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    Singer Kelis and Nas divorced nearly 10 years ago, but Kelis has revealed new information about her marriage to the rapper that has stunned many.  In an interview with Hollywood Unlocked posted Thursday, the singer opened up about her marriage to the rapper, alleging that there was infidelity and physical and mental abuse. The two met in 2002, married in 2005 and divorced in 2010. Kelis, whose birth name is Kelis Rogers, said there were intense highs and lows throughout their relationship and admitted they “were drinking a lot” and “getting high a lot.” “It was never normal,” she said, adding that she was 22 when she met Nas, whose birth name is Nasir Jones. “There’s no balance. There’s no normalcy.” “I was really naive. I was madly in love, and so I took a lot that I shouldn’t have taken and that I generally -- it’s not my character at all,” she said. “I didn’t file for divorce because he cheated. He had been cheating for two years, and I knew it. It was because on top of all the other stuff -- then you’re gonna cheat?” >> Read more trending news  Kelis said she decided to file for divorce in 2009, when she was seven months pregnant with her son Knight. She said she couldn’t bring a baby into her toxic relationship. “It was dark. It was really dark. There was a lot of drinking. There was a lot of, just, mental and physical abuse,” she said. “I probably would’ve stayed longer if I had not been pregnant.” “Did he hit me? Mhm. Did I hit him back? Mhm,” she said when asked more about it. “It was because he would black out. He would drink too much, he drank way too much, he will never admit it… There are times that we would party and I would drink with him, but then he would keep drinking. And so a lot of the stuff, he may not remember.” Kelis said she kept the abuse private because she worried how it would affect her public image. “I remember so clearly when the pictures came out with that whole thing that happened with (Rihanna) and Chris Brown and ... I had bruises all over my body at that time. “I wasn’t ready to walk (away),” she said. Adding that she stayed with Nas for years after that incident. Of her decision to ultimately say something about the abuse, Kelis said, “Seeing (Rihanna) the way she looked and then looking at myself… I felt embarrassed.” She added that she takes ownership for her own wrongs in the relationship. “I wasn’t perfect,” she said. “I never painted myself as an angel.” Kelis also discussed her custody battle with Nas. She alluded that the emcee was in and out of their 8-year-old son’s life.  “A parent isn’t about showing up when you feel like it. You can’t not show up for months and then show up and try to make up your own (visitation) schedule,” she said.  Kelis said her life now is good. She’s since moved on and is married to real estate agent Mike Mora. They have a 2-year-old son named Shepherd. The full interview of Kelis with Hollywood Unlocked can be watched on YouTube.
  • The Georgia Bureau of Investigation has now put a face on a suitcase full of bones found last year in Butts County. A forensic artist has created a sketch of what an unidentified woman might have looked like. Last December, a suitcase full of bones was discovered in the woods along I-75 in Butts County. A forensic anthropologist determined bones were those of an African American female but age range is wide. Investigators say she could have been anywhere from 19 to 45-years-old.  She had a broken ankle at some time in her life. So far, investigators call it an undetermined death.   They aim to find out who she was and they hope artist Kelly Lawson's sketch will jog some memories.  Channel 2's Berndt Petersen spoke to Lawson about her responsibility and the unique feature that could make the woman easy to recognize, on Channel 2 Action News at 4:45.  TRENDING STORIES: Woman kills husband's mistress then turns gun on herself in 'calculated, planned attack': Police Damaging winds and small hail possible as storms head our way Teen was driving 106 mph when she crashed, killed best friend, prosecutors say A skeleton was found in a suitcase along I-75 in Butts County. A forensic artist says the victim may have looked like this. 445 pic.twitter.com/6VUkLyJ7yQ — Berndt Petersen (@BPetersenWSB) April 26, 2018
  • Channel 2 Action News has learned a Fort Valley State University employee at the center of sexual misconduct and GBI criminal investigations has resigned from her position. Channel 2 Investigative Reporter Nicole Carr obtained Alecia Johnson’s personnel file through an open records request. We’re breaking down what's next for everyone involved in this ongoing story, LIVE at 5 on Channel 2 Action News. Johnson, the University president’s former executive assistant, worked for the state institution since 2004, receiving consistent, stellar reviews. TRENDING STORIES: Investigators: Teacher accused of sex with student also had heroin in school Is legal pot a good thing? We travel to Colorado to get the real story LIST: Well-known serial killers of the last 50 years Last year, her salary increased to $64,000 with a promotion to oversee university special events, in addition to her duties in the president’s office. Johnson submitted a resignation letter on April 18, the same day the national office for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated revealed its own probe into sexual misconduct allegations involving a Fort Valley State University employee who is also a graduate member of the sorority.
