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Jamie Dupree's Washington Insider

    With the United States set to slap a new 10 percent tariff on billions of dollars in Chinese goods coming into the U.S. on September 1, the Chinese government officially retaliated on Friday, announcing its own new tariffs on American products, and denouncing President Donald Trump's get-tough actions on trade. 'The US measures have led to the continuous escalation of Sino-US economic and trade frictions, which have greatly harmed the interests of China, the United States and other countries,' the Chinese Minstry of Finance announced. The documents released by China today apply to over 5,000 categories of items imported from the United States, covering everything from diapers to pipes and cigarette holders, to a range of agricultural products like barley, wheat, oats, corn, sorghum, soybeans, peanuts, cotton, covering about $75 billion in U.S. goods. Much like a 122 page list of targeted items put out by the United States earlier this month, China issued over 100 pages of products which would face new import duties. The reaction from Congress and business groups was negative. 'This trade war is not holding China accountable,' said Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA). 'It's hurting farmers and small business owners all over the country who are just trying to earn a living.' “The fact of the matter is that nobody wins a trade war, and the continued tit-for-tat escalation between the U.S. and China is putting significant strain on the U.S. economy, raising costs, undermining investment, and roiling markets,” the U.S. Chamber of Commerce said in a statement. As for President Trump, he has not wavered in his public statements about taking on china, tariff for tariff, as one of his Friday tweets caused some shock on  the markets. “Our great American companies are hereby ordered to immediately start looking for an alternative to China,” the President wrote. “Here’s the thing: Somebody had to take on what China was doing to the United States economically,” the President told reporters this week. “We’re winning big. I took it on. And it should have been done by previous Presidents,” he added. And on Twitter Friday morning, the President expressed no concerns about the Chinese response. Asked by reporters earlier this week about the trade war with China, Mr. Trump said he was the only President who had decided to actually confront Beijing. “I am the chosen one,” the President said, as he looked skyward.
  • Before the leaders of the G7 nations had even boarded their flights for the meeting in Biarritz, France, President Donald Trump was already stirring the political pot associated with the meeting of western allies, making it clear he wants to see Russia return to the group, after being exiled in 2014 over the seizure of the Crimea from Ukraine. 'We spend a lot of time talking about Russia at those meetings,' the President told reporters this week. 'And they're not there. I think it would be a good thing if Russia were there so we can speak directly.' Russia was a member of what was then known as the 'Group of Eight' - but Moscow was booted out in 2014 after Russia seized Crimea from Ukraine. 'President Obama thought it wasn't a good thing to have Russia in,' Mr. Trump said to reporters. 'But I think it's much more appropriate to have Russia in.' But there seems to be little chance of that happening in the current political environment in Europe, especially with Russian backed forces fighting in Ukraine. During a meeting with Vladimir Putin earlier this week, French President Emmanuel Macron made clear his opposition to such a move proposed by President Trump, arguing that Russia must first address Crimea - and the ongoing proxy war pushed by Russian backed forces inside Ukraine - before any such change is made. 'In effect, the resolution of this conflict is a magic wand that will open the door for Russia to return to the G7 club,' Macron said . With the two leaders seated before reporters, Macron labeled the Ukraine situation an 'irritant' in Russian relations with the West. 'It is obvious that the return to the G8 format and normal relations with the EU requires the settlement of the Ukrainian crisis,' Macron added. Last year, the 2018 meeting of world leaders from the United States, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom, ended in odd fashion, when President Trump suddenly left the meeting early, refusing to endorse a joint communique by the leaders. In order to avoid a dispute along those lines in 2019, Macron has decided there will not be a joint communique issued by the G-7. It will be the first time since the meetings began in the 1970's that the group will not issue a statement of joint goals. White House officials previewing the President's trip said much of his focus at the G-7 will be on free, fair and reciprocal trade, as he has often criticized Canada and the European Union of unfair trade barriers to U.S. exports.
