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Crime & Law
Georgia man chases ex, her new boyfriend and shoots at them, police say
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Georgia man chases ex, her new boyfriend and shoots at them, police say

Georgia man chases ex, her new boyfriend and shoots at them, police say
Photo Credit: City of Decatur Police Department
Police say Rickeyon Jenkins shot at his ex-girlfriend and her new boyfriend in Decatur, Georgia.

Georgia man chases ex, her new boyfriend and shoots at them, police say

Decatur, Georgia police are searching for a 23-year-old man accused of shooting at his ex-girlfriend and her new boyfriend Sunday morning.

The couple was leaving a hotel shortly before 11 a.m. when they saw Rickeyon Jenkins, 23, of Baxley, Georgia, according to a post on the City of Decatur Police Department Facebook page.

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Police said Jenkins had a gun and fired toward the couple while they were in the parking lot, prompting them to flee in their vehicle.

Jenkins allegedly pursued and continued to fire, shooting the victims’ vehicle and also ramming it with his own vehicle, a sliver, four-door, early 2000s Mercury Grand Marquis.

The couple had lost Jenkins by the time they reached another street and called 911. 

“Officers observed damage to the victim’s vehicle consistent with gunshots and also recovered physical evidence at the original scene...,” the post said. “Neither of the victims were physically injured.”

Jenkins is charged with aggravated assault.

Anyone with information on his whereabouts or the case was asked to contact mark.hensel@decaturga.com or 678-553-6687. Crime Stoppers Greater Atlanta can also take information at 404-577-8477 and allows callers to remain anonymous.

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