ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
86°
Partly Cloudy
H 92° L 73°
  • cloudy-day
    86°
    Current Conditions
    Partly Cloudy. H 92° L 73°
  • cloudy-day
    92°
    Today
    Partly Cloudy. H 92° L 73°
  • cloudy-day
    92°
    Tomorrow
    Partly Cloudy. H 92° L 73°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb news on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb traffic on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Wsb weather on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Latest from Veronica Waters

    Four attacks in apartments. One at a single-family home. Twice, there were weapons. Police in Clayton County now know they are hunting one serial rapist. Clayton County Police Sgt. Ashanti Marbury tells WSB that DNA trace evidence processed by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation has linked the sexual assaults on five black women over the course of two years. The four rapes—and one attempted rape of a woman who managed to get away—date back to July 2015 in Clayton County. “In every case, we recovered DNA evidence that links to one male,” says Sgt. Marbury. “It’s particularly important for us because initially detectives did not believe that any of the cases were linked together just because the method that was being used by the suspect was ever-changing.” The last known assault by this suspect was in May of 2017. “In a few of the cases, he entered the residence through an open or an unsecured window,” explains Marbury. “In another situation, he accosted his victim as she was walking to her apartment. In one other situation, he knocked on the door of a victim and asked for a wrong name—just a random person— and when she opened the door, he forced his way in. Marbury says most of the women lived in multi-family dwellings—apartment or townhome complexes. All are African American. Two were able to give police enough of a description that they were able to produce composite sketches. “We did notice there is similarity to the sketches that were done at different times by different women. So, we are hoping that someone will recognize or even see a similarity in the person to someone they know, and give us that information, “says Sgt. Marbury. Since 13 months have passed since this suspect’s last known assault, is it possible that the man is already behind bars? “We know that he’s not been processed into the Georgia prison system, because when you go into the state prison system, automatically they collect a sample of your DNA, and that would’ve given us our suspect. But on a local level, if you’re in and out of a local jail, they don’t usually collect your DNA for any reason there,” she says. It’s also possible that a subsequent attack may not have left DNA that has been processed yet—or left DNA at all.  Marbury says it’s not known whether the suspect sought out the women specifically or whether they were all crimes of opportunity.  All of the cases were being investigated separately. Now, the five will come under the review of one detective.
  • A McDonough man was sentenced to life Tuesday after pleading guilty to raping a child relative--and getting her pregnant. The beginning of the end of the little girl's horror story began last September in Michigan. 'A little girl actually had miscarried a fetus,' says Jodi Spiegel, Henry County (GA) Senior Assistant District Attorney. 'And this little girl, nor her mother, really had any idea she was pregnant until that miscarriage.'.
  • An Atlanta group planning a 'die-in' Tuesday near the state Capitol canceled the demonstration due to the threat of bad weather. One would-be attendee disagrees with the call for stricter gun control, but came hoping to connect with the group on a different level.
  • Good news for DeKalb County homeowners.  Thanks to the county's first-ever SPLOST approved in November, residents will see lower tax bills and more county improvements starting this year.  CEO Michael Thurmond tells WSB Radio that the $1.2 billion SPLOST and EHOST “will be applied – $110 million a year, for the next six years.”  Thurmond adds, “Home values are going up, residential property taxes are going down.”  For example, a quarter-million-dollar home in Decatur will see its property tax bill plummet 66 percent from $530 last year to $180 this year. In Dunwoody, the nearly 38-percent-cut takes the bill from $719 to $449. The chart below shows the estimated tax savings for DeKalb homeowners by jurisdiction, based on the $250,000 appraised value of a house. Thurmond says some $600 million of the funds will be used to invest in infrastructure.  'We're going to pave 300 miles of the worst streets and roads in DeKalb County,' he says.  According to Thurmond, each municipality within the county has its own plan for public safety and infrastructure; 85 percent of the funds must be used in those categories.  'Our cities and County will work together to improve streets, roads, and bridges, improve public safety, and also make investments in repairing and upgrading parks, senior centers, libraries, and health centers,' says Thurmond. DeKalb County's plan also includes purchasing new police and fire rapid-response vehicles; replacing, repairing or building 29 fire stations; and designing a new public safety training center.  In 2018, the gross tax digest of all taxable property in DeKalb County grew $3 billion, or 10.7 percent, from $28.3 billion in 2017 to $31.3 billion. Despite the growth in property values, application of EHOST tax credits will generate lower property taxes for DeKalb homeowners.  'We're in a very good place,' says Thurmond. 'It's a harmonic convergence in DeKalb County.
  • THE DEFENDANT: Thank you. In the limited time I have here today, I would like to use notes, if that is possible. I find that without notes I'm more emotional and more broken up. So it might be more cogent for you. I would like to use those, and for really two different purposes. One is that I received a tremendous amount of mail challenging our system and asking why I am not a champion of some challenge of that system. I would like to very briefly describe, if I'm ever allowed to respond, how I would do so. And then I want to close by thanking those who have been great supporters of mine. And I will do that in the most efficient way.
