ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
76°
Partly Cloudy
H 89° L 69°
  • cloudy-day
    76°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 89° L 69°
  • cloudy-day
    89°
    Today
    Partly Cloudy. H 89° L 69°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    88°
    Tomorrow
    Partly Cloudy T-storms. H 88° L 70°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Popular Chinese restaurant passes health inspection after failing twice

The owner of a very popular DeKalb County Chinese restaurant says he now has a system in place to assure his restaurant doesn't fail again.

Canton House on Buford Highway in Chamblee failed a health inspection twice in less than a year.

Wednesday, the restaurant got a score of 96 on a inspection after some quick action.

In October, Canton House in Chamblee failed with a 58.

It also failed with a 64 on May 23.

To stay open, the owner told Channel 2's Carol Sbarge that he had to present a long-term corrective plan to the DeKalb County Health Department.

TRENDING STORIES:

Armed men use young woman to lure victim to door Kids set off fireworks display inside grocery store Commissioner: I never asked for all Confederate flags to be removed

People often pack Canton House, which is especially known for its Dim Sum.

In the failing health inspection earlier this month, the violations included an employee touching face and the food without washing hands, multiple dishes stored as clean that were still dirty and excessive food debris buildup on kitchen floors.

Owner Cam Voung says he met with the DeKalb County Health Department this week.

He says he's retraining his employees and is scheduling another appointment with the health department to come back to the restaurant and do training.

Voung also says he started a system to assure that every day, the employees know exactly what they are supposed to do and mark it.

He says in 23 years, this is the first time Canton House has had two low scores.

The owner says he's determined to keep the score high and is apologizing to his customers.

Read More

News

  • Chicago-based Hometown Food Company is recalling thousands of cases of Pillsbury flour over fears of E. coli contamination. >> Read more trending news  The Food and Drug Administration said it’s a voluntary recall and that the company made the decision to recall 4,620 cases of the flour after learning wheat used to make the product was linked to E. coli illnesses associated with other flour products produced at the ADM Mill in Buffalo, New York. Two lots of 5-pound Pillsbury Best Bread Flour are impacted by the recall and include the lot number 8 342 with a “Best if used by” date of June 8, 2020 and lot number 8 343 with a “Best if used by” date June 9, 2020. Customers who bought the product are urged to throw it out or return it to the store where they bought it. There’s been no reported illnesses from Pillsbury’s bread flour, according to the FDA. >> Related: Flour sold nationwide at Target, Walmart recalled because of E. coli E. Coli infections vary among victims but can include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea and vomiting. Most people recover within a week, but in some cases the infection can result in serious illness.  
  • Philadelphia police are on the scene of a shooting on the city’s southwest side that has left one person dead and eight wounded, according to news reports. >> Read more trending news  The mass shooting happened at a high school graduation party Sunday night and police believe it was a targeted shooting, according to WTXF-TV. The gunman opened fire into a crowd of about 60 people, striking four teenagers, one as young as 15 years old, WTXF reported. They suffered gunshot wounds mostly to the legs, KYW-TV reported. Four adults all in their 20s were also shot resulting in various injuries. The deceased victim was a male in his 20s. There’s been no arrests, yet, as police continue searching for suspects. Check back for more on this developing story.
  • Does your blood pressure read normal at home but skyrocket once you’re in the doctor’s office? The condition is called white coat hypertension, and it could up your heart disease risk, according to a new report.  >> Read more trending news  Researchers from Penn Medicine, an academic medical center in Philadelphia, recently conducted a study to determine the association between white coat hypertension and future health problems.  White coat hypertension “was originally attributed to the anxiety patients might experience during medical appointments,” the team said in a statement. “However, over the years, research has suggested the elevated readings might be a sign of underlying risk for future health problems.” For their assessment, they reviewed 27 studies that analyzed 60,000 patients. They identified adults with untreated white coat hypertension and found they had a 36 percent increased risk of heart disease. They also discovered they had a 33 percent increased risk of death from any cause as well as a 109 percent risk of death from heart disease.  >> Related: If you have high blood pressure by this age, you’re more likely to have a heart attack, study says Their results were published in the Annals of Internal Medicine journal. “Our findings underscore the importance of identifying people with this condition,” lead author Jordana Cohen said in the statement. “Our findings support the pressing need for increased out-of-office blood pressure monitoring nationwide, as it’s critical in the diagnosis and management of hypertension.” While the authors did not reveal why there is a correlation between white coat hypertension and future health issues, they offered some suggestions to combat it.  The team said those with the condition should practice a healthy lifestyle, which should include no smoking, reduction in alcohol intake, and a good diet and exercise regimen.  They also cautioned healthcare providers against over-treating individuals with this condition, especially if they are already on high blood pressure medication.  “This could lead to dangerously low blood pressures outside of the office and unnecessary side effects from medication,” Cohen explained.  >> Related: 5 reasons to take a second look at your blood pressure The scientists now hope to further their investigations to find ways to prevent heart disease risk as a result of white coat hypertension. 
  • More than 260 bottlenose dolphins have died in a series of strandings up and down the Gulf Coast from the Florida Panhandle to Louisiana since January, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. >> Read more trending news  The numbers are three times higher than normal, NOAA officials said, and they have now opened an investigation into what the agency calls an unusual mortality event. “It is too early to determine any potential causes of the UME. Many of the dolphins recovered are very decomposed, limiting the ability to collect samples to determine cause of illness or death,” NOAA said on its website. >> Trending: 70 gray whales have washed ashore along the West Coast this year; what’s killing them? Also contributing to the problem of pinpointing a cause for the dolphins deaths is the fact that a number have stranded in remote locations, making it difficult to examine or recover the carcasses for testing. Officials said some of the dolphins that have been recovered had visible skin lesions that are consistent with exposure to fresh water. Dolphins are usually found in water with high salinity or salt levels. Investigators are looking into a range of potential reasons for the dolphin strandings, including too much freshwater spilling into the Gulf from a wet winter, problems with the animals’ food supply and even a lingering impact from the widespread 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. >> Trending: 64lbs. of plastic found inside dead sperm whale leading to its death, scientists say NOAA officials are asking people to report any sightings of stranded dolphins to authorities.
  • The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources has ticketed a man for branding several sharks. >> Read more trending news  Investigators said the agency's Marine Division began catching sharks that appeared to be marked with a symbol near Dewees Island and Isle of Palms. Branding sharks, or any saltwater fish, is against South Carolina law. Offenders can face a fine up to $200 and 30 days in jail. The department said the man was cooperative when confronted and may have been unaware that his actions were illegal.
  • An 8-year-old boy was bitten on the leg by a shark Sunday afternoon, officials said. >> Read more trending news  The boy was bitten around 4 p.m. and then taken to a hospital, WECT reported.  He is expected to make a full recovery.