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  • A California hospital has permanently removed an emergency room doctor from its roster after she was caught on video mocking a man who was likely in withdrawal from his anxiety medication.  Samuel Bardwell, 20, went to El Camino Hospital in Los Gatos June 11 after suffering a panic attack after basketball practice, his father, Donald Bardwell, told the San Francisco Chronicle. Donald Bardwell said his son takes Klonopin to control his anxiety, but had run out of the drug a few days before the incident. Klonopin, a benzodiazepine, is used to treat anxiety and panic attacks, as well as seizure disorders, according to WebMD. A sudden stop to the medication can cause serious withdrawal symptoms, including seizures, shaking and stomach or muscle cramps, the website said.  “He had a prescription waiting for him at the pharmacy, but couldn’t pick it up,” Donald Bardwell told the Chronicle. “He’s a student and he works. We didn’t know what the consequences of not taking the meds would be.” Samuel Bardwell told CBS San Francisco that when he collapsed, he could not speak, was numb and was in pain. Bardwell, who ABC News reported is a newly-enrolled student athlete at West Valley College in Saratoga, was taken by ambulance to the emergency room. That’s where Dr. Beth Keegstra was assigned to handle his care.  Keegstra kept them waiting for more than three hours, then came into the room with a security guard, the Bardwells told CBS San Francisco.  “I was just, like, ‘Why would there be security when I have done nothing wrong?’” Samuel Bardwell said.  Father and son said that Keegstra accused the athlete of seeking drugs and tried to get him to leave. “She said, ‘I know why you people are here, you people who come here for drugs,’” Donald Bardwell told the Chronicle. “I said, ‘What do you mean, you people?’” That’s when he started recording the exchange with his cellphone.  In the video, father and son are heard trying to explain Samuel Bardwell’s anxiety attacks. “When he has these, he’s throwing up and going in and out of consciousness,” Donald Bardwell tells Keegstra. “I literally saw him go in and out of consciousness.” “He is completely awake and alert right now,” Keegstra says. Bardwell tells the doctor that if his son leaves the hospital, he will have another anxiety attack like the first because he was in the same shape as when they arrived.  “I’m sorry sir, you are the least sick of all the people who are here, who are dying,” a visibly angry Keegstra tells Samuel Bardwell.  She grabs his arm and tries to force him to sit up.  “I can’t get up,” Samuel Bardwell says.  “I am literally trying to help you sit up,” Keegstra says.  “You’re helping me?” an incredulous Samuel Bardwell says. He continues to tell the doctor that he cannot get up, at which point she asks if he wants hospital staff to wheel him home on the gurney. “That’s not what I said,” Samuel Bardwell says.  >> Read more trending news Keegstra tells him that he just lifted his head with no problem, so he should be able to put his hands on the rails of the hospital bed and pull himself up.  “I cannot do that,” Samuel Bardwell says. “I could not do it in the ambulance, I cannot do it now.” “Yes, you can,” Keegstra says.  He tells the doctor that he just tried to inhale and couldn’t. Keegstra begins laughing. “He can’t inhale. Wow. He must be dead,” Keegstra tells someone off camera before turning back to her patient.  “Are you dead, sir?” Keegstra asks Samuel Bardwell. “I don’t understand. You are breathing just fine.” Donald Bardwell steps in, telling her that his son’s breathing is labored, and Keegstra points to his vital signs, which she says show that his blood oxygen levels are normal.  “This is not labored breathing,” she says.  Keegstra and Donald Bardwell bicker back and forth about his son’s care, which the father says consisted of fluids and medication for his son’s pain and anxiety last time an anxiety attack landed him in the emergency room.  “So, you need narcotics, is that what you need?” Keegstra asks Samuel Bardwell. “Here we go,” he mutters. “I didn’t say narcotics, I just said pain reliever and anxiety medication, because I’m in pain and I have anxiety. I didn’t say nothing about narcotics.” “And you just told me that this was not an anxiety attack. That this was something completely different,” Keegstra says.  “If I could get up off this bed, I would,” Samuel Bardwell says. “Yeah, you really should,” Keegstra says. “Because this is ridiculous.” Keegstra tells the patient that she came in there wanting to help him, but that he kept changing his story. Samuel Bardwell says he told her the same thing the entire time  “No. You have changed your story every (expletive) time,” Keegstra says.  “Whoa,” Samuel Bardwell says. “Yeah, that’s how (angry) you’ve gotten me, OK?” Keegstra says. “I didn’t do anything,” he says. “Yes, you did,” she responds. The video ends with Keegstra’s angry instructions to a nurse in the room. “Put and IV in him, give him a liter of fluid and we’ll get him out of here,” Keegstra says. “That’s what he says he needs. He’s obviously a doctor and he knows what he needs.” Samuel Bardwell told CBS San Francisco that tests ultimately showed he was dehydrated. Besides the fluids, he was also eventually given medication for pain and anxiety.  Donald Bardwell uploaded the video of Keegstra’s rant to Facebook early the next morning. “This is how they treat black people in Los Gatos emergency room,” he wrote. “SMH (shaking my head). Everyone share this video. For the record, this is my son.” Bardwell’s friends obliged, and the video soon went viral. As of Tuesday morning, it had been viewed more than five million times and shared more than 120,000 times.  The younger Bardwell said he had a feeling things would go wrong when he spotted Keegstra talking to the security guard before they entered his room. “I already knew from that point,” Samuel Bardwell told ABC News. “I said, ‘Please, Dad, can you please take out your phone? I need you to take out your phone now ‘cause I have a feeling something is gonna happen.” Samuel Bardwell said he is considering legal action against Keegstra and the hospital.  Officials at El Camino Hospital responded to the video Thursday, reaffirming the hospital’s commitment to patient care.  “This week, a patient who visited the emergency department at our Los Gatos campus had an interaction with a physician whose demeanor was unprofessional and not the standard we require of all who provide care through El Camino Hospital,” hospital CEO Dan Woods said in the statement. “We have expressed our sincere apologies and are working directly with the patient on this matter. Please know that we take this matter very seriously and the contracted physician involved has been removed from the work schedule, pending further investigation.” Woods updated the statement Friday to say that the contract company that provides the hospital’s emergency room services, Vituity (formerly California Emergency Physicians), had been asked to remove Keegstra permanently from the hospital’s roster.  Donald Bardwell told the Chronicle that Keegstra treated his son like a drug addict. “I guess she was so angry and assumed he was a druggie and had drugs in his system,” Bardwell said. “She thought she could talk to us any which way she wanted.” Commenters on the video were mostly supportive, though some, like Keegstra, accused Samuel Bardwell of seeking narcotics. Donald Bardwell addressed the “naysayers” in a separate Facebook post, in which he shared a response from someone who told him about benzodiazepine withdrawal.  “It’s very serious and life-threatening, especially when physicians do not recognize it,” the person wrote.  According to her LinkedIn profile, Keegstra has more than 20 years of experience as an emergency physician. In 2015, she started a GoFundMe page to raise money for a mission trip she said was to bring medical treatment to rural villages in Vietnam.  Her LinkedIn bio states that she has been with California Emergency Physicians, which recently changed its name to Vituity, since 1997.  Her employment status with Vituity following her suspension from El Camino Hospital was not immediately known. The Medical Board of California’s website shows that Keegstra, who graduated from medical school in 1987, has a clean record. 
