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    A new census is taking place Friday, August 23rd and Saturday, August 24th and the folks at the University of Georgia need your help. You can actually ‘bee’ part of the solution when it comes to finding out how many pollinators are buzzing around the state of Georgia. Federal budget cuts lead to the USDA suspending the program that counts bees and other pollinating insects around the country.  So, the folks at UGA are stepping in and looking for residents to step up and take part in the Great Georgia Pollinator Census to help them take a census of honey bees - Georgia's state insect and other pollinators around the state.  Pollinator Census Coordinator Becky Griffin says it's something you and kids can do together in 15 minutes.  The first step is to find the right plant 'that has a lot of blooms and is showing a lot of insect activity,' Griffin explains.  Then for the next 15 minutes just count how many bugs you see. 'So you don't have to be an entomologist to participate, because we're only taking insects and putting them into categories,' Griffin adds.  Most of the insects you'll see will be in a variety bee categories including 'carpenter bees, bumble bees, honey bees, small bees, wasps, flies, butterflies. And if it's an insect you don't know, just put it in the other insect category,' Griffin says.  There is a page on the website that you can download to help you put them into these categories.  Georgia is one of the first states to count all of it's pollinators explains Griffin.  Those participating are encouraged to post pictures on social media taking part in the census using #GaPollinators.
  • A local organizer of “Gem City Shine,” the free block party hosted by Dave Chappelle in Dayton’s Oregon District from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. this Sunday, Aug. 25, said it is meant to reclaim the neighborhood following the mass shooting there on Aug. 4.  The street will be closed Sunday, Aug. 25 beginning at 6 a.m. and reopen at 10 a.m. The event hosted by Chappelle begins at 4 p.m.   >> RELATED: Dayton.com, Dayton Foundation partner to help victims' families “I would encourage people to come early, before 4 p.m. Come hang out. Do some shopping. Grab something to eat,” Natalie Skilliter, a member of the Oregon District Business Association board, told this news organization. ***UPDATED: (10:30 a.m. Aug. 23, 2019)  Tickets have been secured by  the first wave of people hoping to go to Gem City Shine,” the free block party hosted by Dave Chappelle in Dayton’s Oregon District from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. this Sunday, Aug. 25. An unknown number of people who registered for the tickets Wednesday were “invited” to get tickets. WHAT’S NEXT Several other verified Ticketmaster users from the Dayton area received emails saying they were waitlisted for tickets.  A message to those waitlisted reads:  “Due to extremely high demand for the Dave Chappelle Onsale powered by Ticketmaster Verified Fan, you are currently on the waitlist. >> The best destinations for a fine meal in the Oregon DistrictShould additional tickets become available, registrants will be randomly selected to move off the waitlist and notified via text message.”  This new organization has reached out to a representative from Live Nation, a global company that includes Ticketmaster.  >> DAYTON.COM PREDICTIONS: 7 really good guesses as to who will be at Dave Chappelle’s Dayton block party Sale times listed on the Ticketmaster site are as follows: Verfied Fan Onsale  Start: Fri 08/23/19 10:00 am EDT End: Sun 08/25/19 04:00 pm EDT Team Chappelle Start: Fri 08/23/19 12:00 pm EDT End: Sun 08/25/19 04:00 pm EDT Oregon District Businesses Start: Fri 08/23/19 12:00 pm EDT End: Sun 08/25/19 04:00 pm EDT Those invited to the event were asked to log in ten minutes before the sale (ticket distribution) started.   >> RELATED: Chris Rock, Michael Che among stars with Chappelle during epic Prince-fueled ‘Juke Joint’ in Yellow Springs barn  “It was a little nerve racking,” said Cathy Mong, a resident of Dayton’s South Park neighborhood.  She said she was initially put in a queue with 2,000+ people ahead of her. Mong said she had issues with the code sent to her that may have been attributed to user error.  Within 30 minutes, she was able to secure tickets.  “I am just glad I got my tickets,” she said. She plans to walk to the event.   The Oregon District block party is billed as “a benefit concert to reclaim the Oregon District,” according to a release from the event’s organizers, which includes the Oregon District Business Association. ***UPDATED (12:09 p.m. Aug. 22, 2019):  Val Beerbower of the Downtown Dayton Partnership provided the following update regarding tickets to “Gem City Shine,” the Dave Chappelle hosted block party planned for  Dayton’s Oregon District from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. this Sunday, Aug. 25: “Ticketmaster is verifying all the people who registered right now. Based on the total number of qualified people, they will see if there are any additional tickets.”  >>SPOTTED: T.I., Aziz Ansari among celebrities spotted at second night of Dave Chappelle Yellow Spring’s Juke Joint *** PREVIOUS COVERAGE (Aug. 21, 2019): The secret/not-secret is now revealed about the community celebration planned in wake of the Aug. 4 mass shooting in Dayton’s Oregon District.  Dave Chappelle will host a “Gem City Shine” block party in Dayton’s Oregon District from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. this Sunday, Aug. 25. A slate of locally and nationally known acts yet to be named are set to perform at the free event. Although the event is free, tickets are required for entry. Find more details on the ticketing process below. Chappelle, an internationally-celebrated comedian who lives near Yellow Springs, has brought a long list of big names to the area for his “Juke Joint” barn parties held at Whitehall Farm in the Tecumseh Land Trust. The Oregon District block party is billed as “a benefit concert to reclaim the Oregon District,” according to a release from the event’s organizers, which includes the Oregon District Business Association. >>RELATED: Dave Chappelle to Dayton audience: ‘You guys are the secret of my success’ “We are supportive of and grateful for these and other types of efforts that seek to unite us, and seek to deny the kind of violence that was exhibited here and other places,” Corner Kitchen owner Natalie Skilliter, a member of the Oregon District Business Association board, told this news organization. An organizer has said as many as 20,000 people are expected for the event.  We first told you of a planned pop-up party in the Oregon District on Aug. 16 as rumors of the event swirled around the community.  It comes in the wake of the Aug. 4 mass shooting, and is meant to “honor the lives lost and to reclaim the community’s favorite places to shop, dine and enjoy time with family and friends,” a press release says.  Other organizers include the Downtown Dayton Partnership, the City of Dayton, the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce, Dayton Police, the Dayton-Montgomery County Convention and Visitors Bureau, The Dayton Foundation, Greater Dayton RTA and others. WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT TICKETS Those interested in accessing up to two free tickets were asked to register via Verified Fan on Ticketmaster at ticketmaster.com/davechappelledayton.  Currently, that Ticketmaster registration site says registration is closed. Check this Ticketmaster website for additional information on the ticketing process. >>SPOTTED: Chris Rock, Michael Che among stars with Chappelle during epic Prince-fueled ‘Juke Joint’ in Yellow Springs barn Tickets to this event are restricted to residents of Dayton, Ohio, and the surrounding areas. “We expect the demand for tickets to see Dave Chappelle to be overwhelming. By powering this on sale with Verified Fan, we have the best opportunity to get more tickets into the hands of fans who want to attend the show and keep tickets out of the hands of bots. While Verified Fan does not guarantee that everyone will get a ticket, it does help ensure only fans are invited to redeem tickets,” according to the Ticketmaster web site registration instructions. >>RELATED: Dave Chappelle ‘photobombs’ engagement shoot in Yellow Springs All 250 volunteer shifts have been taken.  Those waiting to help are asked to donate money to The Dayton Foundation’s Oregon District Tragedy Fund  or sign up to help at other Oregon District Business Association website, theoregondistrict.org. Ways to support victims, their families and the Oregon District Business Association will be included as part of the event. Skilliter said the support is appreciated.  “So many people from within our community and people from across the US are coming here to help support us in our efforts to heal and it's really heartwarming and gracious,” she  told this news organization. “We are very really grateful to everyone who has come to the district and shown their support. I'm just happy and appreciative of all the work being done in the name of unity.”  WHY IS THE BLOCK PARTY HAPPENING? The community was devastated after a mass shooting in the Oregon District in the early hours of Sunday, Aug. 4. Nine people and the shooter were killed. Nearly 30 others were injured enough to require medical attention.  >> Get the latest news developments on the Oregon District mass shooting In the hours, days and weeks that have followed, the community has come together to offer support and begin to heal. This event is to bring the community together as part of the healing process. >> RELATED: John Legend makes surprise visit to Oregon District to show support in aftermath of shooting HOW TO GO The event will include security gates with metal detectors. According to a news release, attendees should plan for extra time to check in and go through security during admission.  