  • Lawyers for Ryan Duke, who is accused of killing 31-year-old Tara Grinstead in a burglary at her home, asked a judge on Thursday for a continuance in the trial, and the judge granted it.
  • The Georgia Bureau of Investigation is no stranger to fraud cases, but in February, the agency found itself on the victim end of one.Now, three men have been jailed for stealing the identity of Georgia's top law enforcement agency--and they are suspected of targeting businesses in at least two other states.
  • We've all ridden an elevator with a stranger. But for one woman in the Fulton County courthouse, a four-floor ride up was full of terror.  As the elevator got closer to the 8th floor of the courthouse on Tuesday morning, Atlanta attorney Michael Katz heard noise from the shaft growing louder, and thought it might be kids playing. But the door opened to something far worse.  “The door opened and there’s a guy on top of a woman,” said Katz. “Her files are all spread out on the ground and I saw that he also had a pair of scissors in his hand.”  An incident report says the woman told a deputy that the stranger had stepped onto the elevator behind her on the 4th floor. When the doors closed, he put her in a chokehold. She struggled and screamed, scrambling to push the elevator buttons to get help.  Katz, who has trained in Jiu-Jitsu for more than 20 years, was in the right place at the right time. The martial art which specializes in ground fighting and grappling was perfect for him to know how to pull back the man who was choking the woman on the floor, and place him in a chokehold of his own.  “I could see the fear in her eyes and I understand that,” he said, “but if you’re used to being on the ground, it’s not that bad.  “I had to do something. I wasn’t going to let her get hurt, and I wasn’t going to let it happen.”  The man talking to Katz on the 8th floor stuck his foot between the elevator doors as they started to close again. Then Katz, 61, hauled 41-year-old Ruben Washington off the legal assistant, put him in a hold, and held him as the woman crawled to safety off the elevator. Washington, however, tried to lash out at Katz--who kicked the scissors out of the way. Washington then punched a court staffer, Judicial Manager DeAndre Royals, who came to intervene and ordered Washington to stop.  The incident report says Royals, the man Washington hit in the jaw, kept Washington on his stomach with his hands behind him until a deputy arrived to handcuff and arrest him. His motive remains a mystery.  “He never said a word,” says Katz.  The legal assistant in the district attorney’s office did not know her attacker.  “She was obviously very scared, she was really in distress. It was scary to see,” said Katz. “But, you know, you’ve got to react or else the door would have closed, and she would have gone down a few more floors and who knows what would have happened.”  Washington was denied bond during his first court appearance Wednesday, according to sheriff’s spokeswoman Tracy Flanagan. He is also charged with aggravated assault, simple battery, and obstructing an officer, jail records show.  The Atlanta Journal Constitution reported that Washington was wanted for probation violation on a 2010 shoplifting charge, and is listed as a fugitive out of Virginia.  “I don’t care where you are, I think you always need to be aware of your surroundings. And even you get on the elevator by yourself you need to be aware whose there and you know it’s just what you have to do in this day in age. Regardless of where you are, you’re never really safe,” said Katz.  “I just felt really bad for her but I felt bad for him,” Katz said. “And know that sounds crazy, because he’s the perpetrator. But I could see that he is not all there.”
  • In the demo, the department used a mannequin to see how the string would wrap around a body. Strickland says in evaluating whether to add the BolaWrap to the tool belt for LaGrange Police, they would want to do field tests on moving people
  • A man yelling in the middle of Cobb Parkway that he wished he had a bomb could have become another statistic in a list of police shootings. But Marietta Police took him down after a tussle -- without ever firing a shot. Travis Cormier, 27, was just indicted by a Cobb County grand jury on four charges including two counts of Obstruction of an Officer for a confrontation dating back to late December of 2017. Two Marietta Police officers responded to a call of a black male walking in the middle of Cobb Parkway, yelling at passing cars that he wished he had a bomb so he could kill everyone. Marietta Police Officer Chuck McPhilamy tells WSB that while Cormier left the roadway and walked to the sidewalk, it became evident that he had no intention of being taken away peacefully -- yelling at the officers and getting into a fighting stance. “He kind of dropped down a little bit and his posture squared off, and he hiked up his pants and made clenched fists,” Officer Chuck McPhilamy recalls. A Taser failed to take down Cormier after getting tangled in his scarf. The officers strategically positioned themselves around Cormier, who then fought with one of them--even lunging for the cop's weapon. “While he’s reaching for the officer’s gun, it’s every officer’s worst nightmare,” McPhilamy says. McPhilamy adds that the officers fell back on their training, which Police Chief Dan Flynn mandates is many hours over the state minimums for departments. They focus not just on target practice, but on de-escalation. “We would be having an entirely different conversation, had it not been for that training,” McPhilamy says. Officers Langley and Lindsey were able to wrestle Cormier into handcuffs without ever resorting to deadly force--a situation that McPhilamy says might have called for the phrase 'lawful, but awful.' He adds, “It would have been lawful for the officers to have pulled their weapon and discharged it, but that isn’t the outcome that anyone would ever want.”
  • Veronica Waters