  • New text messages obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and Channel 2 Action News show a top aide to former Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed pressuring other city officials to delay production of open records during Reed's final months in office. In unvarnished, sometimes vulgar comments, the texts reveal the mindset of senior Reed administration officials through the unguarded words of one of Reed's closest advisers and most ardent defenders, former communications director Anne Torres. We'll show you the text messages and explain how a simple request quickly turned into a dispute between Reed's office and the Atlanta BeltLine, on Channel 2 Action News at 6 p.m. Most ATL taxpayers don’t know this lawyer, but say thanks to her for taking some nasty heat from Mayor Reed’s Office. She & her Beltline boss did the right thing. Ch2 & AJC exclusive at 5:59 @wsbtv pic.twitter.com/osZxj2iJYp — Richard Belcher (@BelcherWSB) April 26, 2018 The GBI opened a criminal investigation of the city's handling of open records requests last month after the AJC and Channel 2 reported on other text messages from former Reed press secretary Jenna Garland. Garland instructed another staffer 'to drag this out as long as possible' and provide information 'in the most confusing format available' in response to a Channel 2 open records request for city water billing records. The new texts from Torres show Garland's instructions to curtail production of records were not an isolated incident. Torres defended the remarks as 'inter-employee banter.' This article was written by Scott Trubey, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
  • Ronald Acuna and Ozzie Albies might be tormenting the National League together for a long time. Braves fans saw that dream realized Thursday.  Acuna delivered a go-ahead bloop-double in the eighth inning, while Albies launched a two-run blast in the fifth, helping the team to a 7-4 win that salvaged a series split against the Reds in Cincinnati.  Acuna had three hits and fell a triple short of the cycle in his second career game. His first homer came on a 3-1 pitch in the second inning. The 416-foot shot landed in the fourth row of the upper deck in left field. He got his second hit in the sixth inning.  Albies extended the Braves’ lead to 4-0 in the fifth with a homer of his own. It was Albies’ 18th extra-base hit of April, setting a new franchise record. He also tied the NL lead with eight homers and leads MLB with 10 doubles.  Freddie Freeman doubled in the eighth and scored on Acuna’s hit. He had his first career three-double day and has 12 hits in his past 30 at-bats.  Dansby Swanson drove Acuna home with an ensuing single to add an insurance run. Albies doubled in Ender Inciarte, who’s on a 10-game hitting streak, for an additional run in the ninth.  Braves starter Sean Newcomb pitched four solid innings, but couldn’t survive the fifth. Joey Votto’s three-run shot tied the score at 4-4. It was Votto’s third consecutive game with a homer after having none entering the series. After two letdown losses against a Reds team off to a historically bad start, the Braves rebounded the past two nights. The Reds scored eight combined runs in the last two games after putting up 19 across the first two. Never miss a minute of what’s happening with the Braves. Subscribe to myAJC.com
  • State officials have released the last meal for convicted murderer Robert Earl Butts, Jr., who is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection. Butts was sentenced to death in 1998 for the murder of Donovan Corey Parks. The execution is scheduled for 7 p.m. on May 3 at the Georgia Diagnostic and Classification Prison in Jackson. Butts requested a last meal of bacon cheeseburger with American and cheddar cheese, ribeye steak, six chicken tenders, seasoned French fries, cheesecake and strawberry lemonade.    There have been 70 men and one woman executed in Georgia since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976.  TRENDING STORIES: Woman kills husband's mistress then turns gun on herself in 'calculated, planned attack': Police GBI investigating second scene in officer-involved in Villa Rica Teen was driving 106 mph when she crashed, killed best friend, prosecutors say If executed, Butts will be the 49th inmate put to death by lethal injection. There are presently 53 men under death sentence in Georgia.   Lawyers: Inmate set for execution should be resentenced A man set for execution next month should be resentenced because he wouldn't get the death penalty if he were sentenced today, his lawyers argued in a court filing. Butts Jr., 40, is scheduled to die on May 3 at the state prison in Jackson. Butts and 41-year-old Marion Wilson Jr. were convicted and sentenced to death in the March 1996 slaying of Donovan Corey Parks in central Georgia. The state and federal constitutions prohibit 'cruel and unusual' punishment, and the state prohibition on such punishment depends on the 'evolving standards of decency of the people of Georgia,' Butts' lawyers wrote in a filing seeking a new sentence in Baldwin County Superior Court, where he was originally sentenced. The murder for which Butts and Wilson were sentenced had a single victim and one aggravating factor, a circumstance that increases the severity of a crime and increases the possible sentence. According to sentencing data obtained and analyzed by Butts' lawyers, no one has been sentenced to death for a murder with one victim and one aggravating factor in over a decade. 