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    The Latest on President Donald Trump (all times local): 1:05 p.m. President Donald Trump has arrived in France for a summit with world leaders. The Group of Seven meeting in Biarritz comes amid anxieties over a global economic slowdown and the president's escalating trade war with China. Air Force One arrived in the seaside resort town on Saturday afternoon. The two-day summit is taking place at one of the most unpredictable moments in Trump's tenure, with his public comments and decision-making increasingly erratic and acerbic of late. Trump faces a wary reception from fellow world leaders. He's opened new points of tension with allies on trade, Iran and Russia. The summit is scheduled to kick off with a dinner Saturday night. The summit is expected to focus on economic issues and climate change, among other topics. ___ 7:05 a.m. President Donald Trump heads into a summit with global economic powers confronting the consequences of his preference for going it alone in a polarized nation and an interconnected world. The Group of Seven nations are gathering in a French beach resort town at one of the most unpredictable moments in Trump's tenure, with his public comments and decision-making increasingly erratic and acerbic of late. Trump faces an icy reception on the world stage, where many challenges await. With fears of a financial downturn spreading, Trump has ridiculed Germany for its economic travails. But he may well need German leader Angela Merkel (AHN'-geh-lah MEHR'-kuhl) and others to help blunt the force of China's newly aggressive tariffs on U.S. goods.
  • President Donald Trump arrived Saturday in France for an international summit with the leaders of the globe's economic powers as he confronts the consequences of his preference for going it alone, both in a sharply divided United States and an interconnected world. The meeting of the Group of Seven nations — Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the U.S. — in the beach resort town of Biarritz comes at one of the most unpredictable moments in Trump's White House tenure, with his public comments and decision-making increasingly erratic and acerbic of late. Trump, growing more isolated in Washington, faces a tepid reception on the world stage, where a list of challenges awaits. Anxiety is growing over a global slowdown , and there are new points of tension with allies on trade, Iran and Russia. Fears of a financial downturn are spreading, meaning the need for cooperation and a collective response is essential. Yet Trump has ridiculed Germany for its economic travails at a time when he may have to turn to Chancellor Angela Merkel and others to help blunt the force of China's newly aggressive tariffs on U.S. goods. Those trade penalties, combined with the economic slowdown, have raised political alarms for Trump's reelection effort . Before he left Washington, Trump declared that U.S. businesses with dealings in China are 'hereby ordered' to begin moving home. There was no immediate explanation of just what he expected or what authority he had to make it happen. He also imposed higher tariffs on Chinese imports. 'Tariffs are working out very well for us,' Trump said. 'People don't understand that yet.' Earlier, he had made light of a sharp drop in the financial markets in reaction to his latest trade actions. His tongue-in-cheek tweet speculated that the Dow's plunge could be tied to the departure of a lower-tier candidate in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. In recent days, Trump has sent mixed signals on a number of policy fronts. At one point, he moved to simmer the trade conflict with China in order to ease the impact on American consumers during the holiday shopping season. At another, he flip-flopped on the need for tax cuts to stimulate an economy that Trump publicly insists is rocketing. Feeding Trump's anxiety, aides say, is his realization that the economy — the one sturdy pillar undergirding his bid for a second term — is undeniably wobbly. Now the president who has long eschewed multilateralism hopes to use his time in Biarritz to rally global leaders around the need to do more to promote economic growth. He engineered a late change to the summit agenda, requesting a working session on global economic issues. For the world leaders, it was the latest example of unpredictability from Trump. After two-and-a-half years of Trump's presidency, traditional American allies have come to expect the unexpected. Increasingly they are looking elsewhere for leadership. 'They have figured out how to deal with this president,' said Jon Alterman, a senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. 