ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
77°
Broken Clouds
H 89° L 72°
  • cloudy-day
    77°
    Current Conditions
    Broken Clouds. H 89° L 72°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    85°
    Afternoon
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 89° L 72°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    83°
    Evening
    Sct Thunderstorms. H 89° L 72°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Local News

    A young woman has been charged after police said she vandalized a Cobb County man’s Donald Trump reelection sign.  George Bentley showed Channel 2’s Matt Johnson how he took a lot of precautions to protect his property and the sign, including putting up a barbed wire fence.  “It's a free country, and we love America, and we're happy with the guy that's in there now,” Bentley said. That’s why he says he placed a Trump 2020 sign on display along his property that overlooks North Marietta Parkway.  “We want him to be elected again in 2020, and we wanted to give our support for him,” Bentley said.  He told Johnson that he can't think of one good reason for anyone to trespass and vandalize his sign. “It really irritates me. I believe people should be able to protest, but not on my property, you know?” Bentley said.  TRENDING STORIES: WARNING: We're seeing the 'toe biter' more than usual this year Town bans gendered language like 'manhole,' 'manpower' from municipal codes Woman claims she was jailed for nearly 6 months on bogus jaywalking charges Bentley’s security cameras captured a car driving through the barbed wire fence and then knocking over a bright-colored cube around 1 a.m. Monday. The video then shows a woman standing in front of the camera to spray-paint the Trump sign. Bentley and his girlfriend, Dee Corson, discovered what happened when they woke up later in the day. “That’s pretty strong for it to bother you something like this,” Corson said. They also made another discovery: a car left behind. Video shows the woman struggled to get back through the fence, so she left the car there. “If the car hadn’t been here with the tag on it, and we just had video of the person, it would have been really tough,” Bentley said.  The car led police to Azaria Moore, 20, who is charged with criminal trespass and failure to report a crash. Bentley said he hopes the criminal charges will send a message. “We're sorry you don’t like it. Go to your place and do your own display, but leave ours alone,” Bentley said.  Bentley estimates the damage to be thousands of dollars, including the fence that has to be repaired. Johnson contacted Moore for comment about this story, but she didn’t want to say anything. She told Johnson that she could face five years in prison if convicted.
  • A group called Homeowners for a Better Government wants a ban on short-term vacation rentals in Rockdale County.   Members of the group packed into a town hall community meeting in Conyers on Thursday night to discuss their concerns about Airbnb and other short-term rental sites. They believe the rental craze has brought big parties and crime to their neighborhoods. Garvin Haynes wanted everyone at the meeting to hear his story. “It would literally roll you out of a bed,” Haynes said. He said when his neighbors rented out their home as an Airbnb, the renters threw a massive party. “Every time they were issued a citation, they would jack up the music even higher,” Haynes said. TRENDING STORIES: WARNING: We're seeing the 'toe biter' more than usual this year Town bans gendered language like 'manhole,' 'manpower' from municipal codes Woman claims she was jailed for nearly 6 months on bogus jaywalking charges It’s the reason he joined dozens of others at the meeting calling for the ban. “If you are doing these Airbnbs and need the money that bad to stay in your home, it’s time for you to sell your home,” Haynes said. Homeowners for a Better Government members say the recent crime is creating unnecessary work for law enforcement. “The ban is required because we don’t have enough law enforcement officers for the county at present,” ban supporter Don Meyer said. Channel 2 Action News reached out to Airbnb. In a statement, a spokesperson said: 'We support fair rules that empower Georgian hosts and homeowners to responsibly share their homes. We have a long track record of working with cities and counties towards reasonable rules and would be happy to support Rockdale County along those lines.' But the people at the meeting want only one rule: a ban. “It can be done,” Haynes said. Members of the group passed out flyers encouraging people to call on county commissioners to pass the ban.