  • The Trump administration's new health insurance option offers lower premiums for small businesses and self-employed people, but the policies are likely to cover fewer benefits. Another caveat: if healthy people flock to the new plans as expected, premiums will rise for those who need comprehensive coverage. President Donald Trump and Labor Secretary Alex Acosta rolled out their final blueprint for 'association health plans' on Tuesday, with Trump promising a small-business group that 'you're going to save massive amounts of money and have much better health care.' Democrats decried it as 'junk insurance,' and some patient groups warned it could undermine coverage for people in poor health. Republicans and some small-business groups said the administration is providing needed flexibility in the face of rising premiums. Independent experts said the administration is setting up a parallel insurance market — with different rules — alongside the Affordable Care Act, the Obama-era law Trump has been unable to repeal. Initial estimates by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office forecast modest changes, not a seismic shift. The new plans created under the administration's regulation incorporate the same protections for employees with pre-existing conditions that large-company plans now have, Acosta said. The Labor Department said association plans could be offered to employers in a city, county, state or a metro area that includes several states. Plans within a particular industry — real estate, for example — can be marketed nationwide. Sole proprietors and their families could join an association plan. Trump has long asserted that promoting the sale of health insurance across state lines can bring down premiums without sacrificing quality. But many experts aren't convinced because medical costs vary greatly according to geography. Currently, plans for small businesses are required to cover the ACA's 10 categories of 'essential' benefits, from prescription drugs to maternity and mental health. Under the new approach, small employers could get coverage that comes with fewer required benefits, said Gary Claxton of the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. Ultimately, the idea's success depends on buy-in from plan sponsors, consumers, insurers and state regulators. No major consequences are expected for people covered by large employers. Acosta cited CBO estimates that predict a modest impact: about 4 million people covered by the plans within five years but only some 400,000 who would have been uninsured. Compare that to the total number of about 160 million covered by job-based insurance. After Republicans hit a dead end trying to repeal the Obama health law, the Trump administration has pushed regulatory actions to loosen requirements and try to lower premiums for individuals and small businesses. 'They are providing insurance options that have fewer benefits and fewer requirements than ACA-compliant plans,' Claxton said. 'That will have a tendency to pull healthier people away because they are more attracted to plans with fewer benefits.' Another major initiative is expected later this summer when the administration eases rules for short-term health plans lasting less than a full year that could be purchased by individuals. Those plans wouldn't have to cover people with pre-existing conditions but would offer healthy people much lower premiums. Critics say the administration's approach will draw healthy people away from the health law's insurance markets, raising the cost of coverage, which is subsidized by taxpayers. About 11 million people are covered by HealthCare.gov and state markets, but the administration's priority is to try to lower premiums for an additional 7 million or so who buy their coverage directly and don't get any help from the government. State insurance regulators have been concerned about association health plans because similar plans in the past had problems with financial solvency and fraud. Administration officials said Tuesday that states and the federal government would share regulatory oversight of the plans, with states retaining their current authority. The new plans will be phased in, starting in September. A small business group called Job Creators Network welcomed the Trump administration's move. President Alfredo Ortiz said it 'will create more options, more competition, and lower costs for Main Street small businesses.
  • The British government announced Tuesday it would move to lift its ban on cannabis-based medicines, amid mounting criticism over the denial of treatment to severely epileptic children. But it rejected calls to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Home Secretary Sajid Javid told lawmakers cases like that of a 12-year-old epileptic boy denied cannabis oil for his condition showed there is 'a pressing need to allow those who might benefit from cannabis based medicines to access them.' But he said the government had 'absolutely no plans' to decriminalize the drug more widely. The change in stance came after the government relented and allowed 12-year-old Billy Caldwell to receive cannabis oil treatment that his mother said was needed to prevent life-threatening seizures. His mother, Charlotte Caldwell, has called for the laws governing medicinal marijuana use in Britain to be liberalized, saying cannabis oil is the only treatment that has warded off her son's seizures. Javid said Tuesday that a license to use cannabis-based drugs would also be issued for 6-year-old Alfie Dingley, whose epilepsy causes scores of seizures a day. He said if a review by the country's chief medical officer identified cannabis-based treatments with 'significant medical benefits,' they would be legalized. He said the current legal situation was 'not satisfactory for the parents, not satisfactory for the doctors, and not satisfactory for me.' Charlotte Caldwell welcomed the announcement, but said she wanted to hear more details. 'Common sense and the power of mothers and fathers of sick children has bust the political process wide open and is on the verge of changing thousands of lives,' she said. 'We are on the threshold of the next chapter of the history books.' The cases of Billy Caldwell and other sick children have put Britain's drug laws under scrutiny. On Tuesday, former British Foreign Secretary William Hague joined a growing number of politicians and medical experts calling for the government to legalize marijuana. The former Conservative Party leader, now a member of the House of Lords, wrote in The Daily Telegraph that the war on cannabis had been lost and that it was 'deluded' to pretend otherwise. He said 'cannabis is ubiquitous, and issuing orders to the police to defeat its use is about as up-to-date and relevant as asking the Army to recover the Empire.' The Home Office said in response that 'the government has no intention of reviewing the classification of cannabis under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and it will remain a Class B drug' — the middle rung on a three-point scale of illegal drugs.
