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    A lawyer who also served as a part-time judge and assistant attorney general faces a dozen charges of sexual exploitation of children. An official said in one of his jobs as a lawyer, George Randolph Jeffery, helped send a lot of people to jail for child support. Channel 2's Mark Winne counted 12 sexual exploitation of children in warrants for Jeffery.  The Georgia Bureau of Investigation said a joint GBI-FBI investigation is ongoing. Attorney Robbie Ballard said his firm represents Jeffery and Jeffery intends to plead not guilty and beyond that it is much too soon to comment. Our research suggests Jeffery held positions of trust. Walton County probate judge Bruce Wright said he inherited Jeffrey as an associate probate judge from the previous administration and Jeffrey handled an average of about one estate case for him a year for the past six years but the charges stunned him. TRENDING STORIES: Abrams sues for more time; Kemp's campaign says math is clear Rain will stick around today, rest of the week Missing woman who left home to run errand found dead Wright said he will assign Jeffery no cases while the charges are pending. He said he will refer Jeffery to the judicial qualifications commission for removal as a judge, if he's found guilty or pleads guilty. A spokesperson for Attorney General Chris Carr indicated Jeffrey had been appointed, 'to serve as a Special Assistant Attorney General representing the Georgia Department of Human Services, Division of Child Support Services - in Walton and Newton Counties. 'Attorney General Carr opposes any and all forms of child exploitation and abuse,' the statement said, 'We hold our Special Assistant Attorneys General to very high standards. Given the circumstances, we terminated Mr. Jeffery’s appointment as a Special Assistant Attorney General immediately upon getting word of the arrest.'  Documents indicate most of the charges involve photos or video but one charge involves an allegation Jeffery used an email account to entice a child for indecent purposes. We're told because of his connections to the system in Walton County, Jeffery has been transferred to the Barrow County jail, where he has been held without bond.  
  • Congratulations to Atlanta Braves superstar Ronald Acuña, Jr. on winning the National League Rookie of the Year Award! Acuña finished 2018 with 26 home runs, a .293 batting average and 64 runs batted in. Ronnie ROY. Your 2018 NL Rookie of the Year: @ronaldacunajr24. pic.twitter.com/7b6UX7EIR9 — MLB (@MLB) November 12, 2018 The 20-year-old beat out Washington Nationals outfielder Juan Soto and Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Walker Buehler. Acuña is the first Braves player to win the NL Rookie of the Year Award award since Craig Kimbrel in 2011. Before that, Rafael Furcal won in 2000. 
  • Georgia Secretary of State Robyn Crittenden told county election officials Monday to count absentee ballots even if they lack a voter’s date of birth, as long as the voter’s identity can be verified. Crittenden issued the instructions for county election officials as they face a Tuesday deadline to certify the results of the Nov. 6 election. [READ: Abrams sues for more time; Kemp's campaign says math is clear] Republican Brian Kemp holds the lead over Democrat Stacey Abrams in the race to become Georgia’s governor. Abrams would need to gain more than 20,000 votes to force the race into a runoff. Crittenden’s instructions could affect vote counting in Gwinnett County, where election officials rejected 1,587 mailed absentee ballots. Gwinnett has the largest number of potential uncounted absentee ballots for Abrams in the state. Many of Gwinnett’s rejections were because absentee ballots contained incorrect birthdate information or insufficient information on the return envelope. [READ: Bourdeaux files motion to delay election certification in 7th District race] Crittenden sent the letter after the State Election Board voted unanimously Sunday night to issue guidance for how local election officials should proceed with their counts. Her letter is meant to reinforce state laws and provide clarification to county election officials, according to the Secretary of State’s office. Rules about vote counting haven’t changed. “What is required is the signature of the voter and any additional information needed for the county election official to verify the identity of the voter,” Crittenden wrote. “Therefore, an election official does not violate [state law] when they accept an absentee ballot despite the omission of a day and month of birth ... if the election official can verify the identity of the voter.” [RUNOFF: Everything you need to know about Secretary of State race] Gwinnett County accounted for 31 percent of all Georgia’s rejected absentee ballots, often because of discrepancies with birth dates, addresses, signatures and insufficient information. Gwinnett Commission Chairwoman Charlotte Nash said she wasn’t surprised at the scrutiny Gwinnett has received because of “the role that both parties saw it playing in their success.” She defended the way the elections office has conducted its business. [READ: Kemp campaign calls Abrams' refusal to concede 'a disgrace to democracy'] “They always focus a lot on figuring out how to deal with the issues that arise,” Nash said last week, “and I have every expectation that they will do that this time around too.”  Gwinnett Elections Board Chairman Stephen Day, a Democrat, has also defended county staff. “There are definitely different political points of view [on the elections board], but we do agree that our staff has acted in the way that the law stated they should act,” Day said following Friday’s closed-door elections board meeting. “We do understand that there are different interpretations of that.”