  • The oldest son in a family of five that once lived in a car is now heading to college. Calvin Rhodes’ mother said her family has come a long way from being homeless, thanks to a traffic stop two and a half years ago as well as concern from Atlanta police. Channel 2 anchor Carol Sbarge visited the family Thursday. In 2016, Atlanta police arrested Ebony Rhodes during a traffic stop due to a problem with her license. The single mom and her kids had been homeless six months, despite the fact that she was working. Ebony said the family is doing really well now, thanks to the ongoing concern of an Atlanta deputy police chief. TRENDING STORIES: WARNING: We're seeing the 'toe biter' more than usual this year Town bans gendered language like 'manhole,' 'manpower' from municipal codes Woman claims she was jailed for nearly 6 months on bogus jaywalking charges Calvin Rhodes told Sbarge that the family has been through a lot and that during that time, he never gave up and just kept his head up. Now, the 18-year-old is preparing to go to Georgia State. He graduated with honors from his high school in South Fulton County. He also won an “Against The Odds” award. Atlanta police Deputy Chief Jeff Grazier said it was terrible to learn that the kids were even having to do homework in the car they lived in, so he felt he had to do something. Glazier got them into a shelter after the arrest and then an apartment in southwest Atlanta. Ebony was working full time when she became homeless with her family. Glazier set up a GoFundMe page for the family and it is still open. In the two and half years it has existed, the family has faced some news challenges. Ebony became sick for awhile and one of her sons was burned. Ebony said the GoFundMe has helped the family face those challenges without losing their apartment. Ebony continues to work full-time, as does Calvin. Next month, he begins college at Georgia State, where he wants to study engineering. He and the rest of the family said they are blessed by Atlanta police and all the strangers who have helped.
  • A Gwinnett County prosecutor is considering criminal charges in a case involving politics and bumper stickers. Channel 2’s Gwinnett County Bureau Chief Tony Thomas talked to a woman Thursday who said she was scared for her life when a man with differing political views followed her for miles. Sharon Wood -- a Democratic activist -- said she had just walked out of Publix when she noticed someone put Donald Trump stickers on top of her Stacey Abrams and Black Lives Matter stickers. Wood said at first, she was annoyed, but the stickers came right off. What happened next frightened her. She said suddenly, she heard someone yelling. “Before I got in my car, I heard this guy screaming from across the parking lot,” Wood said. “He said, ‘You (expletive) traitor! You (expletive) traitor!’” Wood said she pulled out of the parking lot and the man followed her for several miles. “I finally turned into a strip mall that I knew would be public. I made a really quick left-hand turn and he wasn’t able to do that. So, he just laid on his horn and left,” Wood said. TRENDING STORIES: Scooter rider hit, killed by bus identified as 37-year-old Town bans gendered language like 'manhole,' 'manpower' from municipal codes Woman claims she was jailed for nearly 6 months on bogus jaywalking charges The Lawrenceville Police Department and Gwinnett County Solicitor Brian Whiteside are investigating. At a news conference, Whiteside promised he would take action. “We feel that simple assault can be charged. Trespassing and misdemeanor stalking, in regard to that,” Whiteside said.  Police told Channel 2 Action News that the man in question has hired an attorney.
  • Immigrant families across the Atlanta region worried. The city’s public school system urged them to study their legal rights. Activists held a vigil outside a sprawling DeKalb County shopping center and then demonstrated outside of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s downtown Atlanta office. They were all bracing for the raids against unauthorized immigrants that President Donald Trump said would begin last Sunday. And then as they nervously watched and waited for the roundups to begin — not much of anything out of the ordinary happened this week, according to Atlanta-area immigration attorneys, advocates and others. “I have not seen a great deal of increased activity,” said Sarah Owings, a local immigration attorney who serves on the American Immigration Lawyers Association’s Board of Governors. “Yes, there are pickups being conducted but not to the scale or scope we were initially told would occur.” Adelina Nicholls, who leads the Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights, an immigrant advocacy group, offered a similar assessment, even as the threats of raids instilled fear among immigrants. MORE: Metro Atlanta braced for immigration enforcement raids Recent press reports indicated the raids were targeting at least 2,000 immigrant family