ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
50°
Broken Clouds
H 74° L 54°
  • cloudy-day
    50°
    Current Conditions
    Broken Clouds. H 74° L 54°
  • cloudy-day
    68°
    Afternoon
    Partly Cloudy. H 74° L 54°
  • clear-day
    71°
    Evening
    Mostly Sunny. H 74° L 54°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

    I'm not telling you that it is going to be easy. I am telling you that it is going to be worth it,' said Art Williams, father of a child with Down syndrome. Thursday, March 21st is World Down Syndrome Day. WDSD is a global celebration and day of recognition and awareness for the children and adults, as well as their families and friends living in the world of Down Syndrome. Activities and social media awareness efforts will continue worldwide throughout the week.  English physician Dr. John Langdon Down, first identified what he is perceived as a distinct mental health diagnosis in 1862. It was not until early 1959 that French pediatrician and early geneticist, Dr. Jerome Lejeune along with colleague Martha Gautier, discovered that Down syndrome patients carried an additional chromosome on their 21st pair of 23 chromosomes. This gave us the name Trisomy 21, and the genetic marker for Down syndrome, which remains the world's most common genetic abnormality at birth, typically 8 out of every 1000 live births in the United States. Among the most unfortunate aspect which readily comes to mind about the world of Down syndrome, and spending time with infants, children and adults with this genetic abnormality, is that the name of the discovering physician was not Up.  My youngest daughter is a pre-teen with Down syndrome. Whenever I pick her up at the end of a long school day, she still runs and practically jumps into my arms. This welcome is followed by a long hug and inquiry about how my day has been. As we walk to the car, typically hand in hand...she shares the measure of her day, its brief high and sometimes low points, and we plan the rest of our afternoon or evening. Though casting no aspersions, this simply would not happen with a typical pre-teen, boy or girl. Her general kindness and treatment of others routinely brings joy. On a recent grocery trip, she noted the customer ahead of us, a nurse, had apparently had a particularly challenging and long shift. Olivia instinctively stroked her lower back, told her things would get better, and then began to unload her buggy, quickly moving to the end of the same line to bag her order and place it in her cart. Olivia is 11, she has never been trained nor worked in a grocery store, though she regularly visits with her mother, step-father or myself. The nurse was over-whelmed with gratitude, and though she had just previously paid forward a portion of the order of the customer preceding her, she reached back into her purse and handed Olivia two crisp dollar bills and said, 'Pick out something fun, just for you.' It was $2 dollars, generously given, and Olivia's face lit up like a Christmas tree. We didn't make it home before the reward had been purposed and two reward trinkets made the ride home us. I worked for nearly 9 years in the grocery business, during high school and college, and I can't remember how many thousand customers who I helped bag or carry groceries out to their car...but I can't remember a single exchange that felt quite like this one. Our children are not seeking special treatment, a parade or the level of financial support we rightly raise to fight cancer, diabetes or many other chronic health conditions. What they seek, and we advocate on their behalf is pretty simple. They want acceptance, inclusion, friendship, independence and a life largely being treated just like everyone else. They may work years to perfect simple tasks which their own brain can trip them up on. But more than the joy of mastering that skill, they bask in the glow of friendship, consideration and love from others. If you have occasion to interact with someone of special needs this week, perhaps realize for a moment how much they prefer that you treat them normally, that you speak to, include and embrace their presence in your community, workplace or place of worship. And if you make that choice, let me know how you feel, as well as the smile which you most likely receive as instant payment, or perhaps a simple hug which greatly improves your day. I can’t promise that every inter-action will bring joy or perfection, but I can guarantee that over-time you will be the better for those inter-actions. Happy World Down Syndrome Day!
  • With a bit of work ethic and any kind of training or certification in our construction trades, you can be employed in days, ranging from a paid apprenticeship learning a craft up to starting salaries in the $80,000 a year range,' Michael Dunham, CEO, Associated General Contractors of Georgia, Inc. (AGC).
  • My style of deal-making is quite simple and straightforward. I aim very high, and then I just keep pushing and pushing and pushing to get what I’m after. Sometimes I settle for less than I sought, but in most cases I still end up with what I want.' from Donald Trump's autobiographical memoir, 'The Art of the Deal,' published in 1987. As an entrepreneur, reality TV star, later presidential aspirant and now President, Donald Trump frequently reminds us all, on Twitter and elsewhere of his powers of persuasion and big deal making. I give President Trump credit for opening discussions with North Korea, and its odd dictator, Kim Jong Un. Three generations of the Kim family have ruled North Korea since 1948. And standing down the nuclear weapons program of the tiny first world regime has vexed U.S. presidents ever since. Following the first summit, Trump was able to cause Kim to halt missile launches over allies like Japan as well as actively testing his nuclear arsenal. Kim was also persuaded, by Trump or by history, to take the first steps across his border and the de-militarized zone, to walk and talk with his South Korean counter-part, and to possibly begin what might actually become the full armistice and end of the Korean War.
