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    Two home invasion suspects are in custody, and one is in the hospital. Police say the victim shot the suspect. One suspect was arrested at the scene. The other showed up at the hospital with a gunshot wound. Crime scene investigators and detectives worked all Tuesday morning at the apartment complex in the 3000 block of Terrace Court in Norcross. Police said the call came in around 3:45 a.m. as an attempted home invasion at the Fields at Peachtree Corners Apartments. The would-be victim fired at two suspects and knows he hit one of them. That suspect got away and ran, until three hours, later when police tracked him down at Grady Memorial Hospital in downtown Atlanta. Gwinnett police will only say they think the robbery and shooting are drug-related and we did see narcotics officers on the scene. We're talking to police for updates on Channel 2 Action News starting at 4 p.m. TRENDING STORIES Reality star's daughter says father, brother blackmailing her with sex tape Terrifying video shows burglar break into home with mother, baby inside Braves will extend protective netting at SunTrust Park One neighbor says he's complained of drug activity in the area and wants to see more security and police presence. 'We want to have people come in and out of this complex and know it's a trusted complex and we're keeping the bad guys out,' neighbor Faron Brinkley said. A neighbor on the lower level was home with six kids, who all are okay.
  • Officials in Gwinnett County said that a gas leak on Buford Highway has been repaired after at least a dozen homes were evacuated and roads were closed Tuesday morning. Gwinnett County officials said construction workers hit the gas line between Britt Avenue and South Cemetery Street in Norcross in the 5000 block of Buford Highway in Gwinnett. Buford Highway to South Peachtree Street was closed as crews worked to repair the leak.  NewsChopper 2 was over the scene as police blocked off roads.  Firefighters are evacuating approx 3-4 homes along the 5000 Block of Buford Hwy, btwn Britt Ave & S Cemetery Street in Norcross. Buford Hwy to South Peachtree has also been closed Construction workers have struck a 3 to 4-inch gas line. Atlanta Gas & Light's ETA approx 1-hour. pic.twitter.com/5TvIGMmaYk — Gwinnett County Fire and Emergency Services (@GwinnettFire) August 20, 2019 Gwinnett County fire tweeted that the leak had been secured around 12:30 p.m. Businesses were allowed to reopen and residents have been allowed to return to their homes. 
  • A teen arrested at a Cobb County high school last week was armed with a loaded gun, new documents show.  Rolando Moore was taken into custody at Wheeler High School Friday after a code red lockdown. Police said the 17-year-old had a 9 mm handgun without a license. The gun was loaded with seven rounds, according to arrest warrants obtained by Channel 2 Action News and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.  We're digging through new arrest documents and how the school is responding, for Channel 2 Action News starting at 4 p.m. Students at the school told Channel 2 Action News they sheltered in place during the lockdown.  'All doors are locked. Windows are covered. Everybody is quiet. Phones off. Everybody away from windows and doors,' said student Lavar Lesure. TRENDING STORIES: Reality star's daughter says father, brother blackmailing her with sex tape Braves will extend protective netting at SunTrust Park Terrifying video shows burglar break into home with mother, baby inside
  • A 17-year-old boy is facing felony charges after he was found with a loaded gun in his backpack at Wheeler High School last week. The discovery prompted a “Code Red” lockdown at the Cobb County school Friday morning, district officials said. Rolando Jose Moore Figueroa was arrested on campus. He was charged with possessing a 9 mm handgun without a license, a misdemeanor charge, as well as boarding a school bus with a concealed weapon and carrying a weapon within a school safety zone, both felonies. According to an arrest warrant obtained by AJC.com, the gun was loaded with seven rounds.  RELATED: Student arrested after bringing weapon to Wheeler High School Authorities went looking for Figueroa after a Cobb County School District spokeswoman said administrators were made aware of a rumor circulating about a student who made threats against the school. The nature of those threats was not disclosed. School had resumed as normal by Friday afternoon. The incident was one of several that sent cops to metro Atlanta schools after threats of violence or weapons scares.  At Walton High School in east Cobb, a 17-year-old who reportedly brought a water bottle full of alcohol to school was arrested Aug. 5 after kicking an assistant principal and threatening to “get a gun and come back and kill everyone,” according to his arrest warrant. RELATED: Cops: Cobb student kicked assistant principal, said he’d get gun to ‘kill everyone’ Ty William Holder, is charged with making terroristic threats and battery against school personnel. Another student, who was not identified, was arrested at Stephenson High School in DeKalb County last week after a classmate reported seeing a gun on a school bus. Details about that student’s charges have not been released.  Figueroa is being held in the Cobb County jail in lieu of $25,000 bond. — Staff writer Shaddi Abusaid contributed to this article.