Guests are asked not to bring purses, backpacks or other large bags.  Gates will be closed once capacity reaches 20,000, organizers explained. No professional cameras other than credentialed members of the media will be allowed. Chappelle, a philanthropist, encourages the attendees to “live in the moment” and simply enjoy the experience rather than record via cellphone, according to the press release. >> Ned Peppers bouncer: ‘I would’ve died before that guy came in’ >> WATCH: John Legend’s full performance at Blind Bob’s to honor Oregon District shooting victims HOW TO HELP People can get commemorative T-shirts with a minimum donation of $20. Proceeds will benefit The Dayton Foundation’s Oregon District Tragedy Fund. There will be other ways to contribute to the fund as well.  >> RELATED: Shooting tragedy fund could reach $1.5 million FOOD AND DRINK  Guests will be encouraged to shop and eat at Oregon District establishments.  A food pavilion will be located in the parking lot near Omega Music, 318 E. Fifth St.  Beer trucks, soda and water stations, T-shirt stations, and donation stations will be located at several places throughout the District.  STREET CLOSURES  Fifth Street will be closed between Patterson Boulevard and Wayne Avenue beginning as early as 6 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 25. There will be additional closures along Wayne Avenue. Streets will reopen late Sunday night to early Monday morning.  PARKING AND SHUTTLE BUSES Free parking  will be available at the University of Dayton Arena lots A, B and C, with complimentary shuttles provided by Greater Dayton RTA. ** FIRST REPORT (Aug 16, 2019): ‘Pop-up party’ planned in Oregon District this weekend Plans are in the works for a “pop-up party” in the Oregon District this weekend. Rumors have been swirling about a special celebration this weekend with the goal of bringing the community together in the Oregon District in the aftermath of the Aug. 4 mass shooting. >> Dayton United to promote community healing and raise funds through music, shopping, brunch and more This is what we’ve been able to confirm so far: A “pop-up party” will take place on Sunday, Aug. 25, Downtown Dayton Partnership spokeswoman Val Beerbower said. >> Mayor wants Dayton to consider permanent memorial to shooting victims The event is tentatively scheduled from 4-10 p.m. She said additional details about the special event will be shared once confirmed. Volunteers are being recruited for the event. >> Food Network stars to soft-launch their Rolling Indulgence food-truck venture in Kettering this weekend
  • Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms on Wednesday announced that the city had reached its goal of raising $50 million to provide 550 homes for the city’s homeless population. About $25 million came from private donations that range from a few thousand dollars to $15 million. The United Way of Greater Atlanta partnered with the city to raise the money. The other half is from the Homeless Opportunity Bond sale that began under former Mayor Kasim Reed. Bottoms was on the city council when the plan was approved in 2017. “This is one of the things I had the fortune of walking into when I was mayor,” Bottoms said. City officials said the final donation of $114,000 came recently from Ameris Bank, and allowed the city to reach its goal. “Homelessness leads to broken dreams and shattered potential,” Ameris Chief Executive Officer H. Palmer Proctor Jr. said at a press conference with Bottoms on Wednesday. Bottoms said there are 3,217 homeless people in Atlanta, half the number that was recorded a decade ago. One of the city’s most difficult challenges has been connecting people living on the streets to the services available to them, Bottoms said. The city’s approach to addressing homelessness is based on the concept of rapid rehousing — a philosophy that recognizes most homeless people are forced to the streets after a financial crisis. The idea is to quickly provide a temporary home, which allows them to focus on rebuilding instead of where they will sleep. Under the rapid rehousing model, the belief is that the faster someone gets back in a home, the more likely they are to avoid becoming homeless again. “It is a miss-perception that many people have: that homelessness is represented entirely by the people they see on the streets,” said Jack Hardin, Co-Chair of the Atlanta Regional Commission on Homelessness. “A far larger proportion of people experiencing homelessness have incomes and function at very high levels, but live on the margins of the economics of our society and any hardship can derail.” The city’s plan for raising $50 million was announced in 2017, about the same time that it closed the city’s largest homeless shelter — a 100,000-square-foot building at the corner of Peachtree and Pine streets that housed as many as 500 people a night, but was also blamed for tuberculosis outbreaks.