  • A local Democratic candidate for Congress is taking her fight for votes to court. Carolyn Bourdeaux trails incumbent Rob Woodall by less than 1,000 votes in Georgia’s 7th District. Bordeaux told Channel 2 investigative reporter Aaron Diamant that she believes not all the votes are not being counted. [READ: Brian Kemp's lead shrinks, Stacey Abrams to file new lawsuit in governor's race] Bourdeaux told Diamant she likes her chances in court. Her campaign filed an emergency motion in federal court Sunday night seeking to delay Gwinnett County from certifying its election results. “Gwinnett’s refusal to count every eligible voters’ ballot, whether intentionally or not, does constitute a form of voter suppression, and we are demanding that the votes be counted in the 7th District,” Bourdeaux said. [READ: Georgia secretary of state tells election officials to count absentee ballots] The Bourdeaux motion focuses on about 1,000 absentee ballots the county rejected over what she called “trivial reasons,” such as missing birthdates. Bourdeaux wants those ballots counted. “I think that this is a clear violation of federal law and the Voting Rights Act, so I do think a good portion of these votes will be counted,” Bourdeaux said. TRENDING STORIES: Man charged after police say he was driving nearly 120 mph on busy road Rain will stick around today, rest of the week Missing woman who left home to run errand found dead In a statement emailed to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Woodall said: “We have good, honest, non-partisan public servants ... working around the clock to ensure that every vote is counted and that every voter’s vote counts by safeguarding the integrity of the election process. Win or lose, I trust them.” Diamant spent the day Monday trying to reach election leaders for reaction to this story, but the office has been closed for because of the Veterans Day federal holiday. The lawyer representing the county told Diamant he couldn't comment. Unless a judge rules otherwise, Tuesday is the deadline for all Georgia counties, including Gwinnett, to certify their election results.
  • It has been a month since Hurricane Michael left a path of destruction in its wake, and communities in southwest Georgia are still recovering. Officials told Channel 2 Action News that it could take years to rebuild. An estimated $2 billion in damage was caused to the state's agriculture industry when Michael destroyed fields of cotton, vegetables and pecan orchards. Channel 2’s Chris Jose traveled to southwest Georgia to look at the debris still left behind in some of the hardest hit areas. “We need to have at least two to three months before we can start to look at ‘Hey, we’re almost done here,’” storm worker Scott Raymond told Jose. [PHOTOS: Southwest Georgia still recovering month after Hurricane Michael] Channel 2 Action News followed Raymond’s crew around as they cleared the streets. Raymond said recovery efforts have been hampered by a week of wet weather. “We’re going to be with this until next year,” he said. In Miller County, storm survivor James Nalls said he and his 17-year-old daughter are living in a carport because of the mold and mildew inside his home. A 200-year-old oak tree fell in his backyard and another tree put a hole in his roof. “It’s going to take years to overcome this,' he said. 'People are not used to this. A lot of people can’t survive like this. They don’t know what to do.” [PHOTOS: Damage to Georgia agriculture from Hurricane Michael] A look at Miller County a month after Hurricane Michael pummeled SW Georgia. @wsbtv pic.twitter.com/Buj7CFfq2L — Chris Jose (@ChrisJoseWSB) November 12, 2018 Jose also spoke with Kimberly Heard, who owns a women’s clothing store in downtown Donalsonville that sustained some damage from Michael.  Over the last month, Heard said that sales have plummeted not only at her store, but at every small business in the area.  “We need all the help we can get,” she said. Heard said it’s a setback but the focus should be on families who have lost everything.  On Tuesday, state lawmakers will convene for a special session called by Gov. Nathan Deal to consider $270 million in funding for recovery. More than 30,000 people have requested FEMA officials, according to officials. Disaster recovery centers have opened all over southwest Georgia.  [PHOTOS: Hurricane Michael leaves devastating damage behind] HURRICANE MICHAEL TIMELINE Oct. 7- Hurricane Michael forms in the Atlantic Ocean as a tropical storm. Oct. 10- Hurricane Michael makes landfall near Mexico Beach, Florida as a Category 4, according to Severe Weather Team 2.  Oct. 15- President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump visit the areas hit the hardest in southwest Georgia.  Oct. 16- Vice President Mike Pence travels to south Georgia and meets with farmers whose crops were destroyed by Michael.  Oct. 23- Gov. Deal calls for special session over storm costs related to Michael. Nov. 13- A special session will be held by the Georgia Legislature to address funding. 
