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Double murder suspect caught after escaping police custody

A double murder suspect who escaped police custody is now headed back to jail.

Isiah Alexander Williams, 18, somehow managed to get out of his handcuffs and slipped out of a police precinct on Old National Highway Monday evening.

Officers caught him Tuesday afternoon.

“During our encounter with Mr. Williams, he was able to free himself of his handcuffs while being detained,” said Maj. Tamika Pritchett, with the City of South Fulton Police Department

Officers searched for hours looking for him into the night, but couldn't find him.

TRENDING HEADLINES:

Investigators told Channel 2’s Tom Jones that Williams made it to Atlanta, where he was arrested around 2 p.m. Tuesday.

Pritchett said Williams is very dangerous and is accused of killing two teens.

“On Oct. 10, 2019, two juvenile males were murdered at 5195 Old Bill Cook Road at a vacant daycare building,” Pritchett said.

Natasha Williams, no relation to the escaped man, lives near the precinct.

She told Jones that it frightened her when she heard a suspected double murderer had escaped. She now wants to know how it happened.

“I just don't see how you get out of police custody from a police precinct,” Natasha Williams said.

Williams faces two counts of murder, two counts of aggravated assault, possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony and burglary. Escape charges will likely be added.

Posted by Clayton County Sheriff's Office on Tuesday, April 7, 2020
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  • George Floyd was remembered as a “good guy” and a good player by his former coach and classmate at a Florida community college he attended in the mid-1990s. “He was a good athlete, and a good person,” George Walker told WTVT. “I think for George, being in Avon Park was probably, trying to shift his lifestyle from being in a big city to a small town like Avon Park.” Floyd, 46, died Monday after he was detained for questioning regarding a possible forgery in progress. Video of his death, caught by bystanders showed a Minneapolis police officer holding his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than five minutes as Floyd pleaded for air. Floyd was 6 feet 7 inches tall and a forward-center from Houston who started as a freshman at South Florida Community College (known as South Florida State College since 2012) in Avon Park. Walker, was familiar with the Houston native from his days as an assistant at the University of Houston and recruited him to the central Florida college. The coach’s wife, Gloria Walker, said the couple spent a good deal of time with the players away from the court. Floyd was one of them. “We didn’t have a big enough budget with the school to really feed them often, so my husband and I, we took our money and would make family meals, and the kids just loved that,” Walker told WTVT. “When they came to South Florida, they would say to us, ‘We get a bedroom all to ourselves?’ They were very appreciative.” Gerald Snell, who attended classes with Floyd, remembered “a very humble, a very soft-spoken gentleman.” Snell said Floyd and George Walker would attend his church sometimes and would be asked to help out in several projects. “They would ask me, ‘Did I know a lot of strong men,’ and I said, ‘Yeah, I got a whole team,’” Walker told WTSP. “So, we were replacing the pews in the church, so we came over one night and took all the old pews out.' Floyd received an award as the Panthers’ outstanding rebounder in 1994, The Tampa Tribune reported. The school no longer has a basketball program, according to the South Florida Community College website. Snell said he was “just totally blown away” when he heard about Floyd’s death. “This, this has to stop. Somewhere. It has to stop now,' Snell told WTVT. 'He was not someone who deserved this. He was a human being. Regardless of his skin color.” “I didn’t think a person could get treated like that,” Walker told WTSP. “... You would think something like this would be in 1950.' Gloria Walker said her son recognized Floyd in an Instagram post of the video. “My son was screaming through the phone, ‘That’s our George! That’s our George!’” Gloria Walker told WTVT. “Once we saw a close-up view of the video, we saw it was him. It saddens us. George was a good guy.”
  • A phrase used in a tweet by President Donald Trump, which was flagged by Twitter for “glorifying violence,” has a history that goes back 53 years. Trump’s tweet early Friday referred to protesters in Minneapolis as “thugs” and warned that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” The comment, made in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death, echoed a statement made in December 1967 by Walter Headley, the longtime chief of police in Miami. Floyd, 46, a handcuffed black man who pleaded for air and for his mother as a white police officer knelt on his neck Monday, died several hours later. The four officers involved were fired, and one of them -- Derek Chauvin -- was arrested and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. Headley served as Miami’s police chief for 20 years and was 62 in 1967. Complex and controversial, Headley’s aggressive policies in the city’s black neighborhoods led to violence in the city during the late 1960s, the Miami Herald reported. Headley favored tactics that included “shotguns, dogs and a ‘get tough’ policy,” the newspaper reported. The quote that Trump referenced was published in a front-page story in the Miami Herald on Dec. 17, 1967. Headley said, “We haven’t had any serious problems with civil uprising and looting because I’ve let the word filter down that when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” Earlier in the month, Headley “declared war” on crime and said his primary target was 'aimed at young Negro males, from 15 to 21,” the Herald reported in 1967. “Ninety percent of our Negro population is law-abiding and wants to eliminate our crime problems,” Headley said. “But 10% are young hoodlums who have taken advantage of the civil rights campaign,' the Herald reported. Trump told reporters Friday evening that he didn’t know the history behind the phrase, NPR reported. “(Headley) had a long history of bigotry against the black community,” Howard University professor Clarence Lusane told NPR. Headley had his share of critics through the years. The Herald described him as “an unperturbed Buddha,' whose voice “rumbles up from under an Oliver Hardy moustache.” “The chief appears to be mixing avocadoes with mangoes,” Miami News columnist Bill Baggs once wrote about one of Headley’s statements. Walter Everett Headley Jr. was born May 11, 1905, in Philadelphia, and learned to ride horses at his grandfather’s farm in New Jersey. When he was 15, he dropped out of high school, lied about his age and joined the U.S. Cavalry. Headley moved with his family to South Florida in 1923, and after working several jobs joined the Miami police force in 1937. He was appointed chief of police on Aug. 11, 1948, and declared, “There will be no liberal policy here.” For the next 20 years, he wielded power and fended off several attempts to have him fired. When Robert King High, who was mayor of Miami from 1957 to 1967, tried to have him replaced, Headley retorted that no one was going to have him removed “because of the whim of a squirt.” Even when his policies seemed enlightened, Headley managed to antagonize certain groups. He publicly favored gay bars because “it was better to let them congregate in a few places.” “It was like localizing an infection, instead of spreading it all over,” Headley said. In August 1968, during the Republican National Convention in Miami Beach, the predominantly black neighborhood of Liberty City erupted in violence, the Herald reported. Miami police fatally shot two people in Liberty City and one person in Overton. Eighteen other people were injured and police made 222 arrests, according to The Washington Post. Headley died Nov. 16, 1968, in Miami and was buried at Woodlawn Park North Cemetery and Mausoleum. Judge J. Fritz Gordon eulogized Headley as a man who “embraced that rare attribute of men -- the admixture of tact, flavored with humanity, humility and fairness.” Headley never backed down from criticism and insisted his “get tough” actions were not racially motived. “I don’t plan to temper my statements until I get some results,' Headley told the Miami City Commission in December. 'I didn’t mention race and I never have. Everyone here knows I’m not a racist.” Information from Newspaper.com archives were used in compiling this report