  • A day after some areas saw strong storms and heavy rain -- there's a chance more people can see the same today.  Areas saw downed trees and power lines Monday afternoon.  [DOWNLOAD: WSB-TV's Weather App for severe weather alerts] Severe Weather Team 2 Meteorologist Katie Walls said that there is another chance that strong storms could develop later today. 'An isolated strong or severe storm cannot be ruled out,' Walls said. 'Heavy rain, frequent lightning and gusty wind in some of the stronger storms are our main concerns.'  We're using the most advanced weather technology to pinpoint the areas that could see storms, on Channel 2 Action News starting at 4 p.m. Temperatures will remain in the mid-to-upper 80s. The chance for rain sticks around for the rest of the week, and increases into the weekend.  Some clouds this morning, but Stormtracker 2HD is forecast to stay fairly dry for the morning commute. The afternoon is a different story. I'll be updating those rain chances for you every ten minutes on Ch. 2 Action News This Morning. pic.twitter.com/Qhs4YDxZB4 — Katie Walls (@KatieWallsWSB) August 20, 2019
  • Terrifying video shows the moment a burglar broke into a DeKalb County house with a mother and baby inside.  The burglary happened around 4 a.m. on Dawn Drive. The same neighborhood has dealt with six car break-ins in the past week and a half -- but the crimes don't compare to the one the victim Channel 2's Matt Johnson spoke with Monday experienced. 'Who's there? I'm calling the cops. I'm calling 911. Get off my front door,' she's heard saying in the surveillance video as a stranger stands outside her home. The man ignores her and breaks into the living room. 'Help me! Help me!' the woman is heard saying in the video.  Even the sound of the mother screaming and her 8-month-old daughter crying aren't enough to get him to leave without stealing electronics.  The woman said she grabbed her daughter and ran to a neighbor's house on Oakridge Court. 'I went out through the back with my baby, and I was just screaming for the neighbors to hear,' she told Johnson Monday. She said before she left, she saw the thief get inside her home through an app on her phone. TRENDING STORIES: 111-year-old Atlanta woman reveals her secret to long life Teacher under investigation for attempted molestation in mall bathroom Reality star's daughter says father, brother blackmailing her with sex tape 'I just needed to be safe with my baby. Her life matters to me. That was the only thing on my mind, like, I just needed to get her to safety,' she said. Another video appears to show the same person exiting through the front door two hours earlier without locking it. The victim says she later learned he pried open a window two hours earlier and stole her purse while she was asleep. 'Every night I check all the locks. I knew it was definitely locked,' she said. DeKalb County police said they're using the videos to track down the thief. The victim says her move to Georgia just last week is off to a tough start. 'I'm just a mom trying to get by with my baby. I just need my purse back, my passport, my ID cards, everything was in my purse,' she said. Thankfully, neither the mother or baby had any contact with the intruder. A security company has installed new equipment at the home.