  • The summertime highlights of my childhood were often spent on the beaches of Jekyll Island. In addition to hundreds of sand castles, thousands of miles of beach walks and bike rides...my family has very strong and singular memories of assisting sea turtles. During evening beach walks we would often note sea turtle mama's depositing their eggs near the sea wall, or struggling to make their way back out to sea. Nearing five decades later, I am thrilled to know that a corps of volunteers, now mark and protect those baby turtle eggs and nests, and the work of Jekyll Island Sea Turtle Center is known nationwide.
  • America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves,' President Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865). As has been documented in numerous public opinion surveys, Millennials, who as of this year became the largest demographic age group and population block in our nation, have a clouded understanding of the meaning of socialism. When asked, in multiple formats, if our nation would be better off if all incomes were collected by the government, and then redistributed in equal amounts to all citizens...an overwhelming nearly 80 percent of those surveyed emphatically said, Yes. I frankly find this more disturbing than the ongoing Opioid Crisis, which took the lives of nearly 48,000 Americans during 2018. Since elementary school, I have been a student of history, our republic and the conflicts which helped build our nation into the world's strongest economy, and the only place I know where personal freedom reigns supreme. And with that said, I want my children, your children and our grandchildren to better understand that even freedom is not 'free.' The parade of U.S. presidential candidates for 2020 already sounds like a sweepstakes race, with each trying to top the other with their Get Out, No Jail Everything is FREE card. Free college, free Medicare for all, free Daycare, free Basic Income... and the list goes on. I purchase healthcare coverage via the federal Market Place Exchange, and though I can't say I have been pleased with many aspects of the Affordable Care Act of 2010, I had no coverage at all for a few years prior to that, due to a pre-existing medical condition. That said, me having health care coverage remains and should be my responsibility not my employer's, the federal government nor my neighbor. I support subsidized and on-site employer sponsored day care, as an employee amenity, and deductible expense for the employer, but NOT mandated, federally organized and funded child care. If you think otherwise, pay a visit to your nearest local Head Start program. Georgia's lottery provides pre-K funding, but that program funds local schools and even private daycare facilities, leaving placement choices and related staffing concerns in the hands of parents, as it should be. Much example is made of socialist programs in many Scandinavian countries, particularly Norway and Finland. Neither is a true socialist state, but both offer much higher income tax rates, greater redistribution of income and a larger safety net than the U.S. Having traveled to Iceland and other neighboring nations, the populations there are smaller, much more Euro-centric and generally less diverse. Tourism is easy and encouraged, immigration, non-native born citizenship, or the ownership of property is not particularly encouraged and in some cases practically impossible. The immediate prior President of France raised the income tax rate for wage earners there to 75 percent. Almost overnight the top 300 wealthiest citizens of France became citizens of Belgium and other neighboring low and no-tax neighbors within the European Union.  More recently stateside, Trump administration tax cuts removed a long-treasured tax haven of the full deductibility of state income and property taxes. Not surprisingly, with the cap on deductible residential property taxes now $10,000, hundreds of thousands of residents in high tax states have sold their property and homesteads, relocating to lower and no property tax states. Not having served in uniform in our nation's military is perhaps my largest single life regret. Although time spent in the Georgia Defense Force (the Reserve's reserve) was worthwhile, it's not the same, and particularly not the same as serving during a time of military conflict. Those who have lost life, limb or a family member in combat, paying the ultimate price, know more than any others that the price of our continuing freedom is truly not free. A warm visit just over a year ago to the land of fire and ice (Iceland) was followed by my more recent discovery that the world's tiniest nation strictly controls the birth rates of any fetus determined to test positive for a genetic marker for Down syndrome. Nearly 100 percent of those pregnancies are then terminated. Having a child with Down syndrome of our own, we can unequivocally state that this is a choice and price which the people of Iceland are collectively paying, and which they may not fully appreciate for decades, but it also makes the price of any return trip to that lovely island nation a bit too high for me.  
