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    State environmental authorities want to put a man in contempt of court after he failed to clean up his once-smoldering unlicensed landfill in a South Fulton neighborhood. A state court in early summer decided that Tandy Ross Bullock had violated the Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Act. A judge ordered Bullock to remove at least 12,000 cubic yards of waste — or enough to fill 1,200 large dumptrucks — from his six-acre site by Oct. 1. That amounts to 2.5% of the estimated 450,000 cubic yards of construction and site preparation debris — concrete, rebar, stumps and the like. Bullock was also fined $1,084,550. Environmental Protection Division spokesman Kevin Chambers told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Tuesday, three weeks after the deadline, that Bullock hadn’t followed instructions. CATCH UP | $1M fine for owner of unlicensed Fulton landfill that burned for months Chambers said EPD and the state attorney general’s office will ask a judge to put Bullock in contempt of court. It’s up to a judge, but a possible punishment includes Bullock being arrested, which has happened at least three times during this saga. Bullock’s attorney Fred Rushing said Tuesday they are appealing the court’s Oct. 1 deadline. “We disagree with what they’re saying,” he said. Rep. Debra Bazemore, a Democrat and head of the South Fulton delegation, said Bullock was being defiant. “Now there needs to be another step taken.” It is not clear how the landfill fire began, but from Sept. 20 to May 16 the 60-foot-high smoldering mountains of debris coughed up smoke and chemicals into a quiet residential neighborhood about 13 miles southwest of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. READ | Catch up with the story by clicking here. At one point, the state had $500,000 budgeted for an outside contractor to put out the fire. But the state didn’t need to use the money after finding Bullock had put out the fire himself. An Environmental Protection Agency air study found there were no long-term health effects from exposure to the smoke, but identified worrisome levels of six chemicals. Summits of smoldering rubbish don’t happen overnight. Fulton County started received complaints in 2007 about Bullock running a landfill without a permit and cited him. The piles became unstable. Court records show that the EPD first struck a deal with Bullock to reduce the amount of solid waste on the property in 2013. The EPD visited the site 40 times between June 2017 and April 2019 and documented the growing mounds, as detailed in court paperwork that gave Bullock the Oct. 1 deadline. As for the million-dollar fine, Chambers said Tuesday that Bullock hadn’t paid. Follow The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Facebook and Twitter
  • In an effort to reduce e-scooter clutter on Atlanta’s roads, micromobility company Charge installed a massive charging station in downtown Atlanta, which often sees a high influx of scooter riders.  The company launched the charging hub amid debate and concerns over how to better regulate e-scooters in the Atlanta. Another hub is set to launch later this week. A specific date was not provided.  The massive charging station is located on 567 Courtland St. The second one will be near the Krog Street Market on 712 West Ashland Ave. The hubs are the first of four set to be in Atlanta. The company will launch up to six more in other cities, including Austin, Texas.  RELATED COVERAGE: Which metro Atlanta cities have banned e-scooters? Atlanta mayor: No more riding electric scooters and bikes after 9 p.m. One day in Atlanta through the eyes of 50 scooter riders “Most e-scooter operations rely on a network of contractors to collect their scooters each night, charge them and then redistribute around the city. Out hubs are designed specifically with these contractors in mind to help maximize their earning potential,” Charge co-founder and CEO Andrew Fox said in a statement.  The charging hubs contain four individual bays capable of charging 18 scooters each. The entire hub can charge up to 72 scooters.  Scooter companies can rent each bay for a 24-hour period using Charge’s mobile application.  Like Intown Atlanta News Now on Facebook | Follow us on Twitter In other news:
  • Butts County registered sex offenders are suing to stop the Sheriff’s Office from putting signs in their yards to discourage trick-or-treaters ahead of Halloween. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Macon, asks the court to order the agency to stop the practice, which began last year with deputies planting signs that read: “NO TRICK-OR-TREAT AT THIS ADDRESS!! A COMMUNITY SAFETY MESSAGE FROM BUTTS COUNTY SHERIFF GARY LONG.” Deputies put up some of the signs while others among the county’s 200 registered sex offenders were told to display one themselves or face unspecified trouble, according to the complaint. A hearing is set for Thursday at 9:30 a.m. for a judge to decide whether to bar the signs this year. Long intends to fight for the signs. The sheriff said his agency decided to put up the warnings last year because the “Halloween on the Square” event in Jackson had been canceled, causing more children than normal to go door to door for their candy. “Regardless of the Judge’s ruling this Thursday,” the sheriff wrote on Facebook, “I WILL do everything within the letter of the Law to protect the children of this Community.” The suit — filed by registered sex offenders Christopher Reed, Reginald Holden and Corey McClendon — said deputies had violated the law by trespassing to put up signs without permission. The plaintiff’s attorneys, Mark Yurachek and Mark Begnaud, argue that forcing the men to leave the signs up in their yards was tantamount to “compelling speech,” which runs afoul of the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment. The suit also seeks a trial and for a jury to award the plaintiffs compensation for the stress, fear and humiliation the signs caused last year.