  • Back in their home districts on an extended summer break, the drip-drip sound Democrats hear is not coming from the watering the plants, but rather from the halls of the Congress, where more and more Democratic members of the House are publicly announcing their support for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. A flurry of announcements were made on Thursday, as a series of Democrats said they would back an impeachment inquiry by the House Judiciary Committee, bringing the total number to 135 - more than a majority of Democrats in the House. 'I cannot ignore the call to defend our institutions, to safeguard our democratic norms, and to stand up for our democracy,' said Rep. Mark Takano (D-CA) on Thursday afternoon. A few hours earlier, Rep. William Keating of Massachusetts told his Bay State constituents that the Mueller Report left too many unanswered questions about the President, accusing the White House of stonewalling legitimate Congressional oversight. 'No person in America is above the law, including the President of the United States,' said Rep. Lauren Underwood, a freshman Democrat from Illinois. 'I support moving forward with an impeachment inquiry, which will continue to uncover the facts for the American people and hold this president accountable,' said Rep. Ben Ray Lujan (D-NM), the fourth ranking Democrat in the House.  'This is not a position I’ve reached lightly,' Lujan said earlier this week. When Democrats left town four weeks ago for their six week summer break, the number of lawmakers endorsing the start of an impeachment idea was nowhere near 100. But it's been creeping up on almost a daily basis - and more lawmakers seem likely to join in the weeks ahead.
  • Unlikely to qualify for the next debate among Democratic candidates for the White House, Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington State told supporters in an email on Wednesday night that he was dropping his bid for the Democratic Party's nomination for President, further thinning the field with just over five months until the first vote is cast. 'I want to share a tough decision with you,' Inslee said to supporters, as he cited his top priority of climate change. 'But I've concluded that my role in that effort will not be as a candidate to be the next president of the United States,' Inslee added. Earlier in the week, Inslee touted that his campaign had hit 130,000 donors - one of the qualifying requirements for the next Democratic debate in Houston. But Inslee had no chance to register at 2 percent or higher in four different polls, leaving him on the sidelines - and off the debate stage. 'As a result, I don't believe we can compete for the attention and exposure needed to have a reasonable shot at the nomination,' Inslee said. Inslee had tried hard to be the loudest voice in the party on climate change, bringing it up in both debates, and doing numerous events on the subject. But the former Congressman, and current Governor, was never able to break out of the lower tier of Democratic candidates. “I want to once again thank everyone who helped in this effort. We have so much to be proud of,” Inslee wrote to his backers.  “Make no mistake, we also have a lot more work to do.” On MSNBC Wednesday night, Inslee said it was clear this was the right choice. “I'm not going to be carrying the ball,” Inslee said in an interview.  “I'm not going to be the President, so I'm withdrawing tonight.”
  • A day after embracing the idea of a possible payroll tax cut to get more money in the hands of consumers and avoid any signs of an economic downturn, President Donald Trump reversed course on  Wednesday and said he would not pursue tax cuts, instead turning up the pressure on the Federal Reserve to cut interest rates in order to spur new economic growth. 'I'm not looking at a tax cut now, we don't need it - we have a strong economy,' the President told reporters at the White House on Wednesday before leaving for events in Kentucky. Mr. Trump specifically said he would not entertain the idea right now of indexing capital gains taxes - saying that skews to the benefit of more wealthy Americans - and would not be pressing for a payroll tax cut, something President Obama did in 2011 and 2012 as a way to help with growth. With the idea of tax cuts evidently off the table, the President instead tried to shift the burden of any economic difficulties onto the Federal Reserve, again using his bully pulpit to press the Fed to lower interest rates, complaining that interest rate hikes in 2017 and 2018 had held back on growth. 'He raised interest rates too fast, too furious,' Mr. Trump said of Federal Reserve Chair Jay Powell. “The Federal Reserve has let us down,” the President added. New notes released by the Fed on Wednesday afternoon showed members were divided on the best course for interest rates - with some wanting larger cuts as a way to spur economic growth, and insulate the U.S. from the threat of any slowdown. Some GOP lawmakers have urged the President to push for a new round of tax cuts, worried that the billions being collected in new tariffs levied by Mr. Trump have offset the benefits of Mr. Trump's 2017 tax cut package.