  • Channel 2 Action News is waiting to learn if a federal court judge will schedule an emergency hearing Tuesday to delay county certification of the election by one day, as the race for Georgia governor remains unsettled. How many votes remain to be counted depends on which side you ask. Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp said it's less than 14,000. Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams said it's around 26,000, and her campaign is now asking the courts to get involved. [READ MORE: Brian Kemp's lead shrinks, Stacey Abrams to file new lawsuit in governor's race] The Abrams campaign filed a lawsuit Sunday even as the Kemp campaign maintains the election is over. 'From the beginning of this campaign, we have said that every single voter matters,' said Lauren Groh-Wargo, Abrams' campaign manager. Channel 2's Richard Elliot met with Groh-Wargo Monday morning to talk about how many outstanding votes are still out there almost a full week since Election Day last Tuesday. Groh-Wargo said she believes that there are enough uncounted votes, whether absentee or provisional, that Abrams can force Kemp into a runoff. 'We are about 21,000 votes away from forcing a runoff in this race. And by our count, there are at least 26,000 uncounted ballots,' Groh-Wargo said. Elliot also spoke with John Chandler, a lawyer on the Abrams campaign legal team.  'The judges have sided with the voters every single time,' Chandler said. RELATED STORIES: Brian Kemp's lead shrinks, Stacey Abrams files new lawsuit in governor's race Kemp vs. Abrams: Georgia governor's race by the numbers Kemp campaign calls Abrams' refusal to concede 'a disgrace to democracy' The Abrams legal team wants the following:  Counties to count more provisional ballots, including those belonging to voters who, for whatever reason, voted in the wrong county. Stop counties from rejecting ballots for what they say are arbitrary reasons, and to make all counties apply the law the same way. Delay the counties from certifying their votes for 24 hours. Chandler said even a delay would help restore faith in the elections. 'It's so important for people to believe in the integrity of an election, and I'm afraid we're very, very far from that,' Chandler said. The Abrams campaign thinks it still has a shot, but Kemp's campaign does not. After Elliot spoke with the Abrams campaign, he went to speak with the Kemp campaign, specifically Kemp's communications director, Ryan Mahoney. 'The race is over. Brian Kemp is the governor-elect. We're moving on, and they should as well,' Mahoney said. 'For hardworking Georgians, they're ready to move on. That's the reason to get the campaign behind us.' Mahoney said the Abrams campaign's numbers are wrong, that there are less than 14,000 outstanding votes out there. He said even if Abrams got every single one, she still wouldn't have enough. 'It's been a very tough 20 months, and I think everybody is ready to come together and have Thanksgiving and have Christmas and move on, and I think that's what they need to do and she needs to concede,' Mahoney said. A federal court judge would have to hear the request from the Abrams team for an injunction Tuesday morning. There's no word yet if that will happen. Stay with Channel 2 Action News for the latest on this developing story.
  • Duluth police say a man put everyone at risk when he drove his car down a local road at 118 miles an hour. Police stopped Kenny Hemraj in a 45 mile per hour zone on Peachtree Industrial Boulevard just after 9 p.m. on Oct. 17. Duluth police video shows the 2007 BMW pulling over as soon as the officer flipped on his lights. “Do you realize how fast you were going?” the officer asked Hemraj. “About 90?” Hemraj said. “I clocked you at 118,” the officer said. Officers said Hemraj was swerving around other cars when they pulled him over. TRENDING STORIES: Abrams sues for more time; Kemp's campaign says math is clear Rain will stick around today, rest of the week Missing woman who left home to run errand found dead “Any reason you are going that fast?” the officer asked Hemraj. “We just fixed a part on the car and we just wanted to make sure it was good,” Hemraj said. “We just changed the coupler and wanted to check it to make sure.” Duluth police told Channel 2’s Tony Thomas this was one of the fastest speeds they have ever clocked on a driver. “From officers who've worked here a while, they've said that's probably one of the fastest they've seen,” said Officer Ted Sadowski with the Duluth Police Department. Besides a stern lecture, Hemraj was charged with speeding and reckless driving. “You changed lanes really fast to avoid that car in front of you and then blew fast by everybody else. There is no reason to be going that fast,” the officer told Hemraj on the video. The reckless driving charge earned Hemraj a trip to jail. Records show he quickly bonded out a few hours later.

News

  • The wedding band has been in his family for more than a hundred years. So, when he noticed it was no longer on his finger at Saturday's Georgia football game, Stuart Howell said his heart dropped.
  • Congratulations to Atlanta Braves superstar Ronald Acuña, Jr. on winning the National League Rookie of the Year Award! Acuña finished 2018 with 26 home runs, a .293 batting average and 64 runs batted in. Ronnie ROY. Your 2018 NL Rookie of the Year: @ronaldacunajr24. pic.twitter.com/7b6UX7EIR9 — MLB (@MLB) November 12, 2018 The 20-year-old beat out Washington Nationals outfielder Juan Soto and Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Walker Buehler. Acuña is the first Braves player to win the NL Rookie of the Year Award award since Craig Kimbrel in 2011. Before that, Rafael Furcal won in 2000. 