  • A Fulton County elementary principal is leaving after a few months in the role. The school district confirmed Monday that Latrina Coxton would be leaving Love T. Nolan Elementary on Nov. 1, which will be 81 days after classes started on Aug. 12. The district laid out the plan to replace Coxton at Nolan, which is just south of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.  When asked why the principal was leaving, Fulton Schools southside superintendent Gyimah Whitaker said through a spokeswoman that Coxton had “received a promotion to director of special education for Henry County.” “I want to thank (Coxton) for getting us off to a great start in the 2019-2020 school year as she envisioned,” Whitaker wrote in a letter to parents posted on Nolan’s website. READ | Average Fulton ACT score up a bit despite many schools doing worse Coxton was one of the 15 principals in new spots this school year. This is Coxton’s 16th year of public education, according to her bio posted on the school’s website. The bio went on to list her previous positions with FCS, including principal of Oakley Elementary in Union City and multiple special education roles. Fulton Schools spokeswoman Samantha Maxey said the district’s process for selecting a new principal will look at what makes the school unique so they can find who would be a good fit. READ | How did Fulton schools do this year on SAT and AP exams? She said the plan is for Sharon Gay to start as interim principal Oct. 28. Interviews will start Nov. 12 with a panel that includes district executive but also the school’s PTA head, Nolan parents and the school’s teacher of the year. Maxey said the panel hopes to have a recommendation to the school board by Dec. 3. Like North Fulton County News Now on Facebook | Follow on Twitter In other news...
  • A Marietta man sent to death row 33 years ago deserves a new sentencing hearing because his jury was given “a profoundly misleading picture” of who he was, the federal appeals court in Atlanta said in a recent ruling. The unanimous decision by a three-judge panel threw out the death sentence imposed against Lawrence Jefferson by a Cobb County jury. Jefferson’s lawyers failed him at trial by ignoring “a series of red flags that suggested that Jefferson’s aberrant behavior was the result of organic brain damage sustained at the age of two when his head was run over by an automobile.” At trial, Jefferson was convicted of killing and robbing 37-year-old Edward Taulbee, his best friend and supervisor at a construction site. After bludgeoning Taulbee to death, Jefferson took his wallet and car. Cobb County’s medical examiner testified that Taulbee was pummeled to death with a tree trunk weighing about 40 pounds. His body was found May 2, 1985, at an abandoned boat ramp at Lake Allatoona. If Jefferson’s lawyers had conducted a proper investigation and presented evidence that showed Jefferson suffered organic brain damage, it was likely that one or more jurors would not have wanted him sentenced to death, Judge Stanley Marcus wrote. Jefferson’s brain damage “significantly affected his conduct and impulse control at the time of the killing,” Marcus said. But his jury heard nothing about “the headaches and blackout spells he thereafter suffered; and nothing about the resulting frontal lobe and neurological damage he sustained so early in his life, which likely caused diminished impulse control, irritability and short-temperedness, intermittent outbursts of rage, impaired judgment and an inability to foresee the consequences of his actions,” the decision said. Jefferson’s lawyer, Jack Martin, said the decision was a long time coming. “Here, the lawyers learned that when their client was only two years old, his skull was run over by a car and there remained a visible indent and scar on his head,” he said. “It is beyond belief they would not at least do further evaluation to determine whether he has a permanent brain injury.” The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals’ ruling is noteworthy in that the judges who threw out Jefferson’s sentence are among the least likely on the court to do so. Marcus was joined by Chief Judge Ed Carnes and Judge Gerald Tjoflat. The three are conservative jurists who typically rule against death penalty appeals. Even more remarkable was what happened during Jefferson’s appeals in state court before Judge Joseph Newton. After conducting a two-day hearing and accepting legal briefs from lawyers for Jefferson and the state, Newton’s law clerk called a lawyer in state Attorney General’s Office and asked her to prepare an order for the judge to sign that dismissed Jefferson’s appeal. In August 1992, the state attorney mailed a proposed order to the judge’s office in Waycross. The following month, Newton signed the order that, except for the date, a concluding sentence and his signature, was identical to the proposed order sent to him. It appears that Newton, who is now deceased, did not closely read over the proposed order. That’s because it had 21 errors, including a misspelling on the first page: aggravated battery was “aggravated batty.” The word constitutionally was misspelled on page 9. On page 21, reserved was misspelled “reservd.” Even worse, Newton’s order referred to an affidavit signed by lawyer Michael Hauptman even though he had no connection to the case, the 11th Circuit’s ruling said. Newton’s order, replete with “glaring errors,” shows that Jefferson did not receive the “full and fair hearing” he deserved, Marcus wrote. The state attorney general’s had no comment.
