seriously injured.  Police said the suspect, Grady Wayne Wilkes, 29, is on the run. He is described as a 6-foot-4, 215-pound white male with brown hair and hazel eyes. He was wearing body armor, camo clothing and a helmet. Wilkes is believed to be “armed and dangerous,” authorities said. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • The parents of an 8-year-old California girl filed a claim against the Bakersfield City School District after a dog visiting the child’s classroom allegedly bit her, cutting open the right side of her face, KGET reported. >> Read more trending news  Leilani Rivera was bitten by the animal, who had been brought to a second-grade glass at Wayside Elementary School on May 9 by a guest reader, KBAK reported.  The reader, Ann Ardell, brought two dogs into the classroom and invited students to pet them, KGET reported. When Leilani went to hug one of the animals the dog bit her, cutting her face and splitting her lip, the television station reported. 'I was crying and it was painful,' Leilani said Thursday at the law office of Chain Cohn Stiles, which is filing the claim against the Bakersfield City School District and Kern County’s superintendent of schools.  Leilani was taken to a hospital, where she underwent two hours of facial reconstructive surgery, KBAK reported. Bakersfield police spokesman Sgt. Nathan McCauley said owner Ann Ardell’s dog, which was either a chow-chow or Akita, was quarantined by animal control and released May 11, KGET reported. The incident did not appear to be intentional on the part of Ardell, McCauley told the television station. The school district issued a written statement, saying school officials immediately sought medical attention for Leilani and began an investigation, KGET reported. Since then, the school district said that due to pending litigation, it had been advised by legal counsel not to comment further, the television station reported. The claim is designated as 'unlimited,' meaning exceeding $25,000, KGET reported.
  • A man who broke into a home in Houston early Sunday died after he was shot several times by the man who found him in his teenage daughter’s bedroom, according to police and multiple reports.  >> Read more trending news Police said they were called around 2:40 a.m. Sunday to respond to a shooting at a home on North Bellaire Estates Drive. The homeowner told police he found an armed man in his 13-year-old daughter’s upstairs bedroom after a break-in. The homeowner said he wrestled the gun away from the burglar before firing it multiple times, striking the intruder, according to authorities and the Houston Chronicle. Police said the burglar, who was not identified, broke into the home through a downstairs window and walked up the stairs to get to the girl’s bedroom. Four children between the ages of 4 13 and 4 were home at the time of the incident, officials said. Detective Blake Roberts told reporters a neighbor helped get the kids out of the home after the shooting. “They did observe the suspect downstairs in the residence, stabbing himself … (with) a kitchen knife,” Roberts said, according to KPRC-TV. Authorities took the injured intruder to Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, police said. It was not immediately clear why the home was targeted. 'This appears to be random,' Roberts said. “Of course, it's still under investigation. We still have a lot of research to do on the male that broke into the house as far as his criminal history, his mental history and anything we can find in order to determine what would be the motive for this.”
  • Monday is Memorial Day, a day to honor those who died in military service to the United States. >> Read more trending news In addition to being a day to honor those who gave the ultimate sacrifice for their country, the last Monday in May is also seen as the “unofficial start of summer.” Retailers are here to help shoppers get a jump on all things summer with special deals for military personnel and great discounts for the rest of us. Here are some Memorial Day deals to jump start your three-day shopping weekend. Academy Sports and Outdoors: Military and first responders get 10% off in-store and online purchases through Memorial Day. Everyone can get discounts during the Memorial Day sale. Amazon: Look for sales on TVs, KitchenAid mixers, grills, Dyson vacuums and more. Birch Lane: Shop the Memorial Day pre-sale through Wednesday for discounts up to 70%. Bed Bath & Beyond: Save 40% on select outdoor furniture.  Belk’s: Use the code “Memorial” and get 20% off regular & sale purchases (15% off home & shoes; 10% off small appliances), through Memorial Day. Bloomingdale's: From Tuesday through Memorial Day, get 20% off Big Brown Bag sale and clearance. eBags: Get up to 60% off sitewide.  >> Memorial Day 2019: Quotes about patriotism, freedom Eddie Bauer: Use the code “CREEK40” at checkout to get 40% off sitewide when you enter coupon code 'SUMMIT40' at checkout. Famous Footwear: Get up to 60% off select sale items. Home Depot: Get 40% off select appliances. Get $10 off gallon cans of select paints an stain; $40 off 3-gallon and 5-gallon cans of paint. Hush Puppies: Save up to 50 percent on sale items. Johnston & Murphy: Get free shipping on all women’s orders and on orders more than $100.  Joss & Main: From Wednesday to May 30, save up to 70% off sitewide. Land’s End: Get 50% off all swimwear and water shoes.   Layla Sleep: Get $125 off the Layla mattress and get two pillows free. Lilly Pulitzer: Get two wine glasses, elephant wine stopper and a wicker wine basket when you spend $600 or more.  Lowe's: Get up to 40% off select appliances from Thursday through May 29. Macy’s: Sales not going on at Macy’s include select sneakers from 40% to 60% off, men’s 20% to 60% off, luggage 50% off, and fine jewelry 50% to 70% off. Old Navy: Get 50% off tees, tanks, shorts and swimwear. Nordstrom: Get 20% off Thule Baby Gear through Memorial Day. Purple: Up to $100 mattresses, plus free sheets.  Peruvian Connection: Get 20% off sale items plus free shipping through Memorial Day. Sears: Get 40 percent off select appliances. Serta: Save up to $600 on iComfort mattress sets. Target: You can save up to 30% on home and patio items. Walmart: Get 30% to 60% off on clothing, furniture, home goods, kitchen appliances, tech gadgets, toys and more. Wayfair: Through May 28, save up to 70% off mattresses, bedding and kitchen essentials; 65% off living room furniture and pet products; 60% off coffee tables, and up to 50% off grills.