  • It doesn't matter whether he was in the photo, or not in the photo at this point. We have to close that chapter,' said former Democratic Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe, who aided, supported and assisted in the election of current Virginia Governor Ralph Northam on CNN's 'State of the Union.’ Since the low-bar was set during the U.S. Senate confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, the weaponizing of high school and other yearbooks as part of opposition research and background checks is now fully underway. With an expected field of more than 20 Democrats lining up to seek the White House in 2020, you can rest assured that dozens of interns working for the nation's top political consulting firms are fanning out across the country into high school and college libraries to locate and identify the poor decision making in youth of our potential future leaders.  Virginia Governor (as of this writing) Ralph Northam, is someone I've never met, and will not spend time defending. Though I will draw a distinction, between an expectation of maturity and adult reasoning in a Med School student, versus an adolescent in high school. It is more than likely that Democratic Governor Northam, who used race as an issue against his GOP opponent, Ed Gillespie, will be driven from office, in a matter of days or weeks, largely over a photograph on his Med School yearbook page, along with a later admission of donning shoe polish on his face in a staged tribute to Michael Jackson in 1994.  Northam, previously Virginia's Lt. Governor, won the office narrowly, largely on the back of voters in metro Washington, D.C.. The Virginia Commonwealth out-state is a largely conservative and Red State, much like Georgia and metro Atlanta, the politics of its largest MSA, in this case Washington, D.C., often tip the ballot scales in a different direction. But again, if Northam is to be run out on a rail following this trolling stroll down memory lane, it should be for his current or at least more recent poor choices in public life, as well as bad actions or intentions to implement poor public policy...and not simply for stupid costume decision making in youth.  Northam recently endorsed a failed bill in the Virginia General Assembly which would have all but legalized infanticide and extended legal abortion procedures to post-birth. During his campaign, Northam used race as a wedge issue to link his opponent, former RNC Chair Ed Gillespie with some of the bad answer choices of President Donald Trump in the aftermath of the tragic riots and protests in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017. These are the kinds of decisions which Virginians should be holding up for closer scrutiny and review. Christ was not perfect. My main challenge with the Catholic Church of my birth and christening is the insistence that our Pope is a practical deity. He is a man. With all the good and bad that comes with that, selected by other men...again to lead. I know many people including myself, with lives well and charitably lived, who have had bad nights, made poor decisions and on occasion had those moments captured for posterity. Should one black mark or bad costume decision erase decades of good choices? Whatever happened to second chances, or acknowledging the onset of maturity, personal growth or even simply becoming a better human being, generally considered one of the true benefits of aging? Accountability courts now give non-violent criminal offenders a second chance. Florida and other states are having ongoing discussions about restoring the voting rights of felons. If we are such a forgiving people, and so willing to give second chances, shouldn't we start by acknowledging the folly of judging the mindset of a public official today by their youth and costume choices of decades ago? And given the proliferation of electronic photography, are we ready for the likely slutty Mrs. Santa and naughty nurse photos yet to come in a post Me-Too era of the hundreds of women entering elected life?  Having weathered a healthy number of youthful indiscretions as well as more recent bad decisions of my own, I remain glad that we are able to build our cumulative life's work and reputation on the back of a series of good choices and decisions as well as knowing that when we are finally judged by a higher authority, what is truly in our heart, minds and expressed in our faith matters for something. While I wish Governor Northam and his family well, I suspect they are in for a challenging set of years. I would urge my friends and the citizens of the great Commonwealth of Virginia to not rush to judgement and to fully comprehend the reasons for the decision which they are considering, as well as noting the sound of yearbooks rustling and memory sticks moving into vaults, while even the Jefferson Dorm on the UVA campus has walls which contain stories of bad choices and memories. Thankfully though, those walls can't talk.    
  • We're not subtracting anything from the Confederate monuments or the history of Stone Mountain Park. We're just adding to it. And we didn't know we had this treasure of history until we did this study of it,' said Bill Stephens, CEO, Stone Mountain Park Memorial Association (SMMA).In 1965, the Stone Mountain Memorial Association rescued and relocated an ailing and structurally damaged wooden, covered bridge from downtown Athens, Georgia to Stone Mountain Park. The old bridge, rare even then, was originally constructed in 1891, and linked downtown Athens via College Street, to much more rural Clarke County farms and beyond.