  • The blighted Airway Motel on Fulton Industrial Boulevard wasn’t an enticing gateway to the Fulton County airport, which houses corporate aircraft from the likes of Home Depot and Coca-Cola. So the county bought the building, and plans to tear it down. It’s the first of many expected changes at the south Fulton airport. In the coming years, Fulton County intends to add more hangars for corporate jets, build a conference space for conversations about economic development, extend the airport’s main runway and add restaurants and shops. There are also plans to build an animal shelter on the property, as well as an emergency operations center so government officials have a place to go if the downtown Atlanta government center is compromised. All told, the county expects more than $120 million in investment around the airport, including $90 million over 15 years at the airport itself. The work, county leaders say, could be huge for the area. “We can make it into something vibrant,” Fulton County Manager Dick Anderson said. “It can be an economic center for Fulton County.” Now, the general aviation airport is functional, but there’s not much to do if you aren’t flying in or out of Charlie Brown Field. Anderson and others hope continued investment there will spill over to the rest of Fulton Industrial Boulevard — the last unincorporated part of the county and an area that has 28,000 workers and 15 million square feet of industrial space, but few places to eat lunch. “We’re excited about the investment and the attention the district is getting,” said Gil Prado, the executive director of the Fulton Boulevard Community Improvement District. “People want to come to work in a clean, safe, vibrant place.” The plans for the airport are in the early stages. The county still must create a master plan, which is subject to approval by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Georgia Department of Transportation. But the vision for the area calls for an increased government presence, including space for social service agencies and a public safety training complex. In the future, the airport could be an anchor for a wide-ranging set of services, including workforce development training, health services and alternative court programs. But the beginning is the airport itself. New hangar space could help economic development David Clark, Fulton’s public works director, said hangar space in metro Atlanta is in high demand. There are currently 40 hangars at the Fulton airport, which is the third-busiest in the state. There could be room for as many as 20 new hangar spaces by building in an area that wasn’t usable before and re-purposing part of an underused runway, Clark said. The extra hangars could make a difference when it comes to economic development, and luring companies to Georgia, said Liz Hausmann, a Fulton County commissioner. Hausmann said two corporate relocations were lost in the past year because of insufficient hangar access. Peachtree-DeKalb Airport “is full, we’re full,” she said. “It was an issue.” The plan to extend the runway by 1,200 feet over Fulton Industrial Boulevard will make take off safer for fully loaded jets, and the creation of an airport-specific fire department will also improve safety. On top of that, the county plans to rebrand as Atlanta’s executive airport. Clark said there are about 60,000 takeoffs and landings there annually. “When you tie it all together, there’s enormous potential,” Anderson said. And the addition of a business park and retail space in the area will increase the county’s tax base, said Al Nash, the executive director of the county’s development authority. It will likely take 20 years before the vision is complete, but leaders think some parts of the plan — like tearing down the Airway Motel, which the county bought for $850,000, and which was known for drugs and prostitution — will have an immediate impact. The stage was set for improvements when UPS announced plans to build a massive package processing center on land adjacent to the county. It opened last year. Anderson said UPS’ interest in the area was evidence of the demand, and it was a catalyst for these projects. Prado said the CID’s goal is bringing investment to the area. Improvements to the airport, he said, fit in with that strategy. “I think it’s the county’s biggest asset here,” said Robb Pitts, the Fulton County commission chairman. “It’s going to be a signature project for us.”
  • The man charged after a fake bomb threat note was left inside his Porsche is sharing his side of events that forced police to evacuate six buildings Wednesday in Marietta. Passers-by noticed the note on the dashboard of the Porsche that the car was “modified to explode on contact,” and called authorities, but the car’s owner said it was all just a joke between friends. In a letter of apology shared with media, Gary Studenic said his “very innocent and simple accident became a very large problem for so many.” Studenic, 70, was charged with one count of misdemeanor reckless conduct after police cleared the area nearby and tracked him down. Studenic, who owns and oversees a pain clinic, was booked into and released from the Cobb County Jail on $250 bail. In a two-page letter released Thursday, Studenic said he and a friend, a local attorney, have a tradition of playing pranks on each other and the note was another of those. His friend placed the now-infamous note on his vehicle “and then watched for me to come by and see it.” Studenic said he and his wife approached the car and she read the note out loud. “As soon as she started reading it out loud to me, I grabbed it and started looking for my friend because it didn’t fool me for a second,” Studenic wrote. “As I reached for my phone to call him, while looking for his number, I saw him looking out of his office window laughing.” RELATED | Porsche owner charged after cops find bomb threat note in car The next day, Studenic drove in town to find a parking spot. He parked his Porsche near the office of the Marietta Daily Journal, “reached over and grabbed what I thought was only my notice of parking” and ended up placing the note on the dashboard. Studenic went into the Cobb County courthouse and said he turned off his phone. With his phone off, Studenic was unaware