'I think what we're going to see out of this summit is, on the one hand, an effort by countries and the leaders to align with the president, but also an understanding that we'll have to do more without the U.S. president.' The annual G-7 summit has historically been used to highlight common ground among the world's leading democracies. But in a bid to work around Trump's impulsiveness, French President Emmanuel Macron has eschewed plans for a formal joint statement from this gathering. Last year's summit, hosted by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, ended in acrimony when Trump felt he had been slighted by Trudeau after the president left the meeting. Trump tweeted insults at Trudeau from aboard Air Force One as he flew to a summit with North Korea's Kim Jong Un. Trump withdrew his signature from the statement of principles that all seven nations had agreed to. At his first G-7 summit in 2017, Trump's strong feelings against climate change roiled the gathering in Italy. Trump has made his 'America first' priorities clear at every turn. At a recent campaign rally in New Hampshire, the crowd roared with approval when Trump said: 'I'm the President of the United States of America. I'm not the president of the world.' Addressing the global slowdown isn't the only pressing challenge that Trump has discovered requires joint action. For more than a year, his administration has struggled with persuading European leaders to repatriate captured fighters from the Islamic State group. So far his entreaties have been met with deaf ears. Alterman and Heather Conley, the Europe expert at CSIS, both said Macron appeared to be trying to fill the void left by Trump on the world stage, noting the French leader's recent efforts to try to reduce tensions between the U.S. and Iran. Many of the summit proceedings will take place behind closed doors, in intimate settings designed for the leaders to develop personal relationships with one another. Trump, White House aides said, was looking forward to meeting with new British Prime Minister Boris Johnson , the brash pro-Brexit leader whose election he'd backed. Trump has scheduled individual meetings with several of his counterparts, including Macron, Trudeau, Merkel, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Other topics on the agenda will be the clashes between police and pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong; Iran's renewed nuclear enrichment and interference with shipping in the Strait of Hormuz; and the Islamic State prisoners currently imprisoned by American-backed Kurdish forces in Syria. Increasingly fearful of an economic slowdown's potential to diminish his 2020 electoral chances, Trump intended to press leaders about what can be done to spur growth in the U.S. and abroad, as well as to open European, Japanese and Canadian markets to American manufacturers and producers. Trump has imposed or threatened to impose tariffs on all three markets in his pursuit of free, fair and reciprocal trade. It is unclear what substantive steps could be taken by the leaders to address the global slowdown, and much of that discussion stands to be dominated by disagreements on Trump's trade policies. While on French soil, Trump also intends to raise with Macron and the other leaders the issue of a digital services tax that France has imposed on major technology companies such as Google and Facebook despite Trump's threats of retaliatory tariffs on French wine. The Trump administration says the tax targets and discriminates against U.S. businesses. The European Council's president, Donald Tusk, has promised European Union action if the U.S. follows through. ___ Colvin reported from Washington. ___ Follow Miller on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/ZekeJMiller and Superville at http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap
  • The question was about climate change. The answer soon turned to the Bible. And Pete Buttigieg knew the verses. 'There's a lot about the stewardship of creation that is in Scripture that I don't see being honored by the administration right now, not to mention the stuff about loving your neighbor and taking care of the least among us and feeding the poor,' the South Bend, Indiana, mayor said. The crowd of about 250 at a Mississippi River park in southeastern Iowa this month erupted with cheers. Republicans for a half century have built a loyal following among white evangelical Christians. But Buttigieg, like no other Democrat seeking the 2020 presidential nomination, is trying to demonstrate that there's a strong religiosity among Democrats, too. President Donald Trump's reelection fortunes are rooted deeply in the unshakable support among religious conservatives. But Buttigieg's regular references to his own Christian faith offer a counterweight that could be an influential asset in Iowa and beyond as Democrats parry the secular labels that Republicans have tried to apply to them. 'What Pete said about welcoming the stranger, visiting those in prison, that's what Jesus calls on us to do,' said the Rev. Elizabeth Bell, a Methodist pastor in Burlington who attended a mid-August event for Buttigieg in that city. During a two-day trip through eastern Iowa counties that Trump won in 2016 but that Democrat Barack Obama carried in 2008, Buttigieg was invited to discuss his faith in backyards, riverside parks, vintage hotels and town squares. Not since Bill Clinton has a Democratic presidential candidate leaned so heavily on religious references in everyday campaign events, though Buttigieg says he's wary of coming off as overly pious. 'My goal is for people of faith who believe that it has some implications for how they participate in politics to be aware that they have choices,' Buttigieg told The Associated Press. 