  • Some American parents who for years have used cannabis to treat severe forms of epilepsy in their children are feeling more cautious than celebratory as U.S. regulators near a decision on whether to approve the first drug derived from the marijuana plant. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is expected to issue a decision by the end of the month on the drug Epidiolex, made by GW Pharmaceuticals. It's a purified form of cannabidiol — a component of cannabis that doesn't get users high — to treat Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes in kids. Both forms of epilepsy are rare. Cannabidiol's effect on a variety of health conditions is frequently touted, but there is still little evidence to back up advocates' personal experiences. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has long categorized cannabis as a Schedule I drug, a category with 'no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.' That strictly limits research on potential medical uses for cannabis or the chemicals in it, including cannabidiol, or CBD. But for years, parents desperate to find anything to help their children have turned to the marijuana-based products made legal by a growing number of states. Meagan Patrick is among the parents using CBD to treat symptoms in their children. She moved from Maine to Colorado in 2014 so she could legally get CBD for her now-5-year-old daughter, Addelyn, who was born with a brain malformation that causes seizures. 'My child was dying, and we needed to do something,' Patrick said. As for the potential approval of a pharmaceutical based on CBD, she said fear is her first reaction. 'I want to make sure that her right to continue using what works for her is protected, first and foremost. That's my job as her mom,' Patrick said. Advocates like Patrick became particularly concerned when GW Pharmaceuticals' U.S. commercial business, Greenwich Biosciences, began quietly lobbying to change states' legal definition of marijuana, beginning in 2017 with proposals in Nebraska and South Dakota. Some worried the company's attempt to ensure its product could be legally prescribed and sold by pharmacies would have a side effect: curtailing medical marijuana programs already operating in more than two dozen states. The proposals generally sought to remove CBD from states' legal definition of marijuana, allowing it to be prescribed by doctors and supplied by pharmacies. But the change only applies to products that have FDA approval. Neither Nebraska nor South Dakota allows medical use of marijuana, and activists accused the company of trying to shut down future access to products containing cannabidiol but lacking FDA approval. Britain-based GW Pharmaceuticals never intended for the changes to affect other marijuana products, but they are necessary to allow Epidiolex to be sold in pharmacies if approved, spokesman Stephen Schultz said. He would not discuss other places where the company will seek changes to state law. The Associated Press confirmed that lobbyists representing Greenwich Biosciences backed legislation in California and Colorado this year. 'As a company, we understand there's a significant business building up,' Schultz said. 'All we want to do is make sure our product is accessible.' Industry lobbyists in those states said they take company officials at their word, but they still insisted on protective language ensuring that recreational or medical marijuana, cannabidiol, hemp and other products derived from cannabis plants won't be affected by the changes sought by GW Pharmaceuticals. Patrick Goggin, an attorney who focuses on industrial hemp issues in California, said the company would run into trouble if it tried to 'lock up access' to marijuana-derived products beyond FDA-approved drugs. 'People need to have options and choices,' he said. 'That's the battle here.' Legal experts say the changes are logical. Some states' laws specifically prohibit any product derived from the marijuana plant from being sold in pharmacies. The FDA has approved synthetic versions of another cannabis ingredient for medical purposes but has never approved marijuana or hemp for any medical use. A panel of FDA advisers in April unanimously recommended the agency approve Epidiolex for the treatment of severe seizures in children with epilepsy, conditions that are otherwise difficult to treat. It's not clear why CBD reduces seizures in some patients, but the panel based its recommendation on three studies showing significant reduction in children with two forms of epilepsy. Denver-based attorney Christian Sederberg, who worked on the GW Pharmaceuticals-backed legislation in Colorado on behalf of the marijuana industry, said all forms of marijuana can exist together. 'The future of the industry is showing itself here,' Sederberg said. 'There's going to be the pharmaceutical lane, the nutraceutical (food-as-medicine) lane, the adult-use lane. This shows how that's all coming together.' Alex and Jenny Inman said they won't switch to Epidiolex if it becomes available, though their son Lukas has Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Alex, an information technology professional, and Jenny, a preschool teacher, said it took some at-home experimentation to find the right combination of doctor-prescribed medication, CBD and THC — the component that gives marijuana users a high — that seemed to help Lukas with his seizures. 'What makes me a little bit nervous about this is that there's sort of a psyche amongst patients that, 'Here's this pill, and this pill will solve things,' right? It works differently for different people,' Alex Inman said. The Inmans moved from Maryland to Colorado in 2015 after doctors recommended a second brain surgery for Lukas' seizures. The couple and other parents and advocates for CBD said children respond differently to a variety of strains. The Realm of Caring Foundation, an organization co-founded by Paige Figi, whose daughter Charlotte's name is attached to the CBD oil Charlotte's Web, said it maintains a registry of about 46,000 people worldwide who use CBD. For Heather Jackson, who said her son Zaki, now 15, benefited from CBD and who co-founded the foundation, Epidiolex's approval means insurers will begin paying for treatment with a cannabis-derived product. 'That might be a nice option for some families who, you know, really want to receive a prescription who are going to only listen to the person in the white coat,' Jackson said. ____ Banda and Foody are members of members of AP's marijuana beat team. Follow them at Twitter at http://twitter.com/psbanda and http://twitter.com/katiefoody . Find complete AP marijuana coverage here: http://apnews.com/tag/LegalMarijuana
