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    Today is designated “Don’t Fry Day” to encourage sun safety awareness and to remind everyone to protect their skin while enjoying the outdoors. Because no single step can fully protect you and your family from overexposure to UV radiation, follow as many of the following tips as possible:
  • More than 4500 people end up in the emergency room each year because of injuries from pool chemicals, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Inhaling chemicals was the most common injury. CDC examined data on emergency department visits due to pool chemical injuries during 2015- 2017. The top diagnosis was poisoning due to breathing in chemical fumes, vapors, or gases—for example, when opening chlorine containers.
  • No slowdown in the spread of measles in the U-S, according to new numbers from the Atlanta based, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Thomas Clark, CDC says they have had 839 cases reported so far this year. The 75 cases represent a higher bump than the last two weeks, when about 60 additional cases were reported each week. There have been no new cases in Georgia, according to the state health department. Georgia has had a total of six cases in two different families.
  • Cocaine overdose deaths have been rising since 2012 and jumped a staggering 34 percent between 2016 and 2017, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Opioids may carry some of the blame. Many overdose deaths involve someone who took several different drugs, and researchers found that nearly three-quarters of the deaths involving cocaine in 2017 also involved opioids. Deaths also included super-potent drugs such as fentanyl.  Health officials say about 70,000 Americans died of drug overdoses in 2017. Nearly 14,000 involved cocaine, and nearly 48,000 involved some type of opioid.  When it comes to gender and age, the upward trend in fatalities was most pronounced for young women aged 15 to 24, although young men were similarly affected. Cocaine-related deaths were most common in the Midwest, while the West had the highest rate of fatal overdoses involving psychostimulants, the CDC researchers said.
  • Defeat Antibiotic Resistance with the Same Old Antibiotics but Smarter Strategies  In the war on antibiotic resistant bacteria, it’s not just the antibiotics that are making the enemy stronger but also how they are prescribed. A new study suggests that to win against resistance, doctors should keep using the same drugs but as part of more targeted treatments and in combination with other health strategies.   The current broad use of antibiotics helps resistant bacteria strains propagate, but prescribed precisely, the same drugs can help reverse the spread of resistant strains, said researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Duke University, and Harvard University who authored the study. But it can only work if combined with strategies that make sure people carrying resistant strains spread them to fewer people.   The new study delivers a mathematical model to help clinical and public health researchers devise new antibiotic prescription and supporting treatment strategies.   But basing a strategy on antibiotics needs to happen before bacteria resistant to most every known antibiotic become too widespread, rendering antibiotics ineffective. That has been widely predicted to occur by mid-century.   “Once you get to that pan-resistant state, it’s over,” said Sam Brown, who co-led the study and is an associate professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Biological Sciences. “Timing is unfortunately an issue in tackling antibiotic resistance.”   The strategic approach would also help clinicians treat infections effectively by flagging which antibiotics the bacteria are resistant to and which not.   “It’s great for fighting antibiotic resistance, but it’s also good for patients because we’ll always use the correct antibiotic,” Brown said.   The researchers published their study in the journal PLOS ONE on DATE XYZ. The research was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, the Simons Foundation, the Human Frontier Science Program, the Wenner-Gren Foundations, and the Royal Physiographic Society of Lund.
  • Georgia's official state vegetable is officially in season, beloved Vidalia onions can now be found in grocery stores around the world. Grown only from Georgia soil, the Vidalia onion is available for a limited time. Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary W. Black says, 'The sweetest onions on earth are certainly living up to their reputation this year.” He says, “We are proud to offer our sweet Vidalia onions to all those who have been patiently awaiting their arrival.
  • Almost half of all U.S. employers offer some type of health or wellness program, according to a report in the American Journal of Health Promotion. It was the first survey done on the matter in more than a decade. Most on the job health programs focus on physical activity, nutrition and stress management.
  • A new study about America's personal hygiene habits gives Atlanta residents pretty good marks for cleanliness, but reveals some surprising and gross things about Americans in general.Atlanta was ranked 6th overall out of 25 major U.S. cities based on how often residents shower or bathe, brush their teeth, change their bed sheets, put on a fresh shirt and underwear, clean their homes, and wash their hands after using the toilet.
  • A multi drug-resistant fungus is getting a lot of attention after The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention described it as a “global emerging threat” that can cause invasive infection and death.Candida auris is not killed by common anti-fungal drugs, which makes infections difficult to treat. When it enters the bloodstream and spreads throughout the body, it can cause serious invasive infections in the blood, heart and brain, which can be life-threatening. The fungus can spread through contact with infected patients, or contaminated surfaces and equipment.
  • Something is contaminated with e-coli and it's making people sick in five states, including Georgia. The number of cases here has doubled. The state health department says 17 people have gotten sick with three people ending up in the hospital. Cherie Drenzek, State Epidemiologist says the median age is 15 years old.

News

  • In the Book of Genesis, Noah’s ark survived a flood in the Middle East. A replica of the biblical boat was not as lucky, and its owners are suing -- for damages caused by heavy rains in northern Kentucky. >> Read more trending news  The owners of Ark Encounter are suing their five insurance carriers for refusing to cover nearly $1 million in damages after flooding in 2017 and 2018 caused a landslide on its access road, the Louisville Courier Journal reported. In a 77-page lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Kentucky, Crosswater Canyon Inc. and the Ark Encounter sued the business’ insurance underwriters, WLWT reported. The ark’s owners are seeking compensatory and punitive damages, the Courier Journal reported. The ark, located in Williamstown, was not damaged.  According to the lawsuit, 'A significant landslide occurred along portions of the slope,” which caused “significant damage” to the road surface, making portions of the road “unsafe and unfit for use.” The road was fixed by engineers at a cost of $1 million, WLEX reported. But when the Ark Encounter asked its insurance underwriters to cover the cost of repairs, they were rebuffed, the television station reported. The Allied World Assurance Co. is named as a defendant, along with three other carriers, according to The Washington Post. Initially, the suit alleges, defendants cited faulty craftsmanship as the reason for the property damage and claimed they were not liable, WLEX reported. After an appeal, the defendants admitted that only a small amount was covered by the policy. The Ark Encounter, built at a cost of $120 million, opened in July 2016 with a zoo, zip lines and a restaurant in addition to the five-story replica of the ark, the Post reported. It was founded by Ken Ham and his ministry, Answers in Genesis, the newspaper reported. Ark Encounter spokeswoman Melany Ethridge distributed a statement that said “the lawsuit speaks for itself,” noting the park remained open. 'You got to get to the boat to be on the boat,' Ethridge told the Courier Journal.