'I want people to know that when I say I'm guided by some of these ideas, it's not something I seek to impose on anybody else. But I do want people to know that's part of my formation, part of how I come at the world.' During his trip, Buttigieg was asked, unprompted, at almost every stop about how his religion informs his public policy. Jim Thicksten, a DeWitt car dealer, asked if he planned to try to peel off voters from the Christian right. Buttigieg said the opportunity is greater than ever, given the dissonance between Trump's record and Christian teachings, to show all voters that Republicans are snubbing the Bible's teachings on caring for the poor. 'It's an offense to not only our values but their own,' Buttigieg told Thicksten. Thicksten would know. He backed former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee's 2008 winning Republican Iowa presidential caucus campaign only to change his party affiliation to Democrat after a bitter school book banning debate that deeply hurt some of his gay friends. 'I've heard him on numerous occasions be able to explain the left-leaning notions of faith and put them into terms I feel like people on the right might understand,' Thicksten said of Buttigieg. Buttigieg says there's room to invite conservative Christians disappointed by Trump into his caucus campaign, but he is more focused on drawing Christians who may feel abandoned by Democrats' who avoid religion in a political context. Faith is an important cultural signal to voters, especially Democrats who have deep doubts about Trump's character. Buttigieg's own nontraditional route to his religious home followed a path nearly as unexpected as the 37-year-old gay married mayor's leap into the 2020 Democratic top tier. Raised by a former Roman Catholic-priest father and a religious but skeptical mother, Buttigieg attended a Catholic high school in South Bend. Attending services irregularly at Harvard, he was drawn to the Church of England as a Rhodes scholar, first for the intellectual appeal, then as a spiritual refuge 'for the humbling that goes on when you wind up at a place like Oxford,' he said. The Episcopal Church, the Anglican Church's U.S. counterpart, fit when he returned to the states and joined St. James in South Bend, where he married his husband, Chasten, last year. It's that progressive Christian element Buttigieg hopes to capture in a crowded Iowa candidate field, where a niche advantage can make a vital difference. His campaign recently hired the Rev. Shawna Foster to be his faith outreach coordinator, the first such hire of any 2020 Democratic campaign. Among Foster's duties will be reaching LGBTQ-friendly churches, an untapped potential resource. And for Buttigieg, who in South Carolina is registering scant support among the African American voters who form a majority of that early primary's electorate, his ease with Scripture could help him open the door, especially among churchgoing women. A Pew Research Center survey conducted in late July and early August found 15% of white mainline Protestant Democrats said they preferred Buttigieg in the primary contest in an open-ended question. That's compared with 0% of black Protestants. 'There's no question that a very important part of engaging many black audiences is through faith because the church is such an important structure holding black communities and families up,' Buttigieg said. 'It does mean that there's a way to reach people and find some common ground.' With just over five months until the caucuses, there is time. 'I feel like he actually lives the words that he says,' said volunteer Robin Gingrich, a retired test administrator from West Branch. 'I think when he says he's a Christian and he loves God, he proves it every day by the way he lives his life. I feel like he's a therapist for America. He gives us hope.' ___ Follow Tom Beaumont on Twitter at: @TomBeaumont
  • The 'chosen one' says never mind. President Donald Trump raised some eyebrows earlier this week when he glanced heavenward and referred to himself as 'the chosen one' to take on China. He took the comment back Friday. When a reporter asked Trump what he had meant by referring to himself as the 'chosen one,' the president looked annoyed. 'You know exactly when I meant,' Trump said. 'It was sarcasm. It was joking. We were all smiling. And a question like that is just fake news.' The president spoke as he was departing the White House for his trip to the Group of Seven summit in France.
  • President Donald Trump is heading to France for an annual summit of leaders of the world's richest democracies. Trump departed Washington late Friday hours after he escalated a long-running trade fight with China by raising tariffs. Trump also blamed the state of the U.S. economy on the man he chose to lead the Federal Reserve. Before leaving the White House, the president tweeted that he was 'Looking forward to being with great leaders in France!' The Saturday-to-Monday gathering in the French beach resort town of Biarritz comes as the global economy shows signs of slowing, in part due to anxiety caused by the trade war. Besides the U.S., the Group of Seven includes Britain, France, Germany, Canada, Italy and Japan.