  • Smoking in the U.S. has hit another all-time low. About 14 percent of U.S adults were smokers last year, down from about 16 percent the year before, government figures show. There hadn't been much change the previous two years, but it's been clear there's been a general decline and the new figures show it's continuing, said K. Michael Cummings of the tobacco research program at Medical University of South Carolina. 'Everything is pointed in the right direction,' including falling cigarette sales and other indicators, Cummings said. The new figures released Tuesday mean there are still more than 30 million adult smokers in the U.S., he added. Teens are also shunning cigarettes. Survey results out last week showed smoking among high school students was down to 9 percent, also a new low. In the early 1960s, roughly 42 percent of U.S. adults smoked. It was common nearly everywhere — in office buildings, restaurants, airplanes and even hospitals. The decline has coincided with a greater understanding that smoking is a cause of cancer, heart disease and other health problems. Anti-smoking campaigns, cigarette taxes and smoking bans are combining to bring down adult smoking rates, experts say. The launch of electronic cigarettes and their growing popularity has also likely played a role. E-cigarettes heat liquid nicotine into a vapor without the harmful by-products generated from burning tobacco. That makes them a potentially useful tool to help smokers quit, but some public health experts worry it also creates a new way for people to get addicted to nicotine. There was no new information for adult use of e-cigarettes and vaping products, but 2016 figures put that at 3 percent of adults. Vaping is more common among teens than adults. About 13 percent of high school students use e-cigarettes or other vaping devices. The findings on adult smokers come from a national health survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 27,000 adults were interviewed last year. ___ The Associated Press Health & Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.
  • New research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas. Energy companies have drilled more than 11,000 wells since arriving en masse in 2008, making Pennsylvania the nation's No. 2 gas-producing state after Texas. Residents who live near the gas wells, along with environmental groups and some scientists, have long worried about air and water pollution. Two new studies that looked at groundwater chemistry did not find much of an impact from horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing — or fracking — the techniques that allow energy companies to extract huge volumes of oil and gas from shale rock deep underground. The results suggest that, as a whole, groundwater supplies appear to have held their own against the energy industry's exploitation of the Marcellus Shale, a rock layer more than a mile underground that holds the nation's largest reservoir of natural gas. In a study published Monday, a team from Yale University installed eight water wells and drew samples every few weeks for two years — during which seven natural gas wells were drilled and fracked nearby — to measure changes in methane levels at various stages of natural gas production. Methane is not toxic to humans, but at high concentrations it can lead to asphyxiation or cause an explosion. Researchers found that methane spiked in some water wells but attributed rising methane levels to natural variability, not drilling and fracking. Their findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Natural variability 'is potentially a lot greater than previously understood,' said Yale University hydrologist James Saiers, a study co-author. That's important, he said, because residential water wells are typically tested only a few times before and after the start of drilling. 'Before-and-after sampling might not be sufficient and might lead to misattribution of sources of methane,' Saiers said. Rob Jackson, a Stanford University scientist who has studied the impact of drilling on groundwater, challenged the researchers' assertion that elevated methane levels in the water wells had nothing to do with natural gas development, though he agreed the gas found in the water did not come from the Marcellus Shale. 'The simplest explanation is that something associated with drilling and hydraulic fracturing caused shallower gas to migrate into the monitored aquifers,' Jackson, who was not involved in the study, said via email. Penn State University scientists, meanwhile, obtained an enormous trove of data from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection — 11,000 groundwater samples collected since 2010 — and, using what they said was a novel data-mining technique, concluded that water quality is either unchanged or even slightly improved for substances like barium, arsenic and iron. The authors found slightly elevated concentrations of methane near only seven of 1,385 shale wells in the study area. 