of the scene that was unfolding a few blocks from Marietta Square. Police were dispatched around 10:10 a.m. to the Marietta Daily Journal on Waddell Street to find Studenic’s black Porsche with a note on the dashboard that read the car would explode and that it would cost $10,000 for the bomb to be deactivated. Cops evacuated six buildings, including some office buildings within the immediate area. The Cobb County Bomb Squad was called in to investigate the car. Once Studenic turned his phone back on, he he saw he had a “plethora of messages and calls,” including several from Marietta police. “As soon I heard that there was potentially an explosive device in my car, I stated that everyone could stand down, as it had to be from a prank from the other night,” Studenic said. Studenic rushed to the scene where he said he was met with a “ramped-up, agitated group of officers doing their job.” “The conversation was very heated as to why I had done such a thoughtless thing, and I was very upset to have such allegations levied at me of which I would never have knowingly done,” he said. Studenic said the police told him that they felt “some charges had to be given,” so he was arrested and booked into the Cobb jail. The Marietta Police Department declined to comment on Studenic’s apology letter. However, spokesman Chuck McPhilamy said Wednesday that the department takes any threat of a bomb seriously. “In the wake of so many tragedies across the country, police can’t make the assumption that this is not a serious threat,” he said. Like Cobb County News Now on Facebook | Follow on Twitter
  • A street sweeper made a grisly discovery late Thursday night -- a body found on the side of the street. Now, police are investigating the death as a hit-and-run. Police said a crew cleaning the streets found the man dead on the ground in grass near Interstate 285 on Highway 166. The crews immediately called 911. Channel 2's Darryn Moore has been at the scene for hours -- He will bring you the latest on the work to identify the victim, on Channel 2 Action News This Morning TRENDING STORIES: Ex-wife of prominent Atlanta surgeon killed adult children, herself, police say What we know about family found dead inside Vinings townhouse Medical Examiner's Office admits it can't find murder victim's remains
  • By allowing a 16-year-old to participate in outdoor conditioning drills last week, Clayton County’s Elite Scholars Academy appears to have violated district policy that requires suspension of outside athletic activities when the heat index hits 95 degrees. Imani Bell, a basketball player at the school, collapsed and later died after running stairs during outdoor drills on Aug. 13. Temperatures in metro Atlanta reached a high of 100.3 degrees, with a heat index of 109 degrees at 4 p.m. that day, according to the National Weather Service. The fire department received the distress call about Imani’s condition at 5:52 p.m. Imani collapsed after complaining to a coach that she was feeling ill from exercising, her family has said. Autopsy results are pending, and no official cause of death has been released. “This is why it is so ridiculous and why someone needs to be held responsible,” family spokesman Justin Miller said after being read the policy. Miller said the family has been told the autopsy will take three to six weeks. In a policy titled “Heat advisory precautions for physical education/school day activities,” Clayton Schools mandates that all outside activities be suspended when the heat index is 95 degrees and above. The policy extends to physical education classes. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution obtained the policy through an open records request. “Note that full sun exposure can increase the heat index by as much as 15 degrees,” the policy says in bold text. A separate Wet Bulb Globe Temperature policy from the Georgia High School Association prohibits exercise when that measurement is over 92 degrees. The Wet Bulb Globe Temperature differs from the “feels-like” heat index in that it takes into account temperature, humidity, wind speed, sun angle and cloud cover. A wet bulb reading of 92 degrees triggers a “NO OUTDOOR WORKOUTS” mandate, according to the GHSA website. A 92-degree wet bulb reading equates to a heat index temperature of 104-105 degrees, the website says. The GHSA policy was included in the district’s response to the AJC’s open records request. News of the apparent policy violation comes a day after a family spokesman said the Bells have been unable to get their questions answered by the district. Miller, the family spokesman who is also an attorney, said they are considering a lawsuit against Clayton Schools to get those answers. The family wants to know more about the coaching staff and why students were performing outdoor conditioning drills in 100-degree heat. “The school has a policy,” Miller said. “The Georgia High School Athletic Association has a policy. Everyone has a policy, but no one was making sure the policy was being followed.” A spokesman for the district declined to comment Thursday, saying it was doing so out of respect for the family. The district issued a brief statement from Superintendent Morcease Beasley the day of Imani’s death, expressing sorrow and plans to provide grief counselors. “Our team is working diligently to determine more details relative to this matter,” the statement said. Wednesday night, hundreds of people turned out for a candlelight vigil at Dixon Grove Baptist Church in Jonesboro. Friends, family and school officials described her as brilliant, passionate and loving — and the type of person who would rally her teammates when they were struggling on the court. During the vigil, a woman fell ill from the heat, prompting participants to call emergency personnel for help. Dixon secretary Cozella Hill said the unidentified woman was fine after getting help. “I got shaken myself,” said Hill, adding that she went inside the church for momentary relief from the heat. Funeral services for Bell will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at Hillside Chapel and Truth Center, 2450 Cascade Road, S.W. in Atlanta. A wake is scheduled for Friday from 6-8 p.m. at Divine Faith Ministries International, 9800 Tara Boulevard in Jonesboro.