members who have crossed the southwest border recently and who have remained in the country after being ordered deported. Ten cities, including Atlanta, were on ICE’s list. ICE declined to say Thursday what it has done so far, though it is focusing on deporting those who pose threats to national security and public safety. “Due to law enforcement sensitivities and the safety and security of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement personnel,” ICE spokesman Lindsay Williams said in an email, “the agency will not offer specific details related to enforcement operations.” Trump praised the raids during a speech at the White House Monday without offering details about what has happened so far. “The ICE raids were very successful. Many, many were taken out on Sunday,” he told reporters. “You just didn’t know about it.” MORE: Immigration activists turned out for protest Charles Kuck, another local immigration attorney and a past president of the American Immigration Lawyers Association, said ICE is constrained by limited resources. The federal agency has about 20,000 employees working in its Washington headquarters, at its two dozen field offices across the nation, including in Atlanta, and in offices overseas. The agency, meanwhile, is now detaining more than 53,000 people, a record number. Corrections companies operate three immigration detention centers in Georgia through arrangements with ICE. “From what I understand, the local office simply decided to maintain their normal process,” said Kuck, who teaches immigration law at Emory University. “I think part of the problem, at least in Atlanta, is they don’t have (detention) bed space.” After Trump announced the raids in advance, Atlanta officials advised immigrants against opening their doors to people without warrants. “Most law enforcement would tell you that it is just a bad idea to announce when you are going to do something and get people hunkered in their house,” Kuck said. Sitting on a bench outside the Plaza Fiesta shopping center on Thursday, Ismael said he and other unauthorized immigrants always remain on alert about the possibility of ICE raids. The 32-year-old Guatemalan national — he asked that his last name not be published — said he’s fearful about ICE, but he wouldn’t let that keep him from going to work. Inside the sprawling shopping center, Carolina Velasco said sales have been sluggish this week at her jewelry business, possibly because customers are staying home over such fears. “It has stoked a lot of preoccupation within the community about what could happen and still may happen, so we are still on alert for it,” said Owings, the immigration attorney.
  • There’s a warning out about recent overdoses linked to insecticides as the number of insecticide-related poisonings rises. The purpose of wasp and hornet spray is to stun and kill the stinging flying insects. But drug users are ingesting the spray to get a cheap methamphetamine-like high with dangerous results. On the street, it's known as “wasping.” It means spraying bug spray on meth or heating and crystalizing the bug spray to snort or smoke it. Either way, it can be dangerous and even deadly. In West Virginia last week, three overdoses were blamed on wasp spray. “When you ingest stuff like this, it changes the chemical characteristics of your blood,” said Phil Price, with the Cherokee Multi-Agency Drug Task Force. “Obviously, it kills wasps and hornets while they fly, so the effects on the human, I’m sure, are not so positive.' TRENDING STORIES: WARNING: We're seeing the 'toe biter' more than usual this year Town bans gendered language like 'manhole,' 'manpower' from municipal codes Woman claims she was jailed for nearly 6 months on bogus jaywalking charges The key chemical in wasp spray can cause bizarre behavior, seizures and severe, even deadly, allergic reactions in humans. “Incredibly dangerous, terribly dangerous,' addiction counselor and specialist Grace Price said. Price said she has nearly a half-dozen clients who admitted to recently using wasp spray as a meth substitute. She said some would spray it on a metal screen, attach jumper cables and electrify the screen to cook and crystalize the wasp spray. “Then they would sell that, snort it or smoke it,' she said. For hardcore meth addicts with little money, wasp spray is seen as a cheap fix, a high with many downsides, including the risk of lasting brain damage. “It's not illegal, so we can't do anything about it. We can tell them, ‘This is a terrible idea,’ but we can't arrest them for it,' Phil Price said. A recent report says poison control centers average 90,000 calls a year about exposure to pesticides. Chronic exposure can cause nerve and organ damage, cancer and birth defects. But when drug abusers are desperate for a cheap fix, they're not considering the risks. Channel 2’s Tom Regan reached out to local hospitals. So far, they say they have not taken in any patients who overdosed on wasp spray. They're hoping it stays that way.