  • Hours after scrapping a planned state visit to Denmark in early September because Danish leaders refused to consider plans to have the United States buy the island of Greenland, President Donald Trump on Wednesday called the statements of the Prime Minister of Denmark 'nasty,' saying she had offended all Americans. 'I thought it was not a nice statement, the way she blew me off, because she's blowing off the United States,' the President said. 'She's not talking to me, she's talking to the United States of America,' Mr. Trump told reporters on the South Lawn of the White House. 'You don't talk to the United States that way,' as the President repeatedly threw transatlantic elbows at Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen. “I thought that the Prime Minister's statement that it (the sale of Greenland) was an absurd idea, was nasty,' Mr. Trump added. In Denmark, the Prime Minister did not return the President's verbal jabs, as she told reporters the visit would have been an opportunity to further broaden Danish relations with the U.S. Government. 'It was an opportunity I think to celebrate Denmark's close relationship with the U.S.,' Frederiksen said. The Queen of Denmark had invited the President and First Lady for a two day state visit in early September.
  • President Donald Trump's assertion that his 25 percent tariff on imported steel has helped to reinvigorate and rescue the American steel industry took a hit this week, as U.S. Steel told the state of Michigan that the company was laying off workers at one of its mills, with more layoffs envisioned after the end of September. But those moves by U.S. Steel paint a starkly different message from what the President has been saying. 'Those steel mills - U.S. Steel and all of them, all of them - they're expanding all over the place,' the President said last week during a visit to Pennsylvania. But in papers filed with the state of Michigan by U.S. Steel, a different picture emerges. 'The purpose of this letter is to notify you of layoffs,' U.S. Steel wrote to the Michigan Workforce Development Agency. The letter detailed the layoff of 27 part-time workers on July 21, with another 23 layoffs on August 4, with more layoffs likely to 'occur before the end of September.' 'It is anticipated that further layoffs are likely to commence on September 30, 2019 and may continue periodically thereafter based on market conditions,' the U.S. Steel communique states. Last week during a stop outside Pittsburgh, President Trump said the steel business was going downhill before his tariffs. 'Your business was dead,' Mr. Trump said bluntly. 'I don't want to be overly crude. Your business was dead.' But U.S. Steel has seen its stock price drop by over half, as the price of steel has dropped as well. 'A week ago, President Trump said his tariffs — one of the largest middle class tax hikes in history — saved the steel industry,' said 2020 Democratic Presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke. In June, U.S. Steel said it would idle one blast furnace in Michigan, and one in Gary, Indiana, citing falling steel prices and sluggish sales. 'Our economy is doing fantastically,' President Trump said on Tuesday in the Oval Office - but maybe not for those getting pink slips in the steel industry.
  • With the Prime Minister of Denmark making it clear that she was not interested in selling Greenland to the United States, labeling the idea 'absurd,' President Donald Trump said Tuesday night that he would cancel his scheduled visit to the NATO ally in early September. 'Denmark is a very special country with incredible people, but based on Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen’s comments, that she would have no interest in discussing the purchase of Greenland, I will be postponing our meeting,' the President tweeted on Tuesday evening. In interviews this week, Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen had made clear that Greenland was not for sale, even as she welcomed the idea of closer relations between Denmark and the United States. But that wasn't enough for President Trump. On Sunday, President Trump had downplayed the issue as he returned to the White House. 'It’s not number one on the burner, I can tell you that,' the President told reporters when asked about the idea of buying Greenland. The decision obviously came as a surprise to U.S. diplomats in Denmark, as the U.S. Ambassador had put out a tweet a few hours earlier about the President's scheduled state visit. The President and First Lady had been invited by the Queen of Denmark earlier this summer for a two day state visit. Democrats mocked the President for canceling his stop in Denmark. “Embarrassing,” said Rep. Jackie Speier (D-CA). 'What a shame when Greenland could be covered with sand traps, water holes and lots of beautiful putting greens,' said Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-VA), referring to the President's golfing.