  • A student was transported to an area hospital Wednesday after losing two fingertips in an accident at Marietta High School.  Marietta City Schools spokeswoman Jen Brock said the student was in the bathroom when she went into a stall and the door was “accidentally closed” behind her by another student. The student’s two fingertips were caught in the open space near the door’s hinge.  “There was nothing malicious or intentional about what happened,” Brock said. The school called 911, and student was taken to the hospital where she was treated for the injury. No charges will be filed in the incident, Brock said.  Like Cobb County News Now on Facebook | Follow on Twitter
  • Erin Ennis took to social media Wednesday thanking people for their prayers and well wishes. “A bullet will reside in my leg for the rest of my life,”the Clark Atlanta University student posted on Instagram, “but at least I have a life period.” Ennis was one of four students shot Tuesday night at a block party outside the Atlanta University Center’s library. They were with about 200 other students marking the beginning of the school year. Ennis, 18, of Powder Springs, Maia Williams-McLaren, 18, of Boston; Elyse Spencer, 18, of Rochester, New York.; and Kia Thomas, 19 of Jonesboro had injuries ranging from graze wounds to gunshot wounds. Thomas, a junior at Clark Atlanta, is a decorated volleyball standout, university officials confirmed, and was honored in 2017 as the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Player of the Year, the 2018 preseason offensive player of the year and was recently selected for the 2019 preseason all-conference volleyball first team. She is a 2017 graduate of Coweta County’s Northgate High School. Police say an argument between two parties appears to have occurred before the shooting. The injured students were not the intended targets. “I’m just trying to process a lot of things,” Tiffany Williams, the mother of Spelman College student Maia Williams-McClaren, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Wednesday. >> RELATED | Man sought after shooting at Clark Atlanta University >>READ | What defines a mass shooting? Depends on who you ask on her Twitter account, Elyse Spencer says she will graduate from Spelman in 2023 with a major in photography. “Thank you for y’all prayers,” she posted to her Twitter account but could not be reached for further comment. “Can’t really reply to people. But I’m here, I’m alive. God got me. Y’all got me.” Spencer was one of Rochester’s “bright stars,” Mayor Lovely Ann Warren said on Facebook, and was a member of the Mayor’s Youth Advisory Council in Rochester, along with a number of other community groups. A GoFundMe crowdfunding campaign has been set up to raise $5,000 for her continued care. The campaign, organized by her sister, says Elyse “was shot in the chest right by her heart.” Several people helped victims during in the aftermath of the shooting. >> MORE | Clark Atlanta sophomore steps in to help wounded student >> READ | On college campuses, shootings fuel fear but remain rare One, Derrick Daniels, a Clark Atlanta sophomore education major from Chicago, used his shirt to apply pressure on one student’s leg wound. Daniels said he didn’t know the young woman, but “I knew I needed to do something to help her.” He said he knew to apply pressure from his dad, who was in the military and as someone who learned what to do just by growing up in Chicago, a city that has been hit hard by gun violence. Daniels said he has lost several friends to gun violence in Chicago. Earlier this month, the city experienced a weekend of gun violence that included seven deaths and 52 people wounded.“I don’t want to say I’ve become desensitized to these kinds of things, but being the type of person I am, I always want to be able to help people in these situations. I want to keep a level head at all times,” he told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Wednesday.