  • One of Georgia's oldest counties, Gwinnett County, became 200 years old on December 15, 2018. Looking ahead, as the man whom the county is named for frequently did, it may be time for bold decisions and potentially new directions. Button Gwinnett, a longtime resident of Chatham County, briefly became Georgia's provisional President in 1777. An early speaker of the Georgia state legislature and later signer of the Declaration of Independence, like most Georgians of his time felt that an independent United States might be unthinkable. Great Britain was then the world's mightiest empire, and the colonies of the Americas were but a fledgling cluster of port cities and plantation towns up and down the eastern seaboard of North America with no organized militia.  But while first serving in a Georgia provincial assembly in Savannah in January of 1776, Gwinnett was selected as a delegate to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, where he was first seated that May. Gwinnett became convinced that American independence was worth the risk and price that would likely be paid, and on July 2, 1776 and again on July 4th, Gwinnett voted in support of the Declaration of Independence. Georgia was considered a remote colony, but all three of its delegates to the Continental Congress became enthusiastic supporters of the declaration and the American Revolution which followed.  During the century that followed, Gwinnett County remained a predominantly rural county, and still later a somewhat remote bedroom community for fast growing Atlanta to its south. By the 1940 census, prior to World War II, the county population remained just under 30,000. Rapid growth defined the post-war decades and approaching the 2020 census, Gwinnett has become Georgia's second most populous county, now with nearly 1,000,000 residents. Gwinnett is home to Georgia's largest public school system and one of its highest performing. A strong cluster of municipalities offer differing tastes of Gwinnett life and county pride and its percentage of lifelong residents remains high. A strong technology corridor exists along the county center, and the I-85 corridor is ripe for re-development.  But, Gwinnett County is also changing. During the last census, Gwinnett's population became majority-minority. For decades thousands of Gwinnett workers streamed each morning along interstates, state highways and major thoroughfares into metro Atlanta's core. But that traffic is now much more two-way, with workers heading in and out, both of the high and low-skill variety. Interstate connectivity along I-85, 985, 316 and U.S. Highway 78 remain almost unmatched in the region, while east/west connectors apart from the Ronald Reagan Parkway are few and far between. And while Gwinnett Transit System and GRTA Xpress buses offer service across Gwinnett to other parts of the metro Atlanta region, route frequency is largely limited to rush hour commutes.  Gwinnett county sites were left on the sidelines recently during competition for the nation's largest economic development prospect, the Amazon HQ2 search, solely because of lack of direct access to region-wide transit. The Gwinnett County Commission has developed an ambitious transportation plan for the future, but they are leaving the decision on whether or not the county significantly expands and enhances its local transit options to area residents and businesses.  Gwinnett voters previously approved Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (SPLOST) referendums to improve local schools, parks, libraries and other infrastructure. Now they have the opportunity to even more significantly invest in their future through a March 2019 Transportation SPLOST special referendum.  Gwinnett County has reached many milestones with an even brighter future potentially ahead, but to maximize those successes and share the wealth with all levels of the local citizenry, a deeper and more tangible series of connections to the rest of the metro region are needed. A dedicated lane on Ronald Reagan Parkway or the Highway 120 corridor for high occupancy vehicles or bus rapid transit could easily improve and expedite county traffic east and west. Direct rail or light rail access from Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport would provide an explosive boost in convention and tourism business at the Gwinnett Convention Center, Infinite Energy Arena and the upcoming Revel development.  In his day, Button Gwinnett, British born and raised, first a modest merchant and later a plantation owner, heard the voices of those afraid of the future, but he also knew that America and its people could not prosper as a subordinate, under the yolk and thumb of a large and sometimes oppressive government. If Button Gwinnett was still around today, I'm pretty sure he would be leading the way to get on board this train. Go Gwinnett.
  • “Georgia and our people have been very kind to Sandra and me. I'm glad that together we were able to accomplish some things that hopefully make life a bit better here for all Georgians,' said Georgia's outgoing Governor Nathan Deal.