  • Amanda Eller, who went missing more than two weeks ago in Maui has reportedly been found alive according to KHNL in Hawaii. >> Read more trending news The the 35-year-old woman was spotted by a helicopter in a wooded area sources told KHNL. Eller hadn’t been seen since May 8, when she disappeared after a hike in a Maui Forest Reserve, known for its steep and rugged terrain. Her vehicle was found with her cellphone and wallet inside in a parking lot at the reserve. WSOC-TV confirmed the news with Eller's aunt, Lynn Eller Ansley, by phone Friday night. Ansley is one of several relatives who live in North Carolina. Eller’s parents had offered a $10,000 reward for information leading to her safe return. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
  • Officers found snakes, alligators and talking birds inside a Marion, Arkansas, home. >> Read more trending news William Hale, 47, is charged with 60 counts of aggravated animal cruelty after investigators found the exotic animals inside his home. One neighbor took pictures of the snakes he saw investigators taking out of the home. WHBQ-TV received a tip yesterday from a source who said the conditions were so unbearable that even the hazmat team could not handle it. He said the birds they found in that home were having full conversations with the investigators. “Tropical birds, I seen a parrot. Actually he had, like, seven of those, different type of birds, and I seen, like, 30 snakes,” Terrence Blackburn, a neighbor, said. “The bulldog was one of the first animals to come out, and there were five of those. I seen a poodle,” Blackburn said. Yellow caution tape surrounds the home. “I seen the alligator, which they had, it was a small baby alligator and I heard it was like nine of them,” Blackburn said. Investigators with the Marion Police Department told WHBQ-TV Animal Control officers responded to the home after complaints about barking dogs. “And you had no idea this was going on, no idea,” Blackburn said. Hale was not home at the time. He did not show up after officers spoke with him over the phone requesting his return. According to officers, that is when they conducted a search warrant and found several exotic animals that were not being properly cared for. “I would let him know that was kind of wrong. You know, we have kids over here, and them are dangerous animals,” Blackburn said. A source gave confirmation that there were several alligators inside that home yesterday.
  • Officials at Muskogee War Memorial Park said the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management and the National Guard took over the site Friday due to severe flooding. >> Read more trending news The park is home to the USS Batfish, a World War II-era submarine that now serves as a museum. Park staff and volunteers are being used to support emergency officials in managing the scene. Officials said at least one line on the Batfish has broken and they are working to keep it from floating away. Crews are filling the ballast tanks on board the USS Batfish to keep it inside the park's bowl. The National Guard also tied a new line to the boat to add leverage. Those interested in helping support the memorial and any potential repair costs can visit this link for more information.
  • A Walt Disney World employee from Clermont, Florida, was arrested on charges of trying to have sex with an 8-year-old girl. >> Read more trending news Investigators said Frederick Pohl Jr., 40, thought he was chatting with the father of the victim, but he was chatting with an undercover agent. The two arranged to meet at an Orlando hotel Tuesday and that's where Pohl was arrested. Investigators said Pohl was in possession of condoms and a child-sized pink dress. Authorities said Pohl was charged with transferring obscene materials to a minor and attempting to entice a minor. If convicted, Pohl faces a maximum penalty of life in federal prison. Disney said Pohl was placed on unpaid leave of absence.
  • A Gwinnett County, Georgia, police K-9 died Thursday after pursuing a man in 90-degree heat, authorities said. >> Read more trending news Eli, a 9-year-old police dog, had been tracking a man in Grayson, Georgia, for about 30 minutes when he began to show signs of distress believed to be related to the heat, Gwinnett police said in a news release. Eli and his handler, Officer Matthew Bonanno, were assisting Snellville police in a pursuit after a man fled from officers near North Crestview Drive and Grayson Parkway, police said. After showing signs of distress, the dog was removed from the chase, according to police. As Eli and officers walked back to their patrol vehicles, the dog fell to the ground and began to act abnormally, police said.  In an effort to cool him down, officers covered Eli’s body with water. He was taken to a nearby veterinarian for treatment, where he stopped breathing. Vets performed CPR for about 30 minutes before he was pronounced dead just before 5 p.m. “We mourn the loss of this courageous K-9 and will provide more details at a later time,” Gwinnett police said, calling the situation tragic. “Please keep Officer Bonnano and his family in your thoughts.” Eli had been with the department for eight years. His body was taken to the University of Georgia, where a necropsy is being conducted to determine a cause of death, Gwinnett police said Friday. Snellville police said the pursuit began when a woman called 911 to report that her ex-boyfriend was following her in his car. At one point, the man reportedly struck the woman from behind in traffic, authorities said. The altercation began on U.S. 78 in DeKalb County before continuing into Gwinnett, police said. Snellville officers pursued the man into a neighborhood, where he abandoned his vehicle and ran away, prompting officers to call for a K-9. The man, whose name was not released, has still not been found.