  • A woman is in jail facing felony charges after Clayton County authorities said she sneaked a firecracker into a courtroom and threatened to blow the place up.  Whitney Jefferies, 32, was arrested Monday night after a judge saw the threat the woman allegedly posted on social media, Channel 2 Action News reported.  Judge Michael Garrett said Jefferies was on the front row in his courtroom. He told Channel 2 she seemed agitated that it was taking so long for her case to be called.  Later, he saw a video she posted on her social media page where she held up a firecracker and said she was going to blow the courtroom apart, the news station reported.  It is not clear how Jefferies got the firecracker into the courtroom, and Clayton County Sheriff Victor Hill has not commented on the situation. Deputies went to Jefferies’ condo in Morrow to arrest her, Channel 2 reported. Nobody answered when agents first knocked on her door, according to the news station.However, deputies realized someone was inside the home when a pizza was delivered to the house later that evening, Channel 2 reported.  Deputies went back to Jefferies’ door and brought her out in handcuffs, the news station reported.  Jefferies was booked into the Clayton jail, where she remains held on a $35,000 bond. She face three charges, including  making terroristic threats and possession of a destructive device. In other news: 
  • Former Georgia Bulldogs star receiver Mecole Hrdman Jr. will make his NFL debut this season with the Kansas City Chiefs. Along with a career as a professional football player comes an NFL contract. And with that contract, some decent money. So how did the 2019 second-round pick spend his new income?  He bought his mother a house! Hardman Jr. posted a lengthy video on his Twitter account Thursday. In the video, he surprised his mother with a new home. I been dreaming of buying my mama a house since I was 8 and now to finally do it words can’t explain how happy i am 🙏🏾 I love you ma x1000000000❤️ It’s my turn to take care of you now 🙏🏾 pic.twitter.com/nHpwQbMGvB — Mecole Hardman Jr. (@MecoleHardman4) July 18, 2019 “It’s going to be a great day,” Hardman Jr. said in the video. It looks like a couple dozen people attended the revealing. And, as you can imagine, there were a lot of tears and plenty of hugs. “I am so blessed. It makes you feel good as a mother knowing your kid would go to this depth to let you know you did good,” Hardman Jr.’s mother said in the video. Hardman and the Chiefs open the 2019 NFL regular season on Sept. 8 against the Jacksonville Jaguars.
  • Several inmates inside a Gwinnett County jail are being credited with saving a life. Channel 2 Action News obtained video as they jumped into action. The deputies at the jail are paid to protect and save lives. The inmates -- not so much. But three inmates teamed up with a deputy and saved someone, and it may have had more of an impact on the rescuers than they realized.  Fred Huse has a long rap sheet, but he said it shouldn't always be a bad rap. “Not everybody is. I mean, you are considered ‘bad,’ but everyone has a heart,” Huse said. It’s that heart he said caused him and two other inmates to react quickly to save another inmate. Just before 4 p.m., inmates were wrapping up a meal. A video surveillance camera recorded as an inmate walked out of his second-floor cell with a sheet wrapped around his neck.  He sat with his legs over an edge below a railing and then jumped. TRENDING STORIES: Scooter rider hit, killed by bus identified as 37-year-old Town bans gendered language like 'manhole,' 'manpower' from municipal codes Woman claims she was jailed for nearly 6 months on bogus jaywalking charges Other inmates reacted in seconds. One held him off the ground. Another ran upstairs to free him. “It would have been really difficult for our deputy alone to save this inmate,” said Deputy Shannon Volkodav, with the Gwinnett County Sheriff's Office. At one point, the inmate tried to make another run for the upstairs, but Huse grabbed him, a move officials say saved the man’s life again.  “I mean, you got kids, he was a kid. I just did by instinct,” Huse said. “It made me think of my kids and how I wasn't there. It opened me up to a different view.” It’s an impact Huse said will stay with him. “We are really proud of the inmates that intervened,” Volkodav said. “They have no obligation to do so.” Jail administrators gave Huse a bin full of items from the commissary, thanking him for his actions. “It's just a blessing. Everybody did what they did,” Huse said.