  • Joe Biden pondered a most serious, and awkward, question at a campaign stop Friday: What if Barack Obama had been assassinated during his presidential campaign in 2008? Toward the end of an event in Hanover, Biden evoked two of his political heroes, Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy. Both were assassinated in 1968, Kennedy while running for president. Biden said: 'Imagine what would have happened if, God forbid, Barack Obama had been assassinated after becoming the de facto nominee? What would have happened in America?' The 76-year-old Biden served as Obama's vice president for two terms and was a U.S. senator representing Delaware for 36 years. He is seeking the Democratic nomination for president for a third time after two failed runs in 1988 and 2008 cycles. Biden has long been prone to gaffes and misspeaking, another aspect of his candidacy that has come under scrutiny during his latest presidential run. Biden's two appearances Friday included several other problematic comments as he riffed to the crowd. As he talked about teachers, he referenced his wife, Jill Biden, an educator, saying that if he didn't support teachers, 'I would be sleeping alone.' At his final event of the day as he talked about taking away some tax breaks for richer Americans, Biden said, 'I find most rich people are as patriotic as poor people.
  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi still isn't ready to launch impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. Pelosi told House Democrats on a conference call Friday, 'The public isn't there on impeachment.' She told them the case needs to be 'as strong' as possible. 'If and when we act, people will know he gave us no choice,' Pelosi said, according to an aide granted anonymity to discuss the private call. More than half the House Democrats support opening an impeachment inquiry. But Pelosi said the House must weigh its 'responsibility to protect and defend the Constitution' with the need to be 'unifying and not dividing.' She also said she's using a nightguard because it's 'very hard' not to grind her teeth 'all night about what's going on in the White House.
  • The Latest on the escalating trade war between the U.S. and China, the world's two largest economies (all times local): 12:35 a.m. President Donald Trump is pushing back against those questioning whether he has the authority to order American companies to cut trade ties with China. Trump on Friday morning tweeted that he 'hereby ordered' U.S. companies to seek alternatives to doing business in China. The White House did not cite what authority the president could use to force private businesses to change their practices. But at midnight, as he was flying to France, the president tweeted again, saying that those who 'don't have a clue' about presidential powers should look at the Emergency Economic Powers Act of 1977. He added, 'Case closed!' The law says the president is authorized 'to regulate international commerce after declaring a national emergency' if there is an 'extraordinary threat' to the nation. ___ 6:55 p.m. The Consumer Technology Association, a trade group that runs the annual Consumer Electronics Show, says 'enough is enough' when it comes to escalating tariffs in the U.S. trade war with China. The CTA said in a statement Friday that President Donald Trump's tariffs are the worst economic mistake since the 1930 Smoot-Hawley Act raised tariffs just as the world was sliding into the Great Depression. The group says it is clear that tariffs are not moving the U.S. toward a deal with China, and that it is time to end the trade war and come to an agreement. The CTA represents more than 2,200 companies in the technology industry. __ 5:05 p.m. President Donald Trump says products coming from China that were slated to be hit with a 10% tariff on Sept. 1 will now face a 15% tariff. Trump also says goods and products currently being taxed at 25% will be taxed at 30% starting Oct. 1. Trump's comments come after China said it would pursue new tariffs of 5% and 10% on $75 billion of U.S. products. The tariffs would take place in two steps, just as the U.S. said it would do earlier this month in imposing 10% tariffs on $300 billion of Chinese goods. The rising tensions between the world's two biggest economies unnerved investors already on edge Friday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 623 points Friday as companies and business groups urged the two countries to get to the negotiating table. __ 3:45 p.m. Two trade associations representing auto companies say the escalating tariff fight between the Trump administration and China is bad for the industry. Neither the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers nor the Association of Global automakers, however, addressed President Donald Trump's tweet about finding markets