  • Metro Atlanta home prices continued their vigorous climb last month, rising 5.9% from September of 2018, according to a report from a national real estate company. The median sales price of a home sold in the region last month was $253,000, $14,000 higher than a year earlier, with most of the action coming from buyers looking for modestly priced houses, according to Re/Max. However, the overall pace of the increase notched back slightly from August when the median home price was up 6.5% from a year earlier. While the number of sales the past few months has been lower than a year ago, sales picked up through the summer. “Greater Atlanta is slowly moving toward a more balanced housing market,” said Jeff LaGrange, vice president of Re/Max. The number of home sales in September was 3.5% below a year ago. But June’s sales were 12.1% below the levels of a year earlier. In general, higher prices the past several years have been driven by a scarcity of homes for sale: Supply has not been sufficient, so buyers have often bid against each other and pushed up prices. Home listings in a balanced, healthy market typically represent at least six months of sales. But last month, listings in Atlanta represented just 3.1 months of sales – down from what was already a meager 3.6 months supply a year ago, according to Re/Max. But housing is really many markets – different locations and different price tiers. In the city of Atlanta, for example, average home prices in Ansley Park are above $1.3 million, according to data collected by Adams Realtors, which specializes in city property. Morningside’s average is slightly lower, but still above $1 million. In contrast, East Point’s average is about $171,000 and Oakland City’s is $186,000. Demand for luxury homes is a lot less intense than the needs of first-time home buyers. And with a short supply of modestly priced homes in nice neighborhoods, prices at the lower end are increasing much faster than the overall market. At the upper end of the market, there are dramatically more homes listed for sale than there are people interested in making a purchase, LaGrange said. “The luxury market currently favors buyers.” In the overall market, the data on tentative deals seem to foreshadow a continued pick-up in final sales. Pending sales – where buyers and sellers have a tentative deal – are not counted as final sales because some of them fall through. But most pending sales are completed, so if pending sales rise, it’s usually a sign that the completed sales number will rise, too. In September, pending sales in metro Atlanta were nearly 15% higher than a year ago. In July and August, pending sales were 7% above levels of a year earlier. In contrast, pending sales had been down last fall and winter, and that was reflected in dropping sales through most of the spring and summer.
  • The state of Georgia wants a judge to temporarily shut down sterilization operations at the Becton Dickinson plant in Covington, a dramatic escalation in enforcement against the company that comes days after air test results near the plant showed elevated levels of ethylene oxide.  State Attorney General Chris Carr filed the complaint late Monday in Newton County Superior Court on behalf of Gov. Brian Kemp and state environmental regulators, citing a recent leak of the toxic gas that took place over an eight-day period. The complaint alleges violations of the Georgia Air Quality Act and faults BD for failing to report the leak of 54.5 pounds of ethylene oxide from Sept. 15-22.  The complaint alleges BD “failed to recognize or disclose the duration and extent of the release,” initially stating it lasted only one day and totaled two pounds. During the time of the release, the state alleges, BD was not in compliance with its permit requirements to destroy more than 99 percent of ethylene oxide used.  BD contends it reported the release even though it wasn’t required to because the amount of the gas released each day of the leak was below regulatory thresholds.  The complaint will be heard before a judge at a time to be determined. But the state wants BD’s operations suspended until the company can prove that it has reformed its operations and upgraded its emissions controls.  “After months of failed negotiations, empty promises, and misleading reports of ethylene oxide leaks, we have filed a Temporary Restraining Order to suspend operations at the BD facility in Covington,” Gov. Brian Kemp said in a statement. “Our top priority is the health and well-being of Georgia families. This measure is necessary to ensure transparency and prevent behavior that threatens the safety of employees and the community.”  In a statement, BD said it operates safely and in full compliance with its permits and will “vigorously defend” itself. The company accused Kemp and other officials of “ignoring science” and putting patients who need sterilized medical devices at risk.  “The Attorney General’s action is an unnecessary move given the company’s high level of cooperation and is inconsistent with our continued dialogue with the state to implement voluntary improvements at our Covington facility,” the company's statement said.  BD and fellow medical sterilizer Sterigenics in Cobb County have come under scrutiny since July when media reports highlighted a 2018 federal Environmental Protection Agency assessment that flagged areas near the plants for the potential for high cancer risk caused by long-term exposure to ethylene oxide, or EtO.  