  • Americans are benevolently ignorant about Canada, while Canadians are malevolently well informed about the United States,' J. Bartlet Brebner, well known Canadian historian and author. As I crossed the mid-century mark a few anniversaries around the sun ago, I decided that I needed to make a higher priority of actually taking the trips and adventures on my bucket list, before the good lord decided to take me…and while the goin’ was still good.  So last Christmas, our small family made an incredible holiday trek to The Greenbrier, in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. The resort is too incredible to describe in a few sentences, and the time spent with my daughters and son-in-law, on Amtrak en-route and later at the hotel gave us a host of precious family holiday memories. I was greatly touched this year when my father started a new family tradition of sharing favorite Christmas memories, and that Christmas journey has already landed atop those lists.  But this year, both girls would be elsewhere with their mothers, so I wanted to plan something memorable, and singular…in that I was not likely to take this trip again later. I selected The Canadian, the flagship of Canada’s rail system, Train #1 traverses from Toronto to Vancouver, east to west, and Train #2 (my choice) the reverse from Vancouver to Toronto.  I actually prefer train travel in many ways, so I flew from Atlanta to Seattle, taking Amtrak from the under renovation King Street Station in downtown Seattle to Vancouver. On this leg of the trip I met an incredible woman, Ms. Loretta Young Phillips, 85 years young, on her way to spend the holidays with children and grand-children north of the border.  In Vancouver, I spent a lovely Christmas Eve getting to know the city, having only been previously to Vancouver Island and Victoria nearby. An enchanting Christmas market had at its center a three-story Christmas manger, much like a heirloom family holiday centerpiece back home, only this one contained a live three-piece music combo on its main level, which also made me feel more at home as I approached they were swinging to “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree,” originally recorded by Lithonia, Georgia’s own, little Miss Brenda Lee.  After the market and walk along the waterfront, back to the Marriott Pinnacle Vancouver for what turned out to be an incredible Christmas Eve dinner, and the best bowl of summer squash bisque I’ve ever tasted.  Christmas morning brought a return to Vancouver’s grand Pacific Central Rail Station, and off across the Rockies and British Columbia…the views were indescribable and majestic. The Via Rail staff were all incredibly professional, hospitable and accommodating, and I sensed even more so than usual during the holiday season. My accommodations were a comfortable, and compact, sleeper cabin for two, with a half-bath, and a communal shower just steps away. A glass-domed lounge car offered even more incredible 360 degree views as the beautiful vistas continually unfolded.  Our first stop to de-board was in the ski burg of Jasper, population 4,501, easily trebling during ski season. Nearing half our cabin departed here for the slopes on Boxing Day.  This was not my first trip visiting our northern neighbors, prior business ventures had well introduced me to Toronto, Montreal and Windsor . And I noted as always on this trip that Canada welcomes diversity, and Asians of many nations are among their largest and most visible minority population. Passengers on-board this train trek represented most every continent. I counted at least 10 languages which I overheard but could not speak. Yet smiles, nods, and holiday greetings were the universal language easily spoken by all.  Friends in Toronto have already given me good reason to return soon. This was perhaps the whitest Christmas and most snowfall I have also ever experienced, other than some Christmas ski trips to Park City and Steamboat Springs, yet unlike those, I was seldom out IN the snow and cold. And as I type these words, in the warm comfort of my cabin as I watch the beautiful scenery roll by, I’m accompanied by a hot mug of cider, as well as knowing that the warmth of the VIA Rail team and fellow passengers outside are all just a few steps away. It’s the only way to roll, Happy New Year, now back to being out and about.

News

  • Two men are accused to stealing more than $70,000 worth of musical instruments from the University of Louisville’s School of Music, WLKY reported. >> Read more trending news  Alphonso Monrew, 22, and Anthony Abrams, 52, were arrested Thursday, according to Jefferson County Jail records. Each were charged with two counts of third degree burglary and two counts of theft by unlawful taking, the television station reported. According to police, on several occasions the two men stole instruments, including a $10,000 guitar, from the university’s music school, WLKY reported. The thefts occurred over several weeks, the television station reported. All of the instruments have been recovered and will be returned to students, police said.
  • A Texas woman got an early start to celebrating her 105th birthday, joining more than 150 family members for a party at a San Antonio church, KSAT reported. >> Read more trending news  Minnie McRae, who turns 105 on Tuesday, was the guest of honor at Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church on Saturday, the television station reported. McRae’s nephew, Arturo Ayala, flew from Germany to attend the party for a woman who taught him how to dance by giving him lessons in her living room, KSAT reported.  Ayala said he believes he knows the secret to his aunt’s long life 'She's never shared it, but from my relationship with her, I see her always praying and ... always reading,' Ayala told the television station.  Ayala also said McRae was very spiritual and did work with Incarnate Word. 'She's a blessing and she's a miracle,' Ayala told KSAT.
