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Kirby on Rose Bowl: 'We're not going to ride the rides'
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Kirby on Rose Bowl: 'We're not going to ride the rides'

Kirby on Rose Bowl: 'We're not going to ride the rides'
Photo Credit: Photo: WSB-TV

The four men who will coach in the College Football Playoff held a joint news conference Thursday in Atlanta.

Kirby on Rose Bowl: 'We're not going to ride the rides'

Kirby Smart, Nick Saban, Dabo Swinney and Lincoln Riley have a lot in common.

They’re all really good football coaches and they’re all one win away from playing for the National Championship.

The head coaches for Georgia, Alabama, Oklahoma and Clemson were in Atlanta on Thursday for the College Football Awards Show.


Channel 2 Action News and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution are your home for everything Rose Bowl. Make sure to follow @WSBTV and @AJCSports for updates on Twitter & LIKE the official WSB-TV Facebook page!

For much more on the Georgia Bulldogs, CLICK HERE to download and listen to Channel 2 Sports Director Zach Klein & AJC's Jeff Schultz on the ‘We Never Played the Game’ podcast.


Before the event, they held a joint news conference to talk about the College Football Playoff.

When asked about playing in the Rose Bowl, Smart wasn’t shy with his thoughts.

“It’s not your typical bowl game,” he said. “We’re not going to ride the rides.”

Watch the entire news conference below:

The Georgia Bulldogs face the Oklahoma Sooners in the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1 at 5 p.m.

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