Subsequent mathematical modeling using the companies’ self-reported emissions data by the state Environmental Protection Division narrowed the concern to areas immediately around the plants. Both BD and Sterigencis have committed to installing millions of dollars in new emission controls as part of receiving new operating permits.  Sterigenics’ operations are currently suspended, and the company is battling Cobb County over its building permit.  Last week, the city of Covington asked BD to suspend operations after results of seven days of air testing near the plant found elevated levels of ethylene oxide above EPA screening guidelines. The leak overlapped with several days of air testing.  BD officials refused. Ethylene oxide levels recorded in Covington are well below federal workplace guidelines, the company said, and the release was not a threat to public health. Industry groups contend the EPA guidelines are far too strict.  At a Covington City Council meeting Monday night, the state’s complaint received a rousing ovation.  “We are going to work with BD towards a solution that is best for this community,” Mayor Ronnie Johnston said. “This is by no means done, but this process has taken a giant step in the right direction.”  Jason McCarthy, who runs the Covington chapter of an activist group called Stop EtO, told the council: “You guys did what no one else in this area wanted to do and that’s lead. And that wasn’t easy.”
  • The DeKalb County School District could owe current and former employees more than $250 million for breaching a contract by abruptly ending annual contributions to a supplemental retirement fund. The Georgia Supreme Court issued an opinion Monday upholding a Georgia Court of Appeals ruling that the DeKalb County School District should have given employees two years’ notice before any contribution reductions. According to the original lawsuit, filed in 2011 by teacher Elaine Gold and school counselor Amy Shaye, the school district instead suspended contributions to the Georgia Tax Shelter Annuity Plan abruptly in 2009, citing a budget shortfall after a 3% state reduction in funding for all Georgia school systems. Other employees may soon be able to join the lawsuit as a class action. District officials said Monday they will work with their attorneys to determine where the process heads next. “Although we would have liked to see a different outcome, we will move forward with the next phase of this process,” Superintendent Steve Green said. “We value the hard work of all DeKalb County School District employees. Despite the disposition of this case, we remain committed to our teachers and employees.” In 2015, DeKalb County Superior Court Judge Gregory Adams ruled the district did not breach a contract, saying there was no provision calling for a two-year notice before reducing the contributions. The Georgia Court of Appeals reversed that decision last year, citing a “governmental promise” that no changes would take place without two years’ notice. The case will now return to DeKalb County Superior Court, where a judge will determine whether other employees can join the suit as a class action, then award compensation. More than 10,000 employees were impacted. “The board promised its teachers and employees it would fund this retirement benefit,” Elaine Gold, now retired, said. “The district says it wants to retain good teachers in the classroom. But breaking this promise has hurt everyone — the students, the community and especially the classroom teachers.” Former Gov. Roy Barnes, an attorney for the plaintiffs, said a class-action suit would “ensure that everyone who was impacted by the district’s unlawful action is fairly compensated.” The district had annually contributed 6% of a participating employee’s salary. During the 2009-10 school year, DeKalb was scheduled to pay $26.5 million into the plan. If it is found to be liable for that much for each year since, the district could be responsible for more than $250 million, just more than 20% of its annual operating budget. The DeKalb County Board of Education approved a $1.2 billion budget for the 2019-2020 school year. The district currently has about $100 million in its general fund balance. The annuity plan, established in 1979, was an additional benefit to educators and a Social Security alternative. The fund is separate from the state retirement fund and contributions were paid into individual employee accounts, not taxed until withdrawn. Former DeKalb County Board of Education Chairman Tom Bowen said after the lawsuit was filed that the board did not act improperly, adding that the board had the ability to amend its policies. The suit argues, though, that the board voted to waive the two-year notice a year after contributions were suspended. In late 2015, the DeKalb school board voted to establish a 403(b) plan with a match of employees’ contributions up to 2 percent of their salaries. That is less than the halted plan’s 6% contribution that required no match. While the district has spent tens of millions on the new benefit, fewer employees have participated, mostly because fewer employees were eligible. Chief Financial Officer Bell said in 2018 that some employees still received a TSA contribution that had not been suspended in the school board’s 2009 decision. The district’s school board opted out of Social Security in 1978, and DeKalb is one of many districts across the state that does so. In neighboring Gwinnett County, which also opted out of Social Security, career schoolteachers can receive nearly their entire salary annually during retirement because of two retirement plans funded mostly by state and local tax money.