'In other words, the people of Georgia no longer consider single-decedent, single-aggravator murder to be among the 'worst of the worst' offenses for which the death penalty must be reserved,' Butts' lawyers wrote. For that reason, they argue, he should be resentenced. The Georgia attorney general's office on Wednesday declined to comment on Butts' lawyers request to halt his scheduled execution and to hold a new sentencing trial. Butts' lawyers analyzed 246 cases in which the state filed a notice to seek the death penalty and a sentence was imposed from 2006 to 2017. During that time, of the 166 cases with a single victim, only seven, or 4.2 percent, resulted in a death sentence. And in the 21 cases with one aggravating factor, only one, or 4.8 percent, resulted in a death sentence. Under the state and federal constitutions, 'cruel and unusual' punishments 'include a sentence that is arbitrarily or rarely imposed,' Butts' lawyers wrote. The fact that no one in Georgia has been sentenced to death for a single victim, single aggravator murder in 10 years 'raises a threshold inference that Butts' death sentence is grossly disproportionate,' they argue. Attorneys for Butts have also argued repeatedly that his trial lawyers were ineffective and failed to thoroughly investigate his case or to present mitigating evidence, including a childhood characterized by abuse and neglect that could have spared him the death penalty. State and federal courts have rejected his appeals. His lawyers argued in a federal court filing earlier this month that a Georgia Supreme Court opinion published in January opens the door for a federal judge to consider his claims of ineffective assistance of counsel. The state rejected that argument in a filing Wednesday. Butts and Wilson asked Parks for a ride outside a Walmart store in Milledgeville, about 93 miles (150 kilometers) southeast of Atlanta. After they'd gone a short distance they ordered him to stop the car, dragged him out and killed him with a single shot to the back of his head, prosecutors said. They tried unsuccessfully to sell Parks' car and ended up driving it to a remote part of Macon and setting fire to it. Appeals in Wilson's case are still pending. Information from the Associated Press was used in this report
  • In an interview with Rolling Stone published Thursday, Grammy-nominated singer Janelle Monae addressed her sexuality, a subject that’s long been speculated under the limelight. >> Read more trending news  Monae spoke to the magazine about being in relationships with men and women and said that while she initially identified as bisexual, after learning about pansexuality, she realized she identifies with it as well. “Being a queer black woman in America -- someone who has been in relationships with both men and women -- I consider myself to be a free (expletives),” she said.  “Later I read about pansexuality and was like, ‘Oh, these are things that I identify with too.’ I’m open to learning more about who I am.” Compared with being bisexual, which means someone is attracted to more than one gender, being pansexual “means being attracted to all gender identities, or attracted to people regardless of gender,” according to LGBTQ organization GLAAD. Related: What is the difference between transgender and transsexual? Other celebrities that have spoken out about being pansexual include Miley Cyrus, Laci Green, Angel Haze and Jazz Jennings. “I want young girls, young boys, nonbinary, gay, straight, queer people who are having a hard time dealing with their sexuality, dealing with feeling ostracized or bullied for just being their unique selves, to know that I see you,” she told Rolling Stone. Related: Janelle Monae returns with ‘Dirty Computer’ album, two new videos Monae also spoke about her long-awaited third solo album “Dirty Computer,” saying,  “A lot of this album is a reaction to the sting of what it means to hear people in my family say, ‘All gay people are going to hell.’” The singer now says she serves “the God of Love.” “Through my experiences, I hope people are seen and heard,” she said. “I may make some mistakes. I may have to learn on the go, but I’m open to this journey.” “Dirty Computer” will be released Friday.
  • Two men are facing charges after Alpharetta police say they caught them drag racing right in front of an officer on a busy road. Dash cam video from the officer on patrol on April 6 near Webb Bridge and Morris roads captured the men fly past the officer at a stoplight. 'When the light turned green he noticed two vehicles that were two car lengths ahead of him took off at a very high rate of speed,” Officer Howard Miller said. TRENDING STORIES: 50+ horses missing across southeast after vet student ‘adopts’ them Investigators: Teacher accused of sex with student also had heroin in school Is legal pot a good thing? We travel to Colorado to get the real story Video shows Officer Dustin Bak go after the cars. “Clocked both cars going about 91 miles an hour on Webb Bridge road, which is a 40 mph zone,” Miller said. The exclusive dash cam video and what the men told the officer they were doing at the time, on Channel 2 Action News at 4 p.m.