  • Residents of Cobb and Fulton counties on Monday said they want state and federal environmental agencies to do more to ensure the safety of the air they breathe at a town hall meeting about a Smyrna plant and emissions of a carcinogenic gas known as ethylene oxide. Community groups have been outraged since July when a media report highlighted a 2018 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study that warned of potential increased long-term risk of cancer in census tracts near the Sterigenics facility in Smyrna. It also found potential higher long-term cancer risks near a similar sterilization facility in Covington that also uses ethylene oxide. >> Two Dem state lawmakers call for Sterigenics closure On Monday, the EPA and state authorities held the town hall with panels about the risk of ethylene oxide and the steps regulators are taking to curb emissions at the Sterigenics plant. They urged calm to the crowd of well over 1,000 inside the Cobb County Civic Center, and said the 2018 report showed that more study of ethylene oxide emissions is needed. Residents held signs saying “No ETO,” an acronym for ethylene oxide, and many in the crowd sported orange shirts reading “Stop Sterigenics.” Some booed as speakers from state and federal agencies tried to assure residents that working with the company is the quickest way to reduce emissions and ensure compliance. VIDEO: Previous coverage of this issue Albert Luker and Mindy Rolnick made the trip from the Smyrna area to the civic center in Marietta to get answers. Luker, who worked at a facility less than half a mile from Sterigenics from 2014 to 2017, was diagnosed with cancer in his sinuses in January. Luker stumbled across the WebMD and Georgia Health News report on ethylene oxide a few days before he was scheduled to have surgery on July 25. “I was shocked,” he said when he read the report. He sent the report to a former co-worker who was also diagnosed with brain cancer. “How can two people who sat beside each other both get cancer?” Luker asked. The National Air Toxics Assessment, the EPA report that raised alarms last year about potential cancer risks, is “a high-level screening tool” that flags potential air pollution risks, said Mary Walker, EPA Region 4 Administrator in Atlanta.  The study, released last year but based on 2014 data,  found dozens of census tracts in the U.S. have potential high risks for cancer for people with long-term low level exposure to chemicals such as ethylene oxide, but that those areas require additional study. Dr. Ken Mitchell, deputy director of the air and radiation division at the EPA Region 4 office in Atlanta, said in an interview with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution before the hearing that modeling in June showed lower levels of cancer risk than the NATA report. Since 2014, the company has reduced its emissions by about 90 percent, officials said. The June modeling, based on state modeling of Sterigenics emissions data, did not find cancer risks above the EPA’s thresholds of 100 cases in 1 million individuals in residential areas near the plant. It did find an elevated risk at businesses in the immediate area near the Sterigenics plant. Mitchell said state and federal regulators are working with the company to improve emissions controls which should solve the problem. “This is not a run for the hills situation at the Sterigenics facility and we expect it to become better in short order,” Mitchell said. The state EPD and Sterigenics entered into a consent order in which the company agreed to extensive improvements to its emissions control systems. Mitchell also said ethylene oxide has been found to be more pervasive than initially understood. Background levels in testing done around the country has found the gas in unexpected areas or in concentrations that were more than expected with sources that were difficult to pinpoint. During the two-hour formal presentation, a moderator read questions submitted in advance. One that got a round of applause asked why the public wasn’t informed of the 2018 EPA assessment and learned about it through the media. “I hear you we should have talked to you long before that. I hear you,” said Karen Hays, chief of the air protection branch of the state EPD. “Our focus, right or wrong, was to take the NATA results and find out what was going on on the ground.” More testing sought Cobb and Smyrna officials have announced plans to fund air tests near the Sterigenics facility. On Monday, Atlanta City Council approved legislation to join the Cobb and Smyrna tests. Though the facility is not in Atlanta’s city limits, two council districts are within about a mile of the plant. “The city wants to ensure that our communities have clean air,” Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said in a news release. “While there is no evidence our residents have been impacted, we must do our due diligence to ensure the well-being of our families.” Last week, after mounting pressure, the state Environmental Protection Division announced it too would conduct air tests near the Smyrna plant and the BD facility in Covington. On Friday, Gov. Brian Kemp said state leaders would meet with executives of Sterigenics and BD this week to ensure the companies “take responsibility, embrace transparency, and work with their communities to build trust.” “As a parent, I understand why local families are worried,” Kemp said in a video message Friday on Twitter. “The results are confusing, the news coverage is frightening and the public has been left in the dark. This situation is simply unacceptable.” Ethylene oxide is a colorless and combustible gas used to fumigate some agricultural products, sterilize medical equipment and in the manufacturing process of other chemicals such as antifreeze. The gas is long been known to be harmful, but in 2016 the EPA reclassified ethylene oxide as a carcinogen. The gas has been linked to breast, lymphoid, leukemia and other types of cancers. Cobb resident Don McWeaty, who lives near SunTrust Park, said he’s concerned that officials have done little to address what he said is a “known carcinogen.” “I spend a lot of time outside,” he said. “I’m a bicyclist and I may be riding through it.” McWeaty said the government and corporations have a track record of either downplaying or dismissing reports that certain products have devastating consequences on human health. He used the tobacco industry’s decades-long denial that its product was linked to cancer as an example. “We have a long history of being lied to about these things,” he said. Michael Power, a Smyrna resident and representative of the Georgia Chemistry Council, said ethylene oxide is used to make products such as glass and adhesives. Power said it should be noted that ethylene oxide is a naturally occurring chemical that is produced by human bodies, car emissions, cigarette smoke and tree decay. “There are natural sources for it,” he said. A Sterigenics spokesman said the company was not invited to the town hall. In an interview last week, Sterigenics President Phil Macnabb said the company is investing $2.5 million as part of a 12- to 24-week project to enhance its emissions controls system. The new system will improve emissions that go through its stack but also scrub so-called fugitive emissions that can escape detection. “Our mission and our company is all around safety,” Macnabb said. Artemis Tjahjono, who lives in Mableton, said she is worried about exposure to children in schools near the Sterigenics plant and wants to see air testing done within school buildings. Tjahjono, who is expecting her second child, said her 6-year-old son attends St. Benedict’s Episcopal School and takes music classes nearby. Tjahjono said the voluntary steps the company is taking don’t give her much solace. “We can’t just take their word that this is going to happen,” she said. “You want to relax during your pregnancy, not fight the system and become an activist.”
