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  • Northgate High School and Canongate Elementary School in Coweta County were placed on lockdown after school officials said a person with a gun was seen nearby. According to Coweta County School, the school was notified by law enforcement officials that there was somebody walking down Fischer Road in Newnan with a gun Tuesday.  The road is adjacent to the school.  The schools were placed on Code Red Alert, but later downgraded to Code Yellow. Cannongate Elementary was also put on Code Yellow lockdown around 11:20 a.m. Both schools stayed in a Code Yellow lockdown as a precaution until they went home.   Dean Jackson with Coweta County Schools said parents were notified by email, text and letter.  Dean said that some parents came and checked their kids out of school.   The suspect has not yet been caught, officials said.  Northgate High School and Canongate Elementary School are continuing on heightened security at this time, as a precaution only, while law enforcement investigates an incident in northeastern Coweta. Northgate HS moved to a code yellow status at approximately 12:50 p.m.,— Coweta Schools (@CowetaSchools) May 22, 2018 NewsChopper 2 was over the scene. We're working to get updates for Channel 2 Action News starting at 4 p.m. TRENDING STORIES: Patient says she woke up from surgery in hotel room with sandwich in hand 'American Idol' reveals its 2 finalists are dating before announcing winner 2 victims of cougar attack identified, friends grieving death of avid cyclist  
  • Rain and a few storms could put a damper on your Memorial Day plans. Stay weather aware this week with in-depth coverage from Kirk Mellish.
  • A state known for cowboys and stunning mountain vistas is positioning itself as a leader in a new field of technology. Proponents say blockchain is the kick in the pants Wyoming needs to attract tech businesses and boost its economy. Blockchain is the networked ledgering technology behind cryptocurrencies including bitcoin. In March, Gov. Matt Mead signed four bills that arguably make the least-populated state friendlier to blockchain technology than any other. Dozens of companies with names like 'Block Chain Gang' and 'Crypto Cowboy' are now incorporating in Wyoming. But time will tell whether Wyoming's bet on blockchain pays off. So far, the vast majority of the businesses exist only as electronic paperwork.
  • Las Vegas casinos could watch tens of thousands of employees walk off the job for the first time in more than three decades after union members voted to authorize a strike at any time starting June 1, a move that could cripple the city's world-famous resorts. About 25,000 members of the Culinary Union who work at 34 different casino-resorts across the tourist destination cast ballots in two sessions Tuesday, showing the collective power of the largest labor organization in Nevada. The move hands union negotiators a huge bargaining chip as they work to solidify new five-year contracts. The union last voted for a strike in 2002 but reached a deal before employees walked out. The last strike, in 1984, spanned 67 days and cost the city and workers tens of millions of dollars. The latest strike would mean losing workers with roles critical to making a casino-hotel run: bartenders, housekeepers, cocktail and food servers, porters, bellmen, cooks and other kitchen workers. It would affect properties including Caesars Palace, Planet Hollywood, Bellagio, MGM Grand, Stratosphere, The D and El Cortez. It also could cause problems for fans heading to the city to watch the Vegas Golden Knights hockey team play in the Stanley Cup Final in early June, a rare feat for a team in its first year. 'I'm here to show the younger generations that this is the way we fight to maintain our jobs, job security, health benefits and to gain a pay raise,' Lewis Thomas, a utility porter at the Tropicana casino-hotel, said. 'This will be a wake-up call to let (the companies) know we are together, we are united, we are not separated.' The contracts of 50,000 unionized workers are set to expire at midnight May 31, and negotiations with individual casino-operating companies have not led to agreements for new terms. Union officials have said they want to increase wages, protect job security against the increasing use of technology at hotel-casinos, and strengthen language against sexual harassment. 'We've been in negotiations with the companies, and they are not giving the workers what they deserve according to the economy right now,' Geoconda Arguello-Kline, union secretary-treasurer, said after the first voting session. 'They are very successful. They have a lot of money.' MGM Resorts International and Caesars Entertainment operate more than half the properties that would be affected by a strike. MGM said it will keep meeting with the union. 'A vote such as this is an expected part of the process,' the company said in a statement after results were released. 'We are confident that we can resolve the outstanding contract issues and will come to an agreement that works for all sides.' Caesars released a statement late Tuesday saying it expects to reach an agreement with the union 'on or about June 1.' Union members enthusiastically gathered Tuesday at the Thomas and Mack Center at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. They high-fived, took selfies and carried signs urging people to vote. Banners outside said, 'Show up or give up, security strike vote' amid pro-union chants in English and Spanish. Some workers chanted, 'Hey, Caesars, look around, Vegas is a union town' and 'No contract, no peace.' Some employees stopped by in their casino-resort uniforms on their way to or from work, while others donned shirts emblazoned with 'Vegas Strong' and the union logo. Inside, union organizers verified people were eligible to vote, and workers dropped their paper ballots in numbered boxes. When casino workers across Las Vegas went on a strike in 1984, union members lost an estimated $75 million in wages and benefits and the city lost a similar amount in tourism revenue. Millions more were lost in gambling income. Don Leadbeter, a bellman at the MGM Grand, has worked at Las Vegas casino-hotels for more than four decades and participated in previous strike votes. He said workers this time want to protect their job security and ensure that employers provide training as they adopt more workplace technology. He said bartenders are already using automated systems that could potentially eliminate their jobs, and guests are now able to check in and out of resorts without interacting with front-desk personnel, putting those jobs at risk, too. 'I want the companies to open up their eyes and think what's going to happen if we go on a strike,' Leadbeter said. 'That's a lot of business that's going to go down.' ___ Follow Regina Garcia Cano on Twitter at https://twitter.com/reginagarciakNO
