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Pure Cain Perspective

Topics: Socialists are losing primaries
Posted: August 14, 2018

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Pure Cain Perspective

Topics: The narrow lens of the media
Posted: August 13, 2018

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Herman Thanks You for Giving to the 2017 Care-a-Thon

Topics: A big thank you for all who gave!
Posted: July 31, 2017

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The Latest from the Herman Cain Show
Catch the Herman Cain Show at its new time! The Herman Cain Show is now one hour on News 95.5 & AM 750 WSB. Listen Monday - Friday from 11:00 a.m. - noon, everyday. Then listen online, anytime, at www.HermanCain.com 
About Herman Cain
HERMAN'S YOUTH AND THE AMERICAN DREAM  Herman Cain grew up in Atlanta, Georgia with loving parents and little else. His father worked three jobs—as a janitor, a barber and a chauffeur—and his mother was a domestic worker. Even though these jobs required hard work and little glamour, his parents knew this life was better than the dirt farms upon which they grew up. They also knew that this hard work was the key to achieving their American Dreams.  Herman’s parents had two dreams. First, they wanted to own their own house. Secondly, they wanted both of their children to graduate from college. During the segregation era in the Deep South, these aspirations might have seemed lofty, but they knew that if they kept their faith in God, faith in themselves and faith in the greatest country on the Earth, they could achieve.  The first dream was realized in a modest brick house on Albert Street in Atlanta, Georgia. After years of saving from his many jobs, Herman’s father surprised the whole family, even his wife, by purchasing a home for their family. The second dream was realized when Herman graduated from Morehouse College with a degree in mathematics in 1967. His brother, Thurman, would go on to graduate from Morris Brown College.  Inspired by the work ethic and character of his parents, Herman continued his education by earning his Master’s degree in computer science from Purdue University while working full-time developing fire control systems for ships and fighter planes for the Department of the Navy. Though Herman enjoyed using his talents as a civilian employee for the Navy, he gravitated towards the culture of business.  BUSINESS MAN, ADVOCATE, PATRIOT  HERMAN'S CORPORATE SUCCESSES  Herman returned to his home of Atlanta to begin working as a computer systems analyst for the Coca-Cola Company. After considerable success at Coca-Cola, he moved to the Pillsbury Company. Within a short period of time, Herman rose to position of Vice President. Although the comforts of a corner office on the 31st floor of a majestic corporate building seemed satisfying, Herman knew that he needed a challenge.  He became the regional vice president of Pillsbury’s Burger King division. This meant starting from the “ground up,” dodging grease fires and broiling hamburgers. Herman was assigned to lead a low performing region of 450 of their restaurants. Within three years, it became the best performing region in the company.  Energized by overcoming the many obstacles of his job at Burger King, Herman took on the biggest challenge of his career. He accepted the call to become the President and CEO of Godfather’s Pizza, a company that was teetering on the edge of bankruptcy. In just 14 months, Herman returned Godfather’s to profitability and he led his management team to a buyout of the company.  His professional successes garnered the respect and admiration of industry peers who named him the President of the National Restaurant Association. Under Herman’s administration, the group grew significantly and began to lobby for the interests of America’s restaurateurs and small business owners.  In 1994, as head of the National Restaurant Association, he had the opportunity to speak with President Clinton during a nationally televised town hall meeting. Here, Herman challenged the President regarding the impact on businesses if his health care overhaul proposal were passed. President Clinton attempted to assure him and the millions of viewers watching at home that his legislation would not harm American business owners and their employees.  Herman was skeptical. “Quite honestly Mr. President, your calculations are incorrect,” he said. “In the competitive marketplace, it simply doesn’t work that way.” His words echoed across America, and Newsweek named Herman Cain the primary saboteur of Hillarycare.  Through these and other appearances on behalf of the National Restaurant Association, Herman began working with business leaders across all sectors of the American economy. This led to his acceptance of a position on the Board of Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, and he was subsequently elected their chairman. In this role, he analyzed economic conditions in the region and notified the Federal Reserve of how their policies should respond.  After coming in an impressive 2nd in his 2004 bid for the United States Senate in Georgia, Herman soon became the host of his own radio talk show, “The Herman Cain Show,” on Atlanta’s WSB 95.5 FM/AM 750.  Today, as a former Republican candidate for the Presidency, and as the CEO of the newly formed Cain’s Solutions Revolution, he is still a very active and outspoken voice for conservative issues. He serves as a regular contributor on several broadcast networks and as a keynote speaker at conferences and events around the nation. Earlier this year, Mr. Cain began the next phase of his life’s journey, taking over for nationally syndicated radio talk show host, Neal Boortz, upon his retirement.  Herman has established the all-new “Cain Media Division” of THE New Voice, Inc. which is sure to provide yet another set of twists and turns to an already colorful career.  Despite the many professional commitments of his life, Herman continues to enjoy most the time spent with family and friends. As his children got married and had their own children, he knew that he had an extraordinary obligation to do what he could to make this a safe and prosperous nation for them. The paramount joys in his life are his wife, Gloria, his children and his four grandchildren, the youngest of which was born on New Year’s Day 2012.   Newly launched: HermanCain.com
Cain 24/7