other than China. But the alliance says the tariffs are bad for consumers. It says the auto industry thrives with robust and competitive trading. Association of Global Automakers CEO John Bozella says tit-for-tat tariffs without meaningful negotiations put American jobs at risk. He says when China imposed tariffs last year, U.S. vehicle exports to the country were cut in half. The alliance represents most major automakers, while the global group speaks for manufacturers such as Honda, Toyota, Hyundai, Nissan and Subaru. ___ 2:30 p.m. The nation's largest retail trade group says that it would be unrealistic for U.S. retailers to exit China. The National Retail Federation made its comment in response to President Donald Trump's call Friday for U.S. businesses with operations in China to look for alternatives, as trade tensions between the world's two largest economies intensified. The NRF noted that its members have long been diversifying their supply chains but finding alternatives to China would be costly and take years. 'It is unrealistic for American retailers to move out of the world's second largest economy,' said NRF Senior Vice President of Government Relations David French. He noted that retailers' presence in China allows them to reach Chinese customers and also develop overseas markets. 'This, in turn, allows us to grow and expand opportunities for American workers, businesses and consumers,' French said in a prepared statement. ___ 1:55 p.m. Small business owners are baffled by President Donald Trump's suggestion that all U.S. businesses with operations in China find an alternative. Trump lashed out at Beijing Friday after it announced retaliatory tariffs on $75 billion in U.S. products. Peter Horwitz, the owner of Tiger Packaging, a paper and plastic products supplier based in Boca Raton, Florida, says there are supplies that he can get only in China, like vinyl gloves. He says we're living in a global economy and it makes bad business sense to cut out the world's second largest economy in China. _____ 1:35 p.m. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is urging the Trump administration and Beijing to return to the negotiating table with trade tensions escalating rapidly. China on Friday said that it was putting into place tariffs on $75 billion in U.S. products in retaliation for the Trump administration's latest planned tariff hikes. President Donald Trump lashed out at China and on Twitter is urging U.S. companies to consider an alternative to doing business in China. The business group said, 'We do not want to see a further deterioration of US-China relations. We urge the administration and the government of China to return to the negotiating table to complete an agreement that addresses concerns over technology transfer practices, intellectual property enforcement, market access, and the globally damaging impact of Chinese domestic subsidies.' _____ 11:46 a.m. Stocks are falling sharply on Wall Street after President Donald Trump said he would respond to China's latest tariff increase and called on U.S. companies to consider alternatives to doing business in China. Trump on Friday also ordered UPS, Federal Express and Amazon to block any deliveries from China of the powerful opiod drug fentanyl. The Dow Jones Industrial Average sank more than 300 points after the president made the announcements on Twitter. The stocks of all three companies the president mentioned also dropped as traders tried to understand what the implications for them were. Stocks had been wavering between gains and losses earlier after China said it would retaliate against the latest round of tariffs imposed by Washington with duties on $75 billion of U.S. products. _____ 11:30 a.m President Donald Trump says he wants U.S. companies with operations in China to begin looking for alternatives in response to retaliatory tariffs from Beijing. Trump on Friday said that he will respond in hours to an announcement Friday that China was retaliating to U.S. tariffs with a slate of its own protective measures. Trump is also ordering Fed Ex, Amazon, UPS and the U.S Postal Service to begin searching for fentanyl in all packages from China. Early on Friday, China said it would put into place tariffs on $75 billion in U.S. products in retaliation for the Trump administration's latest planned tariff hikes. _____ 10:10 a.m. China is putting into place tariffs on $75 billion in U.S. products in retaliation for the Trump administration's latest planned tariff hikes. China said Friday that it will also increase import duties on U.S.-made autos and auto parts. The retaliation pulled global markets into negative territory Tariffs of 10% and 5% will take effect on two batches of goods on Sept. 1 and Dec. 15. Beijing gave no details of what goods would be affected but the timing matches Trump's planned hikes.