    Reporter

    Veronica Waters is an anchor and reporter for News/Talk WSB. She is also the staff expert on legal affairs and the courts. In 2007, the Radio-Television News Directors Association named Waters' series on "Snaring Internet Predators" best in the region with an Edward R. Murrow award for Investigative Reporting.She has been honored by several professional organizations for news and sports feature reporting, and was named in 2003 as the Atlanta Press Club's Radio Journalist of the Year. Waters has covered an assortment of high-profile cases from Mayor Bill Campbell's corruption trial to the murder trials of activist-turned imam Jamil Al-Amin and of former DeKalb County, GA Sheriff Sidney Dorsey.She served as the station's correspondent for the murder trial of accused "Black Widow" Lynn Turner, and the death penalty case of double murderer Stacey Humphreys. One of the biggest legal cases in Atlanta history involved the notorious Gold Club racketeering trial. Waters covered this unfolding drama not only for WSB Radio and radio stations throughout America, but also for a worldwide audience on BBC Radio. Waters joined WSB in 1997 as an anchor and reporter. She began her journalism career at the Southern Urban Network and Mississippi Network in Jackson, MS. Waters attended Alcorn State University and Mississippi State University, and enjoys cheering for the NFL's Tennessee Titans.

    Latest from Veronica Waters »

