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News
5 generations: 105-year-old matriarch meets great-great-granddaughter
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5 generations: 105-year-old matriarch meets great-great-granddaughter

5 generations: 105-year-old matriarch meets great-great-granddaughter
Photo Credit: jarmoluk/Pixabay
A 105-year-old Maryland woman got to meet her great-great granddaughter for the first time Thursday.

5 generations: 105-year-old matriarch meets great-great-granddaughter

Annie Berry turned 105 on Jan. 18, and Thursday she got to experience the thrill of holding her great-great-granddaughter, WUSA reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Five generations of Berry’s family gathered at the Genesis Larkin Chase Center in Bowie, Maryland, to watch their matriarch hold 1-week-old Olivia, the television station reported.

“I think she’s cute like Grandmama,” Berry told WUSA, winking and laughing as the baby cried.

Berry was born in Meridian Mississippi in 1914 and recalled picking cotton, shucking corn and milking cows.

“She said before I leave this earth we will see a black president,” Berry’s granddaughter, Annie Sewell, told the television station. “I didn’t think it, but it came to pass.”

Berry migrated to North Carolina where she worked as a caretaker. She got married and worked as an administrator for a school system before retiring and moving to the Washington, D.C., area to live with family members, WUSA reported.

Berry told the television station that her longevity is due to "obedience to the Lord.”

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