  • Georgia is now being impacted but the E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce spreading across the country. The Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a new warning after 31 more people were reported ill in the outbreak. Eight-four people total have been affected in 19 states, according to a CDC investigation. No deaths have been reported, but three more states have reported ill people: Georgia, Colorado and South Dakota.  [READ MORE: E. coli outbreak in 11 states linked to chopped romaine lettuce] Illnesses were initially reported in Washington, Idaho, Missouri, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.  Channel 2's Tom Regan breaks down what health experts say you need to do to prevent from getting ill, on Channel 2 Action News starting at 4 p.m. TRENDING STORIES: Woman kills husband's mistress then turns gun on herself in 'calculated, planned attack': Police Damaging wind, small hail possible as potential severe storms head our way Michael Vick to coach new professional football team coming to Atlanta  

News

  • An 17-year-old faces a vehicular homicide charges nearly a month after police said she crashed a car, killing her classmate on senior skip day.  Prosecutors said Cristina Pavon-Baker was driving at 106 mph when she crashed a Mini Cooper into a tree and killed 18-year-old passenger Makayla Penn, Channel 2 Action News reported.  The March 26 crash occurred on I-75 North at the Jonesboro Road exit in Clayton County. The vehicle, “traveling at a high rate of speed,” failed to navigate the turn on the exit ramp, went airborne, overturned several times and ended up hitting a tree, uprooting it in a wooded area, the GSP said at the time of the crash. Pavon-Baker was cut out of the car and taken to Grady Memorial Hospital for her injuries.  Prosecutors said Pavon-Baker was on Snapchat before the crash.  The two girls attended Community Christian School and were participating in senior skip day at the time of the crash.  The judge gave Pavon-Baker a $31,000 bond and ordered her to surrender her passport, Channel 2 reported. She was also ordered to not drive and to stay off of Snapchat. 
  • Ronny Jackson, President Donald Trump’s pick to head the Department of Veterans Affairs, has withdrawn his name from consideration, multiple news outlets are reporting. >> MORE COVERAGE: Embattled VA nominee Ronny Jackson accused of drunken driving, drug use | Jamie Dupree: Trump pick to head VA in trouble as Senators postpone hearing | Senate postpones hearing for Trump VA pick Ronny Jackson amid 'serious allegations' | More trending news 
  • The Latest on a Wisconsin refinery explosion that injured several people (all times local): 2:15 p.m. Authorities have expanded the evacuation zone around a Wisconsin refinery that was rocked by an explosion and are now saying anyone within a three-mile (five-kilometer) radius should leave. Douglas County authorities also say those in a 10-mile (16-kilometer) corridor south of the Husky Energy oil refinery in Superior should leave due to smoke coming from the site. Evacuees are being told to gather at Yellowjacket Union at the University of Wisconsin-Superior or at Four Corners Elementary School in Superior. It isn't clear how many people the evacuation order will effect. The refinery is in an industrial area, but there's a residential neighborhood within a mile to the northeast. The corridor downwind to the south is sparsely populated. At least 11 people were injured in the Thursday morning blast. A spokeswoman for Essentia Health says one person was seriously injured, while another nine being treated at Essentia hospitals in Superior and nearby Duluth, Minnesota, have non-life-threatening injuries. St. Luke's Hospital in Duluth received one patient who is in fair condition. ___ 12:55 p.m. The number of people injured in a refinery explosion in Wisconsin has grown to at least 11. Essentia Health spokeswoman Maureen Talarico says five patients are being treated at St. Mary's Medical Center in Duluth, Minnesota. She says emergency room physicians describe those patients as awake and alert. Talarico says another five are being treated at St. Mary's Hospital in Superior, Wisconsin, where the explosion happened. She says the extent of injuries is unknown. In Duluth, spokeswoman Jessica Stauber says St. Luke's Hospital is treating one person. She doesn't know the condition of that person. The explosion at the Husky Energy oil refinery happened Thursday morning. Superior Fire Chief Steve Panger has said there are no known fatalities. Panger earlier said the fire was out, but Superior police tweeted that the fire has reignited but that there is no need for residents to evacuate. ___ 12:10 p.m. Authorities now say five people have been taken to hospitals after an explosion rocked a large refinery in Wisconsin. Superior Fire Chief Steve Panger initially told The Associated Press that six were taken to hospitals in nearby Duluth, Minnesota, after the explosion Thursday at the Husky Energy oil refinery. The Superior Fire Department later updated that number to five. The fire chief says there are no known fatalities. Authorities don't know the extent of injuries. The fire is out. A contractor who was inside the building told WDIO television that the explosion sounded like 'a sonic boom' and that it happened when crews were working on shutting the plant down for repairs. Owned by Alberta-based Husky Energy, Wisconsin's only refinery produces gasoline, asphalt and other products. ___ 11:30 a.m. Several people have been injured in an explosion at a refinery in Wisconsin. Authorities in Superior say the explosion at the Husky Energy oil refinery happened at about 10 a.m. Thursday. Superior Fire Chief Steve Panger says six people were taken to hospitals in Duluth, Minnesota. He doesn't know the extent of their injuries. Others were walking wounded. There are no known fatalities. A contractor who was inside the building told WDIO television that the explosion sounded like 'a sonic boom' that happened when crews were working on shutting the plant down for repairs. Panger says the fire was out by 11:20 a.m. Superior police are advising people to stay away from the area and roads around the refinery have been blocked off. There have been no neighborhood evacuations.