  • The Braves said Monday that they will extend the protective netting at SunTrust Park to the foul poles to better safeguard fans. The project should be completed by the end of September, “barring any complications,” the Braves said.  The Braves join 10 other MLB teams that have announced this summer plans to extend the netting to or near the foul poles in their stadiums to protect fans from injuries inflicted by line-drive foul balls. “The extension will provide additional protection for our fans while preserving the overall game day experience as much as possible,” the Braves said in a statement. Braves executives declined to comment on the matter Monday beyond the brief statement posted on the team’s official Twitter account. The netting currently runs from behind home plate to the far end of both dugouts at SunTrust Park. The extension will place nets in front of all lower-level seating sections from behind the plate to the foul poles, according to the Braves. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported Sunday on the issue of protective netting at MLB stadiums, noting that in recent years velocities of batted balls have increased, the stands have gotten closer to the playing field and fans have become increasingly distracted by their smartphones. Braves manager Brian Snitker last week expressed his support for extended netting in baseball stadiums. “I stopped watching balls go into the stands when I was a third-base coach because I did not want to turn around and see a young kid get hit,” Snitker said last week. “I did a couple of times, and it makes you sick to your stomach when you see that.”  Braves CEO Derek Schiller told The AJC last month that the organization was evaluating whether to extend the netting farther down the foul lines at SunTrust Park and how to do so.  As injuries caused by foul balls draw increased scrutiny around MLB, the Braves join the Baltimore Orioles, Chicago White Sox, Houston Astros, Kansas City Royals, Los Angeles Dodgers, Miami Marlins, Pittsburgh Pirates, Texas Rangers, Toronto Blue Jays and Washington Nationals in announcing plans for extended netting. Those teams have said in the past two months that they will extend the nets in their stadiums to or near the outfield foul poles by the start of next season or have already done so.  “I applaud those teams that do that,” Snitker said last week. The Braves increased the number of seats behind the protective netting when SunTrust Park opened in 2017. In the final season at Turner Field, the nets ran from behind home plate to the start of the dugouts. When SunTrust Park was built, a 33-foot-high screen was installed from behind the plate to the far end of the dugouts, stopping at the camera wells adjacent to the dugouts.  By the opening of the 2018 season, all MLB stadiums had extended their nets to the far ends of the dugouts. But no team had installed netting all the way to the foul poles until the White Sox last month became the first to do so. The recent flurry of teams extending nets farther down the foul lines followed a much-publicized incident in May at a game between the Astros and Chicago Cubs in Houston. In seats just beyond Minute Maid Park’s protective netting, a 2-year-old girl suffered a skull fracture when struck by a hard-hit foul ball off the bat of the Cubs’ Albert Almora Jr. The incident brought Almora to tears, and he told reporters after the game: “Right now, obviously, I want to put a net around the whole stadium.”   