  • Pushing back against questions about the strength of the U.S. economy, President Donald Trump on Tuesday said the White House is looking at the possibility of tax cuts - including cutting payroll taxes for working Americans - as a way to funnel more money to consumers, and spur new growth. 'Payroll tax is something that we think about, and a lot of people would like to see that,' the President told reporters in the Oval Office, a day after some officials had said it was not an option. But while the President indicated his support for tax relief, he also once more pointed the finger at the Federal Reserve, again jawboning the Fed for another interest rate cut. 'And if they would do a meaningful cut - because they raised too fast - you would see growth like you've never seen in this country,' Mr. Trump said, in yet another verbal jab at Jay Powell, the head of the Federal Reserve. Asked about the ongoing trade fight with China, the President acknowledged that there could be short term economic pain for some U.S businesses - but he said it's a battle which cannot be delayed any longer. 'Whether it's good or bad short term is irrelevant,' Mr. Trump said. 'We have to solve the problem with China.' 'You should be happy that I'm fighting this battle,' the President told reporters, as he said too many past Presidents had taken the easy way out by not confronting Beijing over unfair trade practices. The President said he still believes the U.S. is in a strong negotiating position, as a new 10 percent tariff will go into effect on September 1 against an array of imports. Mr. Trump last week though delayed some of those new tariffs on certain electronics like cell phones and video games, after being warned the import duties could cause lower holiday sales.
  • With just over a week left to meet the requirements set for a mid-September debate in Houston, ten Democratic candidates have already qualified for the ABC News-Univision event, with two more hopefuls on the cusp of being eligible, raising the chance that Democrats will have to hold a two night debate on September 12-13. The latest to qualify was Julian Castro, as the former Obama Administration official now has campaign donations from more than 130,000 people, along with four qualifying polls. Along with Castro, the other Democrats who have qualified are: Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris, Pete Buttigieg, Cory Booker, Beto O'Rourke, Amy Klobuchar, and Andrew Yang. Several other Democrats have met the donor requirement, including Tulsi Gabbard, Tom Steyer, Marianne Williamson, and Jay Inslee - but they still need four polls where they have 2 percent. The closest at this point is Steyer, who needs just one more poll; Gabbard needs two more qualifying polls. If Steyer and/or Gabbard were to qualify by August 28, that would mean a debate field of more than ten candidates, which would then likely bring about a two night debate schedule. Those unlikely to make the debate stage next month include Kirsten Gillibrand, Michael Bennet, Steve Bullock, Tim Ryan, John Delaney, and Bill de Blasio. Based on polls, Inslee and Williamson also may not be included in Houston. The first two Democratic debates featured 20 candidates, divided over two nights.

News

  • The nation's first death possibly linked to vaping has been confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Illinois Department of Public Health says an adult person who recently vaped died after being hospitalized with 'severe respiratory illness.' The agency didn't give any other information about the patient, including a name or where the person lived. The CDC says there are currently 193 potential cases in 22 states, including Georgia. Patients reported similar symptoms – shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and vomiting in some cases – and some were admitted to the intensive care unit.
  • An 8-year-old boy was bitten on the head Wednesday night by a mountain lion, Colorado wildlife officials said. >> Read more trending news The boy was jumping on a trampoline with his brother around 7:30 p.m. when a friend called to him from a nearby house, Colorado Parks and Wildlife said in a release. When the boy ran to visit the friend, he was attacked by the mountain lion. “The kid was running, and it probably triggered the lion’s natural response to a prey animal running,” Mark Lamb, wildlife manager, said in a release. “We all hope that the child will be alright, and you just hate to see this occur.' The boy’s brother ran inside and told their father something was wrong. The father came out, found the animal on top of his son and scared off the mountain lion.  “He did what a father would do, run out and protect his son knowing that he was in trouble,” Jason Clay, parks spokesman, told KCNC. “The father saved his son’s life.” The boy was taken to a hospital, where he was in serious but stable condition, KCNC reported.  Because the animal attacked a human, it must be euthanized, wildlife officials said. They set traps and used dogs to try and track the mountain lion.  On Thursday, a homeowner realized one of his goats was missing, saw two mountain lions and called wildlife officials. Officers were already in the area, which was about a mile from where the boy was attacked. They captured and euthanized the animals, which were about 12 months old and 65 pounds. A necropsy will be conducted to determine if they are the same lions involved in the boy’s attack. “That is how we would be able to confirm with absolute certainty that we got the mountain lion from the attack,” wildlife officials said. Because the mountain lions were feeding on livestock, they can be euthanized. If a mountain lion is captured alive in a trap, it will be kept alive until DNA samples are tested. If the results are negative, the lion will be relocated, officials said.  Officials are still monitoring mountain lion activity in the area but do not have plans to actively search for them. Mountain lions have attacked humans 22 times since 1990, with three attacks coming this year, officials said. A trail runner was attacked Feb. 4 and there was another attack Aug. 10. The last year there had been a mountain lion attack was 2016. The last time there were three attacks in a year was 1998. “We don’t want people to panic, they are very aware of all the wildlife that lives around them, but the proper precautions need to be taken,” Lamb said in a statement. “There are obligations that people must be committed to for living responsibly with wildlife.” Three more mountain lions were seen on the property where the goats went missing Friday, but no more goats have gone missing since.