News

  • A woman is recounting a terrifying and vicious dog attack at a park in Pineville, North Carolina, Monday and when police tried to seize that dog, the owner took off, leading police on a slow-speed chase for miles.  >> Read more trending news  Abryana Heggins said she remembers all the thoughts that were rushing through her mind as a huge dog attacked her at a Pineville dog park.  'I just kept thinking 'What's happening? Why is this happening? How am I gonna get this dog off of me,'' Heggins said.  She said it all started when a very large dog owned by Terilyn Jackson started attacking a husky in the park.  'At first, he grabbed the husky by the back of its neck and then, grabbed its tail and started shaking its head aggressively,' Heggins said. 'The woman got a whistle and blowing at him.' She and her friend Jaylen rushed to get their dogs out of the park, but suddenly, she said she felt pressure on her arm.  'I just ended up being dragged across the ground by the dog, and he started shaking and locked onto my arm and there's people yelling, and she's yelling and Jaylen is trying to rip the dog off my arm,' Heggins said.  Her friend jumped on top of the dog and fought it until Pineville police arrived. Officers told Jackson they needed to take her dog into custody, but they said she took her dog and drove off.  Officers turned on their lights and sirens and followed her. They said she drove the speed limit the entire time, but refused to stop.  At one point, they said she tried to hit their patrol car. Six miles later, she arrived at an animal hospital on Archdale Drive in Charlotte.  Eventually, police arrested Jackson.  'I could have been an 8-year-old or a child and that would be worse than what I got or Jaylen,' Heggins said. Her friend Jaylen suffered several bites and broke a finger during all of this.  The dog is under what is called a 'rabies quarantine.' Animal control officials are monitoring it while police look into its background and decide if it should be put down. 
  • Pete Burdon received a call from his daughter about a post circulating on Facebook that was getting a lot of attention.  >> Read more trending news  Gunnery Sgt. John Guglielmino, a Marine Corps veteran from Clay County, Florida was sick in the hospital and his daughter’s final plea was to get as many visitors as she could to say goodbye to her dad.  “I contacted her right away and I said would this be a good time to go over there,” said Pete Burdon, a retired Navy civilian who spent 37 years working with the Navy. Burdon said he responded to the call because it felt like it was important to say goodbye to a fellow veteran, even if he didn’t know him personally. Last week he gave him a hat and a hero’s salute. “When I joked with him you can see that he tried to smile and then he tried to salute after he put that hat on, that was really a touching moment for me,” Burdon said.  His daughter Katherine Boccanelli told me her father served three tours in Vietnam. She said he suffered a stroke back in April and he was diagnosed with cancer from exposure to Agent Orange. She didn’t want him to feel alone with his last few days on earth so she put the post out on social media.  What she didn’t expect was to see the outpour from the community.  “For her it was a step she didn’t know was going to happen when she put it out there, about a 100 people showed up in that short time,” Burdon said.  Burdon says he said goodbye to Guglielmino in the hospital and he’ll be there tomorrow to say his final farewell at the funeral.  The funeral will be Wednesday at 11 a.m. at Crossroads to Victory Church in Raiford, Florida.  Guglielmino’s family says any veterans who visited who wanted to come out and pay their respects are welcome to attend. To contribute to the funeral services, click here. 