  • A woman who owns land near where a deadly wildfire started in Northern California said Monday that Pacific Gas & Electric Co. sought access to her property just before the blaze started because the utility's power lines were causing sparks. It's still not clear what caused the massive fire that started Thursday, killing at least 29 people and destroying the Sierra Nevada foothill town of Paradise. PG&E has said it experienced a problem on an electrical transmission line near the site of the massive fire, minutes before the blaze broke out. The fire started on 64 acres of land in Pulga, California, owned by Betsy Ann Cowley. Cowley told The Associated Press she received an email from the utility on Wednesday telling her that crews needed to come to her property to work on the high-power lines because 'they were having problems with sparks.' PG&E declined to discuss the email when contacted by AP. Two days before the fire started, PG&E told customers in nine counties, including Butte County, that it might shut off their power Nov. 8 because of extreme fire danger. The fire started about 6:30 a.m. that morning. Later that day, PG&E said it had decided against a power cut because weather conditions did not warrant one.
  • The deadly wildfires whipping through California have killed more than 30 people and destroyed thousands of homes and businesses. Officials are calling the fires the worst in state history. >> Read more trending news  Celebrities, such as Miley Cyrus, Martin Sheen, Gerard Butler and others, are not immune to the flames and have lost homes and property alongside average citizens.  One couple in particular, well-known car enthusiasts and collectors Gary and Diane Cerveny, reportedly lost an irreplaceable collection of classic and rare vehicles worth millions, according to Autoweek. Hotrod.com described the couple as “the best kind of car collectors” and called their collection “eclectic.”  There was a Ferrari Dino, a ’65 Pontiac GTO gasser, a ’66 Dodge Dart, a Marty Robbins NASCAR, a ’66 Dodge Charger, a ’71 Plymouth Barracuda, a ’97 Dodge Viper, a Studebaker kart hauler and perhaps the rarest car in the collection, the one-of-a-kind 1948 Norman Timbs Special. >> Related: Photos: California wildfires kill dozens, destroy entire town The dramatic streamliner was created in the 1940s by mechanical engineer Norman Timbs, according to Conceptcarz.com. The elegant, swooping custom car took over three years to build, then eventually disappeared. It was rediscovered in the desert in 2002 and restored. >> Related: Actor Martin Sheen flees Malibu wildfire; says little chance home survived The Cervenys kept their collection at a shop in Malibu, which has been ravaged by the wildfires.  
  • Georgia Secretary of State Robyn Crittenden told county election officials Monday to count absentee ballots even if they lack a voter’s date of birth, as long as the voter’s identity can be verified. Crittenden issued the instructions for county election officials as they face a Tuesday deadline to certify the results of the Nov. 6 election. [READ: Abrams sues for more time; Kemp's campaign says math is clear] Republican Brian Kemp holds the lead over Democrat Stacey Abrams in the race to become Georgia’s governor. Abrams would need to gain more than 20,000 votes to force the race into a runoff. Crittenden’s instructions could affect vote counting in Gwinnett County, where election officials rejected 1,587 mailed absentee ballots. Gwinnett has the largest number of potential uncounted absentee ballots for Abrams in the state. Many of Gwinnett’s rejections were because absentee ballots contained incorrect birthdate information or insufficient information on the return envelope. [READ: Bourdeaux files motion to delay election certification in 7th District race] Crittenden sent the letter after the State Election Board voted unanimously Sunday night to issue guidance for how local election officials should proceed with their counts. Her letter is meant to reinforce state laws and provide clarification to county election officials, according to the Secretary of State’s office. Rules about vote counting haven’t changed. “What is required is the signature of the voter and any additional information needed for the county election official to verify the identity of the voter,” Crittenden wrote. “Therefore, an election official does not violate [state law] when they accept an absentee ballot despite the omission of a day and month of birth ... if the election official can verify the identity of the voter.” [RUNOFF: Everything you need to know about Secretary of State race] Gwinnett County accounted for 31 percent of all Georgia’s rejected absentee ballots, often because of discrepancies with birth dates, addresses, signatures and insufficient information. Gwinnett Commission Chairwoman Charlotte Nash said she wasn’t surprised at the scrutiny Gwinnett has received because of “the role that both parties saw it playing in their success.” She defended the way the elections office has conducted its business. [READ: Kemp campaign calls Abrams' refusal to concede 'a disgrace to democracy'] “They always focus a lot on figuring out how to deal with the issues that arise,” Nash said last week, “and I have every expectation that they will do that this time around too.”  Gwinnett Elections Board Chairman Stephen Day, a Democrat, has also defended county staff. “There are definitely different political points of view [on the elections board], but we do agree that our staff has acted in the way that the law stated they should act,” Day said following Friday’s closed-door elections board meeting. “We do understand that there are different interpretations of that.”