'It really doesn't look like the groundwater chemistry has gotten worse, even though we've had this huge number of shale gas wells drilled,' said Susan Brantley, a Penn State geoscientist and study co-author. Their research , which also looked at a small number of water samples taken before 1990, appeared in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Allen Robinson, a Carnegie Mellon University engineering professor who wasn't involved in the study, said the large sample size represented an improvement over earlier studies, but he questioned whether researchers' focus on just one county — Bradford County, one of the state's drilling hotspots — might have skewed the results. 'Overall the data demonstrate that there is certainly not a crisis around ground water contamination and unconventional oil and gas activity. That is good news,' he said via email. 'However, it does document some contamination. Is 'rare' contamination around a few percent of wells acceptable? That is a policy question.' Environmental regulators have held drillers liable for tainting more than 300 residential water supplies statewide over the years, while homeowner lawsuits have accused gas companies of polluting the water with methane, heavy metals and toxic drilling chemicals. Older research linked faulty gas wells to tainted water. The latest studies 'reflect our industry's deep commitment to environmental and groundwater protection,' David Spigelmyer, president of the Marcellus Shale Coalition, an industry group, said in a statement.

Health Reporter Sabrina Cupit

  • It's that time of year, wedding season! June is the most popular month for weddings. Amazon has become the 'go to ' for couples tying the knot. The on-line retailer is dominating the $19 billion business of wedding registries. 54% of couples in a recent survey said they registered at Amazon. Most couples who are engaged register at more than one place.
  • In 2017, 3 .6 million middle and high school students said they are current tobacco users. That number is down from about 4.5 million in 2011. “Despite promising declines in tobacco use, far too many young people continue to use tobacco products, including e-cigarettes,” said CDC Director Robert R. Redfield, M.D. “Comprehensive, sustained strategies can help prevent and reduce tobacco use and protect our nation’s youth from this preventable health risk.”E-cigarettes have been the most commonly used product among teens since 2014.
  • Having trouble getting your kids to eat their fruits and vegetables? Try using toys. New research from the University of Georgia suggests that fun can motivate kids to try new foods and ultimately eat more fruits and vegetables.

News

  • Two brothers accused of at least seven robberies across metro Atlanta in May are no ordinary criminals: they’re identical twins. Marquavious and Juntavious Burton, 20, were arrested in early June. According to Fulton County jail records, the twins have been arrested multiple times since 2015 on charges such as aggravated assault and theft by receiving stolen property. The latest charges include seven counts of armed robbery and a charge of participating in criminal street gang activity. Police believe they may be responsible for even more recent robberies. The Burton twins have also been accused of shooting at some of the robbery victims, Channel 2 Action News reported.  In other news:
  • Two Cobb County siblings were killed after their 17-year-old sister allegedly lost control of the family’s SUV on a South Carolina interstate, police said Monday.  Jessica Wolwark was driving a Chevrolet northbound on I-85 in Anderson County when she ran off the highway and the SUV overturned Saturday morning, according to police.  Wolwark and her mother, Natalia Anggraeni, were both wearing seat belts and were seriously injured in the crash. Two other family members died from their injuries after being ejected, police said.  Kirana “Kiki” Wolwark, 15, and 12-year-old Nate Wolwark were both killed, a family friend posted on a Go Fund Me page. The family was traveling from their Kennesaw home to Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C., where the girls were to attend a religious retreat, according to Chrissy Concepcion, who set up the fundraising page for the family. The family does not have medical insurance, she said. The South Carolina medical examiner was unable to confirm the identities of those killed, but family friends confirmed the names and ages of the Wolwark siblings.  “Kiki was a joy to be around, and spread her love for animals to everyone she knew,” Concepcion posted. “Nate was the perfect boy; always helpful, caring, and accepting of everyone around him.” The driver and her mother were both taken by helicopter to a Greenville hospital, where both remained Monday. Anggraeni has a broken neck and several broken ribs, Concepcion said. Jessica Wolwark has torn ligaments in her arm, but is expected to be released from the hospital this week.  The South Carolina Highway Patrol is investigating the crash.  In other news: 
  • A stream of mourners has been leaving mementos at the spot where rapper XXXTentacion was killed as he left a Florida motorcycle dealership. They left behind flowers and candles and decorated the sidewalk with chalk art. Broward County authorities have announced no arrests in the Monday afternoon shooting that saw the 20-year-old rapper gunned down as he drove his electric BMW away from Riva Motorsports in suburban Fort Lauderdale. His attorney said Tuesday that investigators told him the shooting was a botched robbery and that XXXTentacion had withdrawn money from a bank to buy a motorcycle. The Broward Sheriff's Office says deputies are searching for two suspects who fled in a dark SUV. The rapper's real name was Jahseh Dwayne Onfroy. His stage name was pronounced 'Ex Ex Ex ten-ta-see-YAWN.