  • Rep. Steve King said Friday he stands by his recent comments about rape and incest that sparked bipartisan criticism but acknowledged he could have made his point in a 'softer way.' Backed by supporters at a news conference in Des Moines, the Iowa Republican affirmed his belief that abortion should be outlawed with no exceptions for rape or incest. King faced criticism for his comment Aug. 14 that questioned whether there would be 'any population of the world left' if not for births due to rape or incest. The remarks were condemned by numerous groups and individuals, including Republican and Democratic candidates seeking to oust King, Democratic presidential candidates as well as the Iowa Republican Party and Rep. Liz Cheney, the No. 3 Republican in House leadership. Cheney called King's comments 'appalling and bizarre.' House Republicans previously stripped King of his committee assignments for his comments about white nationalism. Although King repeated his claim that his comments were being misconstrued by political opponents and the media, he said he would 'rather deliver that in a little softer way.' In an attempt to do that, King recalled the 1946 movie 'It's a Wonderful Life' and recounted how the film explored the way one person's life touches many others through time and what would happen if one individual had never been born. Comparing the movie to his comments about abortion, King said, 'It was an objectively honest and accurate statement but I think it was willfully misinterpreted.' King was supported by several people representing groups opposed to abortion rights, including Rebecca Kiessling, a lawyer who leads a group called Conceived in Rape. Kiessling, who said she was conceived when her mother was raped at knifepoint, said she appreciated King's effort to write legislation seeking to outlaw abortion with no exceptions for rape or incest. 'Congressman King has been the most pro-life congressman, legislator in D.C.,' she said. J.D. Scholten, who is seeking the Democratic nomination in the 4th District, has chided King for not focusing on issues most vital in the sprawling, largely rural districts, such as low commodity prices and a poor rural economy. After King's news conference, he tweeted, 'What Steve King consistently leaves out are the victims of rape and incest, and the physical and emotional trauma that are a part of that. When he pushes his unconstitutional and freedom restricting ideology, he devalues the trauma experienced by these survivors.' ___ Follow Scott McFetridge on Twitter: https://twitter.com/smcfetridge
  • The Trump administration is planning to open a U.S. consulate in Greenland for the first time in decades amid increased strategic and economic interest in the Danish territory. The State Department says in a letter to Congress that re-establishing a consulate in Nuuk is part of a broader plan to increase the U.S. presence in the arctic. A copy of the letter was obtained Friday by The Associated Press. The U.S. has a 'strategic interest in enhancing political, economic, and commercial relationships across the Arctic region,' said the letter to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. President Donald Trump sparked a diplomatic dispute with U.S.-ally Denmark this week after he proposed that the U.S. buy Greenland and the Danish government rejected the idea. Danish prime minister Mette Frederiksen called it an 'absurd discussion.' Trump fired back that her comments were 'nasty' and he canceled a planned trip to Denmark. On Friday, though, Trump said he had spoken with Frederiksen and called her 'a wonderful woman.' 'We had a great conversation, he told reporters before leaving the White House for the Group of Seven summit in France. 'We have a very good relationship with Denmark. ... Very nice. She put a call in and I appreciated it very much.' A permanent diplomatic presence would allow the U.S. to 'protect essential equities in Greenland while developing deeper relationships with Greenlandic officials and society,' the letter said. It said the consulate would be 'a critical component of our efforts to increase U.S. presence in the Arctic and would serve as an effective platform to advance U.S. interests in Greenland.' Congress would likely have been open to the idea, but after Trump's actions the proposal will likely gain greater scrutiny. The U.S. opened a consulate in Greenland in 1940 after the Nazi occupation of Denmark. It closed in 1953. The new one would open next year in the capital of the semi-autonomous territory. The State Department said it has already assigned a Greenlandic affairs officer working out of the U.S. Embassy in Copenhagen. It now plans to hire locally-employed staff in Greenland by fall, or soon thereafter. Ultimately, it expects a staff of seven at the consulate in 2020. Experts say establishing a greater U.S. presence in Greenland is not unwarranted, despite the awkward roll out of Trump's idea to buy the semi-autonomous Danish territory. It is situated in a geographically important region and holds a potential treasure trove of natural gas and rare earth minerals. The U.S. Russia, China and others are showing their interests. In April, Russian President Vladimir Putin put forward a program to reaffirm his country's presence in the Arctic, including efforts to build ports and other infrastructure and expand its icebreaker fleet. Russia wants to stake its claim in the region that is believed to hold up to one-fourth of the Earth's undiscovered oil and gas. China sees Greenland as a possible source of rare earth minerals and other resources as well as a location for a port to ship through the Arctic to the eastern U.S. __ AP Diplomatic Writer Matthew Lee in Washington contributed to this report.

