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Pure Cain Perspective

Topics: Socialists are losing primaries
Posted: August 14, 2018

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Pure Cain Perspective

Topics: The narrow lens of the media
Posted: August 13, 2018

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Herman Thanks You for Giving to the 2017 Care-a-Thon

Topics: A big thank you for all who gave!
Posted: July 31, 2017

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The Latest from the Herman Cain Show
Catch the Herman Cain Show at its new time! The Herman Cain Show is now one hour on News 95.5 & AM 750 WSB. Listen Monday - Friday from 11:00 a.m. - noon, everyday. Then listen online, anytime, at www.HermanCain.com 
About Herman Cain
HERMAN'S YOUTH AND THE AMERICAN DREAM  Herman Cain grew up in Atlanta, Georgia with loving parents and little else. His father worked three jobs—as a janitor, a barber and a chauffeur—and his mother was a domestic worker. Even though these jobs required hard work and little glamour, his parents knew this life was better than the dirt farms upon which they grew up. They also knew that this hard work was the key to achieving their American Dreams.  Herman’s parents had two dreams. First, they wanted to own their own house. Secondly, they wanted both of their children to graduate from college. During the segregation era in the Deep South, these aspirations might have seemed lofty, but they knew that if they kept their faith in God, faith in themselves and faith in the greatest country on the Earth, they could achieve.  The first dream was realized in a modest brick house on Albert Street in Atlanta, Georgia. After years of saving from his many jobs, Herman’s father surprised the whole family, even his wife, by purchasing a home for their family. The second dream was realized when Herman graduated from Morehouse College with a degree in mathematics in 1967. His brother, Thurman, would go on to graduate from Morris Brown College.  Inspired by the work ethic and character of his parents, Herman continued his education by earning his Master’s degree in computer science from Purdue University while working full-time developing fire control systems for ships and fighter planes for the Department of the Navy. Though Herman enjoyed using his talents as a civilian employee for the Navy, he gravitated towards the culture of business.  BUSINESS MAN, ADVOCATE, PATRIOT  HERMAN'S CORPORATE SUCCESSES  Herman returned to his home of Atlanta to begin working as a computer systems analyst for the Coca-Cola Company. After considerable success at Coca-Cola, he moved to the Pillsbury Company. Within a short period of time, Herman rose to position of Vice President. Although the comforts of a corner office on the 31st floor of a majestic corporate building seemed satisfying, Herman knew that he needed a challenge.  He became the regional vice president of Pillsbury’s Burger King division. This meant starting from the “ground up,” dodging grease fires and broiling hamburgers. Herman was assigned to lead a low performing region of 450 of their restaurants. Within three years, it became the best performing region in the company.  Energized by overcoming the many obstacles of his job at Burger King, Herman took on the biggest challenge of his career. He accepted the call to become the President and CEO of Godfather’s Pizza, a company that was teetering on the edge of bankruptcy. In just 14 months, Herman returned Godfather’s to profitability and he led his management team to a buyout of the company.  His professional successes garnered the respect and admiration of industry peers who named him the President of the National Restaurant Association. Under Herman’s administration, the group grew significantly and began to lobby for the interests of America’s restaurateurs and small business owners.  In 1994, as head of the National Restaurant Association, he had the opportunity to speak with President Clinton during a nationally televised town hall meeting. Here, Herman challenged the President regarding the impact on businesses if his health care overhaul proposal were passed. President Clinton attempted to assure him and the millions of viewers watching at home that his legislation would not harm American business owners and their employees.  Herman was skeptical. “Quite honestly Mr. President, your calculations are incorrect,” he said. “In the competitive marketplace, it simply doesn’t work that way.” His words echoed across America, and Newsweek named Herman Cain the primary saboteur of Hillarycare.  Through these and other appearances on behalf of the National Restaurant Association, Herman began working with business leaders across all sectors of the American economy. This led to his acceptance of a position on the Board of Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, and he was subsequently elected their chairman. In this role, he analyzed economic conditions in the region and notified the Federal Reserve of how their policies should respond.  After coming in an impressive 2nd in his 2004 bid for the United States Senate in Georgia, Herman soon became the host of his own radio talk show, “The Herman Cain Show,” on Atlanta’s WSB 95.5 FM/AM 750.  Today, as a former Republican candidate for the Presidency, and as the CEO of the newly formed Cain’s Solutions Revolution, he is still a very active and outspoken voice for conservative issues. He serves as a regular contributor on several broadcast networks and as a keynote speaker at conferences and events around the nation. Earlier this year, Mr. Cain began the next phase of his life’s journey, taking over for nationally syndicated radio talk show host, Neal Boortz, upon his retirement.  Herman has established the all-new “Cain Media Division” of THE New Voice, Inc. which is sure to provide yet another set of twists and turns to an already colorful career.  Despite the many professional commitments of his life, Herman continues to enjoy most the time spent with family and friends. As his children got married and had their own children, he knew that he had an extraordinary obligation to do what he could to make this a safe and prosperous nation for them. The paramount joys in his life are his wife, Gloria, his children and his four grandchildren, the youngest of which was born on New Year’s Day 2012.   Newly launched: HermanCain.com
Cain 24/7