  • On scorching summer days, taking a nice cold bottle of water for your drive seems like a natural fit. But it could lead to startling consequences, firefighters say. >> Read more trending news One Oklahoma fire department and a power company in Idaho recently demonstrated how a partly filled water bottle could magnify the sun’s rays and start a fire. David Richardson, of the Midwest Fire Department in Oklahoma, told KFOR the sunlight “uses the liquid and the clear material to develop a focused beam, and sure enough, it can actually cause a fire.” “The sunlight will come through (the bottle) when it’s filled with liquid and act as a magnifying glass as you would with regular optics,” said Richardson. A test at the fire department, outside a car, showed sunlight going through a water bottle raised the temperature of a piece of paper to 250 degrees, KFOR reported. Representatives from Idaho Power also showed the same potential problem in a Facebook post in July, with a video showing direct sunlight going through a water bottle leaving smoke and burn marks in car seats before the bottle was removed. While the risk of fire is relatively small, officials recommend keeping water bottles out of unattended vehicles, KFOR reported. Read more at KFOR.  
  • President Donald Trump tried on Tuesday evening to push Republicans in the House to pass an immigration reform bill later this week, basically telling GOP lawmakers he would support whatever they could pass, as Republicans struggled to find the votes to do that, and pressed the White House to back off a new policy that separates some illegal immigrant kids from their parents after being picked up at the border. “The system’s been broken for many years,” the President told reporters at the Capitol before the unusual Tuesday evening gathering. “The immigration system, it’s been a really bad, bad. system, probably the worst anywhere in the world. And we’re gonna try and see if we can fix it.” Earlier in the day, the President had told a gathering of business leaders that he would not back off his calls for major changes in U.S. immigration laws. “When people come up, they have to know they’re never going to get in, or else it’s never going to stop,” Mr. Trump said of the flow of illegal immigration across the southern border with Mexico. President Trump: 'I'm asking Congress to do is to give us a third option, which we have been requesting since last year, the legal authority to detain and promptly remove families together as a unit. We have to be able to do this. This is the only solution to the border crisis.' pic.twitter.com/UllzH6rL4y — CSPAN (@cspan) June 19, 2018 But complicating matters for the President was the recent move to force the separation of children and parents, if the parents were being charged for illegally entering the United States, as that continued to draw stern opposition from GOP lawmakers of all stripes. “All of us are horrified at the images that we are seeing,” said Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX). “We ought to stop separating families,” said Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-KS). “The Administration disagrees,” as GOP lawmakers said the conflict wasn’t really discussed during the Tuesday night meeting with Mr. Trump. “We can have strong border security without separating families,” said Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH). 13 GOP Senators signed a letter to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, asking the Trump Administration to “halt current policies leading to the forced separation of minor children from their parents,” but that missive fell on deaf ears at the White House, as GOP lawmakers scrambled for kind of legislative answer. If every Senator is willing to support it by unanimous consent, the Senate could pass a bill, before the end of the week, that would allow families charged with illegal entry to be kept together while awaiting an expedited hearing. I truly hope that is what we do. — Marco Rubio (@marcorubio) June 19, 2018 House GOP leaders on Tuesday night posted two different immigration bills for possible House votes – one was a more conservative plan backed by Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), which was unlikely to get close to a majority; a second was a more moderate bill that lacked the support of conservatives. It left many unsure what would happen if votes occurred this week on the House floor. “I’m still working through whether I can vote for the compromise bill,” said Rep. Warren Davidson (R-OH), as more conservative lawmakers withheld their support from the only all-GOP plan that has a chance for approval. Meanwhile, even as Mr. Trump tried to push Republicans to stick together on immigration, he managed to cause some internal GOP pain, as lawmakers said the President – during the closed door meeting with House lawmakers – took a verbal shot at Rep. Mark Sanford (R-SC), who lost his primary a week ago to a candidate backed by the President. “Is Mark Sanford here? I just want to congratulate him on running a great race,” the President reportedly said, drawing quiet groans and hisses from some GOP members. One Republican, Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI) said later on Twitter, that the jab was uncalled for. “This was a classless cheap shot,” Amash wrote.