  • A Cherokee County restaurant failed its health inspection for the second time in eight months. It is Golden China on Marietta Highway in Canton. In December, Golden China failed a health inspection with a score of just 52. They got a 96 on the reinspection, but this month, it failed again with a score of 53. When Channel 2's Carol Sbarge went to Golden China at lunchtime, it was closed, even though the sign on the door said it opens at 11 a.m. TRENDING STORIES: Teacher under investigation for attempted molestation in mall bathroom Social media rivalry leads to deadly shooting of 9-year-old girl Acuna on being benched for not running out hit: 'I respect Snit's decision' When Sbarge knocked on the door to ask if a manager was available to talk about the inspection a worker said no one was available. The worker did say they agreed to voluntarily close the restaurant until the reinspection is done. Customer Israel Ramirez pulled up to get some food to go. He said he didn't know it had failed and was surprised. Violations included improper cooling methods for prepared food, moldy cardboard in the walk-in cooler and improper hand washing. Breanna Porter who works next door to Golden China, says the failing score surprised her because she always thought the restaurant looked very clean when she ate there. A worker at the restaurant told Sbarge they expect a reinspection any day. We'll let you know how they do.

News

  • The Coast Guard is searching for two boaters who didn't return from a fishing trip Friday evening off the coast of Port Canaveral, Florida. >> Read more trending news  Brian McCluney and Justin Walker were last seen leaving the 300 Christopher Columbus boat ramp Friday in a 24-foot center console boat heading toward 8A Reef. McCluney is a firefighter with the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department and Wilcox is a master technician with the Fairfax County, Virginia, Fire and Rescue Department. Update 12:35 p.m. EDT Aug. 20: Officials with the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department said they will cover about 12,600 miles Tuesday in their search for two missing firefighters. On Tuesday, 10 aircraft and several boats were surveying the area with the help of law enforcement, fire and rescue officials and civilians, WJAX-TV reported. Crews focused on searching the area where a tackle bag belonging to one of the missing men was found Monday. Update 10:50 a.m. EDT Aug. 20: The wife of one of the boaters missing since Friday morning took her search efforts into the air Tuesday, WFTV reported. Natasha Walker caught a private flight from the Titusville airport to help comb the Florida coastline as the search continues for her husband, Justin Walker, and his friend, Brian McCluney. 'They know that we want them to keep fighting,' Natasha Walker told WFTV before boarding the plane. The U.S. Coast Guard said Monday afternoon that⁩ a volunteer found a tackle bag belonging to Brian McCluney about 50 miles off the coast of St. Augustine. 'This is still absolutely a rescue mission,' Jacksonville fire Chief Keith Powers said Monday at a news conference. 'We're talking about a decorated combat vet here. We're talking about a firefighter paramedic. These guys have the skills ... to survive for a long time.' Kevin McCluney, the brother of Brian McCluney, told WFTV that if any people were resourceful enough to survive, it would be these two men. 'Between the two of them, I know they've got it locked down,' Kevin McCluney said. 'It's just a matter of time.' Brian McCluney's wife, Stephanie McCluney, told WFTV he underwent survival training during his time in the U.S. Navy and that Justin Walker is one of the most resourceful men she knows. 'If I were ever stranded anywhere, those were the two men I'd want to be stuck with,' she said. Coast Guard officials continued to search for the McCluney and Walker on Tuesday. Update 6:44 a.m. EDT Aug. 20: The search for two missing firefighters will continue Tuesday morning, authorities said. The Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department is calling on anyone who would like to help with the search and has the following items: A boat that can work in the range of 30-60 miles Binoculars A SAT phone (which is short for a satellite telephone. It’s a type of phone that connects to other phones by radio, orbiting through satellites.) Update 3:10 p.m. EDT Aug. 19: McCluney's wife said in a post on Facebook that her husband's tackle bag was found 50 miles off the shore of St. Augustine, WJAX-TV reported. The search for McCluney and his friend, Wilcox, continued Monday. Update 1:25 p.m. EDT Aug. 19: Officials with the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department said over 135 people assisted Monday with the search for McCluney and Walker. There were 36 boats searching from Brunswick, Georgia, to St. Augustine, Florida, on Monday, officials said. Searching for the missing boaters will continue until dark, JFRD officials said. Agency officials stressed Monday that the search was still a rescue mission. The missing men were raised on the water, according to JFRD. 'We're talking about a decorated combat vet here. We're talking about a firefighter paramedic. These guys have the skills,' a JFRD official said Monday at a news conference. 'These guys have the skills to survive for a long time.' Update 9:25 a.m. EDT Aug. 19: Authorities and volunteers continued to search Monday for McCluney and Walker. Coast Guard officials said Monday that crews have searched an estimated 24,000 miles since Friday. Authorities said they continued to search Monday from Port Canaveral up to Jacksonville. Officials with the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department urged people in the area to contact authorities 'if you see something ... any debris, anything.' McCluney is a Jacksonville firefighter and Wilcox is a master technician with the Fairfax County, Virginia, Fire and Rescue Department. Update 3:10 p.m. EDT Aug. 18: Multiple agencies have joined the search, On Sunday afternoon, the Coast Guard said crews are investigating reports of a debris field 50 miles east of St. Augustine, Florida, WJAX reported. However, they have confirmed it's not related to the missing boaters. Earlier Sunday, Stephanie Young McCluney, the wife of one of the missing men, thanked the efforts of the Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department in a Facebook post. According to a tweet from the agency, 50 firefighters were assisting the Coast Guard with the search. The Jacksonville Association of Fire Fighters has also set up a link for those wanting to help with search efforts.  