  • When twin sisters Morgan and Regan McVey graduate Thursday from Talawanda High School in Oxford, Ohio, it will actually be their second commencement ceremony. Earlier this year, the school provided a special moment for the seniors and their mother, who was diagnosed with cancer last fall. As the school year moved into its second semester, it was evident their mother, Carey McVey, would not live to see the graduation ceremony. >> WATCH: Texas teen walks for first time in months, stuns prom date in heartwarming viral video “Mr. (Tom) York and others arranged to give us a mini graduation ceremony,” Regan said of the school’s principal. “We had our caps and gowns and got our actual diplomas. Mom got to see them.” “That was one thing she wanted to see,” Morgan added. Their mother died in February. She was 43 years old, according to her obituary. The diplomas were on a table at their home until last week when they were returned to the school so the seniors could receive them again at Thursday’s ceremony. >> Read more trending news  The gesture, the twins said, reinforced their decision to attend the Oxford school. The McVey twins were unknown to their classmates when they started at Talawanda High School four years ago after finishing the eighth grade at Queen of Peace School. “We had to make new friends here. We did not know anyone,” Morgan McVey said. The high school choice took some discussion between the sisters. “Regan wanted to go to Talawanda. I wanted to go to Badin,” Morgan said. Now, they both said they are happy with their decision. “The school really supported us through it all,” Morgan said, referring to her mother’s cancer diagnosis and her death. >> On Journal-News.com: Oxford community advocate ‘lived life to the fullest’ While the family tragedy will forever be linked to their senior year of high school, they said they did not let it affect their personalities or interactions with others, although classmates were often surprised by that. “We are always happy. We joke around a lot. We talk a lot. People forget. Then they say, ‘Your mother… .’ It’s definitely been an experience,” Regan said. Both young women have been cheerleaders all four years of high school and both have been involved in dance all four years, with Regan on homecoming court her junior year and prom court this spring. Both, also found satisfaction in passing on their own love of dance by teaching it to younger children at area dance studios. The fact they are twins earned them a memorable experience outside of school, too. As their senior year dawned, they appeared in a television commercial promoting the Big Ten conference. The theme of the promo was twins and they auditioned last spring in Chicago, which led to a two-day video shoot, also in Chicago. >> On Journal-News.com: New gateways to welcome Miami U., Oxford visitors The commercial appeared on the Big Ten Network and ESPN as well as other television channels. For Morgan, it was a strange feeling the first time she saw it aired. “I did not know it was out. I was in bed with my television on and saw my face. It just popped up,” she said. They said they are thinking about using it as a stepping stone to doing some modeling, but they know that profession is a difficult one to get into and then only lasts a certain time. They are planning a careful route of going to college to train for teaching professions and then see what happens. Regan McVey is looking at early childhood education while Morgan is opting for a degree in integrated language arts for grades 7-12. They plan to attend Miami University Hamilton in the fall to start their college careers. >> On Journal-News.com: Hall of Famer Huismann approved as Talawanda’s head girls hoop coach Morgan said no one in their family teaches, but she hopes to emulate some of the good teachers she has had at Talawanda. Regan opts for younger students after her work with young dancers. “I like little kids. I think it’s interesting to teach them when they are young,” she said. The sisters are among 21 members of the graduating class recognized with the President’s Award for Educational Achievement. The twins agree high school at Talawanda has been a great experience. Their mother and their father, Shane, were both Talawanda High School graduates.
  • Wyoming could allow grizzly bear hunting for the first time in decades when state officials vote Wednesday whether to allow as many as 22 grizzlies to be killed this fall outside Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks. Environmental groups including the Sierra Club and Native American tribes say the hunt would undermine decades of work to restore grizzlies in the Yellowstone ecosystem. About 700 grizzlies now inhabit the region including parts of Idaho and Montana, up from 136 in 1975 when they were listed as a threatened species. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed federal protections for grizzlies in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem in 2017 and Wyoming officials say relatively few would be hunted. 'This came after a lot of discussions with the public about what they wanted to do in terms of grizzly bear management. We heard from the people of Wyoming, they were supportive of this. It's pretty clear the science supports this,' said Wyoming Game and Fish Department spokesman Renny MacKay. The last time grizzly hunting was allowed in Wyoming was 1974. Montana has not yet allowed grizzly hunting. Idaho will allow one grizzly to be hunted this fall. Hunting has been ongoing in Alaska where grizzlies and their minimally differentiated brown bear and Kodiak bear relatives are common. Under the proposed rules before the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission, hunting would begin Sept. 1 in the mountains and basins populated by relatively few grizzlies farthest from Yellowstone and Grand Teton. Hunting in a zone closer to the parks would begin Sept. 15 and end in all areas by Nov. 15. As many as 12 grizzlies could be killed in the zone farther from the parks. Closer in, the limit is 10 and hunting would be stopped once 10 males or one female are killed, whichever happens first. No more than one grizzly hunter at a time would be allowed in the closer-in zone to help ensure nobody accidentally exceeded the quota. If the hunt goes forward and demand for licenses is high, hunters might wait years for their chance. A computer program would randomly draw names of license applicants who would then pay $600 for a resident grizzly license and $6,000 if they live elsewhere. Names would be drawn until 10 hunters have paid for their licenses and certified they've taken a firearms safety course. Each license would be valid for a 10-day window of opportunity. If approved, hunting could account for a sizeable portion of grizzly deaths in the region this year but not likely the biggest. Of the 56 known and suspected deaths of Yellowstone grizzlies in 2017, 40 were caused by people including 19 killed by elk hunters and others in self-defense. ___ Follow Mead Gruver at https://twitter.com/meadgruver