  • U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson accused the Trump administration of a 'cover-up' after officials denied him entry Tuesday to a detention center for migrant children in South Florida where he had hoped to survey living conditions. Nelson and U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, both Florida Democrats, went to the contractor-run Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children following reports it was receiving detained children who had arrived in the country illegally. Wasserman Schultz said the facility was being used for an estimated 1,000 children, aged 13 to 17 — most of whom arrived as unaccompanied minors and about 10 percent of whom are children separated from their families at the border. She said two other South Florida facilities were being used for younger children. 'It is an affront as the senior senator of this state that an agency head would tell me that I do not have entrance into a federally funded facility where the lives and health of children are at stake,' Nelson said. President Donald Trump's immigration policies have drawn intense scrutiny following reports of the forced separation of migrant children from their parents. Democrats and some Republicans are urging an end to the practice at the U.S.-Mexico border. Thousands of children split from their families at that border are being held in government-run facilities. Wasserman Schultz said her staff had spoken Tuesday with the Florida-based company, Comprehensive Health Services, contracted to run the facility. She said her staff was told the lawmakers would be 'welcomed warmly and allowed into the facility.' But Nelson said Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services Eric Hargan told him it would take two weeks for them to gain access. 'I think what they're doing is a cover-up for the president,' Nelson said. Trump doesn't like the negative response he's received, even from fellow Republicans, Nelson said. 'Are they abusing these kids? Are they sleeping on the floor? Are they in cages, like we've seen in some videos?' Wasserman Schultz asked after being barred from the building. The Florida facility is overseen by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Department spokesman Kenneth Wolfe said in an email Monday that it had reopened as 'a temporary unaccompanied alien children program facility.' He did not provide further details. Gov. Rick Scott's office, however, released documents Tuesday that showed that federal authorities in February notified state officials and members of Congress that the Homestead facility would be reopened. Federal authorities didn't give an exact date, but said the Homestead location would reopen after damage from Hurricane Irma was repaired. The release from HHS also stated that the facility would only be used for 'unaccompanied alien children' detained by immigration officials. Later Tuesday, Scott called on Trump's administration to stop separating the families. The Republican governor sent his request in a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar. Scott's letter also requested that federal authorities notify state officials when they bring into Florida migrant children who have been separated from their families. Scott also wants to know what services are being provided to the children and whether they have had any health screenings. He said the information is needed to make sure that the children are being protected. An Associated Press reporter was denied access to Azar while he visited a Miami hospital Tuesday to talk with patients about drug costs. Spokesman Gavin Smith barred the AP reporter from asking Azar about the immigration facility because an interview with the secretary had not been pre-arranged. Several dozen children could be seen Tuesday playing soccer outside the building behind a chain link fence, mostly talking and shouting to each other in Spanish. Security officials would not let reporters near the facility or provide details on conditions inside. Mark Greenberg, a former head of the HHS Administration for Children and Families, said agency policy says requests to visit facilities for migrant children be submitted two weeks in advance. However, Greenberg said in the current state of heightened concern it behooves HHS to act rapidly on requests from lawmakers. Greenberg said much of the reason for lead time is logistical: the facilities are operated by federal contractors and government officials should be present for a congressional inspection. 'The current urgency of concerns about what is happening to children who have been separated from their parents makes it important to provide access as quickly as possible,' he said. Greenberg is currently a senior fellow at the Migration Policy Institute, a Washington think tank focused on immigration. ___ Reporter Gary Fineout contributed to this story from Tallahassee. See AP's complete coverage of the debate over the Trump administration's policy of family separation at the border: https://apnews.com/tag/Immigration