News

  • According to many polls, Americans – especially those who say they are Democrats -- are not that fond of the Electoral College. Neither are many of the Democratic candidates for president. >> Read more trending news  With just over 14 months until the 2020 presidential election, a movement to change the way electoral votes are awarded and who will be elected president has gained some steam. The National Popular Vote Compact (NPV), which has its roots in the most contested presidential election in U.S. history, sets in state law a policy that awards all a state’s electoral votes to the candidate who wins the national popular vote. Under the Electoral College system used today, 48 states have a “winner-take-all” system that awards all the state’s electoral votes to the person who gets a majority of votes in that state. The Electoral College does not take into consideration that national popular vote. Sixteen states, along with the District of Columbia, have passed the NPV agreement. They are California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon and Rhode Island. While legislation has been passed in the 16 states and the District of Columbia, the agreement would not go into effect until states with a collective 270 electoral votes — the number needed to win the presidency — agree to join. Currently, the District of Columbia and the 16 states in the agreement hold a combined total of 196 electoral votes, meaning the pact would need enough new state members to get 74 electoral votes.Supporters say the system would give the person who got the most votes country-wide the presidency he or she deserves. Opponents say states would be forced to hand over electoral votes to a candidate who did not win that state. For instance, in the 2016 election, a state such as Florida, in which President Donald Trump earned more votes, would have had to pledge its 29 electoral votes to Trump’s opponent, Hillary Clinton, who won the national popular vote in the 2016 election. The Electoral College of today was established by the Twelfth Amendment to the Constitution which replaced the method for electing the president and vice president provided in Article II, Section 1, Clause 3. Under the system, when voters cast a ballot for president, they are actually choosing members of the Electoral College, called electors, who are pledged to that presidential candidate. Following the election for president, electors then meet to choose the president. Electors almost always vote for their state’s popular vote winner, and some states have laws requiring them to do so. However, electors are not bound by federal law to vote for a specific candidate – for instance, the one who won the popular vote in their state. In 29 states and the District of Columbia, electors are bound by state law or by a pledge they sign to vote for the candidate who won the popular vote of the state they represent. Five men have won the presidency in the Electoral College while not winning the country’s popular vote: John Quincy Adams in 1824, Rutherford B. Hayes in 1876, Benjamin Harrison in 1888, George W. Bush in 2000 and Donald Trump in 2016. The National Popular Vote campaign goes back to Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore's loss to Bush in 2000, according to The Associated Press. Gore won the popular vote but lost the election over a vote count in Florida.
  • Fans of all things Disney are in Anaheim for the D23 Expo. And news of future development for the properties at the Disney Parks around the world has already started being released. Inside the Disney Parks 'Imagining Tomorrow, Today' Pavilion at the 2019 D23 Expo visitors will be able to see what is coming next to the Disney Parks around the world. While there are a lot of cool things to share, in this post we are going to focus on the upcoming additions coming to Walt Disney World! There is an all-new Star Wars vacation experience coming to Walt Disney World!  >> Read more trending news  The Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser will be a new, first-of-its-kind vacation experience where guests will check in for a two-night adventure aboard a glamorous starship called the Halcyon.  Once onboard, guests will interact with characters and become active participants in stories that unfold around them on their galactic journey.  Also in the pavilion is a model of the multi-year transformation of Epcot complete with new experiences, 'that will make the park more Disney, more family, more timeless, and more relevant.' The reinvention of Epcot will include several new additions, and the first one we learned about was a new attraction called Journey of Water which is inspired by 'Moana.' This first-ever attraction based on the Walt Disney Animation Studios film, 'Moana,' will let guests interact with magical, living water in a beautiful and inspiring setting. And this October, guests will be able to visualize all the exciting plans for Epcot at a new experience center in the Odyssey Events Pavilion called Walt Disney Imagineering presents the Epcot Experience. Inside this first-of-its-kind offering within a Disney park, guests will discover engaging and interactive exhibits that allow you to step inside excitement to see some never-before-revealed details driving the future of Epcot during this unprecedented period of transformation. The Disney Parks pavilion also features other upcoming Walt Disney World attractions including TRON Lightcycle Run coming to Magic Kingdom Park as well as Mickey & Minnie's Runaway Railway coming to Disney's Hollywood Studios. On Sunday, August 25, we'll find out more details on these and other announcements during the Disney Parks, Experiences, and Products presentation at D23 Expo 2019!
  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has undergone radiation therapy to treat a malignant tumor discovered during routine blood tests in early July, according to a statement from the court. >> Read more trending news  Ginsburg, 86, began a three-week course of radiation therapy Aug. 5 at New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. 'The Justice tolerated treatment well,' Supreme Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said in a statement. 'She cancelled her annual summer visit to Santa Fe, but has otherwise maintained an active schedule.' Arberg said doctors noted an abnormality during a routine blood test in early July and that a subsequent biopsy on July 31 confirmed a 'localized malignant tumor' on her pancreas. After Ginsburg underwent treatment, Arberg said, 'There is no evidence of disease elsewhere in the body.' 'Justice Ginsburg will continue to have periodic blood tests and scans,' she said. 'No further treatment is needed at this time.' In January, Ginsburg missed arguments in the Supreme Court for the first time since joining the court in 1993 while recovering from surgery to remove cancerous growths from her left lung. She previously underwent surgery for colorectal cancer in 1999 and pancreatic cancer in 2009, according to the Associated Press. Ginsburg is the eldest person serving on the Supreme Court and leads its liberal wing.