    Read More

News

  • Two brothers accused of at least seven robberies across metro Atlanta in May are no ordinary criminals: they’re identical twins. Marquavious and Juntavious Burton, 20, were arrested in early June. According to Fulton County jail records, the twins have been arrested multiple times since 2015 on charges such as aggravated assault and theft by receiving stolen property. The latest charges include seven counts of armed robbery and a charge of participating in criminal street gang activity. Police believe they may be responsible for even more recent robberies. The Burton twins have also been accused of shooting at some of the robbery victims, Channel 2 Action News reported.  In other news:
  • Two Cobb County siblings were killed after their 17-year-old sister allegedly lost control of the family’s SUV on a South Carolina interstate, police said Monday.  Jessica Wolwark was driving a Chevrolet northbound on I-85 in Anderson County when she ran off the highway and the SUV overturned Saturday morning, according to police.  Wolwark and her mother, Natalia Anggraeni, were both wearing seat belts and were seriously injured in the crash. Two other family members died from their injuries after being ejected, police said.  Kirana “Kiki” Wolwark, 15, and 12-year-old Nate Wolwark were both killed, a family friend posted on a Go Fund Me page. The family was traveling from their Kennesaw home to Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C., where the girls were to attend a religious retreat, according to Chrissy Concepcion, who set up the fundraising page for the family. The family does not have medical insurance, she said. The South Carolina medical examiner was unable to confirm the identities of those killed, but family friends confirmed the names and ages of the Wolwark siblings.  “Kiki was a joy to be around, and spread her love for animals to everyone she knew,” Concepcion posted. “Nate was the perfect boy; always helpful, caring, and accepting of everyone around him.” The driver and her mother were both taken by helicopter to a Greenville hospital, where both remained Monday. Anggraeni has a broken neck and several broken ribs, Concepcion said. Jessica Wolwark has torn ligaments in her arm, but is expected to be released from the hospital this week.  The South Carolina Highway Patrol is investigating the crash.  In other news: 
  • Documents obtained by Channel 2 Action News say a popular high school physics teacher resigned amid allegations of inappropriate behavior. Channel 2’s Mike Petchenik received a tip that Matt Odom had abruptly left his post at Chattahoochee High School, just weeks before school let out for the summer, so Petchenik filed an open records request for Odom’s personnel file. According to documents Petchenik obtained, an investigation by the Fulton County School District determined Odom had acted unprofessionally around female students. “Witnesses reported that Mr. Odom was touchy feely with students and makes inappropriate comments to students about their clothing. By Mr. Odom’s own admission, he is flirtatious with students,” the report said. The report said students had complained to the administration about feeling uncomfortable around the physics teacher. “Although there is no video of the incidents, there is enough evidence to support the allegations of unprofessional conduct,” the report said. In interviews, Odom denied any wrongdoing. “I do put my hands on their shoulders or back and say ‘hey’ sometimes,” he said. “Yeah, I’m kind of flirtatious. It’s kind of my personality. It’s not like directly flirtatious. I’m just kind of fun and relaxed with my student generally. If I see that a student is uncomfortable or not comfortable with the interaction, I’m generally, like scale it back or whatever.” Petchenik spoke to a rising senior at the school who said she experienced the teacher's behavior first-hand. “I would sit in class and he’d look at me weird and sometimes just rub my shoulder a little bit weird,” she said. “It’s embarrassing to have to resign because you know that it’s true.” There were no documents in Odom’s file to indicate he resigned due to the allegations or the investigation. Petchenik attempted to reach Odom by phone and e-mail over the course of two weeks, but never heard back from him.
  • The school meal hall never tasted quite like this. PHOTOS: Public School 404 in Atlanta Take a walk back in time to the days of encyclopedias, globes and letter jackets at an Atlanta eatery. It's called Public School 404. It's a Grill Concepts Restaurant Group creation with nine locations across the country. Each location is dubbed Public School, along with the area code where it's located. The restaurant bills itself as a chef-driven gastropub that offers “An Education in the Art of Food & Beer.”  Public School 404's happy hour is known as “Recess.' It's held Monday through Friday from 3 to 6 p.m. Public School 404 serves craft beer exclusively. That certainly wasn't available in the meal hall growing up. The menus are composition books and include offerings such as Brown Bag Fries, PB&J Burger, Hot Mess and 'What Came First,' a chicken burger that includes a fried egg. “The overall concept originated in Los Angeles about six years ago,” Phil Kastel, executive vice president of culinary, told AJC.com. “What happened is we were trying to create a gastropub. Something fun. Something for everybody. And the name, Public School, kind of led us in that direction. “We focus on having a seasonal menu. We change the menu about four times a year, though there are some staples that stay around all year. We pride ourselves on serving local beer and keeping things fresh and energetic with the food.” Public School 404 is located on Howell Mill Road in Atlanta. RELATED: See more Things 2 Do around Atlanta RELATED: Get chicken and waffles with a twist at these metro Atlanta restaurants RELATED: Atlanta sushi restaurant named one of best restaurants in America RELATED: Chick-Fil-A unveils 2 seasonal items, testing another
  • Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross made a trade betting that the stock in a shipping company with Russian-government ties would fall, a transaction coming just days after he learned of a possible negative news story about his investment in the company. Ross reported on a government form released Monday, as required by federal ethics rules, that he shorted stock in Navigator Holdings in October. The New York Times reported Tuesday that the transaction came three business days after a Times reporter submitted questions to Ross about Navigator. The transaction, listed as worth between $100,000 and $250,000, was first reported Monday by Forbes. Ross rebuffed any suggestions that he shorted the Navigator stock based on confidential information to make a profit. He said the transaction was part of his effort to divest from Navigator and that he did not stand to gain if the stock fell, or lose if it rose, at the time. In short selling, a person borrows shares of a stock and sells them. The aim is to then replace the borrowed shares with others bought later at a lower price, reaping a profit from the difference. Navigator counts a Russian gas producer with ties to the Kremlin among its major customers. President Donald Trump tapped Ross, a billionaire investor in distressed companies, to be his administration's point man on trade and manufacturing as Commerce chief. His spokesmen said in November that Ross planned to completely divest from Navigator, although he wasn't required to do so under his ethics agreement as an incoming Cabinet member, because he wanted to avoid any possible perception of a conflict of interest. Ross says now that he has completely divested his Navigator holdings. In a statement Tuesday, Ross said it would be 'completely false' to imply that the transactions involved insider trading using nonpublic information. The Times reporter 'contacted me to write about my personal financial holdings and not about Navigator Holdings or its prospects,' he said. 'I did not receive any nonpublic information due to my government position, nor did I receive any nonpublic information from a government employee. Securities laws presume that information known to or provided by a news organization is by definition public information,' Ross' statement said. Ross said he had been in the process of selling off his holdings in the company when he learned in late October that there were additional shares belonging to him in an account opened by the company. Because the shares were 'in electronic form' and he didn't have physical access to them to deliver them to the broker on time, he said he 'technically sold them short.' When he received the physical shares on Nov. 16, Ross said he delivered them to the broker to close the transaction. 'Therefore, it made no economic difference to me whether the shares went up or down between the sale date and the date I delivered them,' he said. The owners of Sibur, the Russian gas producer that is a major customer of Navigator, have included two Russian oligarchs close to President Vladimir Putin and a businessman believed to be Putin's son-in-law. Navigator ships products from Sibur. Navigator is one of a few companies in the world that can transport liquefied petroleum gas in cold and icy conditions. Russia is known for its brutal winters as well as its giant, state-controlled oil and gas producers.