  • According to many polls, Americans – especially those who say they are Democrats -- are not that fond of the Electoral College. Neither are many of the Democratic candidates for president. >> Read more trending news  With just over 14 months until the 2020 presidential election, a movement to change the way electoral votes are awarded and who will be elected president has gained some steam. The National Popular Vote Compact (NPV), which has its roots in the most contested presidential election in U.S. history, sets in state law a policy that awards all a state’s electoral votes to the candidate who wins the national popular vote. Under the Electoral College system used today, 48 states have a “winner-take-all” system that awards all the state’s electoral votes to the person who gets a majority of votes in that state. The Electoral College does not take into consideration that national popular vote. Sixteen states, along with the District of Columbia, have passed the NPV agreement. They are California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon and Rhode Island. While legislation has been passed in the 16 states and the District of Columbia, the agreement would not go into effect until states with a collective 270 electoral votes — the number needed to win the presidency — agree to join. Currently, the District of Columbia and the 16 states in the agreement hold a combined total of 196 electoral votes, meaning the pact would need enough new state members to get 74 electoral votes.Supporters say the system would give the person who got the most votes country-wide the presidency he or she deserves. Opponents say states would be forced to hand over electoral votes to a candidate who did not win that state. For instance, in the 2016 election, a state such as Florida, in which President Donald Trump earned more votes, would have had to pledge its 29 electoral votes to Trump’s opponent, Hillary Clinton, who won the national popular vote in the 2016 election. The Electoral College of today was established by the Twelfth Amendment to the Constitution which replaced the method for electing the president and vice president provided in Article II, Section 1, Clause 3. Under the system, when voters cast a ballot for president, they are actually choosing members of the Electoral College, called electors, who are pledged to that presidential candidate. Following the election for president, electors then meet to choose the president. Electors almost always vote for their state’s popular vote winner, and some states have laws requiring them to do so. However, electors are not bound by federal law to vote for a specific candidate – for instance, the one who won the popular vote in their state. In 29 states and the District of Columbia, electors are bound by state law or by a pledge they sign to vote for the candidate who won the popular vote of the state they represent. Five men have won the presidency in the Electoral College while not winning the country’s popular vote: John Quincy Adams in 1824, Rutherford B. Hayes in 1876, Benjamin Harrison in 1888, George W. Bush in 2000 and Donald Trump in 2016. The National Popular Vote campaign goes back to Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore's loss to Bush in 2000, according to The Associated Press. Gore won the popular vote but lost the election over a vote count in Florida.
  • Fans of all things Disney are in Anaheim for the D23 Expo. And news of future development for the properties at the Disney Parks around the world has already started being released. Inside the Disney Parks 'Imagining Tomorrow, Today' Pavilion at the 2019 D23 Expo visitors will be able to see what is coming next to the Disney Parks around the world. While there are a lot of cool things to share, in this post we are going to focus on the upcoming additions coming to Walt Disney World! There is an all-new Star Wars vacation experience coming to Walt Disney World!  >> Read more trending news  The Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser will be a new, first-of-its-kind vacation experience where guests will check in for a two-night adventure aboard a glamorous starship called the Halcyon.  Once onboard, guests will interact with characters and become active participants in stories that unfold around them on their galactic journey.  Also in the pavilion is a model of the multi-year transformation of Epcot complete with new experiences, 'that will make the park more Disney, more family, more timeless, and more relevant.' The reinvention of Epcot will include several new additions, and the first one we learned about was a new attraction called Journey of Water which is inspired by 'Moana.' This first-ever attraction based on the Walt Disney Animation Studios film, 'Moana,' will let guests interact with magical, living water in a beautiful and inspiring setting. And this October, guests will be able to visualize all the exciting plans for Epcot at a new experience center in the Odyssey Events Pavilion called Walt Disney Imagineering presents the Epcot Experience. Inside this first-of-its-kind offering within a Disney park, guests will discover engaging and interactive exhibits that allow you to step inside excitement to see some never-before-revealed details driving the future of Epcot during this unprecedented period of transformation. The Disney Parks pavilion also features other upcoming Walt Disney World attractions including TRON Lightcycle Run coming to Magic Kingdom Park as well as Mickey & Minnie's Runaway Railway coming to Disney's Hollywood Studios. On Sunday, August 25, we'll find out more details on these and other announcements during the Disney Parks, Experiences, and Products presentation at D23 Expo 2019!
  • Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has undergone radiation therapy to treat a malignant tumor discovered during routine blood tests in early July, according to a statement from the court. >> Read more trending news  Ginsburg, 86, began a three-week course of radiation therapy Aug. 5 at New York's Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. 'The Justice tolerated treatment well,' Supreme Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said in a statement. 'She cancelled her annual summer visit to Santa Fe, but has otherwise maintained an active schedule.' Arberg said doctors noted an abnormality during a routine blood test in early July and that a subsequent biopsy on July 31 confirmed a 'localized malignant tumor' on her pancreas. After Ginsburg underwent treatment, Arberg said, 'There is no evidence of disease elsewhere in the body.' 'Justice Ginsburg will continue to have periodic blood tests and scans,' she said. 'No further treatment is needed at this time.' In January, Ginsburg missed arguments in the Supreme Court for the first time since joining the court in 1993 while recovering from surgery to remove cancerous growths from her left lung. She previously underwent surgery for colorectal cancer in 1999 and pancreatic cancer in 2009, according to the Associated Press. Ginsburg is the eldest person serving on the Supreme Court and leads its liberal wing.
  • A service is set for next week for the three members of a prominent Atlanta family killed in an apparent double murder-suicide.  Marsha Edwards, 58, and her two children, 24-year-old Christopher Edwards II and 20-year-old Erin Edwards, will be remembered during a memorial Wednesday in southwest Atlanta, according to a spokesman for the family.  The service is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. at Cascade United Methodist Church, which is at 3144 Cascade Road.  Investigators believe Marsha, the former wife of surgeon and civic leader Christoper Edwards, shot and killed the couple’s children before turning the gun on herself. Their bodies were found by police Wednesday inside her upscale Vinings townhouse after officers were asked to perform a wellness check. RELATED: Ex-wife of Atlanta Housing chairman killed 2 children, herself, police say Lots of questions remained unanswered Friday. Among them: • Who requested the wellness check? • When did the shootings take place? • What kind of gun was used? • Who is the registered owner of the gun? • What evidence prompted authorities to classify the investigation as a double murder-suicide? It could be weeks before autopsy and toxicology results shed light on those and other questions. “Dr. Edwards, his extended family and friends are in a state of grief and shock, and privacy of the family is paramount as arrangements are being made,” spokesman Jeff Dickerson said Thursday in an emailed statement. A longtime fixture in the Atlanta medical community, Edwards serves on the board of trustees of the Morehouse School of Medicine and was formerly on the board of Grady Memorial Hospital. He is the chairman of the Atlanta Housing Authority board. As news of the deaths spread, condolences poured in from those who knew the family and strangers touched by the tragedy. Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and her husband were among the mourners.  Erin Edwards, a Boston University student, was an intern in the mayor’s communications office last summer. Christopher Edwards II joined the Atlanta film and entertainment office in 2018 as a digital content manager.  Both were Woodward Academy graduates. They were “promising young adults and budding NABJ media professionals,” said Sarah Glover, the former president of the National Association of Black Journalists. Glover said on Twitter she met the siblings at a conference in 2017.  Their mother, a medical equipment provider, was also a member of the organization, which advocates for and supports black journalists.  AJC.com has reached out to Cobb police for additional information about the deaths.  — Please return to AJC.com for updates.