  • Nearly 6 million people worldwide -- including more than 1.7 million in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. While efforts to contain the COVID-19 outbreak continue, states have begun to shift their focus toward reopening their economies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here. Live updates for Saturday, May 30, continue below:  US death toll passes 102,000 Update 8:27 a.m. EDT May 30: At least 102,836 people have died in the United States from coronavirus, according to the latest numbers compiled by Johns Hopkins University. There have been at least 1,747,087 cases recorded nationwide. On Saturday, Johns Hopkins reported 1,068 new cases and 27 deaths. The totals include cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other U.S. territories. Global cases near 6M, death toll tops 365K Update 7:49 a.m. EDT May 30: The global death toll attributed to the novel coronavirus reached 365,368 early Saturday, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally. In the four months since the virus was first identified in Wuhan, China, it has infected at least 5,945,737 people worldwide. Meanwhile, 15 nations now have total infection counts higher than China’s 84,123. The 10 nations with the highest number of infections recorded to date are as follows: • The United States has reported 1,747,087 cases, resulting in 102,836 deaths. • Brazil has recorded 465,166 cases, resulting in 27,878 deaths. • Russia has confirmed 396,575 cases, resulting in 4,555 deaths. • The United Kingdom has reported 272,607 cases, resulting in 38,243 deaths. • Spain has confirmed 238,564 cases, resulting in 27,121 deaths. • Italy has reported 232,248 cases, resulting in 33,229 deaths. • France has confirmed 186,924 cases, resulting in 28,717 deaths. • Germany has reported 183,025 cases, resulting in 8,520 deaths. • India has recorded 174,301 cases, resulting in 4,981 deaths. • Turkey has recorded 162,120 cases, resulting in 4,489 deaths Washington’s stay-at-home order to end Sunday  Update 5:37 a.m. EDT May 30: Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said the state’s stay-at-home order will expire on Sunday as planned. “Under this approach, counties will have more flexibility to demonstrate that they have the capability to stay on top of the virus,” Inslee said in a Friday news conference. “This does not mean, obviously, that we’re returning to normal. It means that, three months to the day after we declared a state of emergency, we’re successfully moving forward.” Mexico’s coronavirus death toll doubles in 2 weeks; Brazil’s deaths overtake Spain’s  Update 5:21 a.m. EDT May 30: Mexico’s novel coronavirus-related death toll stands at 9,415, the second-highest count in Latin America, meaning it has nearly doubled in only two weeks and trails only Brazil in the region. According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, Mexico has confirmed a total of 84,627 cases, more than 3,200 of which were diagnosed Friday. Meanwhile, Brazil recorded an additional 1,124 virus-related deaths in the past 24 hours, bringing its cumulative count to 27,878 and pushing the country past Spain’s total fatalities of 27,121. The South American nation also confirmed 26,928 new cases in the same 24-hour period, bringing the nationwide infection count to 465,166. US military personnel in South Korea test positive for COVID-19 Update 5:02 a.m. EDT May 30: A pair of newly assigned U.S. Forces Korea service members have tested positive for COVID-19, USFK said in a statement. The soldiers, who are being treated in the designated COVID-19 isolation barracks at Camp Humphreys, arrived at Osan Air Base May 27 on a U.S. government-chartered flight, USFK said. The pair were placed in mandatory quarantine upon arrival and have since tested positive for the virus. SCOTUS rejects request from California church to block restrictions on in-person services Update 3:42 a.m. EDT May 30: The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Friday to reject a request from a California church to block restrictions on the number of people allowed to attend religious services during the coronavirus pandemic.  “Although California’s guidelines place restrictions on places of worship, those restrictions appear consistent with the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment,” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote, explaining his break with fellow conservative justices in denying the request.  “Similar or more severe restrictions apply to comparable secular gatherings, including lectures, concerts, movie showings, spectator sports, and theatrical performances, where large groups of people gather in close proximity for extended periods of time,” Roberts wrote. US coronavirus cases surpass 1.7M, deaths near 103K Published 12:51 a.m. EDT May 30: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States continued to climb past 1.7 million early Saturday across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, there are at least 1,747,085 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 102,836 deaths.  The hardest-hit states remain New York with 368,284 cases and 29,646 deaths and New Jersey with 158,844 cases and 11,409 deaths. Massachusetts, with 95,512 cases, has the third-highest number of deaths with 6,718, while Illinois has the third-highest number of cases with 117,455. Only 16 states and territories have confirmed fewer than 6,000 cases each. Six other states have now confirmed at least 50,000 novel coronavirus cases each, including: • California: 106,910 cases, resulting in 4,088 deaths • Pennsylvania: 74,984 cases, resulting in 5,464 deaths • Texas: 61,630 cases, resulting in 1,635 deaths • Michigan: 56,621 cases, resulting in 5,406 deaths • Florida: 54,497 cases, resulting in 2,413 deaths • Maryland: 50,988 cases, resulting in 2,466 deaths Meanwhile, Georgia, Virginia and Connecticut each has confirmed at least 41,000 cases; Louisiana, Ohio and Indiana each has confirmed at least 33,000 cases; North Carolina, Colorado, Minnesota, Tennessee and Washington each has confirmed at least 21,000 cases; Iowa and Arizona each has confirmed at least 18,000 cases; Wisconsin and Alabama each has confirmed at least 17,000 cases; Mississippi and Rhode Island each has confirmed at least 14,000 cases; Nebraska and Missouri each has confirmed at least 13,000 cases, followed by South Carolina with 11,131; Kansas, Kentucky, Utah and Delaware each has confirmed at least 9,000 cases; the District of Columbia and Nevada each has confirmed at least 8,000 cases, followed by New Mexico with 7,493; Arkansas and Oklahoma each has confirmed at least 6,000 cases. Click here to see CNN’s state-by-state breakdown.