News

  • A Kentucky radio station did not turn a cold shoulder to a classic Christmas song that has been receiving heated criticism. >> Read more trending news  WAKY held a two-hour marathon, playing the 1944 hit “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” and four other versions of the song, defiantly bucking the trend of radio stations that have been pulling the tune from their playlists because of claims the song normalizes date rape, WLKY reported. 'I'm not sure why it's controversial,' Joe Fredele, director of programming for WAKY, told the television station. 'We've played this song for years, you know, this song is older than WAKY is.' Last month, a Cleveland radio station removed the song from its playlist, saying that its lyrics may not be appropriate, particularly since the #MeToo movement began, WOIO reported. >> ‘Baby, It’s Cold Outside’ removed from Ohio station’s playlist 'We really need to think about the impact that songs have, not just 'Baby, It's Cold Outside,' but numerous songs that we decide to play on the radio,' Amy Turner, the director of sexual assault services at The Center for Women and Families, told WLKY. The song, written by Frank Loesser, includes lyrics normally sung by a woman, including “Say, what’s in this drink?” and “I simply must go,” followed by the woman singing “The answer is no.” >> Writer’s daughter says song is not about date rape While Fredele said he supports the #MeToo movement, he is puzzled why “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” has been the target of criticism. 'This song is not about that. All it is, is a dialogue between a man and a woman, and at the end of the song, you hear them harmonize together, so they're agreeing basically,' Fredele told WLKY. 'It's just a fun way of saying, 'Hey this our vote for that song. It's a fun song. It's a romantic song, don't pick on it.’”
  • DeKalb County officer Edgar Flores paid the ultimate price and today, the community will honor his sacrifice. The first of two funerals for the fallen officer will begin at 11 a.m.  We'll explain how you can show your respect to the fallen officer, on Channel 2 Action News This Morning Investigators said 33-year-old Brandon Taylor shot and killed the 24-year-old officer during a traffic stop last week. Today, Flores would have turned 25 years old. He was engaged to be married and is being remembered as a hero. [ RELATED: Law enforcement escorts fallen DeKalb County officer on his final trip home] DeKalb County officers will form a procession at their police headquarters. That will be followed by a funeral at All Saints Catholic Church in Dunwoody. A second service will be held 11 a.m. Wednesday at Prince of Peace Catholic Church in Flowery Branch. Fellow officers have set up a GoFundMe account to help pay for funeral expenses. 
  • The busiest road in Midtown Atlanta will be partially closed the day before the Super Bowl for an awards show. There are detours planned and years of thought has gone into it. Officials just want residents to put some thought into their plans as well. More than a million people are expected to navigate the streets of downtown Atlanta for the Super Bowl. “We've been meeting for about two years on how best to tackle this here in Atlanta,” said Super Bowl Host Committee official Amy Patterson. Channel 2 Action News received a glimpse of the plan to minimize the inconvenience. At least 14 roads in midtown and downtown Atlanta will be partially affected by either road or lane closures. We'll show you the areas you will need to avoid, on Channel 2 Action News This Morning
  • ’Tis the season for eating, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture is warning consumers to stay away from “cannibal sandwiches” -- a dish featuring raw ground beef, garnished with onions and spices and served on bread or crackers. >> Read more trending news  It seems to be a tradition in Wisconsin, and the state’s Department of Health Services warned there have been eight outbreaks of people becoming sick from the raw meat since 1986. More than 150 people were affected during a 1994 outbreak, the department said on its website. The meal can be dangerous because it is uncooked and could contain harmful bacteria that can only be killed by cooking the meat at a minimum temperature of 160 degrees, the USDA said. The dish, also known as Tiger meat or steak tartare, is never safe to consume because it is raw meat, the USDA reported. The USDA recommends that steaks, chops and roasts that use beef, pork, lamb and veal as their main ingredients should be cooked at a minimum temperature of 145 degrees. Ground beef, pork, lamb and veal should be cooked at 160 degrees, while any kind of poultry should be heated at 165 degrees. If you have a question about preparing a safe alternative to cannibal sandwiches, the USDA suggests calling the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 888-674-6854 or chatting live online at AskKaren.gov from from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday.
  • A local high school student says a school resource officer choked and tackled him for stealing a candy bar. Cellphone video showed the officer force the student to the floor. The officer seen in the video is under investigation and the student and others are facing criminal charges. The mother of one of these students told Channel 2’s Tom Regan she will fight the charges and that officer who wrestled her son to the ground used unwarranted excessive force. The incident happened last week at Alcovy High School in Covington. Video captured the moment when 14-year-old Asah Glenn is confronted by a school resources officer and flipped to the floor.  Moments earlier, officials said he and a crowd of other student grabbed snacks from an open vending machine without paying. We're hearing from the teen's mother about the incident, on Channel 2 Action News This Morning
  • A Minnesota couple in a horse-drawn buggy died after their vehicle was hit from behind by a pickup truck Sunday afternoon, KMSP reported. >> Read more trending news  Robert Alois Keppers, 72, and Mary Joan Keppers, 66, both of Avon, were killed in the crash, the St. Cloud Times reported, citing a media release from the Stearns County Sheriff's Office. Their identities were released Monday afternoon. The horse also died at the scene, the newspaper reported.. According to Sheriff Don Gudmundson, a Ford F150 driven by Marc Lucas Knapp, 23, of Avon was traveling north behind the buggy, the Times reported. The buggy was also traveling north along the shoulder.  'Knapp struck the buggy from behind, sending it into the east ditch,' Gudmundson said. The crash remains under investigation by the Sheriff’s Office, KMSP reported.