News

  • A New Jersey judge who said a teenage boy accused of rape deserved leniency because he came from a 'good family' and got good grades has resigned. >>Read more trending news Monmouth County Superior Court Judge James Troiano resigned Wednesday, the New Jersey Supreme Court announced. The resignation came after weeks of criticism from the public and death threats to Troiano's family, The New York Times reported. In 2018, Troiano, 69, was called out of retirement to hear the case of an alleged rape involving teenagers at a party the previous year, The Washington Post reported. Police said a 16-year-old boy recorded cellphone video of himself sexually assaulting a 16-year-old girl. The boy allegedly sent the video to others with the caption, “When your first time having sex was rape.” Both teens were intoxicated during the incident, prosecutors said. Prosecutors in the case pushed for the teen to be tried as an adult, calling his alleged crime 'sophisticated and predatory,' CNN reported. Troiano denied prosecutors' request. He wrote in his July 2018 decision that he didn't think the teen's actions were necessarily rape, because in 'traditional' rape cases there are 'two or more generally males involved, either at gunpoint or weapon, clearly manhandling a person.' Troiano further wrote, “This young man comes from a good family who put him into an excellent school where he was doing extremely well. He is clearly a candidate for not just college but probably for a good college. His scores for college entry were very high.” The Appellate Division of the New Jersey Superior Court reversed Troiano's decision in June, and sent the case back down for further judgement, CNN reported. Monmouth County prosecutors are planning their next move in the case. 'While we have the utmost respect for the Family Court and the judge in this case, we are grateful that the Appellate Division agreed with our assessment that this case met the legal standards for waiver to Superior Court,' Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher Gramiccioni said in a statement. 'As with all cases, we are assessing our next steps, which will include discussions with the victim and her family.
  • The first trailer for the upcoming musical film 'Cats' has been released. >>Read more trending news 'Cats' is an adaptation of the 1981 Broadway musical of the same name. Based on a collection of poems by T.S. Eliot and featuring music by Andrew Lloyd Weber, 'Cats' follows a tribe of cats called the Jellicles as they decide which cat will come back to life, according to the film's Internet Movie Database page. The original Broadway production ran for nearly 28 years and won several awards, including the 1983 Tony Award for Best Musical. The movie's star-studded cast includes Judi Dench, Idris Elba, Taylor Swift, Jennifer Hudson, James Corden and others. It introduces ballerina Francesca Hayward in her first movie role. Viewers tweeted their reactions to the trailer. Many reactions were negative, as viewers said they found the appearance of the cat characters unsettling. 'Cats' is set for a December 20 release date.
  • A photo of a dog tied up on the back of a tow truck as it goes down busy Massachusetts highway has upset so many drivers who saw it that they now won't stop calling the tow company. >> Read more trending news The Animal Rescue League and Massachusetts State Police are now investigating the alleged crime. The picture snapped by a Brockton, Massachusetts, man and posted on Facebook drew instant criticism. People quickly began posting their objections and flooding the towing company with calls. Apparently, the two people in the van being towed were in the cab of the tow truck and that's why the dog was chained to the bed. The dog is owned by the driver of the truck. The man who took the picture, Mike Gerry, also has a dog: Molly.  Mike says he saw the dog on the flatbed while driving down Route 128 near Route 2 on Wednesday. He beeped and tried to get the tow truck driver’s attention but had no luck. 'I posted it on Facebook for my buddies to put it out there. and it went unreal, it went ballistic,' Gerry said. 'And ever since then people have been commenting on it, 'you're doing the right thing.'' To be clear the company told WFXT the dog being chained to the back of a flatbed truck is not their policy. The driver has reportedly been fired and the dog is OK.  The company also says it is donating $1,000 to the MSPCA and has set up a call center so it can answer and return every single call about the incident.
  • An Oklahoma man is in custody after allegedly raping a 4-year-old girl in a McDonald’s bathroom while the child was on a field trip with her day care class, according to news reports. >> Read more trending news  It happened Tuesday inside a McDonald’s in Midwest City in metro Oklahoma City when the little girl went to the bathroom alone, WXIN-TV reported. Day care employees told responding officers they went to check on the girl after she had “been gone for a while.”  They said they found the bathroom door locked and when they knocked, a man opened the door.He allegedly came out with his hands up and said, “I was just washing my hands,” the news station reported. The 4-year-old allegedly told police she was touched inappropriately by the man, identified as Joshua Kabatra, 37. Police arrested Kabatra at the scene, according to WXIN. He’s facing two rape charges and a count of lewd acts with a child.