News

  • Seth Rollins and Becky Lynch have made their marks as professional wrestlers. Now, both believe they have formed a perfect match and are ready to grapple with married life. >> Read more trending news  The WWE stars announced their engagement Thursday, with Lynch, 32, announcing the news on Instagram.. “Happiest day of my life,” Lynch wrote in her post. Lynch and Rollins’ fellow WWE stars shared their congratulations in the comments section, along with Nikki Bella and her sister, Brie Bella, People reported. “Awww yay! Love this so much!” Nikki Bella wrote. “You deserve all the happiness in the world!!! Love you Becky!!!” “Yay!!!! Congrats!!! So happy for you both!!!” Brie Bella wrote. On Twitter, Rollins called himself the 'luckiest man alive' and posted a photo of Lynch showing off her engagement ring.
  • Lindsey Vonn and P.K. Subban are making the switch from Olympic rings to wedding rings. >> Read more trending news  Vonn, 34, a gold medalist in the 2010 Olympics and winner of 82 World Cup skiing events, made the announcement Friday on Instagram. She and Subban have been dating for at least a year, ESPN reported. 'He said YES!!' Vonn posted. 'Can’t wait to spend the rest of my life with this crazy/kind/handsome/hyper/giving man.' Subban, 30, won a gold medal as a member of Canada's men's hockey team at the 2014 Olympics, ESPN reported. He was traded from the Nashville Predators to the New Jersey Devils in June. The couple met two years ago at the Nickelodeon sports show that follows the ESPYs, Vogue reported. The pair made their relationship official in a red carpet at the CMT Music Awards in June 2018, People reported. “Right off the bat, I knew he was different,” Vonn told Vogue. “But I’d been married before, so I was pretty hesitant to let myself think that I could find someone that I would want to be married to again. After a few months of dating, I knew he was the one I wanted to be with, though. He makes me happy, and he’s so positive and energetic.” In addition to her marriage to skier Thomas Vonn, Lindsey Vonn dated golfer Tiger Woods for nearly three years until they split up in 2015, ESPN reported. 'Lindsey's the best thing that's ever happened to me,' Subban told Vogue. 'There are people in life that deserve to be with good people. They have that person who takes care of them and makes them smile, and she deserves to be with someone who loves her more than anything else in the world, and I do.' Vonn said the couple has not set a date for the wedding but will live in New Jersey, Vogue reported. We’re in such a busy time right now. We’re trying to move to New Jersey,” Vonn told the magazine. “I just want to enjoy the moment and the engagement. We’re not in a big hurry to get married. It kind of depends on his playing schedule, and when we have time to sit down and go through it. I don’t want to stress him out because he has a big season coming.”
  • A school resource officer is out of a job after she filmed a nude video of herself inside an elementary school bathroom during her shift. >> Read more trending news  Kissimmee Police told WFTV the woman removed her badge, uniform and gun when she went to the bathroom at Kissimmee Charter Academy to make the video for her husband in December. The video, which is heavily blurred, shows the woman asking the recipient what they thought of her video. The video was unearthed after the Osceola County Sheriff's Office investigated a personal incident with the school resource officer and her husband.  An investigation showed that while she was on lunch break, she was subject to recall at any point. Police said she was fired because if a shooting had occurred, she wouldn't have been able to respond.  The officer said that she locked the bathroom door and does not believe she should have been fired.  WFTV did not include the woman's name, as it was redacted in the report. 