  • Within the past month, residents in Virginia-Highland have told police there were a dozen sightings of a peeping Tom in their neighborhood. Police have now released a photo of a person of interest, Channel 2 Action News reported. Neighbors who live on Greenwood Avenue have called police to report sightings of the man peeping into windows since September, Channel 2 reported. In some cases, he’s allegedly climbed on top of air conditioning units to try to look into bathroom windows. “There was a man standing and looking directly at me through the cracks in my blinds,” a woman, who asked the news station to remain anonymous, said. “We came face to face in the window. It’s very, very violating.” Last Thursday about midnight, another neighbor’s Ring doorbell camera spotted the man near her home, Channel 2 reported. The 12 sightings happened along the same street but at three different buildings. The most recent sighting was Saturday about 11 p.m., when a resident chased the man off while holding a screwdriver, the news station reported. “My fear is that eventually he’s going to get bored with just peeping into people’s windows,” the woman said. Anyone with information on the person of interest is asked to contact CrimeStoppers at 404-577-8477 or online at www.StopCrimeATL.com. Tips can be sent anonymously and information that leads to an arrest and indictment in this investigation can earn tipsters up to $2,000. In other news:
  • Officers with the Kissimmee Police Department banded together to help save a choking baby's life last week.  Kissimmee police said the child's mother approached a patrol vehicle in the area of North Clyde Avenue and Mabbette Street on Saturday and said that her 1-year-old child was not breathing or responsive after choking on a goldfish cracker. >> Read more trending news  Video captured the moments an officer began thrusting on the baby's back repeatedly as other officers responded for assistance. The baby soon became responsive and was transported to an area hospital for treatment. Officials said the baby was crying at the hospital and seemed to be doing well. 
  • More than $4,000 worth of fake Nike Air Max, Nike Air Jordan and Balenciaga shoes were seized by U.S.Customs and Border Protection officers recently at the Port of Vicksburg/Jackson. CBP said in a Tuesday news release that the shoes were from Hong Kong and found by officials in an express consignment facility. They were in four separate packages labeled 'casual shoes.' >> Read more trending news  Real Balenciaga shoes are sold online at prices ranging from $700 to $1,000. The price for legitimate Air Jordans ranges from $100 to $1,000.  'Counterfeit brand-name shoes is a multi-million dollar criminal industry that preys on consumers looking for deals,' CBP Vicksburg/Jackson Port Director Michael Morris said in a statement. “It’s best to keep in mind that if a product seems too good for the price, it may not be legitimate.” Days earlier, CBP said it seized more than $2.2 million worth of counterfeit shoes in Los Angeles.
  • Update 7 p.m. EDT Oct 22:  Police in Sumter, South Carolina found the remains of missing 5-year-old Nevaeh Adams in a landfill after searching for over two months. >> Read more trending news According to WIS-TV, police discovered the remains on Friday, and through DNA testing, determined that they belonged to Adams. Daunte Maurice Johnson, the man suspected of killing Adams' mother, told officers he killed Adams in August. Update 2:25 p.m. EDT Aug. 7: Police said Johnson told detectives he dumped Navaeh's body in a trash bin at a Sumter apartment complex Monday after killing her and her 29-year-old mother, Sharee Bradley, The Associated Press reported. Authorities said the bin had been unloaded by a trash truck before reports of Bradley's death and Navaeh's disappearance first surfaced. Authorities were searching Wednesday through 46,000 pounds of garbage in Richland and Sumter counties, Sumter police Chief Russell Roark said, according to the AP. Roark told reporters police were also searching other areas for signs of Navaeh. “We keep hope that perhaps she’s still alive,” Roark said, according to WIS. 'We’re going to continue to search. We’re going to continue to take information. But based on what we know now, based on the information he’s provided us, she would be deceased.' Update 3:25 p.m. EDT Aug. 6: Daunte Maurice Johnson, the man who had been in custody after being seen running from the apartment building, is being held in the Sumter Lee Dentition Center and is facing murder charges, WIS reported. Police said Johnson admitted to killing Sharee Bradley and Nevaeh Lashy Adams and provided information where the little girl's body was located, WPDE reported. Original report: Police are desperately searching for a missing 5-year-old girl from South Carolina after her mother was found dead in their apartment in Sumter County. Police were called Monday evening after a family member found the body of Sharee Bradley, WACH reported. But her daughter, Nevaeh Lashy Adams was not there.  Police are now looking for the little girl who is described as 4 feet, 3 inches tall and weighing 50 pounds. She has black hair that is braided and has colored beads, The State reported. An autopsy is scheduled Tuesday on the girl's mother to find out the cause of her death, the newspaper reported. A man was seen running from the apartment and was taken into custody, but no charges were announced against him and police are not sure if he had anything to do with Bradley's death, The State reported. Anyone with information about Nevaeh Lashy Adams is being asked to call Sumter Police Department at 803-436-2700 or their nearest law enforcement agency, WIS reported.