  • After a third consecutive night of protests in Minneapolis and in several other major U.S. cities, authorities on Friday arrested former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin on third-degree murder and manslaughter charges in the death of George Floyd. Floyd, 46, died Monday after he was detained for questioning regarding a possible forgery in progress. Video of his death caught by bystanders showed a Minneapolis police officer identified as Chauvin holding his knee to Floyd’s neck for more than five minutes as Floyd pleaded for air, sparking outrage.  Minnesota governor: 'I urge for peace’ Update 8:13 a.m. EDT May 30: After a night of protests in Minneapolis, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz appealed for calm. “Minnesotans are asking for and deserve confidence that we can respond to this crisis, and we will,” Walz tweeted Saturday. Walz ended his tweet with a plea: “I urge for peace at this time.” Protesters vandalize downtown Phoenix, police say  Update 7:24 a.m. EDT May 30: Protesters have left behind a trail of destruction in downtown Phoenix, Arizona, police said.  “Property throughout the downtown Phoenix area has been vandalized as some demonstrators engage in criminal behavior, breaking windows and doors to municipal and private business and destroy cars parked along the street,” Phoenix Police Department tweeted. Nearly 200 arrested in Houston protest  Update 7:05 a.m. EDT May 30: Nearly 200 people have been arrested in Houston, Texas, following Friday night protests. According to a tweet from the Houston Police Department, most of those arrested will be charged with obstructing a roadway. The department also told CNN four of its officers sustained minor injuries and protesters damaged eight police vehicles. “Our officers who were attacked are in the hospital, patrol cars ruined, businesses damaged,” Houston Police Officer’s Union President Joe Gamaldi said in a tweet. “This is not who we are as a City and as a community. We will protect your right to protest, but we will not allow our city to decay into chaos.” Deputy fires upon San Jose protest Update 6:52 a.m. EDT May 30: Law enforcement opened fire during Friday night protests in San Jose, police said.  Sgt. Enrique Garcia of the San Jose Police Department told an NBC News local affiliate the shooting involved a Santa Clara County Sheriff’s deputy firing on a vehicle captured on cellphone video striking one or more demonstrators.  2 Federal Protective Service officers shot, 1 killed in Oakland protests Update 6:44 a.m. EDT May 30: Two Federal Protective Service officers were shot during Friday night protests in Oakland, California, and one of them died, police confirmed to CNN. A police department spokesman told the network at least 7,500 protesters flooded the streets, resulting in widespread incidents of vandalism, thefts, arson and assaults on officers. “Two Federal Protective Services officers stationed at the Oakland Downtown Federal Building suffered gunshot wounds. Unfortunately, one succumbed to his injury,” the police department said.  The Federal Protective Service, which falls under the Department of Homeland Security, provides security and law enforcement services at U.S. government facilities, CNN reported. Dozens arrested during NYC protests Update 4:35 a.m. EDT May 30: At least 50 arrests were made in New York City Friday night into early Saturday morning as protesters seeking justice following the death of George Floyd poured into the streets. A New York Police Department official told NBC News that in addition to the arrests, the protests resulted in injuries to numerous officers, including bloody noses, lost teeth and leg injuries. Portland police declare a riot in the city and order protesters to disperse Update 4:01 a.m. EDT May 30: Portland police ordered crowds of protesters to disperse early Saturday, declaring the city a riot scene. “Disperse now or you will be subject to gas, projectiles, and other means necessary for dispersal,” the Portland Police Department advised Saturday morning via Twitter. “This event has been declared an unlawful assembly. If you do not go home now, force will be used to disperse you.” According to police, Portland’s Justice Center had been attacked by protesters and set on fire, CNN reported. Man shot, killed as protests continue in Detroit Update 3:42 a.m. EDT May 30: A 19-year-old man was killed after shots were fired into a crowd of protesters in Detroit late Friday, the city’s police department has confirmed. According to the Detroit Free Press, the unidentified victim died later at a nearby hospital. Police said in a statement the shots were fired by an unknown suspect in a gray Dodge Durango. Earlier in the evening, Detroit Police Chief James Craig said a person had been arrested after trying to run an officer over with a vehicle, CNN reported. “I will not stand by and let a small minority, criminals, come in here, attack our officers and make our community unsafe. Just know, we are not going to tolerate it,” Craig said. Minnesota governor: Minneapolis situation remains ‘incredibly dangerous’ Update 3:38 a.m. EDT May 30: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz addressed his state and the entire nation in an early-morning press conference Saturday as violent protests engulfed the Twin Cities for the fourth night and continued their spread across the nation. Watch the video below. Police warn LA protesters to disperse or face arrest Update 2:22 a.m. EDT May 30: The Los Angeles Police Department has declared an unlawful assembly in the downtown area of the city as nationwide protests seeking justice in the death of George Floyd rage for the fourth consecutive night. 'We have declared an unlawful assembly throughout Downtown LA. From the 10 freeway to the 101 & the 110 freeway to Alameda. This is being made following repeated acts of violence & property damage. Residents should stay inside. Business should close. Those on the street are to leave the area,' LAPD said in a statement. According to the department, two LAPD officers were injured during Friday night’s protests. “There was one officer that got hurt at 7:32 this evening and was transported to a local hospital with unknown injuries. Also, at 8:39, an officer needed help after he was hit with a bottle at Seventh St. and Hope St. and was also transported to the hospital. I don’t have their conditions because the situation is still quite fluid,” the statement said. Minnesota National Guard, State Troopers arrive to subdue protests Update 2:10 a.m. EDT May 30: Minnesota State Troopers and the National Guard are actively dispersing protesters from Twin Cities’ streets and assisting local firefighters on multiple scenes, The Washington Post reported. Despite Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey’s 8 p.m. curfew order, protests have raged with little police presence into the early Saturday morning hours, the Post reported. Pentagon puts military police on alert for Minneapolis deployment Update 1:51 a.m. EDT May 30: U.S. soldiers from Fort Bragg in North Carolina and Fort Drum in New York have been ordered to be ready to deploy to Minneapolis within four hours if called, The Associated Press reported. The Pentagon took the rare step of ordering the U.S. Army to place several active-duty military police units on the ready for deployment as the fourth night of widespread protests swept the nation. Minneapolis, where earlier this week 46-year-old George Floyd was killed while in police custody, has become the epicenter of the protests demanding justice in his death. Meanwhile, soldiers in Colorado’s Fort Carson and Kansas’ Fort Riley have been ordered to prepare for potential deployment within 24 hours, The AP reported. Georgia governor issues state of emergency following protests Update 1:33 a.m. EDT May 30: Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp issued a state of emergency early Saturday following hours of protests in the greater Atlanta area, activating the National Guard to “protect people & property in Atlanta.” The protests, demanding justice in the killing of George Floyd, began peacefully but escalated as police cars were damaged, buildings were vandalized and protesters threw objects, broke glass and spray-painted the front entrance to CNN’s Atlanta headquarters, The Washington Post reported. Earlier Friday night, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Bottoms chastised protesters saying they were “disgracing” the city and pleaded for peace, the Post reported. Bail for accused officer Derek Chauvin set at $500,000, report Update 1:08 a.m. EDT May 30: Bail for ex-Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has been set at $500,000, according to documents obtained by CNN. The criminal complaint filed in the 4th Judicial District Court of Minnesota indicates there have been no conditions set for Chauvin’s release. Accused officer Derek Chauvin’s wife says she’s divorcing him Update 10:45 p.m. EDT May 29: A reporter and anchor for WCCO-TV said that the wife of ex-police officer Derek Chauvin has released a statement through an attorney saying she is devastated by George Floyd’s death. “This evening, I spoke with Kellie Chauvin and her family. She is devastated by Mr. Floyd’s death and her utmost sympathy lies with his family, with his loved ones and with everyone who is grieving this tragedy. She has filed for dissolution of her marriage to Derek Chauvin,” reads the statement obtained by WCCO-TV. Protesters overrun Brooklyn Police Precinct Update 9:55 p.m. EDT May 29: Protesters have reportedly overrun the 88th Precinct in Brooklyn. Other precincts in Brooklyn are under siege according to reports. Protesters try to breach CNN lobby Update 9:35 p.m. EDT May 29: Protesters in Atlanta threw rocks and smoke grenades into the CNN lobby in what is believed to be an attempt to breach the lobby. Derek Chauvin booking photo released Update 9:05 p.m. EDT May 29: The booking photo of ex-police officer Derek Chauvin has been released by Ramsey County jail. Lockdown at White House lifted Update 8:50 p.m. EDT May 29: The lockdown has been lifted at the White House. White House locked down amid protests near gates Update 8 p.m. EDT May 29: At least one protester was tackled by Secret Service following