  • Do you feel you’re better focused on the job with a little light background jazz or coffee shop chatter compared to pin-drop silence? Scientists might know why. >> Read more trending news According to Onno van der Groen, a researcher with Australia’s Edith Cowan University school of medical and health sciences, some background noise can actually be beneficial for our senses. This phenomenon is called “stochastic resonance.” First studied in animals, stochastic resonance experiments suggest “sensory signals can be enhanced by noise and improve behaviour in various animals,” van der Groen wrote for The Conversation last week. “For example, crayfish were shown to be better at avoiding predators when a small amount of random electrical currents were added to their tail fins. Paddlefish caught more plankton when small currents were added to the water.” In human experiments, where noise levels were manipulated by getting participants to listen to noisy sounds or feel random vibrations on the skin, people were better able to see, hear and feel at “a certain optimum noise level.” If it were too loud, however, performance dropped. Van der Groen pointed out that stochastic resonance has several real life applications for humans, too. “Adding noise to the feet of people with vibrating insoles can improve balance performance in elderly adults,” he wrote. For patients with diabetes or those recovering from stroke, this can also be used to augment muscle function. His own research has found that when brain currents are applied to participants’ brains with random noise stimulation, “it improved how well they could see a low-quality image.” When he and other researchers applied the same technique to other groups, they noticed “decisions were more accurate and faster when brain cell noise levels are tuned up.” Transcranial random noise stimulation also influenced what participants saw during a visual illusion, suggesting noise could help people approach a situation from multiple perspectives. But the thing about stochastic resonance is it differs from person to person.  The optimal amount of noise for top-notch cognitive function depends on a variety of factors, such as brain variability. Excessive brain variability, van der Groen wrote, is common in those with autism, dyslexia, ADHD and schizophrenia. Elderly folks also tend to have more brain noise (or brain variability) than younger individuals. However, because brain noise can be altered with random noise stimulation, van der Groen believes there are opportunities to explore “interventions or devices to manipulate noise levels, which could improve cognitive functioning in health and disease.”  For example, a study of children with ADHD found white noise delivered specifically through Etymotic earphones at 77 decibels improved memory and concentration. Plenty of downloadable ambient, white and “pink” noise apps have also popped up in recent years. There’s Coffitivity, which plays an infinite loop of coffee-shop sounds — and Noisli, which suggests different sounds for different goals. If you want to improve productivity, you might mix raindrops and train tracks. For those who want to relax, listen to crashing waves. Generally, ambient noise is ideal for creativity, white noise is sound for concentration and pink noise might be most helpful in improving sleep quality. But remember, finding stochastic resonance isn’t a one-size-fits-all process. Play around and see which background noises and volumes work best for you. This guide from Techlicious is a good place to start.
  • An act of kindness extended by three young men has gotten a lot of attention on social media since then.  >> Read more trending news Sean Wetzonis says it all started when he, Pedro and two other friends from Malden planned to attend the game.  But one friend backed out, leaving Pedro with an extra ticket.  'And Pedro's father had suggested, he was like, 'find a girl. Find a girl to take to the game,'' Sean Wetzonis told Boston 25 News. But he said Pedro had another idea.  'He said, 'you know, I'll give it to a homeless person. If I could find a homeless person,' Wetzonis said. Finding a homeless person in Boston is not difficult. Enter John, who was sitting on a stoop near Fenway Park. 'When Pedro asked him if he wanted to go to a Red Sox game, at first I wasn't sure if he was going to get up, but then he said sure and he got up and he seemed pretty excited about it,' Wetzonis said.  He admits he was skeptical about taking a homeless guy to the game. 'I was kind of shocked. Everyone was like, 'dude. You got another ticket. You could try and sell it to make some money back.,' Wetzonis said.  But then he saw something you don't see enough of these days at professional sporting events: a fan actually watching the game.  'Everyone's there sitting on their phones, texting and looking around. He was really immersed in the game. He was there to enjoy the game,' Wetzonis said.  The Red Sox lost Tuesday night. But for three young men from Malden, it was, perhaps, the winningest night at Fenway ever.