News

  • A 28-year-old man was found shot to death inside a car in northwest Atlanta. According to authorities, the body of the 28-year-old was found with multiple gun shot wounds at 6:45 p.m. on Hollywood Road NW. The investigation continues. TRENDING STORIES: Megachurch pastor defends $200K Lamborghini purchase for wife Officials search property of missing Colorado mom's fiance; reward up to $25K Atlanta police chief says Atlantic Station hindered murder investigation
  • Thieves in St. Louis may have reached a milestone -- stealing an entire house, albeit a tiny one, Saturday in St. Louis.  >> Read more trending news  “It’s just so surreal, because you hear about trailers and cars being stolen all the time,' Meghan Panu, who spent two years and nearly $20,000 building the tiny home, told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. She said the house was designed to be as efficient and sustainable as possible and was also built with some recycled materials. Panu planned to move into it over the summer. Panu is hoping nearby businesses have surveillance video that can help identify the suspects or that someone sees the domicile on-the-move.  'I’m just hoping that maybe (the) state patrol will flag it and pull it over,” Panu told the Post-Dispatch. “But in the meantime, it’s just been a waiting game.”
  • Letters to Santa hidden behind a chimney mantle for more than 100 years  were recently revealed during a town’s Christmas celebration.  >> Read more trending news  Two children, whose great-grandparents likely played with the letters’ authors, delivered them to Santa during the Beverly Old Fashioned Christmas. One of the letters, written Dec. 25, 1912, by Page Woodward, who was then 8 years old, sought gifts for her brother, sisters and parents before asking for something for herself, the Charleston Gazette-Mail reported:  “Will you please bring these things. For Reginald, a air rifle, a Boy Scout book, a sweater and two magazines, Country Gentleman and Farm Journal. For Ruby, black ribbon and pair of stockings. For Mabel, two pair of stockings. For Mamma, a book. For Papa, a hat. For Teddy (her sister Henrietta’s nickname), a game, doll and a lot of candy and nuts. For my self, a doll, leggings and lots of candy and nuts.” The letters were discovered during renovations to the Beverly Heritage Center, a history museum built into one of the town’s historic buildings. It is believed they fell between the chimney wall and mantle 106 years ago. The letters offer insight into what life was like more than 100 years ago.  “Writings from children rarely survive,” Christopher Mielke, who created an exhibit to showcase the letters, said in a statement. “Letters to Santa are especially insightful because children genuinely believe that Santa will read their words himself -- values of honesty, generosity, and sharing are at the forefront.” The letters are on display at the history museum until the New Year.
  • It couldn't have gone much better for the Cardinals as they started Sunday's game in Atlanta by forcing two punts. In between, they drove 64 yards in eight plays to take a 7-0 lead on David Johnson's 1-yard run. But everything went haywire from there. The Falcons (5-9) scored the game's next 40 points — 21 off Arizona turnovers — and the Cardinals (3-11) fell 40-14 to a team that had lost its previous five games. Arizona surrendered a season-high seven sacks behind an entire line of replacements. Rookie quarterback Josh Rosen turned over the ball three times, and the Cardinals allowed 215 rushing yards to the only NFL team with fewer yards on the ground than they had. This was a miserable road trip to a gray, cold, rainy place, although at least the roof was closed in Mercedes-Benz Stadium. 'I look at it like the Chargers game a few weeks ago, we started out real fast, put 10 points up, and then something bad happens and we're not able to weather the storm,' said wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald. '. . . It was just an avalanche after the start.' Moments after blunting Atlanta's second possession with a third-down sack by linebacker Haason Reddick, the Cardinals took over with good field position at their 43. On the second play, though, Rosen threw right toward Johnson, and Falcons end Vic Beasley Jr. batted the ball in the air. Linebacker Deion Jones picked it off and rambled 41 yards for a score. Just as the Cardinals went on to lose 45-10 to the Chargers, Arizona imploded again. The Cardinals' next possession ended when Bruce Irvin and De'Vondre Campbell sacked Rosen. On the next play, Falcons running back Tevin Coleman went around right end for 65 yards on the way to a career-best 145 rushing yards on just 11 carries. Atlanta entered the game ranked dead last in the NFL in rushing, averaging 82.1 yards per game, but 'defensively, we didn't do a great job of stopping the run . . . ' Cardinals coach Steve Wilks said. 