protests near the White House. The White House has been locked down and the secret service is not letting anyone off the grounds according to CNN. Protests take tense turn in Atlanta Update 7:45 p.m. EDT May 29: Activists spray-painted a large CNN logo outside the company’s headquarters in Atlanta, breaking a window and tagging doors while protesting the death of George Floyd. Hundreds of protesters were confronting police outside CNN’s downtown headquarters late Friday. One protester climbed on top of the CNN sign and waved a “Black Lives Matter” flag to cheers from the crowd. Shortly before 5:30 p.m., a scuffle happened between a protester and an Atlanta police officer right outside the CNN Center. Protesters pelted officers who came over with bottles, striking some of them. Other bottles thrown at authorities exploded behind the police line, but no officers appeared to get hit. Protesters chanted, “Quit your jobs.” The officers backed their line away from the group of protesters who were throwing objects at them. Police formed a barricade and they are keeping protesters at bay right now so they can’t go any further down the street. This comes after protesters peacefully marched from Centennial Olympic Park to the state Capitol, and then back. The tense moments came as it appeared protesters started leaving Centennial Olympic Park. Trump says he spoke with Floyd’s family members Update 5:55 p.m. EDT May 29: President Donald Trump says he talked to members of George Floyd’s family on Friday and “expressed my sorrow.” Trump spoke about his conversation with members of the Floyd family during a White House meeting with businesses executives. He says of the encounter with police captured on video that “it was just a horrible thing to witness and to watch. It certainly looked like there was no excuse for it.” Trump says the family grieved during the call and that “I could see very much that they loved their brother.” Trump was also asked about his tweet saying “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” He says he had heard that phrase for a long time, but didn’t know where it originated. He says the phrase is “very accurate in the sense that, when you do have looting like you had last night, people often get shot and they die. And that’s not good and we don’t want that to happen.” Trump also spoke about the looters, saying they did a great disservice to their state, city and the country. He said “we can never let that happen again.” The president also says of the city and its mayor “I don’t think they were very well prepared. But we brought in the National Guard. They will be very prepared tonight.” NBA veteran Stephen Jackson speaks at George Floyd rally Update 5:55 p.m. EDT May 29: NBA veteran Stephen Jackson says he’ll use his platform and “everything I have to get a conviction” for the four Minneapolis police officers who were fired after George Floyd’s death. Jackson, like Floyd, is from Houston and they were friends. The handcuffed black man died after pleading for air as a white Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck. That officer, Derek Chauvin, was arrested Friday and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. The charges were announced shortly after Jackson spoke at a news conference organized by activists at Minneapolis City Hall. Actor Jamie Foxx and Minnesota Timberwolves star Karl-Anthony Towns were among those in attendance. Jackson is 42. He played for eight NBA teams from 2000-2013 and won a championship in 2003 with the San Antonio Spurs. He and Floyd called each other “twin” because of their resemblance. Both were star high school athletes in the Houston area in the 1990s. Floyd had moved to Minneapolis two years ago for a fresh start. Minneapolis mayor imposes an 8 p.m. curfew Update 4:55 p.m. EDT May 29: Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey imposed a curfew throughout the city starting at 8 p.m. CDT. The proclamation will extend through the weekend. Chauvin kept knee pressed to Floyd’s neck for 3 minutes after he became unresponsive Update 3:55 p.m. EDT May 29: A Minneapolis police officer charged Friday with murder in the death of George Floyd kept his knee pressed to Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes in total Monday, according to a criminal complaint filed Friday. Prosecutors said that body camera footage showed Floyd appeared to stop moving three minutes before former Officer Derek Chauvin took his knee off Floyd’s neck. In video footage captured by passersby, Floyd can be heard pleading for air before going silent as onlookers demanded Chauvin get off the 46-year-old. Prosecutors said Floyd appeared to stop moving around 8:24 p.m. A minute later, officials said he appeared to stop breathing. Officials said another police officer asked whether Floyd should be moved onto his side, but no one moved him. Another officer checked for a pulse and said he couldn’t find one. Two minutes later, Chauvin removed his knee from Floyd’s neck, prosecutors said. Authorities said that preliminary findings from Floyd’s autopsy showed “no physical findings that support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation.” “Mr. Floyd had underlying health conditions including coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease,” according to prosecutors. “The combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by the police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death.” Minnesota governor says Chauvin’s arrest ‘good first step toward justice for George Floyd’ Update 3:40 p.m. EDT May 29: Echoing comments he made at an earlier news conference, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz called the arrest Friday of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin “a good first step toward justice for George Floyd.” However, the governor said, “it doesn’t change the system problems and persistent inequities that led to his death or the pain our communities live with every day.” Walz said earlier Friday that he had requested the Hennepin County Attorney move quickly to investigate Floyd’s death and bring justice to his family. Floyd’s family: Officer’s arrest ‘welcome but overdue’ Update 3:30 p.m. EDT May 29: The family of George Floyd, the man who died Monday after video footage showed a police officer with his knee to Floyd’s neck for minutes as he struggled to breathe, called the officer’s arrest “welcome but overdue.” Family members and attorney Ben Crump, who is representing the Floyd family, said they want former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin to face first-degree murder charges. He was arrested Friday on charges of third-degree murder and manslaughter. “We call on authorities to revise the charges to reflect the true culpability of this officer,” the statement said. “While this is a right and necssary step, we need the City of Minneapolis -- and cities across the country -- to fix the policies and training deficiencies that permitted this unlawful killing -- and so many others -- to occur.” Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said this week that the technique used by Chauvin to subdue Floyd while detaining him for questioning in connection with a possible forgery in progress had not been approved by police and should have never been used. “Today, George Floyd’s family is having to explain to his children why their father was executed by police on video,” according to the statement. “It’s essential that the City closely examines and changes its policing policies and training procedures to correct for the lack of proper field supervision; the use of appropriate non-lethal restraint techniques; the ability to recognize medical signs associated with the restriction of airflow, and the legal duty to seek emergency medical care and stop a civil rights violation.” Trump defends tweet flagged by Twitter for ‘glorifying violence’ Update 3:05 p.m. EDT May 29: President Donald Trump on Friday defended a tweet he sent earlier in the day that was flagged by Twitter for “glorifying violence” arguing that his post was “spoken as a fact, not as a statement.” “Looting leads to shooting, and that’s why a man was shot and killed in Minneapolis on Wednesday night - or look at what just happened in Louisville with 7 people shot,” the president wrote. 'It was spoken as a fact, not as a statement. It’s very simple, nobody should have any problem with this other than the haters, and those looking to cause trouble on social media.' Trump did not address his tweets or the death of George Floyd during a news conference Friday afternoon at the White House. Early on Friday, Trump posted a message on social media calling protesters in Minneapolis “thugs” and warning that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” According to NPR, the phrase “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” is a well-known phrase dating back to the civil rights era. Miami police Chief Walter Headley said the same thing in 1967 during hearings on crime in his jurisdiction, prompting outrage, NPR reported. “He had a long history of bigotry against the black community,” professor Clarence Lusane of Howard University told NPR. Minneapolis mayor: Former officer’s arrest an ‘essential first step’ Update 2:55 p.m. EDT May 29: In a statement obtained Friday by the Star Tribune, Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said that the arrest of former police Officer Derek Chauvin is an “essential first step.' “For our black community who have, for centuries, been forced to endure injustice in a world simply unwilling to correct or acknowledge it: I know that whatever hope you feel today is tempered with skepticism and a righteous outrage,” he said. “We are a nation at a crossroad, and today’s decision from the County Attorney is an essential first step on a longer road toward justice and healing our city.” Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman said Friday that his office continues to investigate possible charges against the other three officers involved in Floyd’s death. Justice Department investigating Floyd’s death for possible civil rights law violations Update 2:35 p.m. EDT May 29: U.S. Attorney General Bill Barr said Friday that the FBI and the Justice Department have launched an independent investigation into whether any federal civil rights laws were violated in the death of George Floyd. In a statement, Barr called footage of the encounter between Floyd and four Minneapolis police officers, including Derek Chauvin, “harrowing to watch and deeply disturbing.' “The Department of Justice, including the FBI, are conducting an independent investigation to determine whether any federal civil rights laws were violated,” Barr said. 'Both state and federal officers are working diligently and collaboratively to ensure that any available evidence relevant to these decisions is obtained as quickly as possible. ... I am confident justice will be served.” Hennepin County Attorney expects charges will be filed against all officers involved in Floyd’s death Update 2:20 p.m. EDT May 29: Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman said Friday that he expects charges will be filed against the three other officers who were involved in George Floyd’s death following the arrest Friday afternoon of former Officer Derek Chauvin. “I anticipate charges but I’m not going to get into that,” he said at a news conference. He declined to discuss the evidence that led to Chauvin’s arrest one day after he said authorities needed more time to gather evidence. He said among the items authorities reviewed were the video shot by bystander Darnella Frazier which sparked widespread outrage on social media, Chauvin’s body camera footage and a preliminary report from the medical examiner. Freeman announced Friday that Chauvin was arrested on third-degree murder and manslaughter charges in Floyd’s death. He was taken into custody by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. Hennepin County Attorney to speak after arrest of former Minneapolis police officer Update 2:08 p.m. EDT May 29: The Hennepin County Attorney, Mike Freeman, said Friday that former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. Colin Kaepernick launches fund to pay for legal defense of arrested protesters Update 2:05 p.m. EDT May 29: NFL free agency Colin Kaepernick on Friday announced the launch of a legal defense fund to help protesters arrested amid unrest in Minneapolis following the death of George Floyd. The legal defense initiative was created with Kaepernick’s Know Your Rights Camp, a campaign funded by the former San Francisco 49er aimed at empowering black and brown communities. Kaepernick played with the 49ers until 2016 and faced heavy criticism for his decision to kneel during the national anthem in protest of police brutality. Protesters gather outside Chauvin’s Florida home Update 1:50 p.m. EDT May 29: Protesters gathered Friday outside former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin’s home in Central Florida after rumors swirled that he would relocate to the area as protests over the death of George Floyd continue in Minneapolis, WFTV reported. Deputies with the Orange County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement Friday that Chauvin was not at his home in Florida and that he had no plans to visit the area. Deputies told WFTV there had been no calls for service at the former police officer’s home before Thursday, when two calls came in but no reports were filed. Deputies said there several calls were made Friday morning. >> Read more on WFTV.com Taylor Swift criticizes president for ‘when the looting starts, the shooting starts’ tweet Update 1:25 p.m. EDT May 29: Pop superstar Taylor Swift took to Twitter on Friday to criticize President Donald Trump after he posted a message on social media calling protesters in Minneapolis “thugs” and warning that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” “After stoking the fires of white supremacy and racism your entire presidency, you have the nerve to feign moral superiority before threatening violence?” Swift wrote. “We will vote you out in November.” Officer involved in Floyd’s death arrested Update 1:15 p.m. EDT May 29: John Harrington, commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, said Friday that he’s received word that Officer Derek Chauvin has been taken into custody, according to multiple reports. The Star Tribune reported Chauvin was taken into custody by the state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. The newspaper reported the other three officers involved in Floyd’s death had not been charged as of early Friday afternoon. Trump’s tweets encouraging violence against protesters ‘not helpful,’ Minn. governor says Update 12:40 p.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz on Friday criticized a tweet from President Donald Trump in which he called people protesting the death of George Floyd “thugs” and warned that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” “It’s not helpful,” Walz said Friday at a news conference. “In the moment where we’re at, in a moment that is so volatile, anything we do to add fuel to that fire is really not helpful. ... There is a way to do this without inflaming (tensions).” Twitter flagged the president’s tweet for “glorifying violence,” prompting a series of tweets from Trump criticizing the social media site. A similar tweet posted on the official White House Twitter page was also flagged for the same reasons. Obama: ‘This shouldn’t be “normal” in 2020 America' Update 12:20 p.m. EDT May 29: Former President Barack Obama on Friday said everyone has the responsibility of working to ensure that a “new normal” is created “in which the legacy of bigotry and unequal treatment no longer infects our institutions or our hearts.” His comments came as Americans nationwide deal with the ongoing threat of the coronavius pandemic and four days after George Floyd. “It’s natural to wish for life ‘to just get back to normal’ as a pandemic and economic crisis upend everything around us,” he said. “But we have to remember that for millions of Americans, being treated differently on account of race is tragically, painfully, maddeningly ‘normal’ -- whether it’s while dealing with the health care system or interacting with the criminal justice system, or jogging down the street, or just watching birds in a park.” Obama said officials in Minnesota will be tasked with ensuring Floyd’s death is thoroughly investigated and that justice is carried out. “But it falls on all of us, regardless of our race or station -- including the majority of men and women in law enforcement who take pride in doing their tough job the right way, every day -- to work together to create a ‘new normal.’' Wisconsin attorney general calls for arrest of officers involved in Floyd’s death Update 12:10 p.m. EDT May 29: Wisconsin Attorney General Josh Kaul called Friday for charges to be filed against the four officers involved in the death Monday of George Floyd. “What America witnessed happening to George Floyd in Minneapolis was not, in any true sense of the phrase, law enforcement. It was torture and murder, under color of law,” Kaul said in a statement. “Justice demands that those involved in this depraved crime be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.” Officials in Minnesota said at a news conference Friday that they expect justice for the officers involved in Floyd’s death will be “swift.” Minnesota officials expect justice for officers involved in Floyd’s death will be ‘swift’ Update 12 p.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz and state Attorney General Keith Ellison said Friday that they believe justice will be “swift” for the officers involved in the death Monday of George Floyd. “It is my expectation that justice for the officers involved in this will be swift. That it will come in a timely manner. That it will be fair,” Walz said Friday at a news conference. “That is what we’ve asked for.” Ellison said that, following Minnesota law, the charging decisions will come from the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office. “I believe that the message has been sent and received that the wheels of justice must move swiftly,” Ellison said. “It’s important that people have confidence that accountability is how we live in Minnesota.” Minnesota governor apologizes to CNN for arrest of journalists Update 11:50 a.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz apologized Friday for the arrest earlier in the day of a CNN crew which was broadcast live on air. “This should not have happened,” Walz said. “I take full responsibility.” Walz said officers were clearing streets on his order when they arrested CNN journalist Omar Jimenez and two other of the network’s crew. The governor stressed Friday that it is imperative that officials come up with a plan to allow journalists to continue their work safely. Walz said transparency, including allowing for reporters to cover the situation in Minneapolis, “is a key component of how we fix this.” The governor said he spoke to CNN President Jeff Zucker after Friday morning’s arrest and apologized. “I am a teacher by trade and I have spent my time as governor highlighting the need to be as transparent as possible and have the press here and I failed you,” Walz said. Minnesota governor: ‘Thank God a young person had a camera’ to capture Floyd’s death Update 11:45 a.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz on Friday said he was grateful that Darnella Frazier caught video of Officer Derek Chauvin holding his knee to George Floyd’s neck Monday before Floyd’s death. “Thank God a young person had a camera to video it,” Walz said. “Because there’s not a person who is listening today who wonders how many times that camera wasn’t there.” Minnesota governor holding news conference amid protests Update 11:35 a.