  • A service is set for next week for the three members of a prominent Atlanta family killed in an apparent double murder-suicide.  Marsha Edwards, 58, and her two children, 24-year-old Christopher Edwards II and 20-year-old Erin Edwards, will be remembered during a memorial Wednesday in southwest Atlanta, according to a spokesman for the family.  The service is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. at Cascade United Methodist Church, which is at 3144 Cascade Road.  Investigators believe Marsha, the former wife of surgeon and civic leader Christoper Edwards, shot and killed the couple’s children before turning the gun on herself. Their bodies were found by police Wednesday inside her upscale Vinings townhouse after officers were asked to perform a wellness check. RELATED: Ex-wife of Atlanta Housing chairman killed 2 children, herself, police say Lots of questions remained unanswered Friday. Among them: • Who requested the wellness check? • When did the shootings take place? • What kind of gun was used? • Who is the registered owner of the gun? • What evidence prompted authorities to classify the investigation as a double murder-suicide? It could be weeks before autopsy and toxicology results shed light on those and other questions. “Dr. Edwards, his extended family and friends are in a state of grief and shock, and privacy of the family is paramount as arrangements are being made,” spokesman Jeff Dickerson said Thursday in an emailed statement. A longtime fixture in the Atlanta medical community, Edwards serves on the board of trustees of the Morehouse School of Medicine and was formerly on the board of Grady Memorial Hospital. He is the chairman of the Atlanta Housing Authority board. As news of the deaths spread, condolences poured in from those who knew the family and strangers touched by the tragedy. Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and her husband were among the mourners.  Erin Edwards, a Boston University student, was an intern in the mayor’s communications office last summer. Christopher Edwards II joined the Atlanta film and entertainment office in 2018 as a digital content manager.  Both were Woodward Academy graduates. They were “promising young adults and budding NABJ media professionals,” said Sarah Glover, the former president of the National Association of Black Journalists. Glover said on Twitter she met the siblings at a conference in 2017.  Their mother, a medical equipment provider, was also a member of the organization, which advocates for and supports black journalists.  AJC.com has reached out to Cobb police for additional information about the deaths.  — Please return to AJC.com for updates.
  • Volkswagen AG has issued a recall of 679,000 cars sold in the U.S. since 2011. >> Read more trending news  The recall deals with electrical issues where a driver could take out the key after coming to a stop, even if the car was not in park. Silicate can build up on the shift lever micro switch and cause the problem, Reuters reported. The car will show that it is in park but it is still in gear, CNET reported. The car could then roll away, according to Reuters. The recall involves the following Volkswagen models: Jetta Beetle Beetle Convertible Golf Golf SportsWagen GTI. The cars affected come from various model years, from 2011 to 2019. Dealers will turn off a micro switch, install a different switch outside of the gear lever housing and add a new circuit board, CNET reported. Owners of affected vehicles will be alerted about the issue on or after Oct. 11, according to CNET.
  • Health officials in Illinois said Friday that a person who was hospitalized with lung problems after vaping has died in what might be the first death linked to e-cigarettes and similar devices in the United States. >> Read more trending news  The Illinois Department of Public Health said in a statement that the unidentified individual, who was between 17 and 38 years old, had been hospitalized with a severe respiratory illness shortly after vaping. 'The severity of illness people are experiencing is alarming and we must get the word out that using e-cigarettes and vaping can be dangerous,' Illinois Department of Public Health Director Ngozi Ezike said Friday. In Illinois alone, health officials said at least 22 people between the ages of 17 and 38 have experienced respiratory illnesses after vaping. Officials with the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention arrived Tuesday in Illinois to help state health officials investigate, Ezike said. In a statement released Wednesday, officials with the CDC said that between June 28 and Aug. 20, nearly 150 cases of severe lung illnesses linked to e-cigarettes were reported in 15 states. Health officials continue to investigate the illnesses. According to the CDC, no specific product or compound has been linked to all of the cases and it remained unclear Friday whether the cases shared a common cause. Poison control officials have been concerned about exposure to vaping products, including e-cigarettes and liquid nicotine, in recent years due to the high concentration of nicotine when compared with other tobacco products, according to the American Association of Poison Control Centers. Association officials said that as of July 31, poison control centers have managed 2,439 cases connected to e-cigarette devices and liquid nicotine this year. Last year, officials fielded 2,470 such cases, according to figures from the association.