  • Opening your hotel room door with your cell phone? Disney has started to roll out the new technology for guests to skip the front desk and go directly to their room, speeding up the start of vacations. Disney gave WFTV anchor Jamie Holmes an exclusive look at how guests will be able to use their cellphones to get into their hotel rooms. The theme park rolled out the technology at Disney’s Wilderness Lodge. Over the years, the My Disney Experience app has been an expanding feature of how guests navigate the parks and hotels. Previous story: Your smartphone could unlock Disney hotel rooms Guests can use it to check ride wait times and even clean up park photos. But guests can also use it to plan their hotel stay, skip the check-in desk, and go straight to their rooms. 'If you choose to, you can actually bypass the front desk area, if that's important to you, and start your vacation earlier,' Michael Trum, with Disney digital guest experience, said. Here’s how it works: Guests take their cellphones and hold it up to their hotel room door, and that’s when a little Disney magic happens. >> Read more trending news  'They're Bluetooth-enabled. Your phone, most smart phones. We've upgraded our locks to be Bluetooth enabled as well. So, they pair together, via security obviously,' Trum said. The technology can be used as a companion to the Magic Bands, which are required to get into the parks. Long gone are metal hotel room keys, and for the most part, even plastic key cards are gone. But, since most guests these days aren't far from their phones, the Bluetooth technology gives them a choice. Many people wonder whether the new technology is safe. Cellphone passcodes are notoriously hard to crack and Disney stands by the system. “We obviously designed this with security in mind. We can't go into details on Disney security policies, but our guests should absolutely feel safe using this as an entry point into their rooms,' Trum said. Disney is not the first to use the Bluetooth technology. Hilton and Marriot hotels have been using it for several years. The FBI said it has never had a case of hackers using phones to enter a hotel room in the U.S. Disney will expand the service to other hotels over the next several months.
  • New text messages obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and Channel 2 Action News show a top aide to former Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed pressuring other city officials to delay production of open records during Reed's final months in office. In unvarnished, sometimes vulgar comments, the texts reveal the mindset of senior Reed administration officials through the unguarded words of one of Reed's closest advisers and most ardent defenders, former communications director Anne Torres. We'll show you the text messages and explain how a simple request quickly turned into a dispute between Reed's office and the Atlanta BeltLine, on Channel 2 Action News at 6 p.m. The GBI opened a criminal investigation of the city's handling of open records requests last month after the AJC and Channel 2 reported on other text messages from former Reed press secretary Jenna Garland. Garland instructed another staffer 'to drag this out as long as possible' and provide information 'in the most confusing format available' in response to a Channel 2 open records request for city water billing records. The new texts from Torres show Garland's instructions to curtail production of records were not an isolated incident. Torres defended the remarks as 'inter-employee banter.' This article was written by Scott Trubey, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
  • Several fired and still working bus drivers gathered in front of Dekalb County School headquarters on Thursday to discuss their demands for a better work environment. Five of the eight divers who were let go one week ago, were back at the district’s offices demanding their jobs back. The press conference was held a half-hour before Superintendent Dr. R. Stephen Green was to meet with a hand-full of current drivers. Also in attendance, parents, grandparents and current drivers who were there in support of fired drivers like Melanie. “I stand here with the support of hundreds of drivers, parents, students and community members, and I say without hesitation, give us our jobs back.” Said Melanie.