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz is holding a news conference Friday after a third night of protests across Minneapolis and other cities in the wake of George Floyd’s death. Minneapolis City Council member: Floyd, Chauvin used to work together Update 11:15 a.m. EDT May 29: Minneapolis City Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins told MSNBC on Friday that George Floyd and the Minneapolis police officer seen kneeling on his neck for more than five minutes before his death Monday knew one another. Jenkins said Floyd and Officer Derek Chauvin worked together for 17 years as bouncers at El Nuevo Rodeo, a Latin club in Minneapolis. “Officer Chauvin, he knew George,” Jenkins said. “They were co-workers for a very long time.” Melania Trumps calls for focus on peace, prayers and healing Update 10:40 a.m. EDT May 29: First lady Melania Trump on Friday urged the nation to focus on “peace, prayers (and) healing” as protests erupted in Minneapolis and other cities due to the death of George Floyd. “Our country allows for peaceful protests, but there is no reason for violence,” the first lady wrote in a post Friday morning on Twitter. “I’ve seen our citizens unify (and) take care of one another through (COVID-19 and) we can’t stop now.” Protesters set fire to a Minneapolis police precinct station late Thursday in the third night of protests against Floyd’s killing. Video of his death Monday surfaced this week, showing a Minneapolis police officer holding his knee to Floyd for more than five minutes as he lay prone on the ground begging for air. Floyd’s death sparked backlash and prompted protests in several cities with more planned over the coming weekend. White House tweet flagged for ‘glorifying violence’ Update 10:05 a.m. EDT May 29: Officials with Twitter flagged a tweet from the official White House Twitter account on Friday for “glorifying violence.” The tweet included the exact same language as a tweet posted earlier Friday by President Donald Trump in which he called people protesting police brutality in Minneapolis following the death Monday of George Floyd “thugs.” He also threatened to send National Guard troops to the city to keep peace and warned that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” That tweet was flagged a few hours after it was posted. After threat to shoot looters, Twitter slaps warning on Trump tweet Update 9:30 a.m. EDT May 29: The feud between Twitter and President Donald Trump escalated Friday after officials with the social media site flagged a tweet from the president for “glorifying violence” after he threatened to use force against rioters in Minneapolis. “These THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd,” Trump wrote, referring to the black man who died after a Minneapolis police officer knelt on his head and neck for an extended period of time earlier this week. The president then spoke of sending in National Guard troops to restore order, warning that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.” That was evidently too much for Twitter, which placed a warning on the president’s tweet. Trump tore into Twitter early on Friday morning. “Twitter is doing nothing about all of the lies & propaganda being put out by China or the Radical Left Democrat Party,” the president tweeted soon after 7 a.m. “They have targeted Republicans, Conservatives & the President of the United States.” CNN disputes Minnesota State Patrol’s account of reporter’s arrest Update 8:50 a.m. EDT May 29: Officials with CNN disputed an account Friday from Minnesota State Patrol of the arrest of one of the news network’s journalists, Omar Jimenez. Jimenez, who is black and Latino, was arrested early Friday while reporting on protests in Minneapolis that were sparked by the death Monday of George Floyd. In a tweet posted Friday morning, Minnesota State Patrol said three members of a CNN crew were inadvertently arrested as authorities were clearing the streets after protests and riots over Floyd’s death. “The three were released once they were confirmed to be members of the media,” according to authorities. However, officials with CNN shared video of the arrest, which happened live on national television. CNN noted that another of its reporters, who is white, was not arrested Friday although he was near the area where Jimenez was arrested. “I was treated much differently than (CNN correspondent Omar Jimenez) was,' journalist Josh Campbell said, according to CNN. “I’m sitting here talking to the National Guard, talking to the police. They’re asking politely to move here and there. A couple times I’ve moved closer than they would like. They asked politely to move back. They didn’t pull out the handcuffs. Lot different here than what Omar experienced.” Minnesota attorney general says he expects charges against officers soon Update 8:30 a.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison told CNN on Friday morning that he anticipates charges will soon be filed against the four Minneapolis police officers involved in the death of George Floyd. “We are standing by and helping any way we can,” Ellison told the news network. “I anticipate there will be charges. I hope soon. But that is the prerogative of another prosecuting authority.” He told CNN that authorities were ensuring that their case was strong before announcing charges. “Everybody believes that this is a violation of Mr. Floyd. And I believe that everybody wants to see these charges filed as soon as they can be,' he said. 'But again, I do want to say we have seen cases that seem so clear go south.” Minneapolis police release CNN crew Update 7:49 a.m. EDT May 29: CNN correspondent Omar Jimenez and his crew have been released from police custody in Minneapolis, the network reported. Jimenez, along with producer Bill Kirkos and photojournalist Leonel Mendez, were arrested during a live broadcast shortly after 6 a.m. The crew was reporting on protests of George Floyd’s death that turned violent overnight. The team was released from the Hennepin County Public Safety facility in downtown Minneapolis moments ago, CNN reported. Minnesota governor apologizes for CNN team’s arrest while covering protests Update 7:38 a.m. EDT May 29: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz spoke with CNN President Jeff Zucker Friday morning after the network’s team in Minneapolis was arrested while covering the protests of George Floyd’s death that turned violent overnight. Walz called the arrests “unacceptable,” said he “deeply apologizes” for what happened and is working to have the CNN team released immediately, the network reported. Minnesota police arrest CNN team Update 6:45 a.m. EDT May 29: Minneapolis CNN journalist Omar Jimenez has been taken into police custody during a live broadcast at the site of the Minneapolis protests, the network reported just before 6:30 a.m. Jimenez was arrested after identifying himself clearly to officers. The reporter’s crew, including a producer and camera operator, were also placed in handcuffs, CNN reported. The network responded by calling the arrests a 'violation of First Amendment rights. Minneapolis police, protesters clash in pre-dawn confrontations  Update 6:25 a.m. EDT May 29: Police in Minneapolis clashed with protesters early Friday morning, following the third consecutive night of demonstrations challenging police brutality in the wake of George Floyd’s death while in police custody earlier this week. According to CNN, the officers – some in riot gear – used pepper spray and batons to disperse crowds nearest the police station upon arrival. Police were also seen shoving at least one person, while some protesters threw projectiles at the officers and others ran, CNN reported. Minneapolis fires back at Trump for ‘weakness’ claims  Update 3:20 a.m. EDT May 29: Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey addressed U.S. President Donald Trump’s tweet from earlier in the evening which criticized the weakness of the city’s leadership as Thursday night protests turned violent. “Weakness is refusing to take responsibility for your own actions. Weakness is pointing your finger at somebody else, during a time of crisis. Donald Trump knows nothing about the strength of Minneapolis. We are strong as hell. Is this a difficult time period? Yes. But you better be damn sure that we’re going to get through this,” Frey said during a press conference. Trump threatens military intervention in Minneapolis  Update 1:32 a.m. EDT May 29: In a series of early-morning tweets, U.S. President Donald Trump criticized protesters in Minneapolis, calling them “THUGS” and promising Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz the weight of the military if needed. Minneapolis authorities urge caution among residents near riot scenes Update 1:05 a.m. EDT May 29: A police spokesman told NPR all personnel at the overrun third precinct are safe, but city leaders warned residents near the blaze to maintain distance, following unconfirmed reports of a possible explosion. “We’re hearing unconfirmed reports that gas lines to the Third Precinct have been cut and other explosive materials are in the building,” the city tweeted. “If you are near the building, for your safety, PLEASE RETREAT in the event the building explodes.” Original report: Protesters have overrun the Minneapolis Police Department Third Precinct, the third straight night of violent protests spreading beyond the city. Flames are visible around the precinct but it is unclear if it is on fire. Livestream video showed the protesters entering the building, where fire alarms blared and sprinklers ran as blazes were set. Police appeared to have left the building located in the neighborhood not far from where Floyd died Monday. A spokesman didn’t immediately respond to messages left by The Associated Press. Anger over the death of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man in police custody, has spread beyond Minneapolis with looting and fires set along a major St. Paul street. Earlier Thursday, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz called in the National Guard to try to stem the violence. The governor’s order did not say how many Guard members were mobilized or whether they would be in service Thursday night. After calling in the Guard, Walz urged widespread changes in the wake of Floyd’s death. It was the third consecutive night of violent protests following Floyd’s death on Monday. In footage recorded by a bystander, Floyd can be seen pleading that he can’t breathe as Officer Derek Chauvin, who is white, kneels on his neck. As minutes pass, Floyd slowly stops talking and moving. Dozens of businesses across the Twin Cities have boarded up windows and doors Thursday in an effort to prevent looting. Minneapolis shut down nearly its entire light-rail system and all bus service through Sunday out of safety concerns. Check back for more on this developing story. The Associated Press contributed to this story.