  • A Nevada man overcame a weighty problem to become the first member of his family to enlist in the U.S. Army. >> Read more trending news  Seven months ago, Luis Enrique Pinto Jr., of Las Vegas, weighed 317, which meant he could not pass the Army's weight requirements, Army Times reported. The 18-year-old embarked on a program of exercise and diet and shed 113 pounds, allowing him to report to basic training, KNTV reported. Pinto now stands 6 feet, 1 inch and weighs 204 pounds, the television station reported. Pinto had been an offensive lineman in high school and had a steady diet of carbohydrates, but he changed his diet and dropped the pounds. 'I had struggled with weight my whole life. I’ve always been a big kid,' Pinto told KNTV. The biggest hurdle to losing weight was cardio training, Army officials said in a news release. Pinto began to combine jogging and sprinting to improve his times. 'Running wasn't my strong suit,' Pinto said in the news release. 'Carrying all that extra weight and trying to run definitely increased my time.' 'When no one was looking, I was doing push-ups in my room, eating right, knowing what to eat,' Pinto told KTNV. 'I feel like everyone has the power to know what they take into their body, so I just took that into consideration. I just did the right thing at the end of the day,' Pinto's work ethic impressed his friends, family and his Army recruiter, Staff Sgt. Philip Long. 'There were a couple times where he hit a plateau. He would lose a pound or two, maybe,' Long told KTNV. 'But to continue to push forward and put the effort and dedication in, it inspires me and it should inspire you.' Pinto will report to basic training in September, Army Times reported.
  • Six inmates were injured -- two seriously -- during a prison riot Friday night at a San Diego prison, officials said. >> Read more trending news  The disturbance began at the Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility shortly after 8 p.m., The San Diego Union-Tribune reported. Cal Fire San Diego spokesman Capt. Thomas Shoots said approximately 100 prisoners were in the prison yard when the riot broke out, the newspaper reported. It was not clear how many inmates were involved in the riot, the Union-Tribune reported. Officials with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said a fight involving several inmates on the recreation yard escalated into a riot, KNSD reported. According to KSWB, staff members ordered the inmates to stop fighting. When the fighting continued, 'officers used several rounds of less than lethal use of force to quell the disturbance.' Two of the inmates were seriously injured and airlifted to area hospitals, Shoots told the Union-Tribune. No prison staff members were injured, KNSD reported.
  • Identity theft may have entered the final frontier if accusations from a woman against an astronaut are true. >> Read more trending news  Summer Worden, a former Air Force intelligence officer living in Kansas, was married to astronaut Anne McClain. Now in the middle of a yearlong divorce and parenting dispute, Worden claims her former spouse accessed her bank account from space, KPRC reported. Worden filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, accusing McClain of identity theft and unauthorized access to the bank account, according to The New York Times.Worden claims McClain broke into her bank accounts while she was aboard the International Space Station, the newspaper reported. Through her lawyer, McClain admitted she had accessed the bank account from space on a computer system registered to NASA, the Times reported. However, McClain said she was merely keeping tabs on the couple's still intermingled finances, the newspaper reported. “I was shocked and appalled at the audacity by her to think that she could get away with that, and I was very disheartened that I couldn't keep anything private,” Worden told KPRC. McClain's attorney, Rusty Hardin, told the television station in a statement that 'family cases are extremely difficult and private matters for all parties involved.' 'Neither Anne nor we will be commenting on this personal matter,' Hardin said. 'We appreciate the media's understanding and respect, as maintaining privacy, is in the best interest of the child and family members involved.” In a statement to KPRC, NASA said it had no comment on the matter. 'NASA has no statement on this and does not comment on personal or personnel matters. Anne McClain is an active astronaut.' NASA officials told the Times they were unaware of any crimes committed on the space station. McClain, who returned to Earth in June after her six-month mission, took an under-oath interview with NASA's Office of Inspector General last week, the newspaper reported.  “She strenuously denies that she did anything improper,” Hardin told the Times. Hardin told the newspaper the bank access from space was an attempt to make sure there were sufficient funds in Worden’s account to pay bills and care for the child they were raising. Hardin said McClain continued using the same password and claimed she never heard an objection from Worden, the Times reported. The fight from space might be the first case, but Mark Sundahl, director of the Global Space Law Center at Cleveland State University, said it probably will not be the last one. “The more we go out there and spend time out there, all the things we do here are going to happen in space,” Sundahl told the Times.