'The donations will support the search efforts and ultimately the families of the firefighters,' according to the Jacksonville Firefighter Charities donation page. 'Thank you so much for your support and prayers!' Original report: In a Facebook post Saturday, McCluney's wife said the Coast Guard has suspended the air search until Sunday morning but will continue to search by boat and radar overnight. According to Stephanie McCluney's post, the search area will move north as the Coast Guard continues to survey the coast off Volusia County throughout the night. According to the Jacksonville Association of Firefighters, McCluney is a Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department firefighter from Station 31 near Oak Hill Park. The Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department said in a Facebook post that Walker is a master technician at the Virginia fire department near Washington, D.C. The Coast Guard had deployed a search plane and several boats to look for the overdue boaters. The Navy and Brevard County Sheriff's Office are assisting with the search. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville Command Center at 904-714-7558. The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.
  • Although they never publicly confirmed their relationship, reports say actress Katie Holmes and actor, singer and comedian Jamie Foxx have broken up. They were rumored to have been dating for six years. Page Six was the first to report the split, and E! News and People confirmed the news through unnamed sources close to the stars. >> Read more trending news  E! News reported that the breakup news came days after paparazzi captured Foxx leaving Lil Pump's 19th birthday in Los Angeles holding hands with a singer named Sela Vave.  An unnamed source told People Vave is 'just a girl he's helping out, a young singer.' A series of photos posted by Vave on Instagram in June shows her posing with Foxx. 'I am so grateful to this man! Thank you so much @iamjamiefoxx for everything you do and for believing in me,' the caption read. In 2015, Us Weekly reported that Holmes and Foxx had been secretly dating for two years and were photographed holding hands at a music studio in February of that year. After six years of dating, the couple posed together for the first time at a public event at the Met Gala in May. Before then, they were seen arriving separately at the same locations, including a family dinner in New York. They never publicly commented on the relationship, and they were only confirmed as an item when paparazzi photos captured them on a yacht in Miami in December. 
  • Planned Parenthood announced Monday that it would be withdrawing from a federal program that provided millions of dollars to subsidize reproductive health care because a new rule imposed by the Department of Health and Human Services would ban it from referring clients to abortion providers. >> Read more trending news  The organization, which is the largest abortion provider in the United States, said it would not comply with the rules that banned it from referring clients for abortions and additional rules that require both financial and physical separation between facilities funded by Title X and facilities where abortions are performed. The decision means that Planned Parenthood, which serves 40% of all Title X patients, will lose millions of dollars of federal funding. What is Title X and what does the change mean for abortion providers? Here’s a look at the funding program and the new rule change. What is Title X? Title X is a grant program created in 1970 and administered by HHS. Its mandate is to provide comprehensive family planning services and preventative health services. The program funds facilities that provide care to lower-income families. What services are provided under Title X? These services are available to women under Title X: Birth controlContraception counselingBreast and cervical cancer screeningsTesting and treatment for sexually transmitted infectionsPregnancy diagnosis and counseling Can men get services through Title X? Title X also provides services for men who qualify under the program’s rules. Those services include: Education and counselingCondomsSTD testing and treatmentHIV testingIn some cases, vasectomy services  Who is eligible for services at a Title X-funded facility?  The program is aimed at low-income families. It is implemented through grants to more than 3,500 clinical sites. Those sites include public health departments and non-profit facilities such as Planned Parenthood. What is the budget for Title X? In fiscal year 2017, Title X received $286.5 million in funding. How many people are helped through Title X? According to HHS, around 6.2 million people – mostly young, female and low income – are served by Title X funds. It is estimated that 20 million qualify for the program. How many Title X sites are there in the U.S.? There are 4,000 Title X service sites in the U.S. Planned Parenthood represents fewer than 400 of those sites. What does the new rule say?  The first part of the new rule prohibits health care providers serving in Title X-funded institutions from referring patients for abortions. The second part of the rule requires that health care facilities funded by Title X be financially and physically separated from facilities where abortions are performed. When does the new rule go into effect? The part of the rule about referring patients for abortion care went into effect on July 11. The part of the rule on physical separation goes into effect on March 4, 2020.  The rule is being challenged in federal court by more than 20 states, Planned Parenthood and other groups affected by the change. What did Planned Parenthood choose to do in relation to the new rule?  Planned Parenthood made the choice to give up Title X funding in exchange for continuing to refer clients for abortions. The decision means they give up about $60 million in Title X funds. Does that mean Planned Parenthood no longer receives federal funds? No. Planned Parenthood still gets funding from Medicaid, the government health care program for low-income families. Planned Parenthood receives around $500 million per year from Medicaid according to its 2017-18 annual report.