  • More than 5.8 million people worldwide -- including more than 1.7 million in the United States – have been infected with the new coronavirus, and the number of deaths from the outbreak continues to rise. While efforts to contain the COVID-19 outbreak continue, states have begun to shift their focus toward reopening their economies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tracking cases in the U.S. here. Live updates for Friday, May 29, continue below: Virus protection adds new wrinkle to Southwest heat relief Update 11:15 p.m. EDT May 29: Trying to stay safe during a global pandemic is hard enough, but people in Southwest desert cities like Phoenix and Las Vegas where temperatures can soar into the triple digits are also trying to protect themselves from the brutal heat. A 48,000-square-foot hall of the Phoenix Convention Center was being transformed Friday into a daytime heat relief center for homeless people, with city officials offering free transportation to get them there. But with most other government-run spaces like libraries and community centers still closed this week to prevent the spread of coronavirus, the Salvation Army and other nonprofit groups were shouldering a big load of the responsibility for ensuring people stay cool and hydrated amid extreme heat warnings for some parts of the southwestern U.S. At a dozen of their sites in metro Phoenix, Salvation Army staff and volunteers Thursday asked people to wear masks, clean their hands with the alcohol-based sanitizer gel provided and stay at least 6 feet away from others as a precaution amid the virus outbreak. UN announces first 2 deaths of UN peacekeepers from COVID-19 Update 10:15 p.m. EDT May 29: Secretary-General Antonio Guterres on Friday announced the deaths of the first two U.N. peacekeepers from COVID-19. He made the announcement at a ceremony marking the International Day of U.N. Peacekeepers, saying both peacekeepers, who died Thursday and Friday, were serving in Mali. The U.N. said one was from Cambodia and the other from El Salvador. Guterres said the coronavirus pandemic has changed almost everything, but not “the service, sacrifice and selflessness” of the more than 95,000 men and women serving in the 13 U.N. peacekeeping missions around the world. According to the U.N. peacekeeping department, there have been 137 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in U.N. peacekeeping operations, with the greatest number by far — 90 cases — in Mali. There were 21 cases in the U.N. mission in Congo, 17 in Central African Republic, three each in South Sudan and Cyprus, and one each in Lebanon, the U.N.-African Union mission in Sudan’s Darfur region, and the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization in the Middle East. Person tested positive at Lake of the Ozarks Update 9:15 p.m. EDT May 29: Health officials said Friday that they were seeking to “inform mass numbers of unknown people” after a person who attended crowded pool parties over Memorial Day weekend at Missouri’s Lake of the Ozarks tested positive for COVID-19. Camden County Health Department said in a release that the resident of Boone County in mid-Missouri tested positive on Sunday after arriving at the lake area a day earlier. Officials said there have been no reported cases of the virus linked to coronavirus in residents of Camden County, where the parties seen in videos and photos posted on social media took place. Because “mass numbers of unknown people” need to be notified, the officials released a brief timeline of the person’s whereabouts last weekend, including stops at a bar called Backwater Jacks, a bar and restaurant that has a pool, as well as a dining and pool venue called Shady Gators and Lazy Gators. Backwater Jacks owner Gary Prewitt said previously in a statement that no laws were broken, though the images appeared to show people violating Republican Gov. Mike Parson’s state order requiring social distancing. Parson allowed businesses and attractions to reopen May 4, but the state order requires 6-foot social distancing through at least the end of May. US judge won’t lift 50-person cap on Nevada church services Update 8:10 p.m. EDT May 5: A federal judge rejected a rural Nevada church’s request Friday for an emergency injunction that would allow it to exceed Gov. Steve Sisolak’s 50-person cap on religious gatherings. Calvary Chapel Dayton Valley filed a lawsuit against the governor last week that argued the previous ban on religious gatherings of more than 10 people was unconstitutional. Sisolak raised the limit to 50 people under strict social distancing guidelines to prevent the spread of coronavirus when he announced this week the reopening of several business categories previously considered non-essential. That cleared the way for casinos to open June 4 for the first time since mid-March. Washington DC starts reopening in fits and starts Update 6:50 p.m. EDT May 5: As the nation’s capital took the first tiny steps toward reopening Friday, the continued threat of coronavirus was ever present. Showing IDs was not enough at the Dacha Beer Garden in Washington’s Shaw neighborhood. Would-be customers had to answer a series of questions about any possible exposure to the COVID-19 and whether they themselves had shown any symptoms. “Please keep your mask on when you’re not dining and drinking,” hostess Amy Symonds told the patrons, laying out a series of rules and taking down everyone’s’ phone numbers before they were seated at socially-distanced tables. “It’s good to have some level of normalcy again,” said Jeff Gullo, who was one of the first in line to get in. Fifteen minutes after opening, nearly two dozen people were seated at the popular all outdoor facility. But the gradual reopening of the District of Columbia as a three-month stay-at-home order was lifted came in fits and starts, with not everyone ready for even a limited return to pre-pandemic normality. Barbers and hair salons welcomed back clients grown haggard from months of self-maintenance. Nonessential businesses, shuttered since late March, started offering curbside pickup. And restaurants that have been operating solely on takeout began limited outdoor seating. UK officials report 2,095 new cases of COVID-19 Update 6:20 p.m. EDT May 5: Officials in the United Kingdom reported 2,095 new coronavirus infections early Friday evening, raising the country’s number of COVID-19 cases to 271,222. The previous day, 1,887 new coronavirus cases were reported. Authorities with the British Department of Health and Social Care also announced that a total of 38,161 have died in the U.K. due to the novel coronavirus. According to Johns Hopkins University, which releases its own numbers on a rolling basis, here are the countries with the highest numbers of reported coronavirus cases: 1) United States: 1,743,235 cases 2) Brazil: 438,238 cases 3) Russia: 387,623 cases 4) United Kingdom: 272,607 cases 5) Spain: 238,564 cases 6) Italy: 232,248 cases New Jersey announces reopening of child care centers, youth day camps Update 4:35 p.m. EDT May 29: New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy announced plans to reopen more businesses and programs across the state. Murphy said child care centers can reopen June 15, and non-contact organized sports activities can resume June 22. Youth day camps can start July 6. “We want our children to be able to enjoy their summer with friends, participating in the activities that create lifelong memories,' he said. 