'We've got to do a much better job, and like I said, all that starts with me.' Soon after a short field goal gave Atlanta a 10-7 lead, Rosen was sacked and stripped by tackle Grady Jarrett, and nickel cornerback Bryan Poole recovered at the Arizona 34. Maybe Atlanta's pressure didn't count as a surprise. Four of Arizona's starting offensive linemen are on injured reserve, and the team cut a right tackle several weeks ago. Plus, two key reserves are on the injured list. So the Cardinals rolled out rookies Korey Cunningham, Colby Gossett and Mason Cole at left tackle, guard and center, along with right guard Oday Aboushi and right tackle Joe Barksdale, who left with concussion symptoms. Was it any wonder Arizona rushed for just 60 yards on 22 carries? 'It has a lot to do with everybody, really: the timing, blocking, communicating and stuff like that, ' said Aboushi, who was signed on Oct. 23. 'A lot of it comes with shooting ourselves in the foot.' Not long after Rosen's fumble, Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan scored on a 1-yard sneak for a 17-7 lead, and then another Arizona drive fizzled in part because Rosen was sacked by Poole, who was unblocked on a blitz when the quarterback forgot to check his left side. 'I took a couple of other sacks on myself when they were battling their butts off up front, and I've just got to play better,' Rosen said after completing 13 of 22 passes for 132 yards, including a 40-yard completion to Johnson on his second throw of the game. 'We've all got to play better, but I don't want anyone to look at those stats and think everything's on the O-line. In this game there were a couple where I was just a little mentally slow on things.' The Falcons went fast tempo after Rosen's second pick, which set up Ryan's 21-yard pinpoint pass down the left sideline to Julio Jones. He scored on a diving catch with Arizona cornerback Patrick Peterson attached like Velcro. Not for the first time the Cardinals were undone by the second quarter, outscored 16-0 on this day and 137-34 on the season. At least the end is near. 'It's disturbing, frustrating, you hate it, but I try to find the silver lining in everything,' Fitzgerald said. 'It's the holiday season, my kids are healthy . . . I'm no different than anybody else; I'm frustrated at work, but there's a lot to be thankful for.' ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • A prisoner is suing the South Carolina Department of Corrections, contending the agency has violated his religious freedoms by refusing to allow him to smoke pot or wear dreadlocks. >> Read more trending news  Inmate James Rose, 41, filed the federal lawsuit last week, contending the agency has violated his constitutional rights by not providing him marijuana “as part of the Rastafarian religious practice,” according to The Associated Press. Rose also claims officials in the state prisons department held him down and shaved his head, cutting off his dreadlocks, after he asked for marijuana in April of 2017, the AP reported. He is arguing he should be allowed to grow dreadlocks to an “unlimited length” as part of his religion. Rose is seeking $1 million in damages and said in the filing, “The injuries I’ve sustained related to the events were migraine headaches, psychological trauma, mental anguish (depression), panic attacks and nightmares,” according to the AP. >> Trending: Pot makes older people smarter but impairs younger people, scientists say Rose was convicted of murder in 2013 and is serving a life sentence after his conviction in the killing of the son of a Lincolnville town council member.  
  • New England Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman is wearing cleats in honor of the Tree of Life Synagogue shooting victims during Sunday night’s game against the Steelers. >> Read more trending news  Edelman tweeted a photo of the cleats, along with the words 'In Remembrance' with all of the victims’ names. The cleats say, '#Strongerthanhate' and feature a Star of David and the Tree of Life logo on them. Edelman isn't the only Patriot to pay their respects to the victims. On Saturday, Patriots owner Robert Kraft flew to Pittsburgh to visit the Tree of Life Synagogue, according to NFL Network reporter Aditi Kinkhabwala. On Oct. 27, Robert Bowers opened fire inside the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill neighborhood, killing 11 people.