  • If you have a horse you're willing to donate, Pennsylvania State Police want to talk to you. The horse must stand between 16 and 18 hands tall and be a draft or draft-cross breed. Pennsylvania State Police are asking for donations of horses to support mounted patrol units, which utilize animals deployed for security, patrol, searches and crowd control. >> Read more trending news  Once your horse retires, you are able to get your horse back. To arrange a donation, or for more information, contact Corporal Carrie Neidgigh at 717-533-3463.
  • A Nebraska teenager paid tribute to her late father through her high school senior pictures. >> Read more trending news  Julia Yllescas, a senior at Aurora High School, wanted her father to be a part of her senior pictures. Her father, Capt. Robert Yllescas, died Dec. 1, 2008, in Bethesda, Maryland, from injuries he received from an improvised explosive device while serving in Afghanistan. Yllescas had her senior pictures taken Saturday and sent them to photographer Susanne Beckmann to see if she could create an 'angel picture,' KOLN reported. Julie Yllescas loved the first two photographs that Beckmann worked on, They show her sitting and standing next to a faint shadow of her father in uniform, the radio station reported. 'Why it has hit my heart so hard is that I almost felt when I saw those pictures that he truly was there,” Yllescas told KOLN. 'And to have a piece of him with me throughout my senior year. Because sometimes it feels like where are you, why did you have to go.' Beckmann, whose husband has served in the Nebraska National Guard for 16 years, was only too happy to create the images. 'I was teary-eyed when I was editing them,' Beckmann told KOLN. 'All I could think in my head is I don't ever want to have to do this for my own kids.' Beckmann, who has run Snapshots by Suz for eight years, said she has known the Yllescas family since Julia was 9.  'I thought it would be a great idea to do these angel pictures for her as a special gift for her big milestone and to her family,' Beckmann told Cox Media Group by telephone Tuesday morning. 'I am an active duty National Guard wife, which is what inspired the idea and the vision. 'I take a lot of pictures of military families and it is always an honor for me to capture their special memories.' The photographs that include her father are a comfort for Yllescas 'Just to have that on my wall and be like, 'No, he is with me,' even though I can't physically see him,” she told KOLN.
  • A Texas elementary school teacher has a gift for her students.  Richelle Terry is promising no homework for her second- and third-grade math students for the entire school year, KBMT reported.  Terry is a teacher at Evadale Elementary. She had taught pre-K, but this is the first time she's taught the higher grade. >> Read more trending news  Instead of pouring over their math problems for hours at the dining room table, she wants her students to spend time with family and to enjoy their childhood.  'You see them, and they're like, 'I hate school. I don't like school. I don't like learning. That class is boring.' It's because they take the fun out of it. Everything is serious ... and it doesn't have to be that way,' Terry told KBMT. Terry said there should be enough time in class to finish assignments and the school has added a tutorial period for kids need extra help, according to KBMT. Terry said she will take a look at how her students are handling the no-homework rule throughout the semester. The school district allows its teachers to be flexible as long as students meet requirements, KBMT reported.