'We know day camp is one of those memory building places.” Horse racing in the state can resume without fans beginning next weekend. Murphy said the data continues to move in the right direction, with new hospitalizations down by 70% since the state’s peak. To date, 11,531 people have died in New Jersey due to COVID-19. New Jersey health officials confirmed 158,844 coronavirus cases Friday. President Trump announces U.S. will pull out of World Health Organization Update 3:05 p.m. EDT May 29: President Donald Trump announced during a news conference Friday that the United States will terminate its relationship with the World Health Organization. The president said the move was made because he does not agree with the way the organization has handled the COVID-19 pandemic. “We have detailed the reforms that it must make and engaged with them directly but they have refused to act. Because they have failed to make the requested and greatly needed reforms, we will be today terminating our relationship with the World Health Organization and redirecting those funds to other worldwide and deserving urgent global public health needs,' he said. Trump called out China’s role in the spread of the virus. “The world needs answers from China on the virus. We must have transparency,' he said. New York City to begin opening June 8  Update 2:50 p.m. EDT May 29: New York City is on track to begin reopening on June 8 as the state gradually loosens restrictions put in place during the coronavirus crisis. Gov. Andrew Cuomo made that announcement Friday, saying the nation’s worst pandemic hot spot is meeting goals set for hospital rates and testing. The governor said the city will “stockpile” personal protective equipment like masks, and will focus on infection rates in hot spots by ZIP code. Cuomo made the remarks as a large swath of upstate New York got the go-ahead Friday to reopen hair salons, retail shops and offices under strict guidelines. New York City remains the only region of the state that has not yet commenced economic rebirth. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said earlier Friday that masks or face coverings are necessary for all employees and customers for reopenings to be safe and effective. Connecticut colleges and universities to hold in-person classes this fall Update 2:00 p.m. EDT May 29: Mark Ojakian, the president of Connecticut State Colleges and Universities, said the university system plans to reopen campuses this fall. CSCU consists of 17 campuses, including UConn and Yale, and will open Aug. 24, the Hartford Courant reported. The first day of classes will be Aug. 26. Ojakian said there will be safety policies and procedures put in place to keep faculty and students safe. “We still have a lot of planning to do and more questions need to be addressed in the coming weeks and months,' he said. Each school will have to prepare and present plans to reopen that meet state health and safety standards. Many classes will have online portions. According to the Hartford Courant, students will be able to attend in-person classes on campuses until Thanksgiving break. Students will be asked to leave campus for the holiday break and will remain off-campus, completing the rest of their courses and final exams virtually. Coronavirus cases continue to drop in New York; city prepares for phase one of reopening Update 12:20 p.m. EDT May 29: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said the city is nearing milestones that would allow the city to begin reopening in the next few weeks. “We are confident that we will be able to go to phase one in the first two weeks of June,' he said during a news conference. “This is going to be based, of course, on the tangible indicators and thresholds from the state and the city. So that’s what will lead the decision. We have to have that factual evidence.' De Blasio said officials have not confirmed which day phase one will begin. He said officials are conducting conversations that will help them determine “the exact right date to start.” Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the number of hospitalizations due to the coronavirus are down. De Blasio said Thursday that 5% of New York City residents tested positive for COVID-19. “Every day we’ve seen progress in recent weeks, today the lowest we’ve ever seen,” he said. “Congratulations everyone, this is putting us well on the way to our goal of opening in the first half of June. Well done NYC.' Sen. Bob Casey tests positive for COVID-10 antibodies Update 11:55 a.m. EDT May 29: Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey revealed Friday morning that he received a positive test result from a COVID-19 antibody test, which means that he “likely had COVID-19 at some point over the last several months and [has] since developed an antibody response to the virus,” he wrote in a statement. Casey said he experienced a low-grade fever and mild flu-like symptoms for days and he contacted his physician, but he was never tested for the coronavirus. He said he self-isolated and continued to work remotely, as his symptoms were “mild and manageable.” “I will continue to follow the guidance of public health experts by wearing a mask in public and observing social distancing practices, and I hope that others will do the same to help slow the spread of this virus,' Casey wrote in the statement. Doctors sue for mail access to abortion pill during coronavirus pandemic Update 5:55 a.m. EDT May 29: A group of doctors, in concert with the American Civil Liberties Union, filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday, challenging a rule that requires patients to visit medical facilities in order to obtain abortion pills. In the suit, the physicians argue patients should be allowed to have prescriptions for the drug mifepristone filled by mail, avoiding direct contact with potentially contaminated health care settings during the novel coronavirus pandemic. “Of the more than 20,000 drugs regulated by the (U.S. Food and Drug Administration,) mifepristone is the only one that patients must receive in person at a hospital, clinic or medical office, yet may self-administer, unsupervised, at a location of their choosing,” the lawsuit states. Tyson Foods shuts down 7th meatpacking facility amid latest coronavirus outbreak Update 2:53 a.m. EDT May 29: Tyson Foods shut down its Storm Lake, Iowa, pork processing plant temporarily, following the latest novel coronavirus outbreak to infect the company’s operations. Citing a “delay in COVID-19 testing results” as a partial reason for the facility’s idling, the company issued a statement attributing the shutdown to “team member absences related to quarantine and other factors” as well. According to the Des Moines Register, 555 of the Storm Lake plant’s 2,517 employees have tested positive for the virus. The two-day stoppage is intended to allow for deep cleaning and sanitization with plans to reopen for business next week, the company statement said. Since the onset of the global pandemic, Tyson has shuttered six other facilities temporarily, including facilities in Waterloo, Columbus Junction and Perry, Iowa, as well as Dakota City, Nebraska; Logansport, Indiana; and Pasco, Washington, the Register reported. Iowa has confirmed a total of 18,586 novel coronavirus cases, resulting in 506 deaths, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally. US deaths near 102K, total cases soar past 1.7M Published 12:49 a.m. EDT May 29: The number of novel coronavirus cases in the United States soared past 1.7 million early Friday across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. According to a Johns Hopkins University tally, there are at least 1,721,750 confirmed U.S. cases of the virus, which have resulted in at least 101,617 deaths.  The hardest-hit states remain New York with 366,733 cases and 29,529 deaths and New Jersey with 157,185 cases and 11,409 deaths. Massachusetts, with 94,895 cases, has the third-highest number of deaths with 6,640, while Illinois has the third-highest number of cases with 115,833. Only 16 states and territories have confirmed fewer than 6,000 cases each. Five other states have now confirmed at least 53,000 novel coronavirus cases each, including: • California: 103,813 cases, resulting in 3,993 deaths • Pennsylvania: 74,220 cases, resulting in 5,373 deaths • Texas: 60,395 cases, resulting in 1,611 deaths • Michigan: 56,014 cases, resulting in 5,732 deaths • Florida: 53,285 cases, resulting in 2,364 deaths Meanwhile, Maryland, Georgia, Connecticut and Virginia each has confirmed at least 41,000 cases; Louisiana, Ohio and Indiana each has confirmed at least 33,000 cases; North Carolina, Colorado, Minnesota, Tennessee and Washington each has confirmed at least 20,000 cases, followed by Iowa with 18,586 and Arizona with 17,877; Wisconsin and Alabama each has confirmed at least 16,000 cases; Rhode Island and Mississippi each has confirmed at least 14,000 cases; Nebraska, Missouri and South Carolina each has confirmed at least 10,000 cases; Kansas, Kentucky and Delaware each has confirmed at least 9,000 cases; Utah, the District of Columbia and Nevada each has confirmed at least 8,000 cases, followed by New Mexico with 7,364; Arkansas and Oklahoma each has confirmed at least 6,000 cases. Click here to see CNN’s state-by-state breakdown.
  • Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms held a news conference Friday night where she urged the protesters to stop what they were doing.