  • There will be laughing, singing, and music swinging when singer Martha Reeves receives another honor in May. >> Read more trending news  Reeves, 77, the lead vocalist of 1960s group Martha and Vandellas, will be honored by the Alabama State Council on the Arts on May 22, AL.com reported. Reeves was the singer for the group’s hits, including “Dancing in the Streets,” “Heat Wave” and “Jimmy Mack.” Reeves, a native of Eufaula, will receive Alabama’s 2019 Distinguished Artist Award. The award recognizes “a professional artist who is considered a native or adopted Alabamian and who has earned significant national acclaim for their art over an extended period,' according to the council’s website. Other recipients of the award include Jim Nabors, Fannie Flagg and George Lindsey. Vandella moved to Detroit as a child and grew up singing in church, AL.com reported. Her gospel-influenced vocals were evident in the group’s pop and rhythm and blues songs, which gave the Vandellas a string of hits on the Motown label. Reeves was inducted with the group -- Rosalind Ashford-Holmes, Annette Sterling-Helton, Lois Reeves and Betty Kelly -- into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. “Martha and the Vandellas were the Supremes’ tougher, more grounded counterpart,” the Rock Hall website says. “With her cheeky, fervent vocals, Martha Reeves led the group in a string of dance anthems that are irresistible to this day.” Reeves was inducted into the Alabama Music Hall of Fame in 1995. 
  • A Florida deputy was arrested after an altercation at a Jacksonville nightclub, the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office reported. >> Read more trending news  According to the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office, Officer Rodney Bryant, a 5 1/2-year member of the department, was involved in a dispute Friday at Mascara's Gentlemen's Club with his girlfriend and her friend.  Bryant has been charged with three counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. He has been terminated from his position in the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office. According to deputies, the group left the club but the dispute continued in a vehicle. This was when Bryant allegedly pulled over, opened the trunk of his vehicle and pulled out a firearm.  Bryant allegedly pointed the gun at the two women, making threats, according to the Sheriff’s Office.  They were all pulled over long enough for the girlfriend's friend to make contact with her sister, who later arrived at the scene, according to the Sheriff’s Office. The girl's sister observed Bryant with the firearm making threats and that he pointed the firearm at her, according to the Sheriff’s Office.
  • A Marine killed in action during the Vietnam War nearly 50 years ago was honored in a memorial service Saturday, and a headstone and plaque were erected at his gravesite at a South Florida cemetery, the Sun-Sentinel reported. >> Read more trending news  Private First Class Gregory Carter was killed in action Oct. 12, 1969, in the Quang Ngai province of South Vietnam, according to according to a Vietnam military casualties database on Ancestry.com. He was remembered in a service attended by nearly 200 people Saturday at Sunset Memorial Gardens in Fort Lauderdale, the Sun-Sentinel reported. “It’s like he woke up to the world again,” Carter’s brother, Anthony Owens, told the newspaper. “His life is meaningful. It means something.” “No, I did not (expect this many people). It raised our spirits, big time.” Carter laid in an unmarked grave until the Vietnam Veterans of America discovered him while searching for photographs of Vietnam veterans to place on the black granite Wall of Faces in Washington, D.C., the Sun-Sentinel reported. Carter was drafted into the Marines on July 4, 1969, when he was 19, according to the Ancestry.com database. He already had a young son and a daughter was on the way, but Carter would never know either of them, the newspaper reported. The Vietnam Veterans of America worked with the city of Fort Lauderdale and others to get Carter’s grave marker, the Sun-Sentinel reported. The organization also secured a photograph from a baseball team photograph in the Dillard High School yearbook, the newspaper reported. Gregory Carter now lies with his mother, grandparents, three siblings and other relatives at Sunset Memorial Gardens. “If you die you’re just lost until somebody thinks about you again,” Anthony Owens told the Sun-Sentinel. “So his spirit is probably all around us right now. It’s a good thing. He’s doing good.”
  • The wife of former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio was bitten by a rattlesnake at their Arizona home Friday, the Arizona Republic reported. >> Read more trending news  Ava Arpaio was working on her computer in her office around 10 a.m. when the snake bit her on the left foot, Joe Arpaio told the newspaper. 'She's tough. If she can put up with me for 60 years, then she can handle a snake bite,' Joe Arpaio told the Republic. Joe Arpaio, 86, said the large rattlesnake was removed by fire crews. 'Must've been a Democrat,' the longtime Republican joked to the Republic. Ava Arpaio likely will be in a hospital for 'two or three' days, her husband told the newspaper. Arpaio served as sheriff of Maricopa County for 24 years until losing re-election to Democrat Paul Penzone in 2016. The 86-year-old lawman made national news for his Tent City Jail where inmates were housed in Korean War era army tents, KSAZ reported. >> President Trump pardons Joe Arpaio Joe Arpaio was convicted of a criminal charge in July 2017 for refusing to stop traffic patrols that targeted immigrants. He was pardoned a month later by President Donald Trump.